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Information from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Cod

 

Cape Cod

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This article is about the area of Massachusetts. For other uses, see Cape Cod (disambiguation).

For other uses, see Cod (disambiguation).

 

Coordinates: 41°41′20″N 70°17′49″W / 41.68889°N 70.29694°W / 41.68889; -70.29694

Map of Massachusetts, with Cape Cod (Barnstable County) indicated in red

Dunes on Sandy Neck are part of the Cape's barrier beach which helps to prevent erosion

 

Cape Cod, often referred to locally as simply the Cape, is an island and a cape in the easternmost portion of the state of Massachusetts, in the Northeastern United States. It is coextensive with Barnstable County. Several small islands right off Cape Cod, including Monomoy Island, Monomoscoy Island, Popponesset Island, and Seconsett Island, are also in Barnstable County, being part of municipalities with land on the Cape. The Cape's small-town character and large beachfront attract heavy tourism during the summer months.

 

Cape Cod was formed as the terminal moraine of a glacier, resulting in a peninsula in the Atlantic Ocean. In 1914, the Cape Cod Canal was cut through the base or isthmus of the peninsula, forming an island. The Cape Cod Commission refers to the resultant landmass as an island; as does the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in regards to disaster preparedness.[1] It is still identified as a peninsula by geographers, who do not change landform designations based on man-made canal construction.[citation needed]

 

Unofficially, it is one of the biggest barrier islands in the world, shielding much of the Massachusetts coastline from North Atlantic storm waves. This protection helps to erode the Cape shoreline at the expense of cliffs, while protecting towns from Fairhaven to Marshfield.

 

Road vehicles from the mainland cross over the Cape Cod Canal via the Sagamore Bridge and the Bourne Bridge. The two bridges are parallel, with the Bourne Bridge located slightly farther southwest. In addition, the Cape Cod Canal Railroad Bridge carries railway freight as well as tourist passenger services.

Contents

[hide]

 

* 1 Geography and political divisions

o 1.1 "Upper" and "Lower"

* 2 Geology

* 3 Climate

* 4 Native population

* 5 History

* 6 Lighthouses of Cape Cod

* 7 Transportation

o 7.1 Bus

o 7.2 Rail

o 7.3 Taxi

* 8 Tourism

* 9 Sport fishing

* 10 Sports

* 11 Education

* 12 Islands off Cape Cod

* 13 See also

* 14 References

o 14.1 Notes

o 14.2 Sources

o 14.3 Further reading

* 15 External links

 

[edit] Geography and political divisions

Towns of Barnstable County

historical map of 1890

 

The highest elevation on Cape Cod is 306 feet (93 m), at the top of Pine Hill, in the Bourne portion of the Massachusetts Military Reservation. The lowest point is sea level.

 

The body of water located between Cape Cod and the mainland, bordered to the north by Massachusetts Bay, is Cape Cod Bay; west of Cape Cod is Buzzards Bay. The Cape Cod Canal, completed in 1916, connects Buzzards Bay to Cape Cod Bay; it shortened the trade route between New York and Boston by 62 miles.[2] To the south of Cape Cod lie Nantucket Sound; Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard, both large islands, and the mostly privately owned Elizabeth Islands.

 

Cape Cod incorporates all of Barnstable County, which comprises 15 towns: Bourne, Sandwich, Falmouth, and Mashpee, Barnstable, Yarmouth, Dennis, Harwich, Brewster, Chatham, Orleans, Eastham, Wellfleet, Truro, and Provincetown. Two of the county's fifteen towns (Bourne and Sandwich) include land on the mainland side of the Cape Cod Canal. The towns of Plymouth and Wareham, in adjacent Plymouth County, are sometimes considered to be part of Cape Cod but are not located on the island.

 

In the 17th century the designation Cape Cod applied only to the tip of the peninsula, essentially present-day Provincetown. Over the ensuing decades, the name came to mean all the land east of the Manomet and Scussett rivers - essentially the line of the 20th century Cape Cod Canal. Now, the complete towns of Bourne and Sandwich are widely considered to incorporate the full perimeter of Cape Cod, even though small parts of these towns are located on the west side of the canal. The canal divides the largest part of the peninsula from the mainland and the resultant landmass is sometimes referred to as an island.[3][4] Additionally some "Cape Codders" – residents of "The Cape" – refer to all land on the mainland side of the canal as "off-Cape."

 

For most of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, Cape Cod was considered to consist of three sections:

 

* The Upper Cape is the part of Cape Cod closest to the mainland, comprising the towns of Bourne, Sandwich, Falmouth, and Mashpee. Falmouth is the home of the famous Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and several other research organizations, and is also the most-used ferry connection to Martha's Vineyard. Falmouth is composed of several separate villages, including East Falmouth, Falmouth Village, Hatchville, North Falmouth, Teaticket, Waquoit, West Falmouth, and Woods Hole, as well as several smaller hamlets that are incorporated into their larger neighbors (e.g., Davisville, Falmouth Heights, Quissett, Sippewissett, and others).[5]

 

* The Mid-Cape includes the towns of Barnstable, Yarmouth and Dennis. The Mid-Cape area features many beautiful beaches, including warm-water beaches along Nantucket Sound, e.g., Kalmus Beach in Hyannis, which gets its name from one of the inventors of Technicolor, Herbert Kalmus. This popular windsurfing destination was bequeathed to the town of Barnstable by Dr. Kalmus on condition that it not be developed, possibly one of the first instances of open-space preservation in the US. The Mid-Cape is also the commercial and industrial center of the region. There are seven villages in Barnstable, including Barnstable Village, Centerville, Cotuit, Hyannis, Marstons Mills, Osterville, and West Barnstable, as well as several smaller hamlets that are incorporated into their larger neighbors (e.g., Craigville, Cummaquid, Hyannisport, Santuit, Wianno, and others).[6] There are three villages in Yarmouth: South Yarmouth, West Yarmouth and Yarmouthport. There are five villages in Dennis including, Dennis Village(North Dennis), East Dennis, West Dennis, South Dennis and Dennisport.[7]

 

* The Lower Cape traditionally included all of the rest of the Cape,or the towns of Harwich, Brewster, Chatham, Orleans, Eastham, Wellfleet, Truro, and Provincetown. This area includes the Cape Cod National Seashore, a national park comprising much of the outer Cape, including the entire east-facing coast, and is home to some of the most popular beaches in America, such as Coast Guard Beach and Nauset Light Beach in Eastham. Stephen Leatherman, aka "Dr. Beach", named Coast Guard Beach the 5th best beach in America for 2007.[8]

 

[edit] "Upper" and "Lower"

 

The terms "Upper" and "Lower" as applied to the Cape have nothing to do with north and south. Instead, they derive from maritime convention at the time when the principal means of transportation involved watercraft, and the prevailing westerly winds meant that a boat with sails traveling northeast in Cape Cod Bay would have the wind at its back and thus be going downwind, while a craft sailing southwest would be going against the wind, or upwind.[9] Similarly, on nearby Martha's Vineyard, "Up Island" still is the western section and "Down Island" is to the east, and in Maine, "Down East" is similarly defined by the winds and currents.

 

Over time, the reasons for the traditional nomenclature became unfamiliar and their meaning obscure. Late in the 1900s, new arrivals began calling towns from Eastham to Provincetown the "Outer Cape", yet another geographic descriptor which is still in use, as is the "Inner Cape."

[edit] Geology

Cape Cod and Cape Cod Bay from space.[10]

 

East of America, there stands in the open Atlantic the last fragment of an ancient and vanished land. Worn by the breakers and the rains, and disintegrated by the wind, it still stands bold.

Henry Beston, The Outermost House

 

Cape Cod forms a continuous archipelagic region with a thin line of islands stretching toward New York, historically known by naturalists as the Outer Lands. This continuity is due to the fact that the islands and Cape are all terminal glacial moraines laid down some 16,000 to 20,000 years ago.

 

Most of Cape Cod's geological history involves the advance and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet in the late Pleistocene geological era and the subsequent changes in sea level. Using radiocarbon dating techniques, researchers have determined that around 23,000 years ago, the ice sheet reached its maximum southward advance over North America, and then started to retreat. Many "kettle ponds" — clear, cold lakes — were formed and remain on Cape Cod as a result of the receding glacier. By about 18,000 years ago, the ice sheet had retreated past Cape Cod. By roughly 15,000 years ago, it had retreated past southern New England. When so much of Earth's water was locked up in massive ice sheets, the sea level was lower. Truro's bayside beaches used to be a petrified forest, before it became a beach.

 

As the ice began to melt, the sea began to rise. Initially, sea level rose quickly, about 15 meters (50 ft) per 1,000 years, but then the rate declined. On Cape Cod, sea level rose roughly 3 meters (11 ft) per millennium between 6,000 and 2,000 years ago. After that, it continued to rise at about 1 meter (3 ft) per millennium. By 6,000 years ago, the sea level was high enough to start eroding the glacial deposits that the vanished continental ice sheet had left on Cape Cod. The water transported the eroded deposits north and south along the outer Cape's shoreline. Those reworked sediments that moved north went to the tip of Cape Cod.

 

Provincetown Spit, at the northern end of the Cape, consists largely of marine deposits, transported from farther up the shore. Sediments that moved south created the islands and shoals of Monomoy. So while other parts of the Cape have dwindled from the action of the waves, these parts of the Cape have grown.

Cape Cod National Seashore

 

This process continues today. Due to their position jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean, the Cape and islands are subject to massive coastal erosion. Geologists say that, due to erosion, the Cape will be completely submerged by the sea in thousands of years.[11] This erosion causes the washout of beaches and the destruction of the barrier islands; for example, the ocean broke through the barrier island at Chatham during Hurricane Bob in 1991, allowing waves and storm surges to hit the coast with no obstruction. Consequently, the sediment and sand from the beaches is being washed away and deposited elsewhere. While this destroys land in some places, it creates land elsewhere, most noticeably in marshes where sediment is deposited by waters running through them.

[edit] Climate

 

Although Cape Cod's weather[12] is typically more moderate than inland locations, there have been occasions where Cape Cod has dealt with the brunt of extreme weather situations (such as the Blizzard of 1954 and Hurricane of 1938). Because of the influence of the Atlantic Ocean, temperatures are typically a few degrees cooler in the summer and a few degrees warmer in the winter. A common misconception is that the climate is influenced largely by the warm Gulf Stream current, however that current turns eastward off the coast of Virginia and the waters off the Cape are more influenced by the cold Canadian Labrador Current. As a result, the ocean temperature rarely gets above 65 °F (18 °C), except along the shallow west coast of the Upper Cape.

 

The Cape's climate is also notorious for a delayed spring season, being surrounded by an ocean which is still cold from the winter; however, it is also known for an exceptionally mild fall season (Indian summer), thanks to the ocean remaining warm from the summer. The highest temperature ever recorded on Cape Cod was 104 °F (40 °C) in Provincetown[13], and the lowest temperature ever was −12 °F (−24.4 °C) in Barnstable.[14]

 

The water surrounding Cape Cod moderates winter temperatures enough to extend the USDA hardiness zone 7a to its northernmost limit in eastern North America.[15] Even though zone 7a (annual low = 0–5 degrees Fahrenheit) signifies no sub-zero temperatures annually, there have been several instances of temperatures reaching a few degrees below zero across the Cape (although it is rare, usually 1–5 times a year, typically depending on locale, sometimes not at all). Consequently, many plant species typically found in more southerly latitudes grow there, including Camellias, Ilex opaca, Magnolia grandiflora and Albizia julibrissin.

 

Precipitation on Cape Cod and the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket is the lowest in the New England region, averaging slightly less than 40 inches (1,000 mm) a year (most parts of New England average 42–46 inches). This is due to storm systems which move across western areas, building up in mountainous regions, and dissipating before reaching the coast where the land has leveled out. The region does not experience a greater number of sunny days however, as the number of cloudy days is the same as inland locales, in addition to increased fog. Snowfall is annual, but a lot less common than the rest of Massachusetts. On average, 30 inches of snow, which is a foot less than Boston, falls in an average winter. Snow is usually light, and comes in squalls on cold days. Storms that bring blizzard conditions and snow emergencies to the mainland, bring devastating ice storms or just heavy rains more frequently than large snow storms.

[hide]Climate data for Cape Cod

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Average high °C (°F) 2.06

(35.7) 2.5

(36.5) 6.22

(43.2) 11.72

(53.1) 16.94

(62.5) 23.5

(74.3) 26.39

(79.5) 26.67

(80.0) 25.06

(77.1) 18.39

(65.1) 12.56

(54.6) 5.44

(41.8) 26.67

(80.0)

Average low °C (°F) -5.33

(22.4) -5

(23.0) -1.33

(29.6) 2.72

(36.9) 8.72

(47.7) 14.61

(58.3) 19.22

(66.6) 20.28

(68.5) 15.56

(60.0) 9.94

(49.9) 3.94

(39.1) -2.22

(28.0) -5.33

(22.4)

Precipitation mm (inches) 98

(3.86) 75.4

(2.97) 95

(3.74) 92.5

(3.64) 83.6

(3.29) 76.7

(3.02) 62.2

(2.45) 65

(2.56) 74.7

(2.94) 84.8

(3.34) 90.7

(3.57) 92.7

(3.65) 990.9

(39.01)

Source: World Meteorological Organisation (United Nations) [16]

[edit] Native population

 

Cape Cod has been the home of the Wampanoag tribe of Native American people for many centuries. They survived off the sea and were accomplished farmers. They understood the principles of sustainable forest management, and were known to light controlled fires to keep the underbrush in check. They helped the Pilgrims, who arrived in the fall of 1620, survive at their new Plymouth Colony. At the time, the dominant group was the Kakopee, known for their abilities at fishing. They were the first Native Americans to use large casting nets. Early colonial settlers recorded that the Kakopee numbered nearly 7,000.

