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Started mounting some fenders on the E-Trailer, drove it around the block to test clearance. Still have additional brackets to mount, and some trimming of the fender's in the back. It's starting to look a little better.

This photo shows the first HHO Generator that I built to test various electrolyte solutions.,

 

I had to find what solution would keep on working flawlessly, and would not require constant maintenance of the HHO Generator.

 

The HHO generator would work great until the positive electrode would accumulate a brown oxide on it. Once it was coated completely, the electrolysis would stop, and no more HHO would be produced.

 

The first solution I tried was Baking Soda and Tap water. Unit quit working after a very short time period

 

The second solution, I tried was Baking Soda and Distilled water. Unit still quit working after a short time period.

 

The third solution, I tried in another HHO Generator was 5% White Distilled Vinegar. Unit still quit working, but worked for a longer time period. Until the unit over heated the vinegar, somehow turned it a deep purple, and quit working. There's a funny story behind this particular test....... I'll tell about it sometime later.

 

The forth solution, I tried and have continued to use is Citric Acid and Distilled Water. The photo above is the original HHO Generator I built and ran for 2 months with Citric Acid and Distilled water. There is no oxide on the electrodes , they are as clean, maybe cleaner than when I first purchased them.

 

I'll rebuild this HHO Generator, by adding various sizes of S/S fender washers on both electrodes, alternating sizes on each side, in order to obtain more surface area for electrolysis. The more HHO is generated the better the vehicle's MPG is, until you overload the ODBII's oxygen sensor and it starts to think it needs to richen the fuel mixture. This is easily overcome, so don't let that scare you.

 

I hope to install this rebuilt unit in my wife's car. The beta HHO unit given to me from a member of our North Texas Electric Auto Association (www.nteaa.org), is working great in my PTCruiser, using the Citric Acid & Distilled Water solution. I'll keep running it, as I'm impressed with it's output of HHO. The last tank of gasoline I went through, averaged 34mpg, which had my usual mix of city/highway driving during the work week. I seldom averaged 24mpg during this mix of mileage. I also run Marvel Mystery Oil in the gasoline, in every other tank, just to make sure the upper engine is kept well lubed. I've never heard of any problems, running HHO, but I feel better using the Marvel Mystery Oil, just for my peace of mind.

  

FREE, file on building your own at: smacksboosters.110mb.com/Smack.pdf

 

Photo of the initial installation of the golf cart batteries for the Electric Eclipse. The cables in the photo were some test cables I threw together to get the EV moving initially. They have all been replaced with welding cable. I've also replaced the SpeedEasy cap assemblies, with individual caps from US Battery.

  

Took the E-Trailer to Dallas, Texas today. Needing something to show at our Electric Auto Association meeting so I hitched it up.

 

We had two Electric FIero's , one Pb/acid and the othe LiFePO4 powered, along with an Electric Sparrow, 2 scooters, as well as my E-Trailer. I was standing between the Pb/acid Fiero and my PT when taking this photo, so unfortunately it doesn't have the nice Pb/acid Fiero conversion in the photo.

 

This meeting was by far the largest we've had so far. 45+ people filled the small restaurant that hosted the club meeting today.

Started mounting some fenders on the E-Trailer, drove it around the block to test clearance. Still have additional brackets to mount, and some trimming of the fender's in the back. It's starting to look a little better.

NTEAA Member's, Electric Corbin Sparrow.

Since we're on the subject of a pusher trailer, get a kick out of this one from WAY Back in time.

Started mounting some fenders on the E-Trailer, drove it around the block to test clearance. Still have additional brackets to mount, and some trimming of the fender's in the back. It's starting to look a little better.

Just another view of the first Lithium module after being built.

OK, You have to love "Gorilla Tape" after you see this contraption.

 

I had been wondering what to do with the electric golf bag caddy that was given to me. Well I had this push rotary mower in the shed, so I thought ????

 

A few rounds of "Gorilla Tape" and behold an electric rotary mower. The crazy thing is, it actually works!

 

Next, I'll have to get out the ol' HackSaw, and build it into a more pleasant looking EV conversion.

Inside view of the very simple solar water heater. It's merely a standard water tank heater, with the outside casing/insulation removed. The silver reflective material directs the sunlight into the tank that has been painted black to absorb the heat.

Electric Eclipse, in Print........................I Wish! :-)

Holes are marked, ready to be drilled for the battery terminal clips.

