Eric Fischer · Albums

Race and ethnicity: New York City

Contiguous United States, Census 2000 Race and ethnicity: New York City Race and ethnicity: Los Angeles Race and ethnicity: Chicago Race and ethnicity: Houston Race and ethnicity: Philadelphia Race and ethnicity: Phoenix Race and ethnicity: San Diego Race and ethnicity: Dallas Race and ethnicity: San Antonio Race and ethnicity: Detroit Race and ethnicity: San Jose Race and ethnicity: Indianapolis Race and ethnicity, San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley Race and ethnicity: Jacksonville Race and ethnicity: Columbus Race and ethnicity: Austin Race and ethnicity: Baltimore Race and ethnicity: Memphis Race and ethnicity: Milwaukee

Updated for Census 2010

I was astounded by Bill Rankin's map of Chicago's racial and ethnic divides and wanted to see what other cities looked like mapped the same way. To match his map, Red is White, Blue is Black, Green is Asian, Orange is Hispanic, Gray is Other, and each dot is 25 people. Data from Census 2000.

Click Detail to see the city names.

108 photos | 879,467 views



Comments on this set

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worker_robot says:

These are fantastic, nice job!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Peter Bailey says:

These are intriguing displays of demographic data. Do you perhaps have a rendering of Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN?
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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c_david44 says:

Great maps, but how the f**k did you forget to do Miami?
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Sure, I can add Minneapolis and St. Paul, probably this evening. The reason Miami isn't there is that I did the largest US cities by (2000) population and Miami was a little below the arbitrary cutoff. I can add it.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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felixturner says:

Great maps! It would be interesting to compare these against non-US cities (e.g. London), to see if they are more or less racially mixed. (I'm guessing more).
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

If you know a good data source for non-US locations, I'd be interested in seeing it too. The reason these are all US cities is because the US census makes the data easily available.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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alextarasiuk says:

Wow, Miami would be really interesting to see... I wonder if census data also includes country of birth-- I'm curious to see if the there are geographic divisions between Colombians, Venezuelans, Brazilians, Cubans, Argentines etc.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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jbcrail says:

I would like to request Louisville, KY and Cincinnati, OH. I'm curious how these cities compare with each other: similar size but different socio-political background.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Sure, I should be able to add Miami, Louisville, and Cincinnati tonight too. The census questionnaire has asks about some subcategories but as doesn't, as far as I can tell, make the results available in the tabulations.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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alextarasiuk says:

factfinder.census.gov/servlet/QTTable?_bm=y&-qr_name=...

I found some more specific data on "ancestry" in the public census data. Strangely enough, it doesn't include hispanic heritage, even though the census recognizes hispanic ancestry...

factfinder.census.gov/metadoc/ancestry.pdf
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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greg.kristo says:

These are amazing! The contrast in some of them is unbelievable. Can't wait to see Miami.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

alextarasiuk: Oh, thanks for the pointer to the ancestry details. That's a shame it's in Summary File 3 because there it's only available to the block group level instead of to the block... It still would probably be interesting to plot it and see what it looks like.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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photographsdikdik says:

These are totally fascinating and beautiful!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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zen for head says:

you should do this again after 2010 census data comes out in january
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Oh yes, I intend to redo it with 2010 data but I thought it wasnt iavailable until June.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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TonyDoodle says:

These are super-cool.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Lekkers17 says:

I would be very interested to see Pittsburgh, PA.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

OK, I'll make a Pittsburgh one too.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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ankushnarula says:

Excellent stuff - it will be very illuminating if you run this again when the 2010 Census data is released.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

Faelan Goddamnit! [deleted] says:

Miami?? 4th largest US city I believe....I'd like to see the map for us! Nice work.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Kid Ethnic says:

I'm sure these are time-consuming to make, but it would be cool to see how these cities compare with state capitals in less populous states. I selfishly request Raleigh, since I used to live there...