 

Shortly after the Pilgrims arrived, the chief of the Kakopee, Mogauhok, attempted to make a treaty limiting colonial settlements. The effort failed after he succumbed to smallpox in 1625. Infectious diseases such as smallpox, measles and influenza caused the deaths of many other Kakopee and Wampanoag. They had no natural immunity to Eurasian diseases by then endemic among the English and other Europeans. Today, the only reminder of the Kakopee is a small public recreation area in Barnstable named for them. A historic marker notes the burial site of Mogauhok near Truro, although the location is conjecture.

 

While contractors were digging test wells in the eastern Massachusetts Military Reservation area, they discovered an archeological find.[citation needed] Excavation revealed the remains of a Kakopee village in Forestdale, a location in Sandwich. Researchers found a totem with a painted image of Mogauhok, portrayed in his chief's cape and brooch. The totem was discovered on property on Grand Oak Road. It is the first evidence other than colonial accounts of his role as an important Kakopee leader.

 

The Indians lost their lands through continued purchase and expropriation by the English colonists. The documentary Natives of the Narrowland (1993), narrated by actress Julie Harris, shows the history of the Wampanoag people through Cape Cod archaeological sites.

 

In 1974, the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Council was formed to articulate the concerns of those with Native American ancestry. They petitioned the federal government in 1975 and again in 1990 for official recognition of the Mashpee Wampanoag as a tribe. In May 2007, the Wampanoag tribe was finally federally recognized as a tribe.[17]

[edit] History

Cranberry picking in 1906

 

Cape Cod was a landmark for early explorers. It may have been the "Promontory of Vinland" mentioned by the Norse voyagers (985-1025). Giovanni da Verrazzano in 1524 approached it from the south. He named Martha's Vineyard Claudia, after the mother of the King of France.[18] The next year the explorer Esteban Gómez called it Cape St. James.

 

In 1602 Bartholomew Gosnold named it Cape Cod, the surviving term and the ninth oldest English place-name in the U.S.[19] Samuel de Champlain charted its sand-silted harbors in 1606 and Henry Hudson landed there in 1609. Captain John Smith noted it on his map of 1614 and at last the Pilgrims entered the "Cape Harbor" and – contrary to the popular myth of Plymouth Rock – made their first landing near present-day Provincetown on November 11, 1620. Nearby, in what is now Eastham, they had their first encounter with Native Americans.

 

Cape Cod was among the first places settled by the English in North America. Aside from Barnstable (1639), Sandwich (1637) and Yarmouth (1639), the Cape's fifteen towns developed slowly. The final town to be established on the Cape was Bourne in 1884.[20] Provincetown was a group of huts until the 18th century. A channel from Massachusetts Bay to Buzzards Bay is shown on Southack's map of 1717. The present Cape Cod Canal was slowly developed from 1870 to 1914. The Federal government purchased it in 1928.

 

Thanks to early colonial settlement and intensive land use, by the time Henry Thoreau saw Cape Cod during his four visits over 1849 to 1857[21], its vegetation was depauperate and trees were scarce. As the settlers heated by fires, and it took 10 to 20 cords (40 to 80 m³) of wood to heat a home, they cleared most of Cape Cod of timber early on. They planted familiar crops, but these were unsuited to Cape Cod's thin, glacially derived soils. For instance, much of Eastham was planted to wheat. The settlers practiced burning of woodlands to release nutrients into the soil. Improper and intensive farming led to erosion and the loss of topsoil. Farmers grazed their cattle on the grassy dunes of coastal Massachusetts, only to watch "in horror as the denuded sands `walked' over richer lands, burying cultivated fields and fences." Dunes on the outer Cape became more common and many harbors filled in with eroded soils.[22]

 

By 1800, most of Cape Cod's firewood had to be transported by boat from Maine. The paucity of vegetation was worsened by the raising of merino sheep that reached its peak in New England around 1840. The early industrial revolution, which occurred through much of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, mostly bypassed Cape Cod due to a lack of significant water power in the area. As a result, and also because of its geographic position, the Cape developed as a large fishing and whaling center. After 1860 and the opening of the American West, farmers abandoned agriculture on the Cape. By 1950 forests had recovered to an extent not seen since the 18th century.

 

Cape Cod became a summer haven for city dwellers beginning at the end of the 19th century. Improved rail transportation made the towns of the Upper Cape, such as Bourne and Falmouth, accessible to Bostonians. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the Northeastern mercantile elite built many large, shingled "cottages" along Buzzards Bay. The relaxed summer environment offered by Cape Cod was highlighted by writers including Joseph C. Lincoln, who published novels and countless short stories about Cape Cod folks in popular magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post and the Delineator.

 

Guglielmo Marconi made the first transatlantic wireless transmission originating in the United States from Cape Cod, at Wellfleet. The beach from which he transmitted has since been called Marconi Beach. In 1914 he opened the maritime wireless station WCC in Chatham. It supported the communications of Amelia Earhart, Howard Hughes, Admiral Byrd, and the Hindenburg. Marconi chose Chatham due to its vantage point on the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded on three sides by water. Walter Cronkite narrated a 17-minute documentary in 2005 about the history of the Chatham Station.

 

Much of the East-facing Atlantic seacoast of Cape Cod consists of wide, sandy beaches. In 1961, a significant portion of this coastline, already slated for housing subdivisions, was made a part of the Cape Cod National Seashore by President John F. Kennedy. It was protected from private development and preserved for public use. Large portions are open to the public, including the Marconi Site in Wellfleet. This is a park encompassing the site of the first two-way transoceanic radio transmission from the United States. (Theodore Roosevelt used Marconi's equipment for this transmission).

 

The Kennedy Compound in Hyannisport was President Kennedy's summer White House during his presidency. The Kennedy family continues to maintain residences on the compound. Other notable residents of Cape Cod have included actress Julie Harris, US Supreme Court justice Louis Brandeis, figure skater Todd Eldredge, and novelists Norman Mailer and Kurt Vonnegut. Influential natives included the patriot James Otis, historian and writer Mercy Otis Warren, jurist Lemuel Shaw, and naval officer John Percival.

[edit] Lighthouses of Cape Cod

Race Point Lighthouse in Provincetown (1876)

 

Lighthouses, from ancient times, have fascinated members of the human race. There is something about a lighted beacon that suggests hope and trust and appeals to the better instincts of mankind.

Edward Rowe Snow

 

Due to its dangerous constantly moving shoals, Cape Cod's shores have featured beacons which warn ships of the danger since very early in its history. There are numerous working lighthouses on Cape Cod and the Islands, including Highland Light, Nauset Light, Chatham Light, Race Point Light, and Nobska Light, mostly operated by the U.S. Coast Guard. The exception is Nauset Light, which was decommissioned in 1996 and is now maintained by the Nauset Light Preservation Society under the auspices of Cape Cod National Seashore. These lighthouses are frequently photographed symbols of Cape Cod.

 

Others include:

 

Upper Cape: Wings Neck

 

Mid Cape: Sandy Neck, South Hyannis, Lewis Bay, Bishop and Clerks, Bass River

 

Lower Cape: Wood End, Long Point, Monomoy, Stage Harbor, Pamet, Mayo Beach, Billingsgate, Three Sisters, Nauset, Highland

[edit] Transportation

 

Cape Cod is connected to the mainland by a pair of canal-spanning highway bridges from Bourne and Sagamore that were constructed in the 1930s, and a vertical-lift railroad bridge. The limited number of access points to the peninsula can result in large traffic backups during the tourist season.

 

The entire Cape is roughly bisected lengthwise by U.S. Route 6, locally known as the Mid-Cape Highway and officially as the Grand Army of the Republic Highway.

 

Commercial air service to Cape Cod operates out of Barnstable Municipal Airport and Provincetown Municipal Airport. Several bus lines service the Cape. There are ferry connections from Boston to Provincetown, as well as from Hyannis and Woods Hole to the islands.

 

Cape Cod has a public transportation network comprising buses operated by three different companies, a rail line, taxis and paratransit services.

The Bourne Bridge over the Cape Cod Canal, with the Cape Cod Canal Railroad Bridge in the background

[edit] Bus

 

Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority operates a year-round public bus system comprising three long distance routes and a local bus in Hyannis and Barnstable Village. From mid June until October, additional local routes are added in Falmouth and Provincetown. CCRTA also operates Barnstable County's ADA required paratransit (dial-a-ride) service, under the name "B-Bus."

 

Long distance bus service is available through Plymouth and Brockton Street Railway, with regular service to Boston and Logan Airport, as well as less frequent service to Provincetown. Peter Pan Bus Lines also runs long distance service to Providence T.F. Green Airport and New York City.

[edit] Rail

 

Regular passenger rail service through Cape Cod ended in 1959, quite possibly on June 30 of that year. In 1978, the tracks east of South Dennis were abandoned and replaced with the very popular bicycle path, known as the Cape Cod Rail Trail. Another bike path, the Shining Sea Bikeway, was built over tracks between Woods Hole and Falmouth in 1975; construction to extend this path to North Falmouth over 6.3 miles (10.1 km) of inactive rail bed began in April 2008[23] and ended in early 2009. Active freight service remains in the Upper Cape area in Sandwich and in Bourne, largely due to a trash transfer station located at Massachusetts Military Reservation along the Bourne-Falmouth rail line. In 1986, Amtrak ran a seasonal service in the summer from New York City to Hyannis called the Cape Codder. From 1988, Amtrak and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation increased service to a daily frequency.[24] Since its demise in 1996, there have been periodic discussions about reinstating passenger rail service from Boston to reduce car traffic to and from the Cape, with officials in Bourne seeking to re-extend MBTA Commuter Rail service from Middleboro to Buzzards Bay[25], despite a reluctant Beacon Hill legislature.

 

Cape Cod Central Railroad operates passenger train service on Cape Cod. The service is primarily tourist oriented and includes a dinner train. The scenic route between Downtown Hyannis and the Cape Cod Canal is about 2½ hours round trip. Massachusetts Coastal Railroad is also planning to return passenger railroad services eventually to the Bourne-Falmouth rail line in the future. An August 5, 2009 article on the New England Cable News channel, entitled South Coast rail project a priority for Mass. lawmakers, mentions a $1.4-billion railroad reconstruction plan by Governor Deval Patrick, and could mean rebuilding of old rail lines on the Cape. On November 21, 2009, the town of Falmouth saw its first passenger train in 12 years, a set of dinner train cars from Cape Cod Central. And a trip from the Mass Bay Railroad Enthusiasts on May 15, 2010 revealed a second trip along the Falmouth line.

[edit] Taxi

 

Taxicabs are plentiful, with several different companies operating out of different parts of the Cape. Except at the airport and some bus terminals with taxi stands, cabs must be booked ahead of time, with most operators preferring two to three hours notice. Cabs cannot be "hailed" anywhere in Barnstable County, this was outlawed in the early nineties after several robbery attempts on drivers.

 

Most companies utilize a New York City-style taximeter and charge based on distance plus an initial fee of $2 to $3. In Provincetown, cabs charge a flat fare per person anywhere in the town.

[edit] Tourism

Hyannis Harbor on Nantucket Sound

 

Although Cape Cod has a year-round population of about 230,000, it experiences a tourist season each summer, the beginning and end of which can be roughly approximated as Memorial Day and Labor Day, respectively. Many businesses are specifically targeted to summer visitors, and close during the eight to nine months of the "off season" (although the "on season" has been expanding somewhat in recent years due to Indian Summer, reduced lodging rates, and the number of people visiting the Cape after Labor Day who either have no school-age children, and the elderly, reducing the true "off season" to six or seven months). In the late 20th century, tourists and owners of second homes began visiting the Cape more and more in the spring and fall, softening the definition of the high season and expanding it somewhat (see above). Some particularly well-known Cape products and industries include cranberries, shellfish (particularly oysters and clams) and lobstering.

 

Provincetown, at the tip of Cape Cod, also berths several whale watching fleets who patrol the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Most fleets guarantee a whale sighting (mostly humpback whale, fin whale, minke whale, sei whale, and critically endangered, the North Atlantic Right Whale), and one is the only federally certified operation qualified to rescue whales. Provincetown has also long been known as an art colony, attracting writers and artists. The town is home to the Cape's most attended art museum, the Provincetown Art Association and Museum. Many hotels and resorts are friendly to or cater to gay and lesbian tourists and it is known as a gay mecca in the summer.[26]

 

Cape Cod is a popular destination for beachgoers from all over. With 559.6 miles (900.6 km) of coastline, beaches, both public and private, are easily accessible. The Cape has upwards of sixty public beaches, many of which offer parking for non-residents for a daily fee (in summer). The Cape Cod National Seashore has 40 miles (64 km) of sandy beach and many walking paths.

 

Cape Cod is also popular for its outdoor activities like beach walking, biking, boating, fishing, go-karts, golfing, kayaking, miniature golf, and unique shopping. There are 27 public, daily-fee golf courses and 15 private courses on Cape Cod.[27] Bed and breakfasts or vacation houses are often used for lodging.