OK, I know it's not fancy, but I used a coil of wire to at least load test each cell, to verify that they would not drop to zip under even a small load.

 

The extension cord have me a range of 12 to 14 amp load per cell.

 

All held up nicely, even though the cells ship from the factory without a full charge..

PlugIn LiFePO4 modules built up with coroplast on each side of each module for airflow.

 

They will be plugged into the backplane like shown, even with the additional coroplast separators, you can see between each module in the photo.

 

They are stacked with opposing terminals, jumpered in series for verification of the curent voltage of the pack.

 

This 12volt AUX battery will be rated at 40Ah, 40amp continuous, 440amp burst.

 

The kids of the North American Solar Challenge really inspired me to make the E-Riding Mower, solar powered.

 

The two large Panels are wired in series for aprox 44vdc (OCV) to charge the 36volt mower's traction pack. The smaller panel will be used to charge the Electric WeedEater.

 

Please check out the photos/videos from the 2008 North American Solar Challenge, and the official website at: www.americansolarchallenge.org

 

BEQ1 - LiFePO4 Battery Equalizers

 

www.HotJuiceElectric.com

 

Beta testing the newly developed equalizers on 4ea LiFePO4 cells provided by www.LionEV.com sent to Hot Juice Electric by me from: www.TexomaEV.com

 

Date: Tue, April 25, 2008

The parts to modify the BEQ1's for LiFePO4 prototypes arrived yesterday evening and I completed a set for the test pack. I even managed a preliminary test that yielded very positive results! This weekend will be very busy with testing and hopefully, completion of a beta design solution to solve this issue, of balancing a LiFePO4 traction pack.

 

Date: Tue, April 28, 2008

Mike and all,

 

It was, indeed a very busy weekend! There was more work involved than

I expected, including having to add a few parts to slow the regulators

response. It turns out the change of current near the "full" part of a

charge cycle is so sharp it would set up an oscillation with adjacent

cell/regulator pairs. Most of the weekend was spent fine tuning the

response until it was perfectly stable. I managed to perform 5 discharge

/ charge cycles and all worked great.

 

Cell #3 in this test pack is definitely bad, which makes discharge

testing a bit cumbersome, but it is great for testing the regulators. For

example, it is interesting, how the regulator on the bad #3 cell turns

on immediately as soon as charging starts. Then, as the other cells

approach the "full" knee of their charge curve, the #3 cell regulator

shuts off since #3 is still not "full". Finally, all of the regulators

are "on" indicating all cells are charged. This means that even though

cell #3 is bad, its regulator protects it against further damage while

the other cells are charging at a much higher rate.

 

I still have at least one charge test before concluding the design is

ready. I expect to do that this (Monday) evening. The test is a high

(>20 Amp) charge rate.

 

More to come…

 

Date: Tue, April 29, 2008

Last evenings test was a high current charge to see how the regulators handled the current, specifically with the bad #3 cell. The test went great although the pack would not draw more than 8 amps at 14.8 volts. Another test was to parallel two regulators across the bad cell to see if they would share the current evenly when the charge current was pushed up to 10 amps (about 15.8 volts). With 15.8 volts at the power supply, all regulators were on and no cell was over 3.7 volts, including the bad one. (The remaining 1 volt was voltage drop across the leads).

 

I am very pleased with the results. I think we are ready to make plans for putting them into operational tests. I plan to design a footprint to house 4 regulators in one slim package with the same or similar dimensions as a "pop tart" cell. It would have the terminals on the top edge to match the orientation of the cell terminals. I would also like to add signaling terminals that could be connected to a relay, light, etc. to indicate full charge, and fault conditions. At this point, however, I think it might be best to proceed with the original BEQ1 format as operational test subjects. That would get regulation in place faster and would insure the design is operationally sound before proceeding to a finalized product.

 

NOTE: The 4cells I built up for HotJuiceElectric, were of some I had left over from another build. I looked back, and noticed that one of the cells was part of a pack, I had originally used for demonstration purposes, yet it wasn't abused that I know of, but I suspect it is the cell that is bad in this original test pack..... Mike/TexomaEV

Both the +/- cables have been bolted in place, a fiberglass fish paper separator/stiffener extends up between the two cables for a couple of inches, along with insulated tape to keep the two from shorting.

2nd LiFePo4 module has been installed on the adjacent 6 volt golf cart battery. The Paktrakr monitoring device looks at these two as a single 12volt battery. I'll monitor how they perform, compared to the remaining golf cart batteries that don't have LiFePo4 modules on them. I'll eventually have at least 4ea LiFePo4 modules installed so that I can compare any differences between the 4 cells.

