new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged zerenestacker

A Sympetrum striolatum from a while back. This one was a recently emerged individual, it seems that the ommatidia of the compound eye are much more apparent in teneral individuals, I still wonder what Dragon vision would be like, that's not just the compound eyes, you would have to factor in the 3 ocelli as well. I reckon a real case of sensory overload.

 

This was a natural light focus stack of a Darters noggin :o)

 

VIEW LARGE

Taken in the early evening in the garden straight after an April shower.

 

This is something I have been wanting to do for some time now, but just waiting for the right moment. Ideally I was hoping to find one at one of my usual spots on the Mendips but so far not been able to find one yet. Instead, I noticed a couple had emerged from the pond in the garden and with a perfect calm evening, I set up the camera and got everything in position. Then it started to rain quite heavily, so grabbed the camera went inside and waited a short while for it to pass. Fortunately it was still in the same place and position, but now with drops of water, couldn't have worked out better!

  

This is a 49 shot focus stack, processed in Zerene stacker using both PMax and DMap methods.

 

Best viewed large.

 

Visit Mendip Wildlife Photography

15 images, focus stacked.

 

Denver Botanic Gardens

Empilements de 114 photos (16 slabs) de 40 µm/step en mode manuel 100mm - f/5,6 - 0.4’’ - ISO 100 - rapport 3:1

Boitier Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Objectif Canon MP-E 65 mm f/2,8 1:1 ~ 5:1 + lightbox diffusée + rail macro motorisé et contrôleur Cognisys Stackshot 3X.

Logiciel de stacking : ZereneStacker (PMax + DMap), Bugslabber.

Post traitement : ZereneStacker, Lightroom, Photoshop.

Taken in the early morning at Blackmoor Reserve near Charterhouse on the Mendips in Somerset.

 

Hadn't intended for it to be so large in the frame but I made a bit if a hash of the original composition, so there is about a 20% crop to re-compose.

 

Canon EOS5D MkII, Canon MP-E65mm f2.8, ISO200, f5.6, 0.3 sec.

 

A 70 shot focus stack processed in Zerene stacker using a combination of both PMax and DMap methods.

 

Press 'L' to view large.

 

Visit Mendip Wildlife Photography

Empilements de 63 photos (9 slabs) de 250 µm/step en mode manuel 100mm - f/5,6 - 1/15’’ - ISO 100 - rapport 1:1

Boitier Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Objectif Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM + lightbox très diffusée + micro led+ rail macro motorisé et contrôleur Cognisys Stackshot 3X.

Logiciel de stacking : ZereneStacker (PMax DMap), Bugslabber.

Post traitement : ZereneStacker, Lightroom.

I've just been experimenting with Zerene Stacker and its editing possibilities, I had 2 Damselfly images I took earlier in the year, yes they look similar, in one the eyes are in focus and in the other the mouthparts, there is also some difference in limb positioning. So I thought I'd try to stack the 2 images, you can see the results in the comments. Using the editing facilities in Zerene I was able to bring back the image and give it new life, I used Lightroom to change the background colour and reduce the brightness of the flash reflection on the eyes. There is now good focus on the eyes and good focus on the mouthparts, I changed the background colour using the sliders in Lightroom, I had done the purple on an earlier image :o)

 

Oh I really think I'm going to have fun next Damselfly season, lets just hope the weather is better next year :o)

 

This was actually the first Damselfly I found this year, it was fairly cold and this one was resting on a leaf, I was holding the leaf and camera lens with one hand and camera body with the other, the camera was attached to a monopod for more stability, I had placed a coloured card behind held by a hobby stand.

  

VIEW ON BLACK

Tabanus sp.

It's an old work

 

102 shots

Magnification around 4x-4.5x

Lens : JML 21mm f/3.5

Lights: 2 Led and cylinder paper for diffuser

 

Denver Botanic Gardens

 

13 images, focus stacked

Focus stacking with componon 28mm and 15cm extention tube

A close stack of a newly emerged Sympetrum striolatum that was close to taking to the air for the first time, you can just make out the out of focus eye of the exuviae in the bottom left.