 

Each summer the Naukabout Music Festival is held at the Barnstable County Fair Grounds located in East Falmouth,(typically) during the first weekend of August. This Music festival features local, regional and national talent along with food, arts and family friendly activities.

[edit] Sport fishing

 

Cape Cod is known around the world as a spring-to-fall destination for sport anglers. Among the species most widely pursued are striped bass, bluefish, bluefin tuna, false albacore (little tunny), bonito, tautog, flounder and fluke. The Cape Cod Bay side of the Cape, from Sandwich to Provincetown, has several harbors, saltwater creeks, and shoals that hold bait fish and attract the larger game fish, such as striped bass, bluefish and bluefin tuna.

 

The outer edge of the Cape, from Provincetown to Falmouth, faces the open Atlantic from Provincetown to Chatham, and then the more protected water of Nantucket and Vineyard Sounds, from Chatham to Falmouth. The bays, harbors and shoals along this coastline also provide a robust habitat for game species, and during the late summer months warm-water species such as mahi-mahi and marlin will also appear on the southern edge of Cape Cod's waters. Nearly every harbor on Cape Cod hosts sport fishing charter boats, which run from May through October.[28]

[edit] Sports

 

The Cape has nine amateur baseball franchises playing within Barnstable County in the Cape Cod Baseball League. The Wareham Gatemen also play in the Cape Cod Baseball League in nearby Wareham, Massachusetts in Plymouth County. The league originated 1923, although intertown competition traces to 1866. Teams in the league are the Bourne Braves, Brewster Whitecaps, Chatham Anglers (formerly the Chatham Athletics), Cotuit Kettleers, Falmouth Commodores, Harwich Mariners, Hyannis Harbor Hawks (formerly the Hyannis Mets), Orleans Firebirds (formerly the Orleans Cardinals), Wareham Gatemen and the Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox. Pro ball scouts frequent the games in the summer, looking for stars of the future.

 

Cape Cod is also a national hot bed for baseball and hockey. Along with the Cape Cod Baseball League and the new Junior Hockey League team, the Cape Cod Cubs, many high school players are being seriously recruited as well. Barnstable and Harwich have each sent multiple players to Division 1 colleges for baseball, Harwich has also won three State titles in the past 12 years (1996, 2006, 2007). Bourne and Sandwich, known rivals in hockey have won state championships recently. Bourne in 2004, and Sandwich in 2007. Nauset, Barnstable, and Martha's Vineyard are also state hockey powerhouses. Barnstable and Falmouth also hold the title of having one of the longest Thanksgiving football rivalries in the country. The teams have played each other every year on the Thanksgiving since 1895. The Bourne and Barnstable girl's volleyball teams are two of the best teams in the state and Barnstable in the country. With Bourne winning the State title in 2003 and 2007. In the past 15 years, Barnstable has won 12 Division 1 State titles and has won the state title the past two years.

 

The Cape also is home to the Cape Cod Frenzy, a team in the American Basketball Association.

 

Soccer on Cape Cod is represented by the Cape Cod Crusaders, playing in the USL Premier Development League (PDL) soccer based in Hyannis. In addition, a summer Cape Cod Adult Soccer League (CCASL) is active in several towns on the Cape.

 

Cape Cod is also the home of the Cape Cod Cubs, a new junior league hockey team that is based out of Hyannis at the new communtiy center being built of Bearses Way.

 

The end of each summer is marked with the running of the world famous Falmouth Road Race which is held on the 3rd Saturday in August. It draws about 10,000 runners to the Cape and showcases the finest runners in the world (mainly for the large purse that the race is able to offer). The race is 7.2 miles (11.6 km) long, which is a non-standard distance. The reason for the unusual distance is that the man who thought the race up (Tommy Leonard) was a bartender who wanted a race along the coast from one bar (The Cap'n Kidd in Woods Hole) to another (The Brothers Four in Falmouth Heights). While the bar in Falmouth Heights is no longer there, the race still starts at the front door of the Cap'n Kidd in Woods Hole and now finishes at the beach in Falmouth Heights. Prior to the Falmouth race is an annual 5-mile (8.0 km) race through Brewster called the Brew Run, held early in August.

[edit] Education

 

Each town usually consists of a few elementary schools, one or two middle schools and one large public high school that services the entire town. Exceptions to this include Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School located in Yarmouth which services both the town of Yarmouth as well as Dennis and Nauset Regional High School located in Eastham which services the town of Brewster, Orleans, Eastham, Wellfleet, Truro, and Provincetown (optional). Bourne High School is the public school for students residing in the town of Bourne, which is gathered from villages in Bourne, including Sagamore, Sagamore Beach, and Buzzards Bay. Barnstable High School is the largest high school and is known for its girls' volleyball team which have been state champions a total of 12 times. Barnstable High School also boasts one of the country's best high school drama clubs which were awarded with a contract by Warner Brothers to created a documentary in webisode format based on their production of Wizard of Oz. Sturgis Charter Public School is a public school in Hyannis which was featured in Newsweek's Magazine's "Best High Schools" ranking. It ranked 28th in the country and 1st in the state of Massachusetts in the 2009 edition and ranked 43rd and 55th in the 2008 and 2007 edition, respectively. Sturgis offers the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme in their junior and senior year and is open to students as far as Plymouth. The Cape also contains two vocational high schools. One is the Cape Cod Regional Technical High School in Harwich and the other is Upper Cape Cod Regional Technical High School located in Bourne. Lastly, Mashpee High School is home to the Mashpee Chapter of (SMPTE,) the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers. This chapter is the first and only high school chapter in the world to be a part of this organization and has received much recognition within the Los Angeles broadcasting industry as a result. The officers of this group who have made history are listed below:

 

* President: Ryan D. Stanley '11

* Vice-President Kenneth J. Peters '13

* Treasurer Eric N. Bergquist '11

* Secretary Andrew L. Medlar '11

 

In addition to public schools, Cape Cod has a wide range of private schools. The town of Barnstable has Trinity Christian Academy, Cape Cod Academy, St. Francis Xavier Preparatory School, and Pope John Paul II High School. Bourne offers the Waldorf School of Cape Cod, Orleans offers the Lighthouse Charter School for elementary and middle school students, and Falmouth offers Falmouth Academy. Riverview School is located in East Sandwich and is a special co-ed boarding school which services students as old as 22 who have learning disabilities. Another specialized school is the Penikese Island School located on Penikese Island, part of the Elizabeth Islands off southwestern Cape Cod, which services struggling and troubled teenage boys.

 

Cape Cod also contains two institutions of higher education. One is the Cape Cod Community College located in West Barnstable, Barnstable. The other is Massachusetts Maritime Academy in Buzzards Bay, Bourne. Massachusetts Maritime Academy is the oldest continuously operating maritime college in the United States.

[edit] Islands off Cape Cod

 

Like Cape Cod itself, the islands south of the Cape have evolved from whaling and trading areas to resort destinations, attracting wealthy families, celebrities, and other tourists. The islands include Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard, as well as Forbes family-owned Naushon Island, which was purchased by John Murray Forbes with profits from opium dealing in the China trade during the Opium War. Naushon is one of the Elizabeth Islands, many of which are privately owned. One of the publicly accessible Elizabeths is the southernmost island in the chain, Cuttyhunk, with a year-round population of 52 people. Several prominent families have established compounds or estates on the larger islands, making these islands some of the wealthiest resorts in the Northeast, yet they retain much of the early merchant trading and whaling culture.

Maila Nurmi was the original Queen of the Modern Gothic. Vampira, her iconic macabre creation, influenced generations of filmmakers, musicians, artists and lifestylers. Sadly, she shuffled off her mortal coil on January 10th, 2008. She was aged 86.

 

A Finnish-born model and actress, Maila had posed for Man Ray, Vargas and Bernard of Hollywood before being discovered at a masquerade ball by a TV producer. Her pale-skin and tight black dress complete with black wig and long, haemorrhage-red fingernails were quite unique in 1953. A year later, she became the eponymous star of The Vampira Show bringing a distinctive mix of sex, horror and death.

 

As the world’s first TV horror host, Vampira’s sardonic wit and eye-popping hourglass-figure made her the ghoulish fantasy of guys and ghouls across the globe, despite appearing on a show that was only broadcast in LA. Every week the voluptuous vamp would unleash blood-curdling screams and utter puns in an exotic and alluring Marlene Dietrich-like drawl – ‘I am…Vampira. I hope you all had the good fortune to have had a terrible week.’

 

After her show was cancelled, Maila accepted a tiny fee to appear as the reanimated corpse bride in Plan 9 From Outer Space, a role in the unfairly dubbed ‘Worst Film of all Time’, but it was one that would ensure Vampira’s immortality in popular culture.

 

As a star in the Golden Age of Tinsletown, Maila gigged with Liberace, dated Orson Welles, was friends with Marlon Brando and formed a tremendous kinship with James Dean, whose spirit, she claimed, haunted her for six months after his death.

 

Even as lady in her eighties, she was an incredible bright spark, a feisty old dame and a terrific raconteur, recalling stories from the old days with childlike glee. Like her icons-in-crime Bela Lugosi and Ed Wood, Maila Nurmi died nearly penniless, but she left behind a legacy that will endure forever.

     

Here's the article I wrote for Bizarre Magazine...

 

The Lady is a Vamp

 

I’m sat in Pioneer Chicken, a fast-food joint off Sunset Boulevard, deep in discussion with Vampira, the world’s first TV horror host. Maila Nurmi, the Finnish-born performer beneath the famous black wig and nails was a phenomenon in the nineteen-fifties. Her iconic gothic style, sardonic wit and eye-popping hourglass-figure made her the ghoulish fantasy of guys and ghouls across the globe, despite appearing on a show that was only broadcast to the Los Angeles area. Every week the voluptuous vamp would emerge from dry-ice studio fog to the sound of creepy organ music. She would unleash a blood-curdling scream and utter puns in an exotic, sexual, Marlene Dietrich-like drawl - “I am…Vampira. I hope you all had the good fortune to have had a terrible week."

 

But this is not simply an interview with a vampire. Conversing with Naila Nurmi means taking a voyeuristic journey through the lives of mythological cult icons of fifties Hollywood. It seems that Vampira’s finger was firmly on the jugular pulse of the tinsletown scene during the beat generation. Captivating tales with James Dean, Marlon Brando, and Elvis Presley pour from her octogenarian lips, memories recalled with intensity and insight.

 

Since Maila claims psychic capabilities, one can also add a touch of the paranormal to this Hollyweird concoction. She speaks of clairaudience, strange premonitions and visions. Most sensationally, it was such psychic sensitivity that found her haunted by the spirit of James Dean, whose death profoundly affected her.

 

She’s certainly one tough cookie though, that’s for sure - strongly opinionated and gutsy. Before international fame, back when she was modeling for the likes of Bernard of Hollywood, Vargas and a young Man Ray, she still wasn’t taking any crap from studio big shots. Even movie mogul Howard Hawks - who discovered Maila performing a skeleton striptease in a New York show - suffered the wrath of Vampira’s razor-witted tongue, despite having just turned Lauren Bacall into a household name.

 

“I thought he was stupid, so I tore up my contract,” she giggles, tucking into her rice. “I told him to kindly find a place for it in one of his numerous waste baskets.”

 

Yet in 1956, her outspoken manner caused her blacklisting from the system. Broke, she accepted a measly $200 to play the reanimated corpse-bride of Bela Lugosi in the trash sci-fi epic Plan 9 From Outer Space. Irony, for this movie cemented her position in popular culture and led to Tim Burton’s marvelous biopic of director Ed Wood, one that cast model Lisa Marie as Maila.

 

At eighty-three, she’s still hip and sharp like Vampira’s fingernails.

 

So how did your famous horror host role come about?

 

I decided I wanted to become an evangelist. I had to sponsor myself and I thought I needed $20,000. How could I do it? Well, television was just warping people’s minds, so I thought could do that - and they paid big. I thought I’d satirise soap operas, I’d take improbable people and make them do all these bourgeois things. Since Charles Addams had already done it in comic form, I wanted it to bring it to television. So that is why I made the dress, went to a masquerade ball and won first prize. They discovered me and that was the end of it. But Vampira wasn’t really acting. It was television, just a lot of hogwash.

 

What went wrong with the revival of Vampira in the early eighties and the subsequent launch of the Elvira character?

 

Well I was dealing with KTTV for three months and then they suddenly didn’t want me to come to the studio anymore. They eventually called me in to sign a contract and she was there (Cassandra Peterson). They had hired her without asking me.

 

So it was going to be the Vampira name?

 

It’s Vampira all together. She did the whole thing with the Rocky Horror people. They stole it. They stole $100 million dollars. She was in 51 markets at one time with 350 kinds of merchandise; milked my cupboard bare.

 

Did you successfully sue?

 

I sued for eight years but not successfully. Finally I ran out of money. To continue would have cost $60,000. I wrote to the judge and said, “I’m sorry, I have no money. I have to close the case.” So he charged them to pay all the expenses. That money was meant for animal welfare and she spent it on cocaine and red limousines. Boy has the devil got that bitch—it’s the devil in her blood. That slut was a big player in porno movies - she was trying to hide her background. They deemed it unwise to reveal that fact so they told her to make up stuff if she was asked. But she said, “Why make it up when it is written here?” She was pretending to be me. How dare she? She’s such a low-life, such a no talent. She’s so stupid and she has no sense of timing. No sense of humor; such a common slut that speaks Americanese. Nasal. Phlegmatic. You know, the limousines and the lovers and the houses—they can take all that. Initially they wanted me. I wouldn’t do it because I didn’t want Vampira to be anything but perfect. I certainly didn’t want it to be a streetwalker-slut like that. Angelina Jolie would be a good Vampira.