 

Note: The 6.94vdc you see on the meter is with the charger on. The charger has been cycling on/off with both periods being around 10 to 15minutes, now for over 24hrs.

 

-Added to theCream of the Crop pool as most interesting.

 

Photo of the LiFePO4 Cells, installed in the front compartment of the Electric Fiero. There is a total of 16ea up front.

BEQ1 - LiFePO4 Battery Equalizers

 

www.HotJuiceElectric.com

 

Beta testing the newly developed equalizers on 4ea LiFePO4 cells provided by www.LionEV.com sent to Hot Juice Electric by me from: www.TexomaEV.com

 

Date: Tue, April 25, 2008

The parts to modify the BEQ1's for LiFePO4 prototypes arrived yesterday evening and I completed a set for the test pack. I even managed a preliminary test that yielded very positive results! This weekend will be very busy with testing and hopefully, completion of a beta design solution to solve this issue, of balancing a LiFePO4 traction pack.

 

Date: Tue, April 28, 2008

Mike and all,

 

It was, indeed a very busy weekend! There was more work involved than

I expected, including having to add a few parts to slow the regulators

response. It turns out the change of current near the "full" part of a

charge cycle is so sharp it would set up an oscillation with adjacent

cell/regulator pairs. Most of the weekend was spent fine tuning the

response until it was perfectly stable. I managed to perform 5 discharge

/ charge cycles and all worked great.

 

Cell #3 in this test pack is definitely bad, which makes discharge

testing a bit cumbersome, but it is great for testing the regulators. For

example, it is interesting, how the regulator on the bad #3 cell turns

on immediately as soon as charging starts. Then, as the other cells

approach the "full" knee of their charge curve, the #3 cell regulator

shuts off since #3 is still not "full". Finally, all of the regulators

are "on" indicating all cells are charged. This means that even though

cell #3 is bad, its regulator protects it against further damage while

the other cells are charging at a much higher rate.

 

I still have at least one charge test before concluding the design is

ready. I expect to do that this (Monday) evening. The test is a high

(>20 Amp) charge rate.

 

More to come…

 

Date: Tue, April 29, 2008

Last evenings test was a high current charge to see how the regulators handled the current, specifically with the bad #3 cell. The test went great although the pack would not draw more than 8 amps at 14.8 volts. Another test was to parallel two regulators across the bad cell to see if they would share the current evenly when the charge current was pushed up to 10 amps (about 15.8 volts). With 15.8 volts at the power supply, all regulators were on and no cell was over 3.7 volts, including the bad one. (The remaining 1 volt was voltage drop across the leads).

 

I am very pleased with the results. I think we are ready to make plans for putting them into operational tests. I plan to design a footprint to house 4 regulators in one slim package with the same or similar dimensions as a "pop tart" cell. It would have the terminals on the top edge to match the orientation of the cell terminals. I would also like to add signaling terminals that could be connected to a relay, light, etc. to indicate full charge, and fault conditions. At this point, however, I think it might be best to proceed with the original BEQ1 format as operational test subjects. That would get regulation in place faster and would insure the design is operationally sound before proceeding to a finalized product.

 

NOTE: The 4cells I built up for HotJuiceElectric, were of some I had left over from another build. I looked back, and noticed that one of the cells was part of a pack, I had originally used for demonstration purposes, yet it wasn't abused that I know of, but I suspect it is the cell that is bad in this original test pack..... Mike/TexomaEV

These students, jumped on this project, and finished building the metal framework in 1.5hrs. Earlier students had built the motor coupler and battery tray. I'd say it took the class a total of 4 maybe 5 hrs to complete the mechanical portion of the project.

BEQ1 - LiFePO4 Battery Equalizers

 

www.HotJuiceElectric.com

 

Beta testing the newly developed equalizers on 4ea LiFePO4 cells provided by www.LionEV.com sent to Hot Juice Electric by me from: www.TexomaEV.com

 

Words of Wisdom from Hot Juice Electric below:

Date: Tue, April 25, 2008

The parts to modify the BEQ1's for LiFePO4 prototypes arrived yesterday evening and I completed a set for the test pack. I even managed a preliminary test that yielded very positive results! This weekend will be very busy with testing and hopefully, completion of a beta design solution to solve this issue, of balancing a LiFePO4 traction pack.

