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The single 2-seat A-10 on the north ramp at Edwards way back in 1996. I saw it again a few years later and it looked much nicer.

That's one of 2 T-46A Eaglets behind it.

  

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Fairchild YA-10B 73-1664 preserved outside the AFFTC Museum at EDwards AFB

Prototype YA-10B two seater version of the A-10A tankbuster. Only one was ever built, seen here preserved (in a loose sense of the word!) at Edwards AFB, Ca Aug 1992.

Fairchild YA10-B Thunderbolt II at the 1988 Edwards AFB Open Day

Unlike every other A-10 in existence, this one is a two-seater. Modified from an A-10A, this one was developed as a test platform for Night and Adverse Weather (N/AW).

Fairchild YA10-B Thunderbolt II at the 1988 Edwards AFB Open Day

A-10A 303FS/442FW 'KC' London International (YXU) - June 2nd 1995

 

The aircraft is the only two-seat A-10 made. The Y designation indicate the aircraft was a prototype. Fairchild Republic Company's two-place night/adverse weather A-10 began flight tests at Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB in May 1979. It was converted by Fairchild from one of six pre-production single place A-10s built in 1975. It was a two seat adverse-weather configuration. The pilot was assisted by a weapons office in the back seat. Key Features: Low altitude navigation; Accurate visual weapons delivery at night and in adverse weather; A-10 can deliver up to eight tons of ordnance per sortie to destroy enemy armor and to suppress hostile anti-aircraft missiles. (Text from sign at site.)

The aircraft is the only two-seat A-10 made. The Y designation indicate the aircraft was a prototype. Fairchild Republic Company's two-place night/adverse weather A-10 began flight tests at Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB in May 1979. It was converted by Fairchild from one of six pre-production single place A-10s built in 1975. It was a two seat adverse-weather configuration. The pilot was assisted by a weapons office in the back seat. Key Features: Low altitude navigation; Accurate visual weapons delivery at night and in adverse weather; A-10 can deliver up to eight tons of ordnance per sortie to destroy enemy armor and to suppress hostile anti-aircraft missiles. (Text from sign at site.)

The first preproduction A-10A (s/n 73-1664) was returned to the Republic factory in March 1979 for conversion to two-seat prototype. The modifications were redesignated as N/AW (Night/Adverse Weather) A-10.

A-10A 103FS/111FW 'PA' "The Black Hogs" London International (YXU) - June 6th 1997

  

A-10A 75FS/23FW 'FT' Toronto International (YYZ) - September 2nd 1995 'EL' was the old code for England AFB, but changed to 'FT' when the unit moved to Pope AFB

 

A-10A 357FS/355FW 'DM' Farnborough - September 1977

 

A-10A 18FS/343CW 'AK' at an unknown location - 1983

 

A-10A 75FS/23FW 'EL' London International (YXU) - May 31st 1991 'EL' was the code for England AFB, but changed to 'FT' when the unit moved to Pope AFB

 

A-10A 49FS/917FG 'BD' CFB Trenton - June 27th 1992

 

A-10A 172FS/110FW 'BC' London International (YXU) - June 6th 1997

 

Based on A-10A Thunderbolt II, the YA-10B is a two-seater version of A-10A. So as to improve the A-10A, Fairchild proposed a prototype of this two-seat Night/Adverse Weather (N/AW) version, including the modification of its night-vision avionics with mounted infrared/radar sensor pods, LN-39 inertial navigation system and AN/APN-194 radar. Maiden flight, aircraft serial 73-1664 (cn A10-0001), was made from Edwards AFB, Muroc, California, USA on May 4, 1979. However, due to the lack of funding, the project was scrapped.

Fairchild Republic YA-10B Thunderbolt II Prototype seen at the Air Force Flight Test Museum, Edwards AFB. The company proposal for a two-seat night/adverse weather configuration with a Weapons Officer in the back seat was not adopted by the USAF.

Fairchild Republic YA-10B Thunderbolt II Prototype seen at the Air Force Flight Test Museum, Edwards AFB. The company proposal for a two-seat night/adverse weather configuration with a Weapons Officer in the back seat was not adopted by the USAF.