 

Didn’t Vampira lead you to James Dean?

 

With the character I had been handed the keys to the city. I wanted to see who’s who and so I attended a movie premiere. But all I could find was vapid identities, people of whom I had no interest, except for one fellow who was with Terry Moore. I thought “him, that’s the one with the tuxedo and the collar, the farm boy hair that wouldn’t stay down.” Twelve hours after, I was sitting in Googies, and Jimmy rode up on his motorcycle, the windows rattled and the rest was history. We were never apart again. We were best friends instantly, like psychic Siamese twins.

 

Was he openly gay to his friends?

 

No. As he said, “do I look like someone who would go through life with one hand tied behind my back?” That was a courageous statement in those days. Jimmy was primarily heterosexual but he used men sexually to get ahead, and if he saw someone he liked, he liked them. More often it was women, but maybe that was because he had never got the really pretty girls before. He had always got the ugly leftovers that nobody else wanted.

 

How much time did you spend with him?

 

Seventeen-hundred hours, every moment to treasure. But he was just a little boy in search of his mother. Everyone must have seen it, maybe not known what it was, not how to read it, but they saw the feeling. I was a little more psychic so I knew what it was. He had the impression she had abandoned him. But after, I found out she died of cancer and hadn’t abandoned him at all, but she did go away and leave him all alone in the world. He was an only child and it was impossible for him to relate to his father. The father had probably married his mother for her boobs or something and had nothing in common with her. She raised a boy whom she named after a poet, James Byron. And the father didn’t know poetry from a hole in the ground. He was a nice, practical, and sensible dentist.

 

Do you remember when you heard that James Dean had died?

 

Yeah I was at home with Tony Perkins (Psycho). Jack Simmons (actor in Rebel Without A Cause and friend of Dean) had just left to visit some lesbian whores that lived a block away. We knew we had to tell Jack before someone else did, but then we had to go tell Ursula (Andress), Jimmy’s ladylove. We drove up and I waited in the car because I didn’t really know her very well. It was in a dead end street, and now dark. Then suddenly, Marlon (Brando) appeared at the car - he had been hiding in the bushes. Ursula had called him in hysterics screaming, “They are trying to kill me. They’re threatening me. They think he killed himself because of me. I’m frightened! You have to come. I’m alone.” She would have used any device to get to Marlon at that time, even though she was trying to break up John Derek’s marriage. She wanted Marlon above all; she even bought the same car that he had. So he went, but looked in the windows first to be sure that she wasn’t putting him on and that she was really upset. Then Jack found him in the bushes. “Maila’s over there, in the hearse,” he said.(laughs) So he came over to offer condolences.

 

I heard that the spirit of James Dean visited you.

 

He visited a lot of people. He was very active. Now a lot of people made it up too I’m sure, but even people who weren’t psychic had experiences. He was that strong. Jimmy was following me around and was with me a lot of the time for the first six months. There would be an ashtray, I’d look and say “don’t anybody touch the ashtray, it’s gonna go up. That’s Jimmy’s sign that he’s here.” And it would go up!

 

Did you have psychic tendencies early on?

 

Yeah, I was very psychic in those days. My first husband Dean Eisner (writer of Dirty Harry and Play Misty For Me) and I lived in Laurel Canyon. He came home from work one day and said a story editor was writing a TV series about us. TV was very new and it was very easy to get anything you wanted done. He said they called it “Laurel Canyon”, but apparently sold it under the working title Bewitched. That was written about Dean Eisner and I. You see my mother was a witch. She wasn’t practicing, but she couldn’t help but be a witch. It was natural. It exuded from her, the very essence of her. And I was very psychic too.

 

Didn’t you share some strange, paranormal experiences with Marlon Brando?

 

We were sitting around and chatting in the dining room and Einstein had died just three weeks before. Marlon always had a wonderful portrait of Einstein on his headboard and sometimes he would just shove it in your face. Suddenly Marlon says, “There’s someone here. It’s Einstein. He has a message for us.” I was included in the message. “You young ones have to hurry up,” That’s what Einstein told Marlon, who wasn’t inventing it - he believed it. He may have seen it or heard it. The point is that Marlon really wanted to believe that he was a humanitarian, and Einstein was urging him to hurry up with his duties. Marlon was a very humane human being, though he didn’t know how to be humane with his own children. Some of his best friends despised him and said he was a brute and a beast and nothing in-between. He’s either the gentlest, noble of human beings or the coarsest and grossest. How do you like them apples?

 

What was your first introduction to any of the Ed Wood clan?

 

I was a young girl window-shopping on Hollywood Boulevard. I was bending low to see the detail of some shoes and someone whizzed around the corner on roller skates, almost bumped my fanny and crashed into me. “Pardon me,” said he, and “Pardon me,” said I. He was wearing an ascot and a beret. It was Bela Lugosi on roller skates. He was on his way to a cigar store.

 

Had you heard of Ed Wood before you met him?

 

Yes, because there had been an article in a newspaper, saying that he wanted to make a movie with Vampira. The nerve of him! This was before I was blacklisted. After, I had no money and I couldn’t get a job. A guy came and visited me and offered $200 to make this Ed Wood movie called Grave Robbers From Outer Space (later changed to Plan 9). I thought it was a good title at least. Oh boy! So I did it, and he came into my life right after then.

 

Did you find Ed Wood to be an intelligent guy?

 

No. But anyone who has become a phenomenon has a karmic current carrying them there. Nobody who is normal has such drive. That’s got to be driven by something larger than life. There was something there that I didn’t understand or respect because I was an intellectual snob, but it was there alright.

 

How did Ed Wood react when he heard you didn’t want to speak his words?

 

Paul Marco told him, so I don’t know. I didn’t want to hurt his feelings, but my God, I could not say those words. I wish I had them today because I threw them away. Do you know what jewels those lines must have been? I tried to say them, but I curdled my own blood. (laughs) They were awful!

 

Did you go to the premiere of Plan 9 From Outer Space?

 

Yeah. The theatre was full of people. I was backstage and I could see the images behind the screen. People were in the wings, dictating to me when to walk out, so that I was there on screen at the same time as I walked across stage. The audience booed, whistled and threw popcorn – they loved it! But I never actually got to see the film as I had to leave, then the film was banned in Los Angeles for 26 years. It never played here and Ed Wood never knew why. They hated him I guess or maybe it was because of me. But Criswell told me that the film played in a small theatre in New York for over a year and a half, with just standing room only all the time. When it was on the road in Indianapolis, even though it was pouring with rain, people queued around the block with newspapers over their heads. It was very popular. People knew it was Lugosi’s last film.

 

What kind of state of mind do you think Ed Wood have when he later made porn films?

 

He loved the porn. He was in his element. He would have been very unhappy if he had known he couldn’t have done porn again. He just kept writing them so fast. He’d write a whole pornographic book in just two days.

 

Did Tim Burton talk to you before he filmed the movie Ed Wood?

 

Yes. He introduced me to his stuffed bat. The film was accurate in some way but he wasn’t really trying to be accurate. It was a docu-drama. He was taking liberties, which he was entitled to do, but he got some of the essences correct—the ones that he should have retained. And then he embroidered a little. Johnny Depp is such a good actor and was believable as Ed Wood. Although it wasn’t exactly the same persona, his essence was there. The enthusiasm was so believable - such gung-ho enthusiasm.

 

Finally, is it right you had an encounter with Elvis before he became famous?

 

I went to Las Vegas with Liberace and met a19 year-old Elvis. I was there eating breakfast in the hotel and across the huge dining room in backlight - because the sun was shining through the windows - I could see three older men, smoking cigars, looking plump and eating. A tall, young, graceful man came in, and sat with them. Then on the intercom it said that somebody was wanted on the telephone. This young guy got up, and walked like Robert Mitchum. All I saw was his silhouette, that was it. So I paid my bill and walked past the men and said, “well congratulations, he’s going to be the biggest movie star in the world. I see he has tremendous magnetism.” “Ah,” they said, “thank you.” (laughs). And I hadn’t yet seen Elvis’ face. But the next night when he opened, I went with Liberace and his whole family. A side curtain parted and this kid comes out alone. I had never seen someone boldly standing on a stage – supposedly a heterosexual male – wearing turquoise eye shadow and grinding his hips like that. I thought, “oh-my-god. What am I seeing? This music is great.” The orchestra, one by one put down their instruments. They crossed their arms and refused to play. The audience started booing, and they booed him off the stage. Then a voice said to me – and I wasn’t on any drugs – “go around the side of the hotel and in the back, there’s a swimming pool and you’ll find someone in a canary yellow jacket.” Now I hadn’t seen a jacket like that anywhere. But I went around and in the dark moonless night, far away I could see the double doors of the casino, golden with light. They opened and a figure came into the doorway. It was Elvis, wearing a canary yellow jacket. He looked confusedly into the darkness, so I said, “I’m over here.” We walked towards each other, sat down and talked. I told him that I was a performer and that what happened was absolutely awful. He said, “every night before I go on, I talk to God and he always answers me. But tonight he didn’t answer. When them curtains opened and I saw all those white heads and them glasses, I knew why.“ I told him I admired his courage and that they only did that because they’re sheep and they do as they think they are supposed to do. One person booed and so then they all did. They’ve never, ever seen anything like you and it frightened them. But, Life Magazine are going to discover you (because that’s what they did in those days) and they will kiss your shoes.” He said, “it’s coming out Thursday” and it did. I was thirty-three and he said to me, “I know you’re getting old and all, but if you’d like to come back after the show, I’d be proud to take you back to my bungalow.” (laughs) His hallowed words! And so Elvis went back to do a second show.

 

Many thanks to Joe Moe and Forry for their assistance with this interview.

 

(Photos and Words Copyright - Mark Berry)

RULES OF THE TAGGY:

-Copy these questions.

-When you get 2 favorites, answer the questions below.

 

200: My middle name is: Nun.Ya.Beez.Wax.

199: I was born in: A hospital

198: I am really: A flying purple people eater.

197: My cellphone company is: Boost Mobile

196: My eye color is: Brown

195: My shoe size is: ...4...AND I'M IN 9TH GRADE O.-

194: My ring size is: No clue

193: My height is: ..ehhh...4'7 I think...

192: I am allergic to: nothing

191: My 1st car was: A tricycle.

190: My 1st job was: None yet

189: Last book you read: The Summer I Turned Pretty

188: My bed is: FLUFFEH *.*

187: My pet: Is turtly enough for the turtle club.

186: My best friend: Well, real life wise: Ange, Amber, and Kyle :3

185: My favorite shampoo is: ..this question is awkward..

184: AIM name: Don't have one

183: Piggy banks are: Always bashed apart in t.v. shows

182: In my pockets: A quarter, a gum wrapper, and a doll shoe o.o..

181: On my calendar: Don;t have one in my room xD

180: Marriage is: Neh.

179: Spongebob is: VERY SPONGEY.

178: My mom: Is epic

177: The last three cd's I bought were?: Goodwill.

176: Last YouTube video watched: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE-5sYqKbFY&list=PL74062CEF3A... x""D

175: How many cousins do you have?: 50 something?

174: Do you have any siblings?: Nope

173: Are your parents divorced?: Nope

172: Are you taller than your mom?: Nope :c

171: Do you play an instrument?: the guitar and mayonaise.

170: What did you do yesterday?: Climbed up my hill

 

[ I Believe In ]

169: Love at first sight: Yes

168: Luck: Sometimes

167: Fate: YUSH.

166: Yourself: Kinda

165: Aliens: I am one. So DUH.

164: Heaven: Mhm

163: Hell: Mhm

162: God: 99%

161: Horoscopes: Nope, but there fun to read :3

160: Soul mates: Yep

159: Ghosts: HELL YES.

158: Gay Marriage: Mhm

157: War: Nope. MAKE TACOS NOT WAR.

156: Orbs: The floating lint balls? Nope.

155: Magic: Ehh kinda

 

[ This or That ]

154: Hugs or Kisses: Huggles ^-^

153: Drunk or High: Dru- I MEAN NEITHER. (Jk, I don't drink, or get high.)

152: Phone or Online: Online

151: Red heads or Black haired: Gingers FTW.

150: Blondes or Brunettes: Brunettes (although I have a crush on a blonde :p)

149: Hot or cold: Cold

148: Summer or winter: Summer

147: Autumn or Spring: Both

146: Chocolate or vanilla: Vanilla

145: Night or Day: Night

144: Oranges or Apples: Apples

143: Curly or Straight hair: Straight

142: McDonalds or Burger King: DA DA DA D-DA I'M LOVIN' IT

141: White Chocolate or Milk Chocolate: Milk chocolate

140: Mac or PC: I honestly don;t know :o

139: Flip flops or high heels: Flip flops

138: Ugly and rich OR Sexy and poor: sexy and poor

137: Coke or Pepsi: Coke

136: Hillary or Obama: Obama

135: Burried or cremated: Not sure o.O

134: Singing or Dancing: Singing

133: Coach or Chanel: Eww. Neither.

132: Kat McPhee or Taylor Hicks: Who?

131: Small town or Big city: Love them both <33

130: Wal-Mart or Target: Target

129: Ben Stiller or Adam Sandler: Adam Sandler

128: Manicure or Pedicure: Manicure

127: East Coast or West Coast: East Coast baby <333333333

126: Your Birthday or Christmas: Birfday :3 (No offense to Jesus O.O)

125: Chocolate or Flowers: Flowers

124: Disney or Six Flags: Six Flags

123: Yankees or Red Sox: Red Sox

 

[ Here's What I Think About ]

122: War: Shouldn't exsist.

