new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
Not all the navigation technology on the Okeanos Explorer is 'high-tech.' Okeanos Explorer crew points to a map used during previous work in the Gulf of Mexico. ©Janet Krenn/VASG | by Virginia Sea Grant
Back to photostream

Not all the navigation technology on the Okeanos Explorer is 'high-tech.' Okeanos Explorer crew points to a map used during previous work in the Gulf of Mexico. ©Janet Krenn/VASG

To the landlubber, the ocean floor may seem remote, but deep-sea maps are essential for researchers and resource managers. Deep-water canyons provide a refuge for a variety of animals including deep-sea corals and fish, and knowing how ecologically and commercially important fish use the canyons can improve the way we manage fisheries. Maps of the ocean floor can also aid in planning for offshore energy or other uses.

 

That’s why representatives from 15 of Virginia’s federal and state organizations gathered on May 24 to tour the Okeanos Explorer and hear about one new success story: a collaboration that is putting data that is usually difficult and expensive to obtain into the hands of Virginia’s management agencies.

 

On Tuesday, May 29, the Okeanos Explorer, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, cast off from Norfolk and started mapping deep-sea canyons along the mid-Atlantic coast. This kicks off a series of expeditions designed to improve understanding of the deepwater canyons off of Delaware, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, and Virginia.

 

Read more at: vaseagrant.vims.edu/2012/06/07/okeanos/

3,803 views
2 faves
0 comments
Taken on May 24, 2012