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The Yu Yuan Garden in Old Shanghai were within walking distance of our hotel, so we got there early to avoid the crowds.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuyuan_Gardenhttps://en.wikipedia.o...

The water feature at Yu Garden was decorated for Chinese New Year.

 

Yu Garden was a private garden of the Pan family in the Ming Dynasty. It was the largest and most prestigious of its era in Shanghai after it was completed.

 

The garden is unique in its design blending decorative halls, elaborate pavilions, glittering pools, zigzag bridges, pagodas, archways, and rockeries.

 

Giardini Yuyuan - Shanghai - Cina

Marzo 2010

 

consiglio..... View On Black

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One of many buildings in the the Yu Garden.

Beyond the wall is the Yu Garden and towering in the distance is the Jin Mao Tower (left) and the Shanghai World Financial Center (right). Standing on the Zigzag Bridge, I could experience both history and modernity all at once.

SHANGHAI, China - A single lotus flower appars among the green leafs on a pond of the traditional Chinese Yuyuan garden of Shanghai.

 

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Another example of a great detail from a Chinese roof. This one is from the Yu Garden although the building itself escapes me.

Tourists meander through the Yu Garden. This is a great example of the balance between the foliage and the buildings in the garden.

 

View it large!

Visitors line the shopping area around the City God Temple. You can get a sense of how crowded the streets can get from this.

Tourists walk over the Zigzag Bridge with ancient buildings in the background and newer buildings in the distance.

Most of my shots from China don't have many crowds in them. This is mostly because it's difficult to take photos with lots of people bumping into you and people tend to block your view. This is one instance where there was no way I was going to be able to avoid crowds. This was taken in the middle of the Zigzag Bridge which was absolutely swarming with people. Not only was it narrow and crowded but since there are so many sights to see from the bridge, half of the people at any given time are stopped and looking around while the other half tries to push by them. To make matters worse, the people who are actually moving are usually going separate directions (there's no one direction to walk over the bridge). Anyway, hopefully this gives you a sense of just how packed it was.

The Jiuqu Qiao (the Nine-bend Bridge) in Yuyuan Garden of Shanghai's old town. The bridge winds more than a hundred meters because of its nine twists Flanked by balustrades with square posts, it has also by its side a mid-lake pavilion in which visitors may have a cup of tea in one of the nicest places in the Yuyuan Garden, the Hu Xing Tin Teahouse upstairs and enjoy the view all around. It sits in the middle of a lake. To get to the teahouse you have to cross the Nine-bend Bridge. Hundreds of goldfish live in the lake. Feeding them seems to be a popular pastime.

HANDHELD-NO TRIPOD

 

Best to be viewed in large size format

All rights reserved. Copyright 2012 © Jacques Freund. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission. All rights reserved - Copyright 2012 © Jacques Freund

Nikon D7000.

 

Shanghai, China, 2013.

Scenes from wandering around Shanghai, China.

A glimpse of the tranquil pond through the wall in the Yuyuan Gardens.

 

For a high resolution full screen view of my photos, please visit: www.pictographica.net

 

Fish in the pond of Yuyuan Garden, Shanghai, China.

Yuyuan Garden is a famous classical garden located in Anren Jie, Shanghai. It was established in 1577 by a government officer of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) named Pan Yunduan. Yu in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying and this garden was specially built for Pan's parents as a place for them to enjoy a tranquil and happy time in their old age.

In its 400 years existence, Yuyuan Garden had undergone many changes. During the late Ming Dynasty, it became dilapidated with the decline of Pan's family. In 1760, some rich merchants bought it and spent more than 20 years reconstructing the buildings. During the Opium War of the 19th century, it was severely damaged. The garden you see today is the result of a five year restoration project which began in 1956. It was open to the public in September, 1961.

