imagining links

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    If you can’t imagine anyone linking to what you’re about to write, don’t write it.

    www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/jan/05/clay-shirky-future-n...

    www.will-lion.com/digitalbites

    JohnConnell, nashworld, and 27 other people added this photo to their favorites.

    1. osiatynska 63 months ago | reply

      I'm thrilled to have happened upon a link to your work on www.socialsquared.com/. I've never seen such well-composed strategic arguments and insights.

    2. bettyjaneneary 61 months ago | reply

      I love this --it says it all about the new web 2.0 technology and SHARING, thanks Will!

    3. diogo86 59 months ago | reply

      Someone linked me here.

    4. clio-jlh 52 months ago | reply

      hmm. This turned up on my tumblr, and I'm thinking it's a really lousy quote to be taken out of context, as happens when one makes a macro.

      Clay Shirky didn't say that—he was quoting Jeff Jarvis. And Jeff Jarvis was saying that about newspapers and how they can keep themselves relevant. I don't know if this is really a general fiat that can be laid down on the universe. I personally can't imagine that anyone would want to link to anything I've ever said, and yet they do; if that was my train of thought before I wrote then I'd probably never write anything.

      And then there's all this casual speech that is linkable but isn't written to be so, like Tweets about how you loved some movie, or your FB status, or a paragraph on your blog about how you miss a friend. As a historian I wish that more casual speech from the past had been written down and I'm excited that so much is written now. I would hate to say that all of that speech shouldn't exist because it doesn't have the ability to go viral.

    5. Will Lion 51 months ago | reply

      clio-jlh, thanks for spotting the incorrect attribution. Correct now.

      And I agree with you: this is only really relevant to publishers, like newspapers and brands. The broader point I used this to make was about adding value rather than noise.

      (I suppose we can refine this by adding the caveat that value is in the eyes of the beholder, doesn't have to be mass or even intended by the author because, for example, it may have value to a future historian.)

    6. wendylady2010 46 months ago | reply

      love your work!

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