Great work, all around.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Maybe by metro area, but Miami itself is the 46th most populous in the 2000 census. I'll still add it though. Sure, I can add Raleigh too.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Mufasus says:

I would be very interested in seeing a rendering of Omaha, NE. The city is notoriously segregated.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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flyinggirlfly says:

Great work! These are very interesting. I would also be interested in seeing a comparison between Newark, New York and the areas between. It seems the level of segregation grows as you exit NYC proper.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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ajfroggie says:

Agree with Peter Bailey. Disappointed you didn't do a Minneapolis-St. Paul map. Minneapolis may not be one of the largest US cities, but the Twin Cities metro is in the top 20 when it comes to metro area population.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Silus Grok says:

Stunning! I do wish, though, that you had a Salt Lake City rendering. I think I’d even pay to see one (seriously).
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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zen for head says:

well... 2010.census.gov/2010census/how/key-dates.php
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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matthewpardon says:

Miami is a tough one, because the population of the City of Miami is actually quite small compared to that of Miami-Dade County, which would provide a more accurate view of what everyone calls, "Miami". i.e. Miami Beach (the Miami that everyone thinks of from movies, TV, etc.), for instance, is not part of the City of Miami. A view of Miami-Dade County would be VERY interesting.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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chap2k1 says:

Tulsa, OK, please.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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JACluley says:

Wichita falls, TX please........ lol, haha....... jk
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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JACluley says:

Oh ya, these are awesome, nice work!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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ld1005 says:

these are great! Thanks for posting them. Out of curiosity I'd really like to see Salt Lake City. would be great if you could add it too.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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E.W.Cook says:

This is getting on your nerves I reckon, but I'm sure Newark, NJ would be quite interesting. I'm currently residing in Melbourne, VIC (Aus) and I reckon you'll find a true melting pot here.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

OK, here are Minneapolis-St. Paul, Miami, Louisville, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Raleigh, Omaha, Newark, Salt Lake City, and Tulsa.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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pat woolven says:

This is the wrost map I have ever seen.
I know in the state's you have the kkk what you have done is a map that walks stright into their hands..
A map is for finding your way around.
This type of map is very dark and not liked
UK Comment
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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IreneMeansPeace says:

Eric, This is pretty intense. St. Louis metro area would be cool to see. I liked how one of the cities (maybe Jacksonville?) was a shade of purple overall rather than RED here and BLUE there. :) Thanks for the time you're putting into this. It's something of a wakeup call. As to the comment from the UK, unfortunately any good information can be put to use by those with wicked intent.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Silus Grok says:

Thank you, Eric! Where can I send my PayPal tip?
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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tiffanybbrown says:

These maps are pretty incredible, particularly because they're a visual representation of segregation and housing patterns. I was immediately able to pick out Buford Hwy / Doraville / Chamblee, GA by the cluster of yellow and green dots. Great job dude!

@pat wolven: the KKK already knows where these folks are. it's not a secret, particularly in the southern states.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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parsonspix says:

These are beautiful and amazing! IMHO Toronto might make a fascinating map.... I know you mentioned that it is hard to find the right census data, perhaps someone at Statistics Canada could help - www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/met01/met128-eng.htm - ? Either way, thanks for this!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Spence_ says:

How did you make these? They're incredible. You must have some way of automating it, but I can't figure it out. Can you give us a peak behind the curtain?
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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phil dokas says:

Awesome work, this is very interesting to see so cleanly. If requests are being taken I'd love to see Ann Arbor, MI!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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mwms1916 says:

Cool. Would be great to have some cities in New England other than Boston, even if they're not large compared to cities in other parts of the U.S. E.g., Portland ME, Concord or Portsmouth, NH, Burlington VT, Hartford CT, Providence RI, etc.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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adamnvillani says:

This is a fantastic set of maps. I could spend ages poring through these. One request: Any chance "other" could get a more distinct color than gray that doesn't fade into the background?
EDIT: I initially thought you had skipped Honolulu. Never mind!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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etang707 says:

Fascinating stuff. Thanks for making them.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Antero Pietila says:

Great stuff. My explosive new book, "Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City," contains maps that show how the Home Owner Loan Corporation's 1937 redlining of 239 cities directed the spread of black neighborhoods, at least in Baltimore (pp. 68-69).
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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bugginxout says:

great data visualization mapping. it strikes me how the sites of "diversity" across north america's landscapes are in her prisons.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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fungiform says:

look, i'm the first person to criticize the u.s. for its problems when it comes to integration and race relations, but i'm also the first person to point out that you can't just look at the u.s. and criticize. europe has the same problems when it comes to racism and racially segregated neighborhoods, just look at paris with its banlieues. the problem is basically the same in all the western countries that have sizeable "non-white" populations, although to my knowledge, the u.s. is the only nation whose "non-white" populations have powerful representation in our political system. this is an assumption based on what i've seen, so if i'm wrong, please let me know, although i'm not sure that the u.k. is going to elect a pakistani president anytime soon. and when it comes to asia? you'd really have to do these maps with all of the various asian ethnicities in each country separated by color [for kuala lumpur, for example, you'd have to separate malay from indian from chinese], otherwise, the maps would just be a bunch of green dots. talk about a lack of integration!

all that being said, i would love to see cities like reykjavik and stockholm compared to london and lisbon. i think that you'll see similar differences in the racial make-up of these cities as compared to ones in the u.s. [portland is very white, l.a., not so much], and i'd be interested to see how segregated or integrated their neighborhoods are.

also, i would love it if you'd add honolulu! the work you've done is fabulous and i realize that this took a lot of time and effort, but being someone who lives in hawaii, my country's most racially diverse state, i'd love to see what honolulu looks like.

and one more thing, how do you DO these?! they're fabulous!

thank you thank you! just fascinating!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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More Than A Thread says:

Great map. Would love to see this concept expanded to the whole United States, maybe be available in huge wall print. That would do well for some artsy people like me. For sure would want to see 2010, lots of things have changed since 2000.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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nataliemona says:

mmwm - I can definitely put in a second vote for Providence, RI.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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JoeInSouthernCA says:

Informative and thought-provoking. Many thanks for doing this.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

OK, I should be able to add the other requested cities, probably tonight. Honolulu is already there. If anybody knows a good source of non-US data, I'd like to add other world locations.

For the people wondering about how the maps are made: the data comes from Census 2000 Summary File 1. There is a file for each state that includes (among other things) the location and size of each block within the state and the racial and ethnic makeup of that block's population.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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San Diego Personal Injury says:

I see me...
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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john m flores says:

Wow. Thanks for this!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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alextarasiuk says:

Heyyy, that's awesome! thanks for adding Miami!
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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cyiakay says:

These maps are really cool!! After the 2000 census, Time ran an article in 2002 about how Sacramento, CA was considered the most diverse city in the US. It'd be interesting to see a visual representation of that here. :-)

Then of course, I'd love to see the Denver area since that's close to my hometown of Boulder, CO.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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cyiakay says:

OOPS... never mind! They are already done! :-)
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Juice Stain is my contact says:

These are fantastic! Thanks so much for doing these. (A request, if you have time: Providence, RI! I just moved here and I'm curious if my intuitions have any basis in reality.)
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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kitchenlattice says:

Could you explain in better detail how you constructed each dot? Did you simply go from block to block assigning a number of dots and color-coding those dots based on the proportional ethnic make-up of each block's population?

Consider a block with 10 whites (as defined by the US Census, obviously), 6 blacks, 4 Asians, 4 Hispanics, and 1 Native American. Does that block get a single red dot for being majority white?

I'm curious how true diversity (with local population distributions being very close to the mean population distribution of a given city) would render on your map.

Considering that the USA is about 13% black, a fully integrated city would appear 100% white in the coloring scheme I described above.

Can you give us some technical details on your construction?
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Kitchenlattice: That particular block you mentioned would actually not get any dots because it does not have 25 of any group -- the dots are per race, not subdivided from the total population of the block. However I did let the remainders from any group not plotted diffuse to adjacent blocks until the total gets large enough to actually plot a dot. This keeps the total count for each group correct but means that when a dot is split between two or more blocks it is kind of arbitrary which of them it will show up in.