Yuyuan Garden occupies an area of approximately five acres. However, the small size is not a representative of the attractions of the garden. The pavilions, halls, rockeries, ponds and cloisters all have unique characteristics. There are six main scenic areas here: Sansui Hall, Wanhua Chamber, Dianchun Hall, Huijing Hall, Yuhua Hall and the Inner Garden. Each area features several scenic spots within its borders.

Upon entering the garden, you will encounter a rockery, which is called the Great Rockery. With a height of 50 feet, it is the largest as well as the oldest rockery in the southern region of the Yangtze River. On the top of the rockery, you can get a bird's eye view of the garden. Cuixiu Hall sits at the foot of the rockery. It is a quiet and elegant place surrounded by old trees and beautiful flowers. Visitors will find curio shops in the Cuixiu Hall.

Sansui Hall was built in 1760 and was originally used to entertain guests. Later it became a place to hold ceremonies for the gentlemen and bookmen. With a height of 30 feet and featuring five halls, it is the largest and most commodious structure in the garden. The name Sansui is derived from the book History of the later Han Dynasty and means 'propitious' and 'lucky'.

Wandering in the area of Yule Pavilion and Wanhua Chamber, you will find pavilions, corridors, streams, courtyards as well as many other natural features. Wanhua Chamber is a delicately chased building surrounded by derious cloisters. Spring bamboos grow beside the cloisters. In front of Wanhua Chamber, there are two old trees. One is a maidenhair tree which is 70 feet tall. It is said that the tree was planted by the host of the garden 400 years ago.

The Dianchun Hall area is located east of Wanhua Chamber and includes Hexu Hall, Relic Hall, Ancient Well Pavilion and the Acting-and-Sing Stage. Dianchun Hall was once the headquarters of Xiaodao Hui, a revolted group who fought against the government of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) during 1853-1855. The coins made by Xiaodao Hui and the bulletins they proclaimed are currently displayed in the hall.

The true treasure of Yuyuan is the Exquisite Jade Rock. Located across from Yuhua Hall, it is one of the three famous rocks in the southern region of the Yangtze River. The other two are Duanyun Feng in Suzhou and Zhouyun Feng in Hangzhou. The rock is 10.8 feet in height and has 72 holes. What is interesting about this rock is that if you burn a joss stick just below the rock, the smoke will magically float out from all of the holes. Similarly, when you pour water into the rock from top, the water will flow out from each hole creating a spectacular sight to see. Pan Yunduan was very fond of the Exquisite Jade Rock, and he built Yuhua Hall facing the rock, so it was convenient to sit in the hall and admire it. The furnishings in the hall were made of top grade rosewood of the Ming Dynasty, appearing both natural and graceful.

The Inner Garden was a separate garden built in 1709, but is now a part of Yuyuan in the south. It is compact and exquisite, and the rocks, pavilions, ornamental ponds and flower walls offer some of the most attractive sceneries in Yuyuan.

  

Tomorrow I post 5 more pictures of the Yuyuan garden

 

The Yuyuan Garden is a famous classical garden located in Anren Jie, Shanghai. The garden was finished in 1577 by a government officer of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) named Pan Yunduan. Yu in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying, and this garden was specially built for Pan's parents as a place for them to enjoy a tranquil and happy time in their old age.

During the late Ming Dynasty, it became very dilapidated with the decline of Pan's family. During the Opium War of the 19th century, Yuyuan Garden was severely damaged. The Yuyuan Garden you see today is the result of a five year restoration project which began in 1956. The garden was open to the public in September, 1961.

Yuyuan Garden occupies an area of 20,000 square meters. The pavilions, halls, rockeries, ponds and cloisters all have unique characteristics.

  

Best to be viewed in large size format

All rights reserved. Copyright 2012 © Jacques Freund. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission. All rights reserved - Copyright 2012 © Jacques Freund

The Yuyuan Garden is a famous classical garden located in Anren Jie, Shanghai. The garden was finished in 1577 by a government officer of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) named Pan Yunduan. Yu in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying, and this garden was specially built for Pan's parents as a place for them to enjoy a tranquil and happy time in their old age.