 

This was a rather ambitious handheld focus stack of 18 images. For this one I was in manual and was using diffused flash, the aperture was F/7.1, ISO 200 and a 1/160 shutter speed. I have cropped the image as well.

 

Thanks for the positive feedback on my last video, it meant a lot to me and if you haven't seen it the link is here :-

 

www.flickr.com/photos/odonataman/9509318393/

 

NEEDS TO BE VIEWED LARGE :O)

  

 

Empilements de 249 photos (36 slabs) de 20 µm/step en mode manuel 65mm - f/5,6 - 0.4’’ - ISO 100 - rapport 5:1

Boitier Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Objectif Canon MP-E 65 mm f/2,8 1:1 ~ 5:1 + lightbox diffusée + rail macro motorisé et contrôleur Cognisys Stackshot 3X.

Logiciel de stacking : ZereneStacker (PMax + DMap), Bugslabber.

Post traitement : ZereneStacker, Lightroom, Photoshop.

Trichodes

Family: Cleridae

 

Late afternoon handheld stack based on 33 natural light exposures in Zerene

Sony ILCE-7M2 , Metabones Smart Adapter (Mark IV) , Canon MP-E65 f:2.8

iso 400, f.5.6

(IBIS ON)

 

Empilements de 66 photos (10 slabs) de 115 µm/step en mode manuel 65mm - f/5,6 - 0.4’’ - ISO 100 - rapport 2,5:1

Boitier Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Objectif Canon MP-E 65 mm f/2,8 1:1 ~ 5:1 + lightbox diffusée + rail macro motorisé et contrôleur Cognisys Stackshot 3X.

Logiciel de stacking : ZereneStacker (PMax DMap), Bugslabber.

Post traitement : ZereneStacker, Lightroom, Photoshop.

Natural light late afternoon field stack taken with 7dmk2 + reversed Hexanon40mm and some extension tube.

 

12 shots at f5.6 ; v 1/20s ; iso 200.Assembled in Zerenestacker,mostly Dmap with some Pmax retouching.

 

Pictures taken in March

Taken in the early evening in the garden straight after an April shower.

 

Another version of the same Damselfly. This is later on after the previous image and the dew drops started to evaporate quite quickly, I also wanted one with the legs in full view, plus the two drops I thought made an interesting addition.

 

I did quite a few attempts but in the end only a couple of complete stacks worked as though it was very calm, the damselfly did have a habit of moving a leg or two. This time a 62 shot focus stack, processed in Zerene stacker using both PMax and DMap methods.

 

Best viewed large.

 

Visit Mendip Wildlife Photography

Empilements de 184 photos de10 µm/step (40 slabs) en mode manuel 65mm - f/4 - 1/6’’ - ISO 100 - rapport 5:1

Boitier Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Objectif Canon MP-E 65 mm f/2,8 1:1 ~ 5:1 + lightbox diffusée + rail macro motorisé et contrôleur Cognisys Stackshot 3X.

Logiciel de stacking : ZereneStacker (PMax), Bugslabber.

Post traitement : ZereneStacker, Lightroom, Photoshop.

Nomada sp.

Family: Apidae

 

Early morning stack based on 39 natural light exposures in Zerene .

Sony Nex 5n,Canon MP-E65, f/5.6,iso 200

Canon 7D with Rodenstock 50mm f2.8

at f8, 6cm ex.tube, iso 120, 1/125

Flash YN 560IV power 1/16

D.I.Y Diffuser for macro

stack of live specimens from 7 images with Zerenestacker.

Taken at GB Gruffy nature reserve on the Mendips in Somerset, with no wind or breeze and although quite mild for the time of the year, I was able to get several series in between the fly changing position. The fly itself is around 6/7 mm long.

 

Canon EOS5D MkII, Canon MP-E65mm f2.8, ISO100, f5.6, 1.3 sec, last shot in the sequence f9.0, 3.2 sec, @ 3 x magnification.

 

A 50 shot focus stack processed in Zerene stacker using a combination of both PMax and DMap methods.

 

Press 'L' to view large.

 

Visit Mendip Wildlife Photography

They look a little different this side of the pond. Doesn't stop them from being complete bastards though. Very aggressive species. This is the only thing I'm scared of! you should see me run like a child when one starts buzzing around me.