121: George Bush: BWHAHAHAHHAAHA. Joke.

120: Gay Marriage: Support it :)

119: The presidential election: Don't care.

118: Abortion: Well, it depends on how bad your situation is.

117: MySpace: Ghost town

116: Reality TV: Stupid people doing stupid things= entertaining.

115: Parents: a lil nagging but cool people xD

114: Back stabbers: Ahem, FUCK YA'LL STUPID HOES. I feel better.

113: Ebay: Correction: Evilbay.

112: Soccer: Blech.

111: Work: Referring to schoolwork: Ehh, not that bad.

110: My Neighbors:..Interesting..

109: Gas Prices: Too high D:

108: Designer Clothes: Don't need them. I like my damn Wal-Mart pants.

107: College: I'm a freshman. Not too concerned yet.

106: Sports: Eww.

105: My family: Loving their oddness :)

104: The future: PHIL OF THE FUTURE.

  

[ Last time I ]

103: Hugged someone: Yesterday (March 3rd, 2012)

102: Last time you ate: About 10 minutes ago

101: Saw someone I haven't seen in awhile: A friend that I thought I lost forever.

100: Cried in front of someone: 2 weeks ago?

99: Went to a movie theater: Freaking last summer xD

98: Took a vacation: Last July (referring to 2011 when I say last)

97: Swam in a pool: Last September

96: Changed a diaper: ...Last May..At a friends sleepover...Don't question it.

95: Got my nails done: 4 years ago.

94: Went to a wedding: Last October

93: Broke a bone: Never

92: Got a piercing: Never

91: Broke the law: ...Does not playing gym count?

90: Texted: 15 minutes ago.

 

[ MISC ]

89: Who makes you laugh the most: My friends

88: Something I will really miss when I leave home is: Just that homey feeling

87: The last movie I saw: Uhmm..I saw Scooby Doo Two: Monsters Unleashed on t.v. today :D

86: The thing that I'm looking forward to the most: Hanging with my crush soon :3

85: The thing im not looking forward to: Staying after Wed. for help in Algebra -.-

84: People call me:...I can't list all my nicknames xD

83: The most difficult thing to do is: Letting go of someone that you never had a hold of.

82: I have gotten a speeding ticket: Never

81: My zodiac sign is: Capricorn

80: The first person I talked to today was: My friend Amber over text

79: First time you had a crush: Kindergarten O.o

78: The one person who I can't hide things from: My friends Kyle and Ange

77: Last time someone said something you were thinking: On a schooltrip to boston last November

76: Right now I am talking to: No one

75: What are you going to do when you grow up: Hopefully be a director

74: I have/will get a job: Will

73: Tomorrow: Will be boring

72: Today: Was fun

71: Next Summer: Will hopefully be an amazing summer

70: Next Weekend: Better be fun

69: I have these pets: A turtle

68: The worst sound in the world: This teacher's voice that's in my school *twitch twitch*

67: The person that makes me cry the most is: Someone.

66: People that make you happy: My friends, family

65: Last time I cried: Didn't I answer this already?

64: My friends are: Crazy-ass mofo's.

63: My computer is: My child

62: My School: Is filled with whores.

61: My Car: I don't have one

60: I lose all respect for people who: hurt me in ways a friend should never do.

59: The movie I cried at was: None...I'm so heartless Dx

58: Your hair color is: Ginger red

57: TV shows you watch: Walking Dead, Dance Moms, Adventure Time, and many others

56: Favorite web site: Flickr and Twitter

55: Your dream vacation: Going on a world wide trip :)

54: The worst pain I was ever in was: When I twisted my ankle o.o

53: How do you like your steak cooked: I'm a vegitarian.

52: My room is: A lil messy but oh so cozy ^_^

51: My favorite celebrity is: Idk...o.p

50: Where would you like to be: Narnia.

49: Do you want children: Maybeee

48: Ever been in love: Yes

47: Whos your best friend: Ange and Kyle (I swear I don't have any friends in my real life xD)

46: More guy friends or girl friends: Girls..But it's a lot of drama x.x

45: One thing that makes you feel great is: Getting an answer right in Algebra xD

44: One person that you wish you could see right now: My crush :c

43: Do you have a 5 year plan: Psh..nuu...

42: Have you made a list of things to do before you die: Sorta

41: Have you pre-named your children: Yep! Girl: Haley or Aubrey Boy: Chase or Leo

40: Last person I got mad at: My dad

39: I would like to move to: Maine

38: I wish I was a professional: Hooker. LOL jk, I have no clue

 

[ My Favorites ]

37: Candy: Skittles

36: Vehicle: PUNCH BUGGY YELLOW SAFETY!

35: President: Idk

34: State visited: New York

33: Cellphone provider: Idk xD

32: Athlete: Don't care

31: Actor: Not sure O.O

30: Actress: Jennifer Aniston I guess

29: Singer: Hmm...Taylor Swift

28: Band: Asking Alexandria

27: Clothing store: Hot Topic

26: Grocery store: Does it matter?

25: TV show: Walking Dead

24: Movie: TWILIGHT. Lol jk, dumb sparkly faries aren't my cup of tea. It's the Smurfs :3

23: Website: I swear I answered this too....

22: Animal: Wolf

21: Theme park: SDoes the Big E count as one?

20: Holiday: Easter or Halloween

19: Sport to watch: Don;t watch them

18: Sport to play: Bowling

17: Magazine: Seventeen or MAD

16: Book: I'd Tell You I Love You But Then I'd Have To Kill You, The Summer I Turned Pretty, and Cut

15: Day of the week: Friday

14: Beach: I hate beaches xD

13: Concert attended: Blood On The Dance Floor local concert..( I got to meet Dahvie <33333333333333333333333333)

12: Thing to cook: Toast. The only thing I can cook without getting the fire department called on me.

11: Food: Stuffed peppers without meat

10: Restaurant: A local diner right near me

9: Radio station: No clue o.o

8: Yankee candle scent: I don;t remember the name, but it was purple and it had to deal with bad weather.

7: cologne: For guys? Axe <33 For me? I like Dark Kiss from Bath And Body Works

6: Flower: White Tulip

5: Color: Neon green

4: Talk show host: Dr. Phil (Mr. Mustache as my friend calls him xD)

3: Comedian: Jeff Dunham or Gabriel Ingecies (sp)

2: Dog breed: Tiny lil yorkie

1: Are you ready for this survey to be over?: Yush. I've had to pee. xD

I tag everyone who hasn't done this!!

The most beautiful women in TV and Movie History now become Barbie Collector Dolls created by acclaimed re-paint Artist Donna Brinkley.

 

Farrah Leni Fawcett is known as the world's Sexiest Star of all time... she will forever be one of Hollywood's greatest Icons. She was born in Corpus Christi, Texas, the younger of two daughters.[3] Her mother, Pauline Alice January 30, 1914 – March 4, 2005), was a homemaker, and her father, James William Fawcett (October 14, 1917 – August 23, 2010), was an oil field contractor. Her sister was Diane Fawcett Walls (October 27, 1938 – October 16, 2001), a graphic artist. She was of Irish, French, English, and Choctaw Native American ancestry. Fawcett once said the name Ferrah was made up by her mother because it went well with their last name.

 

A Roman Catholic, Fawcett's early education was at the parish school of the church her family attended, St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Corpus Christi. She graduated from W. B. Ray High School in Corpus Christi, where she was voted Most Beautiful by her classmates her Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior years of High School. For three years, 1965–68, Fawcett attended the University of Texas at Austin, living one semester in Jester Center, and she became a sister of Delta Delta Delta Sorority. During her Freshman year, she was named one of the Ten Most Beautiful Coeds on Campus, the first time a Freshman had been chosen. Their photos were sent to various agencies in Hollywood. David Mirsch, a Hollywood agent called her and urged her to come to Los Angeles. She turned him down but he called her for the next two years. Finally, in 1968, the summer following her junior year, with her parents' permission to try her luck in Hollywood, Farrah moved to Hollywood. She did not return.

 

Upon arriving in Hollywood in 1968 she was signed to a $350 a week contract with Screen Gems. She began to appear in commercials for UltraBrite toothpaste, Noxema, Max Factor, Wella Balsam shampoo and conditioner, Mercury Cougar automobiles and Beauty Rest matresses. Fawcett's earliest acting appearances were guest spots on The Flying Nun and I Dream of Jeannie. She made numerous other TV appearances including Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, [Mayberry RFD]] and The Partridge Family. She appeared in four episodes of The Six Million Dollar Man with husband Lee Majors, The Dating Game, S.W.A.T and a recurring role on Harry O alongside David Janssen. She also appeared in the Made for TV movies, The Feminist and the Fuzz, The Great American Beauty Contest, The Girl Who Came Giftwrapped, and Murder of Flight 502.

 

She had a sizable part in the 1969 French romantic-drama, Love Is a Funny Thing. She played opposite Raquel Welch and Mae West in the film version of, Myra Breckinridge (1970). The film earned negative reviews and was a box office flop. However, much has been written and said about the scene where Farrah and Raquel share a bed, and a near sexual experience. Fawcett co-starred with Michael York and Richard Jordan in the well-received science-fiction film, Logan's Run in 1976.

 

In 1976, Pro Arts Inc., pitched the idea of a poster of Fawcett to her agent, and a photo shoot was arranged with photographer Bruce McBroom, who was hired by the poster company. According to friend Nels Van Patten, Fawcett styled her own hair and did her make-up without the aid of a mirror. Her blonde highlights were further heightened by a squeeze of lemon juice. From 40 rolls of film, Fawcett herself selected her six favorite pictures, eventually narrowing her choice to the one that made her famous. The resulting poster, of Fawcett in a one-piece red bathing suit, was a best-seller; sales estimates ranged from over 5 million[12] to 8 million to as high as 12 million copies.

 

On March 21, 1976, the first appearance of Fawcett playing the character Jill Munroe in Charlie's Angels was aired as a movie of the week. Fawcett and her husband were frequent tennis partners of producer Aaron Spelling, and he and his producing partner thought of casting Fawcett as the golden girl Jill because of his friendship with the couple. The movie starred Kate Jackson, Jaclyn Smith and Fawcett (then billed as Farrah Fawcett-Majors) as private investigators for Townsend Associates, a detective agency run by a reclusive multi-millionaire whom the women had never met. Voiced by John Forsythe, the Charles Townsend character presented cases and dispensed advice via a speakerphone to his core team of three female employees, whom he referred to as Angels. They were aided in the office and occasionally in the field by two male associates, played by character actors David Doyle and David Ogden Stiers. The program quickly earned a huge following, leading the network to air it a second time and approve production for a series, with the pilot's principal cast except David Ogden Stiers.

Fawcett's record-breaking poster that sold 12 million copies.

 

The Charlie's Angels series formally debuted on September 22, 1976. Fawcett emerged as a fan favorite in the show, and the actress won a People's Choice Award for Favorite Performer in a New TV Program. In a 1977 interview with TV Guide, Fawcett said: When the show was number three, I thought it was our acting. When we got to be number one, I decided it could only be because none of us wears a bra.

 

Fawcett's appearance in the television show boosted sales of her poster, and she earned far more in royalties from poster sales than from her salary for appearing in Charlie's Angels. Her hairstyle went on to become an international trend, with women sporting a Farrah-do a Farrah-flip, or simply Farrah hair Iterations of her hair style predominated American women's hair styles well into the 1980s.

 

Fawcett left Charlie's Angels after only one season and Cheryl Ladd replaced her on the show, portraying Jill Munroe's younger sister Kris Munroe. Numerous explanations for Fawcett's precipitous withdrawal from the show were offered over the years. The strain on her marriage due to her long absences most days due to filming, as her then-husband Lee Majors was star of an established television show himself, was frequently cited, but Fawcett's ambitions to broaden her acting abilities with opportunities in films have also been given. Fawcett never officially signed her series contract with Spelling due to protracted negotiations over royalties from her image's use in peripheral products, which led to an even more protracted lawsuit filed by Spelling and his company when she quit the show.

 

The show was a major success throughout the world, maintaining its appeal in syndication, spawning a cottage industry of peripheral products, particularly in the show's first three seasons, including several series of bubble gum cards, two sets of fashion dolls, numerous posters, puzzles, and school supplies, novelizations of episodes, toy vans, and a board game, all featuring Fawcett's likeness. The Angels also appeared on the covers of magazines around the world, from countless fan magazines to TV Guide (four times) to Time Magazine.

 

The series ultimately ran for five seasons. As part of a settlement to a lawsuit over her early departure, Fawcett returned for six guest appearances over seasons three and four of the series.

 

In 2004, the television movie Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Charlie's Angels dramatized the events from the show with supermodel and actress Tricia Helfer portraying Fawcett and Ben Browder portraying Lee Majors, Fawcett's then-husband.

 

In 1983, Fawcett won critical acclaim for her role in the Off-Broadway stage production of the controversial play Extremities, written by William Mastrosimone. Replacing Susan Sarandon, she was a would-be rape victim who turns the tables on her attacker. She described the role as the most grueling, the most intense, the most physically demanding and emotionally exhausting of her career. During one performance, a stalker in the audience disrupted the show by asking Fawcett if she had received the photos and letters he had mailed her. Police removed the man and were able only to issue a summons for disorderly conduct.

