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Trinity Church - Memorial for Unknown Revolutionary War Heroes | by wallyg
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Trinity Church - Memorial for Unknown Revolutionary War Heroes

The Soldiers' Monument, or the Memorial for the Unknown Revolutionary War Heroes, was erected in memory of "those great and good Men who died whilst in Captivity in the old Sugar House and were interred in Trinity Church Yard in this City."

 

The Sugar House, likely the Livingston family sugarhouse on Crown Street, now Liberty Street, was thought to be the worst of the prisoner of war camps in New York during the Revolutionary War. The six-story stone building was captured in March 1777 and initially housed about 50 prisoners. That number soon swelled to 400-500, resulting in cramped conditions rampant with disease and starvation.

 

 

Trinity Church, prominently located at the terminus of Wall Street at 79 Broadway, is the oldest Episcopal church in New York City, having been consecrated on Ascension Day May 1, 1846. Designed by architect Richard Upjohn, Trinity is considered a classic example of Gothic Revival architecture. At the time of its completion, the 281-foot spire was the highest point in New York until being surpassed in 1890 by the New York World Building.

 

The adjoining Trinity Churchyard Cemetery, opened in 1697, is one of three separate burial grounds that make up the non-denominational Trinity Church Cemetery (the others being the Churchyard of St. Paul's Chapel and the Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum at the Chapel of Intercession). Among the 1,186 interred here are Alexander Hamilton, William Bradford, Robert Fulton (memorial tribute), Captain James Lawrence, Horatio Gates, and Albert Gallatin. There are also memorials to 16 officers of the Continental Army and Navy buried in the church cemeteries, and to the thousands of Americans who died in prison ships in New York Harbor.

 

Trinity Church and Graveyard was designated a landmark by the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966.

 

National Register #76001252 (1982)

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Taken on June 22, 2006