An 87% white city that was extremely dense probably would look almost all white because the dots of other races would probably get covered up with white dots. Most cities are not dense enough that the entire areas of blocks is full of dots so usually you should be able to see them in areas proportional to their representation.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

OK, here are Providence, Burlington, Hartford, Portland, Concord, Portsmouth, and Ann Arbor.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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bjweiner says:

Eric, these are very interesting but I think there is a potential visualization problem. From looking up close at a few maps, it appears the points are always plotted in the order green, orange, red, blue (Asian, hispanic, white, black). This means that orange points overlie green and so on, like in rock, paper, scissors. If this is happening, it causes several unfortunate effects, for example hiding Asians, and making majority-black neighborhoods look more monochromatic than they actually are.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Actually the points within each block are plotted in the sequence red, blue, green, orange, gray (and then repeating that sequence until the values for the block are used up), but yes, there are problems with overlap. I should probably have made five layers and overlaid them instead of doing them as part of a single process.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Elaine Vigneault says:

Thanks for making these. They are really interesting. And thanks for including Vegas, my city :)
Can't wait to see how they compare to ones done with 2010 Census data, particularly cities that have lost of gained large numbers (like New Orleans and Vegas).
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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amdaddypeter says:

Hey....Is the Genocide of the Americas totally over ??? Really? No Native Americans left???
Gee.......some really interesting work and ideas here...but get real...the ethnicity/Race group whose suffering and displacement and near annihilation preceded and was intrinsically tied to (or directly caused by) the movements of most of these other groups....is still here, though not represented...
on the continent where they have been making art and clothing with beautiful colors, and watching the movements of Nations and Communities, for at least 30,000 years. (Don't misunderstand..I know that the Holocaust of the Americas definitely includes Millions of Africans, abducted, dying, fighting, surviving...but people don't refer to African American people as a group...in the past-tense.)
Of course most Hispanic peoples here in the U.S. are partly Indios, but how...with such an interest in this area of study....can you buy into the genocidal practice of referring to Native Americans in the past- tense? As the texting generation would say: OMFG..WTFF?!? The Millions of Native American people whose ancestors struggled, starved, fought, sucked it up, trudged, trod, farmed, soldiered, healed, taught, and have survived against all odds and the worst most comprehensively brutal and sustained genocidal takeover in the history of humankind...deserve better. First Americans deserve to get a color on their Continent, their almost completely stolen Land...they are here; and it wasn't easy...it still is not...especially with the insanely ignorant myth of everything being so much better with all the casino money Native folk are supposed to be getting. Good luck with getting this project up to excellence...rather than genocide-denial, and a dismissive take on those who have had so much taken and survive here in spite of everyone you did acknowledge as being real.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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amdaddypeter says:

Okay....so harsh criticism having been levelled;
one way you might get subsidy to do this work which it sounds like you enjoy...might be to partner with an
animator and track changes and movements from the beginning of the Census.
Movement of Religions, Diseases, Technology, Cultures, Wars, Empires, Nomadic Groups, Indigenous Cultures and Industrial Cultures, Languages, Cuisines, Plant-transport/Agrarian practices, and Political Ideologies....all occurring across a 3-D Sphere,
for educational and entertainment value...there's probably a market for a suite of such maps, and screensavers...and probably some funding sitting around for just such a thing.
So, that's what I offer as a thought...much more work...guess 's maybe worse than a scathing ranting indictment...the intention was to offer an idea of value.
Acknowledging the Millions who are survivors from the over 500 Nations of First Americans here in the lower 48...and up Nort'...would be a good start on whatever is next.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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oakraidr says:

If we could see the Congressional district lines with this maps. We can then see why some politician never leave office.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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rachels_squiggles says:

This is VERY cool! Would love to be able to zoom in and I like the idea of the animation. Would be very cool to pull this stuff into Flash. Let me know if you would like to do something like that. I do Flash stuff and am way into maps/infographics stuff like this.

I don't check my flickr so much and can't find a way to contact you here. (Maybe we have to be friends for me to email ya here?) You could always find me on facebook: Rachel Bachman (seattle)
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Louise Inman says:

If you wanted to look at UK data, the data set you'd want is the UK census data from 2001. They go down to the unit of postcode (zipcode) or super output area. Here's the link to the data set homepage: www.ons.gov.uk/census/get-data/guide-data/index.html
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Thanks for the UK census link. Postcodes are a lot bigger than blocks but it would still be interesting to see the geographic distributions there.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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whatever3311 says:

Awesome work, but would like to see it with another color scheme.