 

Date: Tue, April 28, 2008

Mike and all,

 

It was, indeed a very busy weekend! There was more work involved than

I expected, including having to add a few parts to slow the regulators

response. It turns out the change of current near the "full" part of a

charge cycle is so sharp it would set up an oscillation with adjacent

cell/regulator pairs. Most of the weekend was spent fine tuning the

response until it was perfectly stable. I managed to perform 5 discharge

/ charge cycles and all worked great.

 

Cell #3 in this test pack is definitely bad, which makes discharge

testing a bit cumbersome, but it is great for testing the regulators. For

example, it is interesting, how the regulator on the bad #3 cell turns

on immediately as soon as charging starts. Then, as the other cells

approach the "full" knee of their charge curve, the #3 cell regulator

shuts off since #3 is still not "full". Finally, all of the regulators

are "on" indicating all cells are charged. This means that even though

cell #3 is bad, its regulator protects it against further damage while

the other cells are charging at a much higher rate.

 

I still have at least one charge test before concluding the design is

ready. I expect to do that this (Monday) evening. The test is a high

(>20 Amp) charge rate.

 

More to come…

 

Date: Tue, April 29, 2008

Last evenings test was a high current charge to see how the regulators handled the current, specifically with the bad #3 cell. The test went great although the pack would not draw more than 8 amps at 14.8 volts. Another test was to parallel two regulators across the bad cell to see if they would share the current evenly when the charge current was pushed up to 10 amps (about 15.8 volts). With 15.8 volts at the power supply, all regulators were on and no cell was over 3.7 volts, including the bad one. (The remaining 1 volt was voltage drop across the leads).

 

I am very pleased with the results. I think we are ready to make plans for putting them into operational tests. I plan to design a footprint to house 4 regulators in one slim package with the same or similar dimensions as a "pop tart" cell. It would have the terminals on the top edge to match the orientation of the cell terminals. I would also like to add signaling terminals that could be connected to a relay, light, etc. to indicate full charge, and fault conditions. At this point, however, I think it might be best to proceed with the original BEQ1 format as operational test subjects. That would get regulation in place faster and would insure the design is operationally sound before proceeding to a finalized product.

 

NOTE: The 4cells I built up for HotJuiceElectric, were of some I had left over from another build. I looked back, and noticed that one of the cells was part of a pack, I had originally used for demonstration purposes, yet it wasn't abused that I know of, but I suspect it is the cell that is bad in this original test pack..... Mike/TexomaEV

Photo of the 16ea, LiFePO4 cells, installed in the Electric Fiero. Just waiting now on the Hot Juice Electric regulators, so they can be charged.

KXII, Channel 12 was nice enough to come out and interview myself, and Ram, a fellow NTEAA member, with regards to the Electric Riding Mower, and the Jalon Scooter.

 

www.kxii.com/home/headlines/25671884.html

These students, jumped on this project, and finished building the metal framework in 1.5hrs. Earlier students had built the motor coupler and battery tray. I'd say it took the class a total of 4 maybe 5 hrs to complete the mechanical portion of the project.

Will build up 4ea of these modules for a 12volt battery pack. The connection terminals are solid copper tabs, with one on each side of the module, using a total of 4 tabs to make the +/- battery terminals. These tabs will insert into a socket, something like your house breakers snap into.

BEQ1 - LiFePO4 Battery Equalizers

 

www.HotJuiceElectric.com

 

Beta testing the newly developed equalizers on 4ea LiFePO4 cells provided by www.LionEV.com sent to Hot Juice Electric by me from: www.TexomaEV.com

 

Date: Tue, April 25, 2008

The parts to modify the BEQ1's for LiFePO4 prototypes arrived yesterday evening and I completed a set for the test pack. I even managed a preliminary test that yielded very positive results! This weekend will be very busy with testing and hopefully, completion of a beta design solution to solve this issue, of balancing a LiFePO4 traction pack.

 

Date: Tue, April 28, 2008

Mike and all,

 

It was, indeed a very busy weekend! There was more work involved than

I expected, including having to add a few parts to slow the regulators

response. It turns out the change of current near the "full" part of a

charge cycle is so sharp it would set up an oscillation with adjacent

cell/regulator pairs. Most of the weekend was spent fine tuning the

response until it was perfectly stable. I managed to perform 5 discharge

/ charge cycles and all worked great.