 

The following year, her role as a battered wife in the fact-based television movie The Burning Bed (1984) earned her the first of her four Emmy Award nominations. The project is noted as being the first television movie to provide a nationwide 800 number that offered help for others in the situation, in this case victims of domestic abuse. It was the highest-rated television movie of the season.

 

In 1986, Fawcett appeared in the movie version of Extremities, which was also well received by critics, and for which she received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama.

 

She appeared in Jon Avnet's Between Two Women with Colleen Dewhurst, and took several more dramatic roles as infamous or renowned women. She was nominated for Golden Globe awards for roles as Beate Klarsfeld in Nazi Hunter: The Beate Klarsfeld Story and troubled Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton in Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story, and won a CableACE Award for her 1989 portrayal of groundbreaking LIFE magazine photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White in Double Exposure: The Story of Margaret Bourke-White. Her 1989 portrayal of convicted murderer Diane Downs in the miniseries Small Sacrifices earned her a second Emmy nomination[20] and her sixth Golden Globe Award nomination. The miniseries won a Peabody Award for excellence in television, with Fawcett's performance singled out by the organization, which stated Ms. Fawcett brings a sense of realism rarely seen in television miniseries (to) a drama of unusual power Art meets life.

 

Fawcett, who had steadfastly resisted appearing nude in magazines throughout the 1970s and 1980s (although she appeared topless in the 1980 film Saturn 3), caused a major stir by posing semi-nude in the December 1995 issue of Playboy.[citation needed] At the age of 50, she returned to Playboy with a pictorial for the July 1997 issue, which also became a top seller. The issue and its accompanying video featured Fawcett painting on canvas using her body, which had been an ambition of hers for years.

 

That same year, Fawcett was chosen by Robert Duvall to play his wife in an independent feature film he was producing, The Apostle. Fawcett received an Independent Spirit Award nomination as Best Actress for the film, which was highly critically acclaimed.

 

In 2000, she worked with director Robert Altman and an all-star cast in the feature film Dr. T the Women, playing the wife of Richard Gere (her character has a mental breakdown, leading to her first fully nude appearance). Also that year, Fawcett's collaboration with sculptor Keith Edmier was exhibited at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, later traveling to The Andy Warhol Museum. The sculpture was also presented in a series of photographs and a book by Rizzoli.

 

In November 2003, Fawcett prepared for her return to Broadway in a production of Bobbi Boland, the tragicomic tale of a former Miss Florida. However, the show never officially opened, closing before preview performances. Fawcett was described as vibrating with frustration at the producer's extraordinary decision to cancel the production. Only days earlier the same producer closed an Off-Broadway show she had been backing.

 

Fawcett continued to work in television, with well-regarded appearances in made-for-television movies and on popular television series including Ally McBeal and four episodes each of Spin City and The Guardian, her work on the latter show earning her a third Emmy nomination in 2004.

 

Fawcett was married to Lee Majors, star of television's The Six Million Dollar Man, from 1973 to 1982, although the couple separated in 1979. During her marriage, she was known and credited in her roles as Farrah Fawcett-Majors.

 

From 1979 until 1997 Fawcett was involved romantically with actor Ryan O'Neal. The relationship produced a son, Redmond James Fawcett O'Neal, born January 30, 1985 in Los Angeles.[26] In April 2009, on probation for driving under the influence, Redmond was arrested for possession of narcotics while Fawcett was in the hospital.[citation needed] On June 22, 2009, The Los Angeles Times and Reuters reported that Ryan O'Neal had said that Fawcett had agreed to marry him as soon as she felt strong enough.

 

From 1997 to 1998, Fawcett had a relationship with Canadian filmmaker James Orr, writer and producer of the Disney feature film in which she co-starred with Chevy Chase and Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Man of the House. The relationship ended when Orr was charged with and later convicted of beating Fawcett during a 1998 fight between the two.

 

On June 5, 1997, Fawcett received negative commentary after giving a rambling interview and appearing distracted on Late Show with David Letterman. Months later, she told the host of The Howard Stern Show her behavior was just her way of joking around with the television host, partly in the guise of promoting her Playboy pictoral and video, explaining what appeared to be random looks across the theater was just her looking and reacting to fans in the audience. Though the Letterman appearance spawned speculation and several jokes at her expense, she returned to the show a week later, with success, and several years later, after Joaquin Phoenix's mumbling act on a February 2009 appearance on The Late Show, Letterman wrapped up the interview by saying, I'm sorry you couldn't be here tonight and recalled Fawcett's earlier appearance by noting we owe an apology to Farrah Fawcett.

 

Fawcett's elder sister, Diane Fawcett Walls, died from lung cancer just before her 63rd birthday, on October 16, 2001.[33] The fifth episode of her 2005 Chasing Farrah series followed the actress home to Texas to visit with her father, James, and mother, Pauline. Pauline Fawcett died soon after, on March 4, 2005, at the age of 91.

 

Fawcett was diagnosed with anal cancer in 2006, and began treatment, including chemotherapy and surgery. Four months later, on her 60th birthday, the Associated Press wire service reported that Fawcett was, at that point, cancer free.

 

Less than four months later, in May 2007, Fawcett brought a small digital video camera to document a doctor's office visit. There, she was told a malignant polyp was found where she had been treated for the initial cancer. Doctors contemplated whether to implant a radiation seeder (which differs from conventional radiation and is used to treat other types of cancer). Fawcett's U.S. doctors told her that she would require a colostomy. Instead, Fawcett traveled to Germany for treatments described variously in the press as holistic aggressive and alternative. There, Dr. Ursula Jacob prescribed a treatment including surgery to remove the anal tumor, and a course of perfusion and embolization for her liver cancer by Doctors Claus Kiehling and Thomas Vogl in Germany, and chemotherapy back in Fawcett's home town of Los Angeles. Although initially the tumors were regressing, their reappearance a few months later necessitated a new course, this time including laser ablation therapy and chemoembolization. Aided by friend Alana Stewart, Fawcett documented her battle with the disease.

 

In early April 2009, Fawcett, back in the United States, was hospitalized, with media reports declaring her unconscious and in critical condition, although subsequent reports indicated her condition was not so dire. On April 6, the Associated Press reported that her cancer had metastasized to her liver, a development Fawcett had learned of in May 2007 and which her subsequent treatments in Germany had targeted. The report denied that she was unconscious, and explained that the hospitalization was due not to her cancer but a painful abdominal hematoma that had been the result of a minor procedure. Her spokesperson emphasized she was not at death's door adding - She remains in good spirits with her usual sense of humor ... She's been in great shape her whole life and has an incredible resolve and an incredible resilience. Fawcett was released from the hospital on April 9, picked up by longtime companion O'Neal, and, according to her doctor, was walking and in great spirits and looking forward to celebrating Easter at home.

 

A month later, on May 7, Fawcett was reported as critically ill, with Ryan O'Neal quoted as saying she now spends her days at home, on an IV, often asleep. The Los Angeles Times reported Fawcett was in the last stages of her cancer and had the chance to see her son Redmond in April 2009, although shackled and under supervision, as he was then incarcerated. Her 91-year-old father, James Fawcett, flew out to Los Angeles to visit.

 

The cancer specialist that was treating Fawcett in L.A., Dr. Lawrence Piro, and Fawcett's friend and Angels co-star Kate Jackson – a breast cancer survivor – appeared together on The Today Show dispelling tabloid-fueled rumors, including suggestions Fawcett had ever been in a coma, had ever reached 86 pounds, and had ever given up her fight against the disease or lost the will to live. Jackson decried such fabrications, saying they really do hurt a human being and a person like Farrah. Piro recalled when it became necessary for Fawcett to undergo treatments that would cause her to lose her hair, acknowledging Farrah probably has the most famous hair in the world but also that it is not a trivial matter for any cancer patient, whose hair affects [one's] whole sense of who [they] are. Of the documentary, Jackson averred Fawcett didn't do this to show that 'she' is unique, she did it to show that we are all unique ... This was ... meant to be a gift to others to help and inspire them.

 

The two-hour documentary Farrah's Story, which was filmed by Fawcett and friend Alana Stewart, aired on NBC on May 15, 2009.[47] The documentary was watched by nearly nine million people at its premiere airing, and it was re-aired on the broadcast network's cable stations MSNBC, Bravo and Oxygen. Fawcett earned her fourth Emmy nomination posthumously on July 16, 2009, as producer of Farrah's Story.

 

Controversy surrounded the aired version of the documentary, with her initial producing partner, who had worked with her four years earlier on her reality series Chasing Farrah, alleging O'Neal's and Stewart's editing of the program was not in keeping with Fawcett's wishes to more thoroughly explore rare types of cancers such as her own and alternative methods of treatment. He was especially critical of scenes showing Fawcett's son visiting her for the last time, in shackles, while she was nearly unconscious in bed. Fawcett had generally kept her son out of the media, and his appearances were minimal in Chasing Farrah.

 

Fawcett died at approximately 9:28 am, PDT on June 25, 2009, in the intensive care unit of Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, with O'Neal and Stewart by her side. A private funeral was held in Los Angeles on June 30. Fawcett's son Redmond was permitted to leave his California detention center to attend his mother's funeral, where he gave the first reading.

 

The night of her death, ABC aired an hour-long special episode of 20/20 featuring clips from several of Barbara Walters' past interviews with Fawcett as well as new interviews with Ryan O'Neal, Jaclyn Smith, Alana Stewart, and Dr. Lawrence Piro. Walters followed up on the story on Friday's episode of 20/20. CNN's Larry King Live planned a show exclusively about Fawcett that evening until the death of Michael Jackson several hours later caused the program to shift to cover both stories. Cher, a longtime friend of Fawcett, and Suzanne de Passe, executive producer of Fawcett's Small Sacrifices mini-series, both paid tribute to Fawcett on the program. NBC aired a Dateline NBC special Farrah Fawcett: The Life and Death of an Angel; the following evening, June 26, preceded by a rebroadcast of Farrah's Story in prime time. That weekend and the following week, television tributes continued. MSNBC aired back-to-back episodes of its Headliners and Legends episodes featuring Fawcett and Jackson. TV Land aired a mini-marathon of Charlie's Angels and Chasing Farrah episodes. E! aired Michael and Farrah: Lost Icons and the The Biography Channel aired Bio Remembers: Farrah Fawcett. The documentary Farrah's Story re-aired on the Oxygen Network and MSNBC.

 

Larry King said of the Fawcett phenomenon,

TV had much more impact back in the '70s than it does today. Charlie's Angels got huge numbers every week – nothing really dominates the television landscape like that today. Maybe American Idol comes close, but now there are so many channels and so many more shows it's hard for anything to get the audience, or amount of attention, that Charlie's Angels got. Farrah was a major TV star when the medium was clearly dominant.

 

Playboy founder Hugh Hefner said Farrah was one of the iconic beauties of our time. Her girl-next-door charm combined with stunning looks made her a star on film, TV and the printed page.

 

Kate Jackson said,

She was a selfless person who loved her family and friends with all her heart, and what a big heart it was. Farrah showed immense courage and grace throughout her illness and was an inspiration to those around her... I will remember her kindness, her cutting dry wit and, of course, her beautiful smile...when you think of Farrah, remember her smiling because that is exactly how she wanted to be remembered: smiling.

 

She is buried at the Westwood Village Memorial Park in Los Angeles.

 

The red one-piece bathing suit worn by Farrah in her famous 1976 poster was donated to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH) on February 2, 2011.[65] Said to have been purchased at a Saks Fifth Avenue store, the red Lycra suit made by the leading Australian swimsuit company Speedo, was donated to the Smithsonian by her executors and was formally presented to NMAH in Washington D.C. by her longtime companion Ryan O'Neal.[66] The suit and the poster are expected to go on temporary display sometime in 2011–12. They will be made additions to the Smithsonian's popular culture department.

 

The famous poster of Farrah in a red swimsuit has been produced as a Barbie doll. The limited edition dolls, complete with a gold chain and the girl-next-door locks, have been snapped up by Barbie fans.

 

In 2011, Men's Health named her one of the 100 Hottest Women of All-Time ranking her at No. 31

srilankaactressmodel.blogspot.com/2010/12/srilankan-hotte...

 

Judy Muller is one of the hottest, promising Sri Lankan Model aspiring to make it big in the glamour fashion world. She has a very long way to go in the glamour world and we wish her the best. Here are the High Quality (HQ) collection of images of Judy...

Angelina Jolie is an American actress. She has received an Academy Award, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and three Golden Globe Awards. Jolie promotes humanitarian causes, and is noted for her work with refugees as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). She has been cited as one of the world's most attractive people, as well as the world's "most beautiful" woman, titles for which she has received substantial media attention.

I was tagged by no less than FOUR PEOPLE to do the 16 Things meme! I guess I'm kinda popular. It boggles the mind. I never know how to start these things, so we might as well start with the mask....

 

1. During spring 2004 I had recurring dreams (well, nightmares) about a donkey-headed man...not long afterwards I saw this mask in a costume shop and figured that if I bought it, it just might exorcise the dream from my head...it worked! And now I'm rather fond of donkeys, ironically.

 

2. I'm 23 years old and I've never been kissed, never been on a date, never been no nuttin'. Sometimes this really bugs me, especially since I'm a hopeless romantic. In any case, I have learned the fine art of solitude.