When I zoom into the high resolution images, I can often see so much more detail and diversity than initially observed. In particular I think the light green color of Asians is far too light and gets drowned out by the much darker red. Maybe a darker green? Also, I didn't even realize there were gray dots until I zoomed in. I realize there are far less gray dots, but still feel they blend in too much with the markings of the map, making them impossible to see.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

I agree the colors are not ideal and I would like to try some other approaches that might improve the visibility. For my eyes, the trouble is telling green from orange.
Posted 44 months ago. ( permalink )

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matthewpardon says:

Eric: You are awesome.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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dametfan1 says:

I'd love to see Suffolk and Eastern Nassau County, NY.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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ryan collects cameras says:

Very impressive! I assume this is some kind of GIS output?

If we're requesting cities, I'd love to see a map of the NY capitol region (Albany, Schenectady, Troy, and Saratoga Springs) -- I think there would be some interesting comparisons between the housing patterns.

How about a couple of smaller southern metro areas like Greenville/Spartanburg SC? I know the city (Spartanburg at least) is mostly black by populace, but I'm sure the dividing lines are stark… or maybe that's just my Yankee prejudice showing.

In any event, awesome maps! Beyond more locations, my suggestion would be to weight dots by income (it'd be interesting to see if there's any rich black enclaves like there is for whites or Asians) and also to plot the data against Congressional districts (both state and federal) to see the effects of gerrymandering, especially after the 2000 census.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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p00pd0g says:

why would you not have Birmingham, Alabama? it's perhaps the most segregated place in the entire country.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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rosemared says:

Eric... These are beautiful and interesting and informative. I'd love to see what Nashville, TN looks like. I live in a racially diverse neighborhood and would like to see how it works out against the city as a whole and how Nashville compares to other cities you've made maps for. If you can, thanks in advance. If not, thanks for sharing this fab project.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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King James 3000 says:

America will always be racist and segregated. It was founded on the slavery of Africans and the genociding of Indians. But this is the land of opportunity and you can be anything you want to be
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Birmingham and Nashville are already there if you want them. I chose the initial set of cities to post just by the ones with the largest populations, not by presence or absence of segregation.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Meng Bomin says:

I see that there's already been some comment on the color scheme and I agree in full with the sentiment that the green used for Asians makes differentiation from Hispanics difficult.

I did some color manipulation on your map of Chicago to test some of my intuitions about alternative color schemes. I think that simply changing the Asian color to a darker, more solid green goes a long way. I shifted the (Red: 153 Green: 254 Blue: 0) to a (Red: 0 Green: 200 Blue: 0) and to my eyes, it solves the differentiation problem. That map can be found here.

In the process, I noticed that the colors you used are almost exactly the same as Rankin's, with the exception of the color for whites having a blue value that was 100 lower than in Rankin's (75 instead of 175), and I was wondering if that change was intentional or not. I do think that it helps with contrast, so it certainly wasn't a negative change.

Though, on the topic of contrast, I also found that the contrast could be improved by switching the red to (Red: 210 Green: 0 Blue: 0) and similarly switching the blue to (Red: 0 Green: 0 Blue: 210), which is what I did in this map in addition to switching the Asian color as above. The colors are a bit less mild, but I think they go further in aiding the visualization.

I didn't really play with the issue of the gray "others", partially because it would be technically difficult to do a color swap starting with the PNG image and also because I didn't think that it was a major focus of attention. However, given my experience playing with the colors, I do think that replacing the gray with black would at least allow a viewer to see where those in "other" categories live.

I'm not a fan of using black for the four main categories because it's not comparable to the hued colors, but given that the gray used makes others essentially disappear into the roads and the fact that making five colors that provide satisfactory contrast in a map such as this is much more difficult than finding four, black would do.