 

This guy is covered in pollen, must have been feeding on nectar recently. Look at those mega jaws! Perfectly capable of tearing wood from trees to build nests.

 

Stacked from 23 images with the El-Nikkor 50mm f/2.8

Hallmen style beauty dish with a Nikon SB24 for lighting.

 

My Fork-leaved sundew is growing with an unexpected vigour and the multi branched leaves that give it it's name are now opeing up on every stem.

 

Any insects in the kitchen are advised to steer clear of these beautiful drops of 'dew', they are gluey mucilage which grabs hold of any small insect attracted by the sugars within. More mucilage tipped tendrils close around the prey and enzymes in the fluid break down the insects soft tissue, which is absorbed into the plant.

 

Nature red in tooth and tendril...

Thomisus Onustus (Female)

Family: Thomisidae

 

Afternoon stack based on 48 natural light exposures in Zerene .

Sony Nex 5n ,Canon EF 100mm f:2.8L Macro USM.

iso 200, f/6.3

 

On a walk around a local country park at 5;30am I found the grand total of 1 Damselfly, they must have been hiding somewhere, I expected to see loads, during the day on Sunday there were lots about. Still can't complain as I found this beauty.

 

This is a male Ischnura elegans in full adult colours. This is a handheld focus stack of 25 images, I wanted to get the front of the seed head he was on and get his front claws holding onto the spikey bits.

 

I hope to find a few more of these before the season is done, really is getting close now. Also hope to do another full video shoot of an emerging Common Darter at some point.

 

Hope everyone has a grand week :o)

 

MUST VIEW LARGE

This photo serves as a comparison to the Sigma's version which could be see bellow! A giant difference means to the background!

 

Early morning stack from 33 natural light exposures @ 2,2x macromagnification.

 

Canon EOS 6D,

Canon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macro Lens

You can download or view Macroscopic Solutions’ images in more detail by selecting any image and clicking the downward facing arrow in the lower-right corner of the image display screen.

 

Three individuals of Macroscopic Solutions, LLC captured the images in this database collaboratively.

 

Contact information:

 

Mark Smith M.S. Geoscientist

mark@macroscopicsolutions.com

 

Daniel Saftner B.S. Geoscientist and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer

daniel@macroscopicsolutions.com

 

Annette Evans Ph.D. Student at the University of Connecticut

annette@macroscopicsolutions.com

 

1) Subject : Chrysoperla carnea

2) Camera : Nikon D800 (DX mode)

3) Lens : Rodenstock Apo-Gerogon 240/9 as tube lens

4) Other : 68 mm Extension tubes

5) M/Obj : Generic 10X PLAN Infinite Microscope Objective

6) Magnification:

7) Lens Settings: iso100, S 1/4, f9

8) Stack # : 149 @ 10µm

9) Lighting : 3 leds

  

I had to upload this one as it is just a different angle on a Damselfly, but it really does illustrate the Pseudopupil effect of the compound eye. This is how Wiki explains it :-

 

In the compound eye of invertebrates such as insects and crustaceans, the pseudopupil appears as a dark spot which moves across the eye as the animal is rotated. This occurs because the ommatidia which one observes "head-on" (along their optical axes) absorb the incident light, while those to one side reflect it. The pseudopupil therefore reveals which ommatidia are aligned with the axis along which the observer is viewing.

 

So this explains why a Damselfly appears to be watching you no matter what angle you view them at. This also gives us the all important eye contact which helps with photography.

 

This was a handheld focus stack of 10 images at F/8, ISO125 and 1/60 second shutter speed.

 

VIEW LARGE

Love these spiders, and great to see them appearing again. This is a 3 shot stack using Zerene Stacker software.

Another Soldier fly, different species, larger still than the previous one.

 

Honourable Mention in Olympus Bioscapes 2012

Holopyga sp. (Hymenoptera, Chrysididae). ID credit of AlxndrBrg. Body length: 8 mm.

 

Pseudospinolia neglecta. The original ID edited after the comment of Alxndrbrg.

 

Focus stack of this sleeping wasp found on late afternoon. 24 natural light shots taken at 3.9x magnification, combined in Zerene, uncropped.