 

3. ...Speaking of being a hopeless romantic, I cry at sad movies. When I first saw "The Fellowship of the Ring" I bawled so hard people gave me dirty looks. :^| Insensitive peons. :^P

 

4. And speaking of MOVIES, I adore classic, old-timey, black-and-white movies. AY-DORS THEM. I live and breathe them and study camera angles and buy movie soundtrack albums and obsess over actors and actresses long since dead. I tape their pictures on my walls. I've tried to trace the reasons for my complete love of classic movies, and I think it was because I was homeschooled by a ever-so-slightly fundamentalist Christian family, and we didn't have cable when I was a kid (or friends, but that's another story). Instead of Rugrats cartoons and MTV, I was raised on old Laurel & Hardy and Three Stooges tapes. Not to mention Gene Kelly movies. Turner Classic Movies has practically saved my life....

 

5. My first crush was on Frank Sinatra, when I was 8 years old. I was sure that I was going to marry him, thanks to my poor sense of time (see #6 below). My mom had to break the news to me that he was, in fact, much older than I was, practically an old man even. I think she even dropped the word 'fat'. I cried all day. :^(

 

6. I have no sense of time. At all. When I say something will take me five minutes, it could mean two seconds, 45 minutes, or three hours. I also had no sense of time in terms of ages and years until I was about 10 years old...before that time I thought *every* movie was recently made (which is why I thought I had a chance with Frank Sinatra) and anything your grandparents had or experienced was still widely available. I have two typewriters, I say words like 'hot-cha' and 'palooka', and when somebody my age doesn't know who Groucho Marx is, I get violent.

 

7. My maternal grandfather is a Methodist reverend, and during my childhood church was MANDATORY. I now find sermons dull as can be, and am usually daydreaming through them. Though I still consider myself a Christian, I find much of the religion to be too dogmatic and filled with shaky unspoken rules. The superior attitude concerning the 'unsaved' also sticks in my craw. My spiritual leanings tend to be rather pantheistic...Nature is about as purely holy as things can get. Dogs can convey pure love much better than humans. (We have a mini poodle named Betsy. She's a sweetheart.) I also think 'Reality' is a very, very loose term...Reality is what you believe it to be. If you think you're the King of the Netherlands *just* hard enough, than you will be the King of the Netherlands (in your own mind, at the very least). We all know people who we think are crazy, right? How do you know what they believe is or isn't real? How do you know they're just not believing in a reality different than yours? THAT'S RIGHT, YOU DON'T. I think the secret to world peace is just to accept that we all see different realities, just as we all perceive the colors of the spectrum in a slightly different way. (Or we're all just crazy, it depends on how you want to define it).

 

8. I was not the popular kid. When you're homeschooled and don't have cable tv, to other kids you might as well be a deaf-mute from Mars. In one church we went to when I was about 11, my youth group had three rich yuppie girls who teased me mercilessly because I was unattractive, quiet, and slightly-lower-middle-class. I now hate all rich people.

 

9. I'm terribly, terribly creative. :^P I started drawing when I was about 4 and I haven't stopped. I've never taken an art class in my life, and I won't start now, as I don't wish to lose my uber-cool 'Outsider Artist' status. ;^P Everything I know about art I learned from stacks and stacks of books from the library. When I was 9 I played the violin, then dropped it to play the trombone...then dropped *that*, didn't play anything for years, and then when I was 19 I started taking violin lessons again. :^) When I was 11 years old I decided I wanted to be a writer. I have stories I've silently been working on for years and years...this April my science fiction epic, "Anomaly", will be ten years in the making. 0_0 That's kind of amazing. Somehow I want to be able to combine all this artistic spiffyness into something big...my dream job to is to be a filmmaker or a graphic novelist. (Read: Maker of comic books.) My brain won't stop thinking of ideas, and when I was 8 years old I started keeping a journal. Last week I finished my 30th.

 

10. My favorite movies are The Invisible Man, The Petrified Forest, and Amélie. My favorite TV show is Mystery Science Theater 3000. My favorite books are the The Wizard of Oz series. My favorite song is Sarah Vaughan's version of "Darn That Dream", and my favorite cartoon character is Snidely Whiplash. My favorite animals are the hedgehog, the fox, the tiger, and yes, the donkey. My favorite color is always changing.

 

11. I also love toys. The comic artist Lynda Barry said that toys are "outfits for innerspace creatures", and I think that's very true and profound. I project personalities into my toys, make them have epic adventures and soap operas, and yes, take pictures of them! I think it helps my own personality keep stabilized. :^)

 

12. I LOVE clothes and fashion, but I am too poor to be fashionable. :^( I've developed my own style, a mix of Goodwill couture and homemade stuff (I knit, crochet, make jewelry, and sew a tiny bit of a little)...you'd be surprised how well it works. I don't have a lot of clothes, per se, but I have LOTS of accessories...tons of purses and shoes. Mix-and-match is a genius concept. On very rare, special occasions, I even put on makeup. My skin's extremely sensitive and I can't wear it very often. This makes me sad, because I want to be glamorous and beautiful more than anything else in the world. Unfortunately, I fit into many categories but 'beauty queen' is not one of them. :^(

 

13. I only have one sibling, a sister two years older than me. She is both my best friend and my mortal enemy. She is the stupidest, most embarrassing person I know, and is also filled with such words of wisdom as (my personal favorite): "No matter how bad your situation gets, it could always be worse. You could be Hitler." We are always bickering, but we have very few friends outside of ourselves so we have to take what we can get. We're too similar anyway.

 

14. From July 2005 to March 2008 I lived in Nebraska, the state where I was born, and I hated every minute of it. I'm never going back. The people are closed-minded and provincial. The endless fields of corn will drive you mad. Your relatives will want you over for dinner every week. I speak from experience. Though it proved to be the location of my own personal coming of age, it was also the most depressing experience of my life. And THAT is how Turner Classic Movies saved my life...watching old movies kept me distanced from a truly horrible situation. God Bless Robert Osborne.

 

15. Do you remember when all children were forced to learn to play the piano? And they had to practice for an hour every day? I wish The Law Of Pianos was still in effect. EVERYBODY should learn to play some sort of music. Learning to *play* music, not just listening to it, will open up whole areas of your mind you didn't know existed...making music makes you smarter. It makes you a better person. It just might also get you dates. Win-win.

 

16. I'm pro-life and pro-Gay Marriage. I believe that everybody deserves to live and be loved.

 

...Except for Hitler.

The most beautiful women in TV and Movie History now become Barbie Collector Dolls created by acclaimed re-paint Artist Donna Brinkley.

 

Farrah Leni Fawcett is known as the world's Sexiest Star of all time... she will forever be one of Hollywood's greatest Icons. She was born in Corpus Christi, Texas, the younger of two daughters.[3] Her mother, Pauline Alice January 30, 1914 – March 4, 2005), was a homemaker, and her father, James William Fawcett (October 14, 1917 – August 23, 2010), was an oil field contractor. Her sister was Diane Fawcett Walls (October 27, 1938 – October 16, 2001), a graphic artist. She was of Irish, French, English, and Choctaw Native American ancestry. Fawcett once said the name Ferrah was made up by her mother because it went well with their last name.

 

A Roman Catholic, Fawcett's early education was at the parish school of the church her family attended, St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church in Corpus Christi. She graduated from W. B. Ray High School in Corpus Christi, where she was voted Most Beautiful by her classmates her Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior years of High School. For three years, 1965–68, Fawcett attended the University of Texas at Austin, living one semester in Jester Center, and she became a sister of Delta Delta Delta Sorority. During her Freshman year, she was named one of the Ten Most Beautiful Coeds on Campus, the first time a Freshman had been chosen. Their photos were sent to various agencies in Hollywood. David Mirsch, a Hollywood agent called her and urged her to come to Los Angeles. She turned him down but he called her for the next two years. Finally, in 1968, the summer following her junior year, with her parents' permission to try her luck in Hollywood, Farrah moved to Hollywood. She did not return.

 

Upon arriving in Hollywood in 1968 she was signed to a $350 a week contract with Screen Gems. She began to appear in commercials for UltraBrite toothpaste, Noxema, Max Factor, Wella Balsam shampoo and conditioner, Mercury Cougar automobiles and Beauty Rest matresses. Fawcett's earliest acting appearances were guest spots on The Flying Nun and I Dream of Jeannie. She made numerous other TV appearances including Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, [Mayberry RFD]] and The Partridge Family. She appeared in four episodes of The Six Million Dollar Man with husband Lee Majors, The Dating Game, S.W.A.T and a recurring role on Harry O alongside David Janssen. She also appeared in the Made for TV movies, The Feminist and the Fuzz, The Great American Beauty Contest, The Girl Who Came Giftwrapped, and Murder of Flight 502.

 

She had a sizable part in the 1969 French romantic-drama, Love Is a Funny Thing. She played opposite Raquel Welch and Mae West in the film version of, Myra Breckinridge (1970). The film earned negative reviews and was a box office flop. However, much has been written and said about the scene where Farrah and Raquel share a bed, and a near sexual experience. Fawcett co-starred with Michael York and Richard Jordan in the well-received science-fiction film, Logan's Run in 1976.

 

In 1976, Pro Arts Inc., pitched the idea of a poster of Fawcett to her agent, and a photo shoot was arranged with photographer Bruce McBroom, who was hired by the poster company. According to friend Nels Van Patten, Fawcett styled her own hair and did her make-up without the aid of a mirror. Her blonde highlights were further heightened by a squeeze of lemon juice. From 40 rolls of film, Fawcett herself selected her six favorite pictures, eventually narrowing her choice to the one that made her famous. The resulting poster, of Fawcett in a one-piece red bathing suit, was a best-seller; sales estimates ranged from over 5 million[12] to 8 million to as high as 12 million copies.

 

On March 21, 1976, the first appearance of Fawcett playing the character Jill Munroe in Charlie's Angels was aired as a movie of the week. Fawcett and her husband were frequent tennis partners of producer Aaron Spelling, and he and his producing partner thought of casting Fawcett as the golden girl Jill because of his friendship with the couple. The movie starred Kate Jackson, Jaclyn Smith and Fawcett (then billed as Farrah Fawcett-Majors) as private investigators for Townsend Associates, a detective agency run by a reclusive multi-millionaire whom the women had never met. Voiced by John Forsythe, the Charles Townsend character presented cases and dispensed advice via a speakerphone to his core team of three female employees, whom he referred to as Angels. They were aided in the office and occasionally in the field by two male associates, played by character actors David Doyle and David Ogden Stiers. The program quickly earned a huge following, leading the network to air it a second time and approve production for a series, with the pilot's principal cast except David Ogden Stiers.

Fawcett's record-breaking poster that sold 12 million copies.

 

The Charlie's Angels series formally debuted on September 22, 1976. Fawcett emerged as a fan favorite in the show, and the actress won a People's Choice Award for Favorite Performer in a New TV Program. In a 1977 interview with TV Guide, Fawcett said: When the show was number three, I thought it was our acting. When we got to be number one, I decided it could only be because none of us wears a bra.

 

Fawcett's appearance in the television show boosted sales of her poster, and she earned far more in royalties from poster sales than from her salary for appearing in Charlie's Angels. Her hairstyle went on to become an international trend, with women sporting a Farrah-do a Farrah-flip, or simply Farrah hair Iterations of her hair style predominated American women's hair styles well into the 1980s.

 

Fawcett left Charlie's Angels after only one season and Cheryl Ladd replaced her on the show, portraying Jill Munroe's younger sister Kris Munroe. Numerous explanations for Fawcett's precipitous withdrawal from the show were offered over the years. The strain on her marriage due to her long absences most days due to filming, as her then-husband Lee Majors was star of an established television show himself, was frequently cited, but Fawcett's ambitions to broaden her acting abilities with opportunities in films have also been given. Fawcett never officially signed her series contract with Spelling due to protracted negotiations over royalties from her image's use in peripheral products, which led to an even more protracted lawsuit filed by Spelling and his company when she quit the show.

 

The show was a major success throughout the world, maintaining its appeal in syndication, spawning a cottage industry of peripheral products, particularly in the show's first three seasons, including several series of bubble gum cards, two sets of fashion dolls, numerous posters, puzzles, and school supplies, novelizations of episodes, toy vans, and a board game, all featuring Fawcett's likeness. The Angels also appeared on the covers of magazines around the world, from countless fan magazines to TV Guide (four times) to Time Magazine.

 

The series ultimately ran for five seasons. As part of a settlement to a lawsuit over her early departure, Fawcett returned for six guest appearances over seasons three and four of the series.

 

In 2004, the television movie Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Charlie's Angels dramatized the events from the show with supermodel and actress Tricia Helfer portraying Fawcett and Ben Browder portraying Lee Majors, Fawcett's then-husband.

 

In 1983, Fawcett won critical acclaim for her role in the Off-Broadway stage production of the controversial play Extremities, written by William Mastrosimone. Replacing Susan Sarandon, she was a would-be rape victim who turns the tables on her attacker. She described the role as the most grueling, the most intense, the most physically demanding and emotionally exhausting of her career. During one performance, a stalker in the audience disrupted the show by asking Fawcett if she had received the photos and letters he had mailed her. Police removed the man and were able only to issue a summons for disorderly conduct.

 

The following year, her role as a battered wife in the fact-based television movie The Burning Bed (1984) earned her the first of her four Emmy Award nominations. The project is noted as being the first television movie to provide a nationwide 800 number that offered help for others in the situation, in this case victims of domestic abuse. It was the highest-rated television movie of the season.

 

In 1986, Fawcett appeared in the movie version of Extremities, which was also well received by critics, and for which she received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama.