All that said, I'm a big fan of these maps and I want to thank you for putting them up as well as Bill Rankin for the prototype map that inspired this set (though I'm not sure he'll read this comment thread).
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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jim.windle says:

Great set. Very interesting and informative, pretty too. Thanks for putting it together.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Meng Bomin: Thanks for trying out some other colors! To my (red-green-colorblind) eyes, the darker green does make for much better contrast with orange, but becomes hard to tell from red. I want to try it again with colors chosen from from the "Colorblind barrier-free color palette" and see how well that seems to work.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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WendyLouP says:

Wow! This is excellent and very interesting. Memphis is already in your collection, but I would love to see maps of Memphis thru the years.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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yojimbo78 says:

Eric,

These maps are brilliant. Just to add to what Louise said about UK data, the postcode *unit* is actually a very small area, I think roughly equivalent to a US Census block (postcode unit has an average 25 households, a Census block I think an average 85 people).

That said, I'm not sure if you can easily access UK Census data at postcode unit. You can however get data at the level of output areas, which on average have about 125 households so about 320 people, from Neighbourhood Statistics: neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk

As the site can be a bit confusing, let me know if you'd like to me to send you the ethnicity data for London.

Jim
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Mateu Bonet says:

These are fantastic! Already tweeted and shared on FB. Saw you mentioned on Hacker News, too. A humble vote for Portland, OR when you have time!

adéu,
Mateu
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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alcal flickr says:

Amazing convergence of geography, demographics, and information design. Thank you for this!
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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soncorn12 says:

FYI, you have Hartford, CT there twice each with a slightly different appearance.

I converted all of your png's so they have a transparent background and I am currently placing the png's on google earth with the hope of being able to make a downloadable kml file so people can better visualize this information.

Unfortunately it is rather tedious and I am afraid that the download will be a rather large file.

Perhaps a collaborative approach would be more effective.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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soncorn12 says:

Here is a google documents folder I have set up with the PNG files with transparent backgrounds and with the KMZs I have made so far. Please make a KMZ from a file and then delete the corresponding PNG.

docs.google.com/leaf?id=0BwdwhE8MGAaJNDZhZTZiZTMtNjRkNy00...

I have made 18 KMZs so far.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Oops, that was very sloppy of me to post Hartford twice! Thanks for pointing it out. I removed the duplicate.

I wonder if I could generate the KML files automatically. It must be making a lot of work for you to make them manually.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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RichardOBrown says:

Very nice and valuable work, thank you.

One more suggestion for the color code - I found that replacing the white background with black made the color code easier to read and interpret, especially where the density was low. (We tend to perceive the additive mixture of the colors including the background, so white can dominate and desaturate the small colored dots, while black lets them pop out in full saturation.)
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Bryan Pocius says:

Amazing stuff! I added some deeper insight to the NYC one:
www.flickr.com/photos/pocius/5026914906/
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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thisshipoffools says:

Interesting... Suggestion: Can you create maps of the same areas, showing breakdown by income level instead of race?

So much attention is paid to racial divides, but actually most neighborhoods are segregated based on income, no matter what color the people are. Would love to see both the race maps & the income maps, overlaid together. Thanks!
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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ochoseis says:

Is there any chance you could add Huntsville, AL?
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Martin Tomaske says:

Could you do the same maps, but this time displaying religion? Thanks
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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dchatton says:

Fascinating stuff! Thanks again for the time and effort put into this. I don't think there is any reason to include income segregation. This would be pretty obvious, I think. You are not going to find mansions sitting next to trailer parks, after all. Someone used the term "Fruity Pebbles" to describe an area that is ethnically diverse. I wonder what people think is the most ethnically diverse area. From what I could tell it was Santa Ana, CA. I'd love to see what caused that area to become so ethnically diverse.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

I wouldn't be so quick to rule out that there could be mixed-income areas. Bill Rankin's Chicago map shows some and it would be interesting to see how other places look too.

Martin Tomaske: Sorry, but I don't have a good source of data for where people of different religions live.

ochoseis: Sure, I can make one for Huntsville.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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lowlight47 says:

Just read an article in which your maps were featured. Love the idea. I would love to see how the maps change from decade to decade. I know the 5 boroughs of NYC have changed a lot over the course of the 1900's. An animation would look be cool to watch. I feel like Google Earth allows for some sort of animation so the KMZ files might be a good place to start.