 

Cell #3 in this test pack is definitely bad, which makes discharge

testing a bit cumbersome, but it is great for testing the regulators. For

example, it is interesting, how the regulator on the bad #3 cell turns

on immediately as soon as charging starts. Then, as the other cells

approach the "full" knee of their charge curve, the #3 cell regulator

shuts off since #3 is still not "full". Finally, all of the regulators

are "on" indicating all cells are charged. This means that even though

cell #3 is bad, its regulator protects it against further damage while

the other cells are charging at a much higher rate.

 

I still have at least one charge test before concluding the design is

ready. I expect to do that this (Monday) evening. The test is a high

(>20 Amp) charge rate.

 

More to come…

 

Date: Tue, April 29, 2008

Last evenings test was a high current charge to see how the regulators handled the current, specifically with the bad #3 cell. The test went great although the pack would not draw more than 8 amps at 14.8 volts. Another test was to parallel two regulators across the bad cell to see if they would share the current evenly when the charge current was pushed up to 10 amps (about 15.8 volts). With 15.8 volts at the power supply, all regulators were on and no cell was over 3.7 volts, including the bad one. (The remaining 1 volt was voltage drop across the leads).

 

I am very pleased with the results. I think we are ready to make plans for putting them into operational tests. I plan to design a footprint to house 4 regulators in one slim package with the same or similar dimensions as a "pop tart" cell. It would have the terminals on the top edge to match the orientation of the cell terminals. I would also like to add signaling terminals that could be connected to a relay, light, etc. to indicate full charge, and fault conditions. At this point, however, I think it might be best to proceed with the original BEQ1 format as operational test subjects. That would get regulation in place faster and would insure the design is operationally sound before proceeding to a finalized product.

 

NOTE: The 4cells I built up for HotJuiceElectric, were of some I had left over from another build. I looked back, and noticed that one of the cells was part of a pack, I had originally used for demonstration purposes, yet it wasn't abused that I know of, but I suspect it is the cell that is bad in this original test pack..... Mike/TexomaEV

This is just to funny not to post. I am a big fan of "Gorilla Tape" , therefore using a few rounds of it, I put together the beginning's of an Electric Rotary Mower. This video should make you chuckle....

I've temporarily attached a tow bar to the differential, I'll be using in the Electric Pusher Trailer. This will allow me to get started on the build.

 

The electric motor to be used is sitting there for reference..

 

The motor will point towards the front of the trailer.

The four 100Ah test cells arrived Friday.

 

Test results are very encouraging!

First test was to assemble the cells into a pack and install the

BEQ1's on the cells. Then to charge the pack at 20 Amps to see if

the BEQ1's would be overwhelmed. The results: By the time the

first BEQ1 lit, the charge current was down to 8 Amps and dropped

in steps as each cell filled and its BEQ1 lit. The cells all

filled within one minute of each other. No cell ever exceeded 3.8

volts, including the first to finish even though the charge current

was still at 8 amps.

 

The next step was to discharge the cells at an uneven rate. First

I applied a 300 Amp load across the whole pack. Just to test the

pack performance I turned the amps up to 450 for a few seconds.

The pack handled it great, still holding the voltage above 12

volts. Next I applied a 20 Amp load across one cell to unbalance

the pack. After a few minutes, I put the pack back on charge at 20

amps. As expected, the three cells that did not receive the 20 Amp

load filled first lighting their BEQ1's. The voltage across the

three full cells still did not exceed 3.8 Volts while the last one

caught up which took about 10 minutes. When finished, all cells

were at 3.67 Volts with a remaining 2.5 Amps charge current.

 

Thanks for everyone’s patience! We are getting there!

 

Ken Thomas

Hot Juice Electric LLC

  

Ken from Hot Juice Electric says:

 

I decided to do an unusual test. I temporarily installed the test 100 Ah LiFePO4 12 volt battery in place of Tweety’s #10 Odyssey battery. The idea is to test the BEQ1’s ability to keep the LiFePO4 cells within

their voltage limits in an extremely unbalanced pack. The lithium

battery is mixed into a pack of AGM’s – not as buddy pairs, but in

series. This test includes variables in chemistry, voltage and

charge curves.

 

First I discharged the pack enough to get some good charging data.

During bulk charge, the voltage across the lithium battery held

steady at 13.4 volts while the AGM’s were around 14.2 volts. As

the Link 10 approached 100% or 0 Ah, the lithium cells abruptly lit

three of their regulators. The third regulator lit about three

minutes later. At that time the voltage across the lithium battery

was 14.8 volts and the voltage across the AGM’s was 14.7.