Canon EOS 5DII + MP-E65 lens, f/5.6, 1/5 sec., ISO 200.

 

View large!

Taken in the early morning at Porto Conte National park near Torre del Porticciolo in Sardinia. A 23 shot focus stack processed in Zerene Stacker.

 

I would have liked to have done some more with these little bees from different angles, but you don't get long with them, the slightest disturbance and they wake up and are off.

 

Best viewed large!

 

Visit Mendip Wildlife Photography

A Teneral Ischnura elegans (I think, but don't quote me) from Wollaton Park last Summer. When Damselflies first emerge they lack their adult colours and often look a bit green/yellow/brown (This does vary with different species), after a while they gradually take on their adult appearance.

 

This was a 9 image focus stack, there was some lower jaw movement, but I managed to edit around that. This guy had probably only just emerged on the day I found him :o)

 

VIEW LARGE

My first-ever focus-staked image !!! This is a stake of 3 images combined with zerene stacker !!! I kept three flowers of different colours( pink, yellow and white ) to make the drops more interesting !!

 

Have a great week ahead, friends !!

 

Just click on the image and then hit F11 to see on full screen and you shouldn't miss it !!! (For PC users only !! )

This fly (ID unknown yet) was the other insect found on my first field macro session of 2015. A difficult subject for stacking with all those fine bristles, it took me quite some time for a partial cleaning of stacking artifacts.

 

Stack info: Canon 6D, Canon MP-E 65 lens

58 natural light exposures at f5.6, ISO 200

Magnification: 3.3X

 

3600px version

I've seen a lot of these green eyed horseflies this summer.

 

Focus stacked using the Zerene Stacker.

 

Nikkor 105mm F/2.8 macro with 56mm of extension tubes.

Large

Another perspective on a Grey Coneflower bud, attempting to capture the Fibonacci sequence in the many layers in the flower.

 

Studio shot, Pentax K1, DFA 100mm macro on extension tube, pixel shift mode, 57 stacked images combined in Zerene Stacker.

 

MCCP9082-MCCP9138_PMax_tu5

I've found this lovely blue in late September 2012. Does anyone have an idea about the ID?

 

Stack info: Canon 5D Mark II, Canon MP-E 65 lens

46 natural light exposures, f4.0, ISO 100

Magnification: 1.2X

 

4000px version

Empilements de 61 photos de 400 µm/step en mode manuel 65mm - f/8 - 1/6” - ISO 400 - rapport 1:1

Boitier Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Objectif Canon MP-E 65 mm f/2,8 1:1 ~ 5:1 + flash Canon MT-24EX Macro Twin Lite diffusé + lumière arrière LED diffusée + rail macro motorisé et contrôleur Cognisys Stackshot 3X.

Logiciel de stacking : ZereneStacker (PMax).

Post traitement : ZereneStacker, Lightroom.

 

Portrait of a Clytus arcuatus male (Cerambycidae) found in Provence.

Studio work, stacking based on 59 images, assembled using Zerene Stacker (Pmax & Dmap). Post production using Adobe Photoshop CS6. Canon 600D. Microscope lens x4, ISO-100, 1 sec. 2 daylight LED, diffused with tracing paper.

 

20 images : Manuel 70mm - f/5,6 - 1/13” - ISO 400 - rapport 0,7:1

Boitier Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM + lumière LED diffusée.

Logiciel de stacking : ZereneStacker (PMax).

Post traitement : ZereneStacker, Lightroom.

 

Once again, a lateral view made from 46 images stacked in zerene stacker, 3x macromagnification.

 

The lighting conditions were stunning today.

 

Canon 5D Mark II & Canon MP-E 65mm macro lens

 

Click to View Larger!

Weinschwärmer

Elephant hawk moth

 

Fieldstack 10 pics with componon 40mm

The robberfly (diptera family asilidae) is one of the carnivores of the insect world that preys on other insects: exceedingly common throughout the world, it can reach up to an inch in length. The short, strong proboscis you can see at the front of the photo is used to stab and inject victims with saliva containing neurotoxic and proteolytic enzymes which paralyze and digest the insides; the fly then sucks the liquefied meal through the proboscis. Nature isn't a sentimental place! While dragonflies typically chase down their prey, robberflies sit on a leaf waiting, in order to anticipate their prey's flight path and intercept the prey in mid-flight. They pounce, clasp their prey in their strong legs, inject their venom then take it to a leaf to do the business.