I imagine that an animation would look like those old "Game of Life" simulations where colored dots on a white grid obey certain rules and evolve over time.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Thanks. Unfortunately the machine-readable data only goes back to 1980 so it is a lot more work to make an animation for census data older than that. But it would be interesting to see an animation of what changed over even just the past few decades.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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James Bond 179 says:

How did you do it? Did you create a program for the data? Placing each dot individually would be next to impossible.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Yes, I wrote a program to do it. People did make stipple maps like this by hand back in the old days, but fortunately we have software now.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Duncan Creamer says:

Do you have an image of the whole nation? It would be fascinating to see a gigapan version of the nation that would allow one to zoom in and out of the overall country.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

I haven't made one for the whole country, but I probably ought to. Zoomable would definitely be better than static images.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Joii2 says:

Hi Eric, I really like these sorts of maps, and I'd like to replicate them.

Is there any chance you'd share your program or script? I can do ArcGIS, Python, and I'm quick at learning new languages, so anything you can throw out there would be really helpful. Beats starting at square one. Thanks for the maps you've uploaded.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Sure, send me your address and I'll send you the script. I'm not sure it's really much more useful than anything you could write from scratch without much trouble, though.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Macranthropos says:

With my limited IQ and not being a cartographer, it's hard to assign meaning to the maps without knowing *exactly* how they were constructed, what assumptions were made, etc. Is this detailed somewhere for review? When I look at the largest resolution map for my neighborhood, it gives the impression that there are no blacks there when in fact there are. The neighborhood is quite diverse, but one wouldn't know that by looking at your map. In a previous comment you said something about layering maps. That would be more meaningful, but being unable to review your methodology, it's difficult to know.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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Macranthropos says:

I should add that I came across these maps via David Dukes' website. You know who he is. The maps were cited as "proof" that America remains segregated. As I note in my post above, the map for my neighborhood does indeed suggest this when in fact the neighborhood is diverse.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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jgmoore says:

see link: www.objectcity.com/pdf/baltimorecolor.pdf

i did very similar GIS mapping to these, cross indexed with property values, etc. and at different scales as part of my graduate research at Columbia Urban Design in 2003. The red dots are blacks instead of whites; the blue dots whites instead of blacks.. but the same thing generally. The research showed how geographic features (such as watersheds, topography, etc.) helped determine these patterns over time.
Posted 43 months ago. ( permalink )

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mycho3 says:

Could you please add Broward County (Ft Lauderdale metro) and Palm Beach County FL? Politically, these cities are small, but realistically they are very large conglomerations of small "cities".
Posted 42 months ago. ( permalink )

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Calvert Library says:

Very interesting! Can you teach me how to do this? I'd really like to see one of Calvert County, MD or Southern MD as this fits so well with a discussion we're having at the beginning of November.
Posted 42 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

OK, here are Fort Lauderdale, Palm Beach, and Calvert County, Maryland.
Posted 42 months ago. ( permalink )

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ochoseis says:

Can you do Huntsville, AL?
Posted 42 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

OK, here is Huntsville.
Posted 42 months ago. ( permalink )

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ziptie034 says:

Are you going to update these cities according to the 2010 Census when it is released? It would be cool to see the migration over a 10 yr period and to be able to try and predict the basic racial migration tendencies. It looks like basic instinct! Good work!
Posted 42 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Yes, I think the 2010 data will be released in June and I would like to do comparisons then.
Posted 42 months ago. ( permalink )

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More Than Gray says:

i admit i haven't read the bazill comments above me, but i just want to give a shout out and say your work is th3 $h1t. i'm thankful for the piece on sf.curbed (covering a piece on missionlocal) introducing you to the world. i completely agree with them, btw -- you need a macarthur fellowship so you can stop day-working (if you are) and make what your curiosity tells you to.
keep it up!
Posted 41 months ago. ( permalink )

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chaserofstorms says:

When you do the 2010 data, will you update this set, or create a whole new set?
Posted 41 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

I was planning to make a new set, since the old data is still useful to have for comparison.
Posted 41 months ago. ( permalink )

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habeebee says:

HI Eric,

I can't help wonder, did you work on the amazing maps the NYT just published too? Or did they get the idea from you? Or is it just the same genius idea, conceived of by different people at (roughly) the same time? I hope you were somehow involved, that would be so cool!

projects.nytimes.com/census/2010/explorer
Posted 41 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

No, I wasn't involved, and I don't know whether this set had any influence on how they did it or whether it was totally independent. I got the idea from Bill Rankin so it isn't original with me either.