Eventually, the Zivan entered the pulse phase. Within about 20

minutes, the AGM’s were cycling their BEQ1’s with each pulse. The

voltage across them was following the pulse between 14.8 and 15.6

volts. The lithium battery did not cycle at all. The regulators

were lit solid and held a constant 14.8 volts across the 4 cells.

All of the cells were even at 3.7 volts. The lithium regulators

were working pretty hard but never were overwhelmed. Their

temperature reached 140 degrees Fahrenheit. There was still quite

a bit of hea

droom since the regulators top temperature limit is 100 C or 212

Fahrenheit.

 

I am very pleased with this test. All of the batteries in the

series were “happy” even though they were charged in series with

very different batteries with very different characteristics, and a

battery charger with an inappropriate profile for the lithium.

 

It’s looking pretty good.

Ken Thomas

 

Jerry, the machinist, I must say, out did himself on this one. He took the sprocket from the motor shaft, turned it down to where he could press fit onto it the shaft extension he made.

 

Then he welded the shaft extension and old sprocket together as one, and turned it down to balance them out.

 

He then cut/threaded set screws in the coupler, and even drilled small spots in the motor shaft for the set screws to bottom out into. This will keep the extension shaft from sliding down and off the original motor shaft.

 

He took it another step further, and milled out the inside of the shaft extension to match the varied motor shaft diameter on the end where the keyway and threads for the original golf cart sprocket was retained, making the extension shaft a very close/tight fit, with absolutely no play at all.

 

Of course he drilled and tapped the other end of the extension shaft, for the retaining bolt to hold the double pulley onto the newly built shaft.

No more GAS for this car!!!!

Terminals of the DC motor used in the Mitsubishi Eclipse.

Finished and Installed battery rack, with traction batteries in place.

Motor controller, with 3ea, Pentium4 heaksink/fans for coolling.

FlexPack Cell #2 of 4 , showing voltage reading across the BEQ1.

 

Mike,

 

The pristine cells arrived slightly bent. I straightened them out,

but you can still see the artifacts of the bends. I suspect

bending the flex packs is not a good thing! That may be why they

seem to have a higher fail rate from the "rigid" cells. Just a

thought.

 

The first charging balance with regulators test was a complete

success. As suspected, none of the cells "finished" at the same

time. To exaggerate the test, I used a 60 amp charger with

relatively poor regulation. Max current was just under 10 amps.

The current stepped down as each cell filled and its regulator lit.

The final current was 50 milliamps. The attached pics show the

voltage results of each cell at the end of charging. I also

included a picture of the charger and dummy load.

 

The dummy load is designed for a whole traction pack, so at 12

volts it only draws 5 Amps, but that is a good test current for

these cells.

 

It does appear that one of the cells is compromised, compared to

the other three. It's voltage with the 5 amp discharge immediately

drops to 2.8 volts. The other three sits at 3.1 volts and did not

change for the full one hour test. The low one also did not

change. Also, when put back on charge, the low cell immediately

goes high, as if "full". The rest of the cells start at 3.5 volts

and sits there until full then goes to 3.66 volts (regulator limit).

 

The placement of the cells in the pack makes no difference. When

rearranged, the characteristic of each cell does not change. It

remains the same regardless of its position in the string. That,

of course, was the intent of the test.

 

I guess the next test should be with actual traction pack cells.

If Ken Curry could send me a set of them, and we get the same

results, I will feel confident that we will be ready for actual

vehicle testing.

 

Regards,

 

Ken Thomas

 

North American Solar Challenge - Show-n-Tell at the kickoff point in Plano, Texas.

Looking at this meter for the E-Riding Mower.

 

I'm thinking it will be safer to watch this while mowing, to keep from over discharging the battery pack.

 

It's only around $15 plus shipping on Ebay.

Filmed as the Solar Car passed through Calera, Oklahoma. Please feel free to comment on what vehicle this was, and any specifics as well.

North American Solar Challenge - Show-n-Tell at the kickoff point in Plano, Texas.

Was given this self propelled golf bag, thingy this weekend. Works great, pondering on what to make out of it.

North American Solar Challenge - Show-n-Tell at the kickoff point in Plano, Texas.

Filmed as the Solar Car passed through Calera, Oklahoma. Please feel free to comment on what vehicle this was, and any specifics as well.

Was given this self propelled golf bag, thingy this weekend. Works great, pondering on what to make out of it.

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