 

As an evolutionary aid, robber flies have developed characteristically hairy faces -- which helps protect their eyes from the prey that they catch. As with other aerial predators, robberflies have excellent vision, characterized by two conspicuous compound eyes. But, the worst a robber fly could do to a man is administer a pinch with its sharp beak, and then only the largest could! In fact they are almost beneficial as they kill pests: the larvae do not harm crops nor infect plants with disease. That said some consider robber flies a pest as they can feed on bees one by one until they decimate the entire colony! However, they also handle plant pests the same way and are thus also referred to as assassin flies.

 

Note for the men amongst us, the girls are no walkover! With this insect, the predatory nature of the girls is so dominant that when a males tries to court a female robber fly, if he is not careful, she will fly out, stab him with her proboscis and eat him! It's not the only arthropod that has such behaviour... we've got it relatively easy =).

 

Technical, preserved specimen, BG output onto SmallHD via HDMI matrix used as background; rear curtain sync .8s exposures; 210 photos into 26 sub stacks using zerene stacker, retouched from Dmap composite, finished off with CS4, NoiseNinja & Topaz Detail. Step size of 40µm, polystyrene chip cone diffuser. Resized to reduce noise. 40 year old Schneider Componon 35 f/4 enlarger lens reversed on slightly more than flat bellows so about 1.5:1 ish; 3 flashes @1/32 perpendicular @2,6 &10 o clock. Took me about 6 hrs or so. As a stack this only gets about a 7/10 from me, boo. I can do better. The eyes could be nicer, and I'm not really convinced by this blue in the background, it's a touch too dark for my personal taste. I wanted to make it a bit menacing but it's sort of in between. Maybe a warm medium brown next time, dunno!

 

Link to large version: farm8.staticflickr.com/7278/7509916888_a48ca1f16d_o.jpg

 

UPDATE 2013 - An extreme macro photography learning site to explain the techniques and equipment used for all my macro photos here in Flickr is now ready. To point to a few of the links that people who want to learn this stuff might like to have a browse of:

  

Focus Stacking, Focus Stack Preparation, Shooting A Stack, Stack Processing, Stack Post Processing, Schneider Kreuznach Componon 28 mm f/4, Schneider Kreuznach Componon 35 mm f/4, Schneider Kreuznach Componon 80 mm f/4, Nikon El-Nikkor 50 mm f/2.8N, Reject Enlarger Lenses, JML Optical 21 mm f/3.5, 20 mm Microfilm f/2.8, Anybrand MP-E 65 Macro Lens, Manual, TTL, Rear Curtain Sync, Extreme Macro Backgrounds, Single Colour Background, The Gradient Background, Adjustable Flash Shoe Mounts, Extension Tubes, Eyepiece, Field Monitor, Flash Bracket, Focusing Helicoid, Holding Tools, Lens Adapters, M42 Iris, Macro Tripod, Making A Macro Beanbag.

 

Early morning field stack of a frequently occurring species here,

 

21 natural light exposures stacked in Zerene Stacker,

1/5 sec. ƒ/5.6 ISO 100

 

Canon EOS 5D Mark II & Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 L IS USM Macro

 

View Larger!

I'm still wondering what this one is.

 

13 focus-stacked images, Denver Botanic Gardens.

A nice and pretty small crab spider from Thomisidae family. Photographed in a very early May morning.

 

47 natural light exposures at f5.6, ISO 100 made with Sony NEX-7, Olympus Zuiko Auto-1:1 Macro Lens 80mm f/4 on Novoflex BALPRO 1 bellows.

 

3600px version

Thomisus sp.

 

Playing with my old Nikon in the field.

A crab spider just before she lays her eggs.

20 natural light exposures with El-Nikkor 50mm .

A Paphiopedilum bud, Denver Botanic Gardens

 

Five images, focus stacked

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 79 80