However it happened, they did a nice job with it.
Posted 41 months ago. ( permalink )

Anna Kramer [deleted] says:

Hi Eric,

Nice maps! How did you do it? I'm doing research in urban planning, looking to use this method and juxtapose this type of data with transit networks. Can you share your method?

Thanks,
Anna
anna.kramer@gmail.com
Posted 40 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

There's nothing too complicated about it -- it is just drawing dots within each Census block proportional to the number of people within each group in that block.
Posted 40 months ago. ( permalink )

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A Rish Family says:

PLEASE, Please, please, do another set when the 2010 census data is available. I use this in my teaching all the time.
Posted 38 months ago. ( permalink )

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ajfroggie says:

Not sure if they got the cue from you, but the New York Times did something similar recently, on a national scale, using 2005-09 ACS data:

projects.nytimes.com/census/2010/explorer?ref=us
Posted 37 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

I don't know exactly where their inspiration came from, but they did an excellent job with it.
Posted 37 months ago. ( permalink )

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Stephanie Eastwood says:

Wonderful use of census databank, Eric! I did some Census 2010 work in Wisconsin so love seeing all that work made visual. Enjoyed the comments too.
Posted 37 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Thanks! This set is actually Census 2000 -- see the other set for Census 2010.
Posted 37 months ago. ( permalink )

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sophia-lucia says:

Amazing pictures. Do you give-sell copyrights? I am interested in Detroit.
Posted 37 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

By "copyrights" do you mean prints? If you really mean copyright, these are Creative Commons licensed so you are welcome to use them elsewhere as long as you include the attribution.
Posted 37 months ago. ( permalink )

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@annwimsatt says:

These are amazing. I wondered how you did these maps and whether they might be done all the way back to the 20s?
I've been researching the impact of the Great Migration on the City of STL. There appear to be profound correlations between where AfAm settled in northern cities and the urban history of those cities.
The book 'Mapping Decline' has maps that look at the dispersal of AfAms that happened in STL but the maps only went back to the 1950s.
If your 'Race and Ethnicity' maps went back to 1920s, it would be much easier to see understand why AfAms have struggled in the US.
Posted 26 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Thanks! These are made from the data files on www2.census.gov, which unfortunately only go back to 1980, and only have block-level detail for 2000 and 2010. It sounds like tract-level data for St. Louis is available back to 1910 if you consult the printed census reports at a federal depository library.
Posted 26 months ago. ( permalink )

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breezypalm23 says:

This is really important work.

Is there anyway to super-impose this over maps of the city's highways and major arterial roads? It would be interesting to see how the highways literally cut different ethnic groups off from each other in major cities. That is literally the case in Oakland, CA, and I wouldn't be surprised if it was that way in other cities as well.

GREAT WORK!

-Matthew
Posted 24 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Thanks! The roads are there in the images—they are just rather light in the background.
Posted 24 months ago. ( permalink )

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adamcfc says:

Hi Eric, I just came across these today and they are beautiful and fun to look at. Could you describe the process you used? Is it point distribution based on percentage of race in census blocks? If so I think it would be smart to include the block boundaries, as point distribution could be pretty misleading, especially in conversations about segregation...
Posted 9 months ago. ( permalink )

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Eric Fischer says:

Yes, the dots are randomly placed within block boundaries. There is a base map of streets there if you zoom in, and census blocks are mostly delimited by streets.
Posted 9 months ago. ( permalink )

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madesumitre says:

Amazing Picture Biografi tokoh-tokoh dunia.
Posted 3 months ago. ( permalink )

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