small camp

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    I had the privilege of being a photographer for the month-long leadership school just winding up this week at the camp Daniel works at. The director wanted something a little different for this year's photo.

    Since the wind didn't cooperate for a kite aerial shot, I borrowed an idea from Good Molecules .

    Several other examples of this sort of thing have been done by folks in the Polar Pano group; there's also a link to a tutorial or two in their discussions and in the Amazing Circle group discussions as well.

    best viewed large.

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    UPDATE: People keep asking me how to make their own Small Planets: Here are two good tutorials online. Please check those out first before emailing me - if they don't help you, I'd be happy to answer your questions.

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    Ric e Ette, Jakes_World, (fabritio), and 711 other people added this photo to their favorites.

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    1. weavingmajor 31 months ago | reply

      thanks all!

      SoaringPhoto, click the links in the photo description, or google "polar panorama small planet tutorial"... I can't invent that wheel any better than it's been done already...

    2. dylancolaco 30 months ago | reply

      Awesome picture... One question though... how did you manage to keep the large group perfectly still while taking pictures for making the panorama? I'd have expected at least someone to move, even in the most controlled situation! But I see no ghosting at all!

    3. weavingmajor 30 months ago | reply

      Hi Dylan, thanks!

      The people didn't have to stay still except for when they themselves were in the panorama. And I took the pictures with enough overlap so that I could choose which people to cut between in each overlapping section. (I hand cut and pasted the sections with no transparency in the final layer, so rather than having ghosting if I wasn't careful, it would be someone with two elbows or a notch out of their shirt or something strange like that.)

      The only REALLY tricky part was getting the last photo to line up with the first one, because you're right: by the time it was all done the people had moved a fair amount. If I remember right, either there was a tiny bit of space between the two people (which makes it easy!) or I just overlapped the last person a bit farther over the first one.

    4. nikkitomtom 29 months ago | reply

      is there any way you can somehow teach me how to do this. my yearbook staff would really like to do a picture similar to this one for the opening pages, but we are having trouble finding it out. if you could e-mail me at nikkitomtom23@aol.com, that would lovely. thank you.

    5. weavingmajor 29 months ago | reply

      Hi Nikki,

      as I said in my email to you, the tutorial has already been written countless times. I gave links to tutorials in my photo description above, and more links throughout the comments. I answered specific questions in the comments as well. Google "polar panorama tiny planet" if what I've said or linked to already isn't enough help. If you have any specific questions you can email me, but I don't see the need to write yet another tutorial for the process. Good luck with your yearbook photo!

      Kelly

    6. wilsx4 29 months ago | reply

      I am amazed by this picture! Can you explain how to do this? I'd love to take pictures of my daughters sports teams using this method.

    7. weavingmajor 29 months ago | reply

      Hi Wilsx4,

      The tutorial has already been written countless times. I gave links to tutorials in my photo description above, and more links throughout the comments. I answered specific questions throughout the comments as well. Google "polar panorama tiny planet" if what I've said or linked to already isn't enough help. If you have any specific questions you can Flickr-mail me, but I don't see the need to write yet another tutorial for the process. Good luck with your sports team photo!

    8. John Paul Sepe 27 months ago | reply

      Amazing. Great idea!

    9. cheensiong 27 months ago | reply

      this is so creative!! :-)

    10. weavingmajor 27 months ago | reply

      thank you all! I can't take credit for the idea - lifted it from other Flickr folks - but it was sure a lot of fun to do! I hope I have a chance to do another group of people like this someday!

    11. peterotoole™ 26 months ago | reply

      Woah, just incredible!

    12. ballerinanurse 25 months ago | reply

      While I'll probably never get as great a final product as your shot here, I am definitely going to try it. Looking to make a special memento/gift for the principal of our school. I have a group of 22 science olympiad kids (elementary school kids) and I am going to try this today with them! Hoping it comes out decent! Thanks for the inspiration! Have never seen anything like this....it has given me the nudge to step out of my comfort zone with photographs and try something different! Thanks for the links and tutorials! :)

    13. weavingmajor 25 months ago | reply

      thanks!

      ooh, so cool! that's exactly what I wanted, to be able to pass on what I've learned from others. Please post your result, I'd love to see it!

    14. ajstonestreet 24 months ago | reply

      I was curious as to how you went about with getting the grass spot right in the middle, I've looked through the tutorials but haven't seen anything.

    15. weavingmajor 24 months ago | reply

      Hi Ajonestreet - I think I said this once already, but I can't find it either, so I'll say it again! I had to take a separate photo of the grass (from a chair looking down) and then after I'd turned the panorama into a 'planet' I put the grass photo in the middle and used Photoshop's filter>distort>"bulge" (can't remember if that's the name - the opposite of pinch. Maybe spherize?) to make it look globe-like... I might have had to apply that filter more than once. Then I tweaked the colors to match the photo, then took an eraser tool and erased it jaggedly around the edges until it kind of matched the grass, and tweaked the colors some more.... hope that helps!

    16. Torrit 23 months ago | reply

      What a great idea, I will look up the tutorial.

      Cheers

      Tom

    17. dev meta 20 months ago | reply

      Fantastic!!

    18. Nikondreamer143 14 months ago | reply

      is there a way to do something similar without photoshop?

    19. weavingmajor 14 months ago | reply

      thanks and good luck!

      thank you!

      Hi Nikondreamer, you just need any graphics program that can do polar transformations. I'm guessing GIMP does, and it's free, but I haven't used it. Photoshop Elements will also work and is far cheaper than the full Photoshop. Try googling "Gimp polar panorama tutorial " (or similar with whatever program you are interested in trying).... chances are if it can be done, someone has done it.

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