During the late Ming Dynasty, it became very dilapidated with the decline of Pan's family. During the Opium War of the 19th century, Yuyuan Garden was severely damaged. The Yuyuan Garden you see today is the result of a five year restoration project which began in 1956. The garden was open to the public in September, 1961.

Yuyuan Garden occupies an area of 20,000 square meters. The pavilions, halls, rockeries, ponds and cloisters all have unique characteristics.

  

Best to be viewed in large size format

All rights reserved. Copyright 2012 © Jacques Freund. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission. All rights reserved - Copyright 2012 © Jacques Freund

Giardini Yuyuan - Shanghai - Cina

Marzo 2010

 

Da internet:

Nella città vecchia di Shanghai è stata ricreata un’area con edifici in stile Ming nota con il nome di Bazar YuYuan. Qui si trovano tantissimi ristoranti, negozi e bancarelle che vendono tantissimi articoli di artigianato cinese, souvenir e moltissimi oggetti di ogni tipo.

 

All’interno vi è anche la casa del tè Huxinting Chashi (Padiglione della casa del tè sul lago). Questa struttura è posta su un piccolo lago ed esiste da oltre quattro secoli ma solo nel 1855 è stata convertita in casa del tè.

Molto particolare sono i due ponticelli a zig zag che si devono percorrere per raggiungerla.

Sono stati costruiti cosi per confondere gli spiriti maligni che, secono la tradizione cinese, procedono solo per linee rette.

Yuyuan Garden, Shanghai, China

Yuyuan Garden is a famous classical garden located in Anren Jie, Shanghai. It was established in 1577 by a government officer of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) named Pan Yunduan. Yu in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying and this garden was specially built for Pan's parents as a place for them to enjoy a tranquil and happy time in their old age.

In its 400 years existence, Yuyuan Garden had undergone many changes. During the late Ming Dynasty, it became dilapidated with the decline of Pan's family. In 1760, some rich merchants bought it and spent more than 20 years reconstructing the buildings. During the Opium War of the 19th century, it was severely damaged. The garden you see today is the result of a five year restoration project which began in 1956. It was open to the public in September, 1961.

Yuyuan Garden occupies an area of approximately five acres. However, the small size is not a representative of the attractions of the garden. The pavilions, halls, rockeries, ponds and cloisters all have unique characteristics. There are six main scenic areas here: Sansui Hall, Wanhua Chamber, Dianchun Hall, Huijing Hall, Yuhua Hall and the Inner Garden. Each area features several scenic spots within its borders.

Upon entering the garden, you will encounter a rockery, which is called the Great Rockery. With a height of 50 feet, it is the largest as well as the oldest rockery in the southern region of the Yangtze River. On the top of the rockery, you can get a bird's eye view of the garden. Cuixiu Hall sits at the foot of the rockery. It is a quiet and elegant place surrounded by old trees and beautiful flowers. Visitors will find curio shops in the Cuixiu Hall.

Sansui Hall was built in 1760 and was originally used to entertain guests. Later it became a place to hold ceremonies for the gentlemen and bookmen. With a height of 30 feet and featuring five halls, it is the largest and most commodious structure in the garden. The name Sansui is derived from the book History of the later Han Dynasty and means 'propitious' and 'lucky'.

Wandering in the area of Yule Pavilion and Wanhua Chamber, you will find pavilions, corridors, streams, courtyards as well as many other natural features. Wanhua Chamber is a delicately chased building surrounded by derious cloisters. Spring bamboos grow beside the cloisters. In front of Wanhua Chamber, there are two old trees. One is a maidenhair tree which is 70 feet tall. It is said that the tree was planted by the host of the garden 400 years ago.

The Dianchun Hall area is located east of Wanhua Chamber and includes Hexu Hall, Relic Hall, Ancient Well Pavilion and the Acting-and-Sing Stage. Dianchun Hall was once the headquarters of Xiaodao Hui, a revolted group who fought against the government of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) during 1853-1855. The coins made by Xiaodao Hui and the bulletins they proclaimed are currently displayed in the hall.

The true treasure of Yuyuan is the Exquisite Jade Rock. Located across from Yuhua Hall, it is one of the three famous rocks in the southern region of the Yangtze River. The other two are Duanyun Feng in Suzhou and Zhouyun Feng in Hangzhou. The rock is 10.8 feet in height and has 72 holes. What is interesting about this rock is that if you burn a joss stick just below the rock, the smoke will magically float out from all of the holes. Similarly, when you pour water into the rock from top, the water will flow out from each hole creating a spectacular sight to see. Pan Yunduan was very fond of the Exquisite Jade Rock, and he built Yuhua Hall facing the rock, so it was convenient to sit in the hall and admire it. The furnishings in the hall were made of top grade rosewood of the Ming Dynasty, appearing both natural and graceful.

The Inner Garden was a separate garden built in 1709, but is now a part of Yuyuan in the south. It is compact and exquisite, and the rocks, pavilions, ornamental ponds and flower walls offer some of the most attractive sceneries in Yuyuan.

  

Busy sidewalk at night crowded with people and parked scooters. Just outside Yuyuan Garden at Gate 2 corner of Fuyou and Danfeng roads

At Yu Yuan Garden,Shanghai,China.

I used Nikon Df and 50mmF1.8@F4.

Yuyuan Garden is a famous classical garden located in Anren Jie, Shanghai. It was finished in 1577 by a government officer of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) named Pan Yunduan. Yu in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying, and this garden was specially built for Pan's parents as a place for them to enjoy a tranquil and happy time in their old age.

 

In the 400 years of existence, Yuyuan Garden had undergone many changes. During the late Ming Dynasty, it became very dilapidated with the decline of Pan's family. In 1760, some rich merchants bought it and spent more than 20 years reconstructing the buildings. During the Opium War of the 19th century, it was severely damaged. The garden you see today is the result of a five year restoration project which began in 1956. It was open to the public in September, 1961.

I happened to catch this couple enjoying the trees, water, and rocks from a bridge near the Yule Xie.

[Shanghai, China] A narrow alley in the popular shopping center adjacent to the Yuyuan garden of Shanghai, with facades screaming of traditional Chinese architecture.

 

Check out my albums:

---------------------------------

• All my photos in Explore

Curated stream of my best photos

• My best selling photos

• All my photos used in book covers

  

Follow my photos in Facebook and Instagram

  

©2017 German Vogel - All rights reserved - No usage allowed in any form without the written consent of the photographer.

In the middle of YuYuan Gardens in Shanghai, lies a teahouse situated in the middle of a small lake or pond. In this one shot, you can see the ancient China architecture and the rising modern towering China Skyscraper at the back

 

Website | 500px | FaceBook | Getty | Instagram

  

Azrin Az© 2019. All Rights Reserved. The images posted are for your viewing pleasure, please do not copy, reproduce or publish without my consent permission.

Yuyuan garden, Shaghai / 上海豫园

Nine-bend bridge, Old Town, Shanghai China.

 

Jiuqu Qiao (the Nine-Bend Bridge) close to Yu Garden of Shanghai's old town. While this bridge only crosses a 30m (98.5 ft) lake, the bridge winds more than a 100m (328 ft) because of its nine twists.

The Yu Yuan Garden in Old Shanghai were within walking distance of our hotel, so we got there early to avoid the crowds.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuyuan_Gardenhttps://en.wikipedia.o...

Yuyuan Gardens old and new fusion of shopping experience..

 

Website | 500px | FaceBook | Getty | Instagram

  

Azrin Az© 2019. All Rights Reserved. The images posted are for your viewing pleasure, please do not copy, reproduce or publish without my consent permission.

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