 

She appeared in Jon Avnet's Between Two Women with Colleen Dewhurst, and took several more dramatic roles as infamous or renowned women. She was nominated for Golden Globe awards for roles as Beate Klarsfeld in Nazi Hunter: The Beate Klarsfeld Story and troubled Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton in Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story, and won a CableACE Award for her 1989 portrayal of groundbreaking LIFE magazine photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White in Double Exposure: The Story of Margaret Bourke-White. Her 1989 portrayal of convicted murderer Diane Downs in the miniseries Small Sacrifices earned her a second Emmy nomination[20] and her sixth Golden Globe Award nomination. The miniseries won a Peabody Award for excellence in television, with Fawcett's performance singled out by the organization, which stated Ms. Fawcett brings a sense of realism rarely seen in television miniseries (to) a drama of unusual power Art meets life.

 

Fawcett, who had steadfastly resisted appearing nude in magazines throughout the 1970s and 1980s (although she appeared topless in the 1980 film Saturn 3), caused a major stir by posing semi-nude in the December 1995 issue of Playboy.[citation needed] At the age of 50, she returned to Playboy with a pictorial for the July 1997 issue, which also became a top seller. The issue and its accompanying video featured Fawcett painting on canvas using her body, which had been an ambition of hers for years.

 

That same year, Fawcett was chosen by Robert Duvall to play his wife in an independent feature film he was producing, The Apostle. Fawcett received an Independent Spirit Award nomination as Best Actress for the film, which was highly critically acclaimed.

 

In 2000, she worked with director Robert Altman and an all-star cast in the feature film Dr. T the Women, playing the wife of Richard Gere (her character has a mental breakdown, leading to her first fully nude appearance). Also that year, Fawcett's collaboration with sculptor Keith Edmier was exhibited at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, later traveling to The Andy Warhol Museum. The sculpture was also presented in a series of photographs and a book by Rizzoli.

 

In November 2003, Fawcett prepared for her return to Broadway in a production of Bobbi Boland, the tragicomic tale of a former Miss Florida. However, the show never officially opened, closing before preview performances. Fawcett was described as vibrating with frustration at the producer's extraordinary decision to cancel the production. Only days earlier the same producer closed an Off-Broadway show she had been backing.

 

Fawcett continued to work in television, with well-regarded appearances in made-for-television movies and on popular television series including Ally McBeal and four episodes each of Spin City and The Guardian, her work on the latter show earning her a third Emmy nomination in 2004.

 

Fawcett was married to Lee Majors, star of television's The Six Million Dollar Man, from 1973 to 1982, although the couple separated in 1979. During her marriage, she was known and credited in her roles as Farrah Fawcett-Majors.

 

From 1979 until 1997 Fawcett was involved romantically with actor Ryan O'Neal. The relationship produced a son, Redmond James Fawcett O'Neal, born January 30, 1985 in Los Angeles.[26] In April 2009, on probation for driving under the influence, Redmond was arrested for possession of narcotics while Fawcett was in the hospital.[citation needed] On June 22, 2009, The Los Angeles Times and Reuters reported that Ryan O'Neal had said that Fawcett had agreed to marry him as soon as she felt strong enough.

 

From 1997 to 1998, Fawcett had a relationship with Canadian filmmaker James Orr, writer and producer of the Disney feature film in which she co-starred with Chevy Chase and Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Man of the House. The relationship ended when Orr was charged with and later convicted of beating Fawcett during a 1998 fight between the two.

 

On June 5, 1997, Fawcett received negative commentary after giving a rambling interview and appearing distracted on Late Show with David Letterman. Months later, she told the host of The Howard Stern Show her behavior was just her way of joking around with the television host, partly in the guise of promoting her Playboy pictoral and video, explaining what appeared to be random looks across the theater was just her looking and reacting to fans in the audience. Though the Letterman appearance spawned speculation and several jokes at her expense, she returned to the show a week later, with success, and several years later, after Joaquin Phoenix's mumbling act on a February 2009 appearance on The Late Show, Letterman wrapped up the interview by saying, I'm sorry you couldn't be here tonight and recalled Fawcett's earlier appearance by noting we owe an apology to Farrah Fawcett.

 

Fawcett's elder sister, Diane Fawcett Walls, died from lung cancer just before her 63rd birthday, on October 16, 2001.[33] The fifth episode of her 2005 Chasing Farrah series followed the actress home to Texas to visit with her father, James, and mother, Pauline. Pauline Fawcett died soon after, on March 4, 2005, at the age of 91.

 

Fawcett was diagnosed with anal cancer in 2006, and began treatment, including chemotherapy and surgery. Four months later, on her 60th birthday, the Associated Press wire service reported that Fawcett was, at that point, cancer free.

 

Less than four months later, in May 2007, Fawcett brought a small digital video camera to document a doctor's office visit. There, she was told a malignant polyp was found where she had been treated for the initial cancer. Doctors contemplated whether to implant a radiation seeder (which differs from conventional radiation and is used to treat other types of cancer). Fawcett's U.S. doctors told her that she would require a colostomy. Instead, Fawcett traveled to Germany for treatments described variously in the press as holistic aggressive and alternative. There, Dr. Ursula Jacob prescribed a treatment including surgery to remove the anal tumor, and a course of perfusion and embolization for her liver cancer by Doctors Claus Kiehling and Thomas Vogl in Germany, and chemotherapy back in Fawcett's home town of Los Angeles. Although initially the tumors were regressing, their reappearance a few months later necessitated a new course, this time including laser ablation therapy and chemoembolization. Aided by friend Alana Stewart, Fawcett documented her battle with the disease.

 

In early April 2009, Fawcett, back in the United States, was hospitalized, with media reports declaring her unconscious and in critical condition, although subsequent reports indicated her condition was not so dire. On April 6, the Associated Press reported that her cancer had metastasized to her liver, a development Fawcett had learned of in May 2007 and which her subsequent treatments in Germany had targeted. The report denied that she was unconscious, and explained that the hospitalization was due not to her cancer but a painful abdominal hematoma that had been the result of a minor procedure. Her spokesperson emphasized she was not at death's door adding - She remains in good spirits with her usual sense of humor ... She's been in great shape her whole life and has an incredible resolve and an incredible resilience. Fawcett was released from the hospital on April 9, picked up by longtime companion O'Neal, and, according to her doctor, was walking and in great spirits and looking forward to celebrating Easter at home.

 

A month later, on May 7, Fawcett was reported as critically ill, with Ryan O'Neal quoted as saying she now spends her days at home, on an IV, often asleep. The Los Angeles Times reported Fawcett was in the last stages of her cancer and had the chance to see her son Redmond in April 2009, although shackled and under supervision, as he was then incarcerated. Her 91-year-old father, James Fawcett, flew out to Los Angeles to visit.

 

The cancer specialist that was treating Fawcett in L.A., Dr. Lawrence Piro, and Fawcett's friend and Angels co-star Kate Jackson – a breast cancer survivor – appeared together on The Today Show dispelling tabloid-fueled rumors, including suggestions Fawcett had ever been in a coma, had ever reached 86 pounds, and had ever given up her fight against the disease or lost the will to live. Jackson decried such fabrications, saying they really do hurt a human being and a person like Farrah. Piro recalled when it became necessary for Fawcett to undergo treatments that would cause her to lose her hair, acknowledging Farrah probably has the most famous hair in the world but also that it is not a trivial matter for any cancer patient, whose hair affects [one's] whole sense of who [they] are. Of the documentary, Jackson averred Fawcett didn't do this to show that 'she' is unique, she did it to show that we are all unique ... This was ... meant to be a gift to others to help and inspire them.

 

The two-hour documentary Farrah's Story, which was filmed by Fawcett and friend Alana Stewart, aired on NBC on May 15, 2009.[47] The documentary was watched by nearly nine million people at its premiere airing, and it was re-aired on the broadcast network's cable stations MSNBC, Bravo and Oxygen. Fawcett earned her fourth Emmy nomination posthumously on July 16, 2009, as producer of Farrah's Story.

 

Controversy surrounded the aired version of the documentary, with her initial producing partner, who had worked with her four years earlier on her reality series Chasing Farrah, alleging O'Neal's and Stewart's editing of the program was not in keeping with Fawcett's wishes to more thoroughly explore rare types of cancers such as her own and alternative methods of treatment. He was especially critical of scenes showing Fawcett's son visiting her for the last time, in shackles, while she was nearly unconscious in bed. Fawcett had generally kept her son out of the media, and his appearances were minimal in Chasing Farrah.

 

Fawcett died at approximately 9:28 am, PDT on June 25, 2009, in the intensive care unit of Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, with O'Neal and Stewart by her side. A private funeral was held in Los Angeles on June 30. Fawcett's son Redmond was permitted to leave his California detention center to attend his mother's funeral, where he gave the first reading.

 

The night of her death, ABC aired an hour-long special episode of 20/20 featuring clips from several of Barbara Walters' past interviews with Fawcett as well as new interviews with Ryan O'Neal, Jaclyn Smith, Alana Stewart, and Dr. Lawrence Piro. Walters followed up on the story on Friday's episode of 20/20. CNN's Larry King Live planned a show exclusively about Fawcett that evening until the death of Michael Jackson several hours later caused the program to shift to cover both stories. Cher, a longtime friend of Fawcett, and Suzanne de Passe, executive producer of Fawcett's Small Sacrifices mini-series, both paid tribute to Fawcett on the program. NBC aired a Dateline NBC special Farrah Fawcett: The Life and Death of an Angel; the following evening, June 26, preceded by a rebroadcast of Farrah's Story in prime time. That weekend and the following week, television tributes continued. MSNBC aired back-to-back episodes of its Headliners and Legends episodes featuring Fawcett and Jackson. TV Land aired a mini-marathon of Charlie's Angels and Chasing Farrah episodes. E! aired Michael and Farrah: Lost Icons and the The Biography Channel aired Bio Remembers: Farrah Fawcett. The documentary Farrah's Story re-aired on the Oxygen Network and MSNBC.

 

Larry King said of the Fawcett phenomenon,

TV had much more impact back in the '70s than it does today. Charlie's Angels got huge numbers every week – nothing really dominates the television landscape like that today. Maybe American Idol comes close, but now there are so many channels and so many more shows it's hard for anything to get the audience, or amount of attention, that Charlie's Angels got. Farrah was a major TV star when the medium was clearly dominant.

 

Playboy founder Hugh Hefner said Farrah was one of the iconic beauties of our time. Her girl-next-door charm combined with stunning looks made her a star on film, TV and the printed page.

 

Kate Jackson said,

She was a selfless person who loved her family and friends with all her heart, and what a big heart it was. Farrah showed immense courage and grace throughout her illness and was an inspiration to those around her... I will remember her kindness, her cutting dry wit and, of course, her beautiful smile...when you think of Farrah, remember her smiling because that is exactly how she wanted to be remembered: smiling.

 

She is buried at the Westwood Village Memorial Park in Los Angeles.

 

The red one-piece bathing suit worn by Farrah in her famous 1976 poster was donated to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH) on February 2, 2011.[65] Said to have been purchased at a Saks Fifth Avenue store, the red Lycra suit made by the leading Australian swimsuit company Speedo, was donated to the Smithsonian by her executors and was formally presented to NMAH in Washington D.C. by her longtime companion Ryan O'Neal.[66] The suit and the poster are expected to go on temporary display sometime in 2011–12. They will be made additions to the Smithsonian's popular culture department.

 

The famous poster of Farrah in a red swimsuit has been produced as a Barbie doll. The limited edition dolls, complete with a gold chain and the girl-next-door locks, have been snapped up by Barbie fans.

 

In 2011, Men's Health named her one of the 100 Hottest Women of All-Time ranking her at No. 31

This portrait of madonna has Pop Art and Warhol influences, especialy his use of the iconic image of Marilyn Munrow. (And thanks to Tina for reminding me i had not stated this!

 

"Madonna Louise Ciccone Ritchie (born August 16, 1958) is an American pop singer-songwriter, musician, dancer, record producer, film producer, actress, film director and author. She is known for the use of sexual, social and religious themes in her work and has been nicknamed the "Material Girl" and "Queen Of Pop" by the media. Since her debut in 1982, Madonna has released many chart-topping albums and singles, and has sold more than 200 million albums worldwide. Billboard reported that her 2006 Confessions Tour holds the record for the highest grossing concert tour by a female artist. According to both the 2007 Guinness Book of Records, and Forbes, she is the top earning female singer in the world with an estimated net worth of over $325 million. In 2001, the Guinness Book of World Records listed Madonna as the "World’s Most-successful Female Musician". She is the 2nd most successful top selling female artist in the US according to the RIAA, and 15th biggest selling artist overall. In the United Kingdom, she is the most successful female in the UK album chart history, having sold 3.9 million copies of her compilation The Immaculate Collection there alone. In 2005, she tied with Elvis Presley's record of 36 top 10 hits, the most for any artist in the history of the Billboard Hot 100 charts. RIAA named Madonna the Best Selling Female Rock Artist of the twentieth century.

 

Madonna opposes United States President George W. Bush. She endorsed Wesley Clark's Democratic nomination for the 2004 United States presidential election in an impassioned letter to her fans, saying at the time that "the future I wish for my children is at risk." In the autumn of 2006, she expressed her support for Hillary Clinton in the 2008 election. Most recently, she stated that she would be behind Al Gore if he decided to run for the 2008 elections after seeing his documentary on global warming, An Inconvenient Truth. She also urged her fans to see Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11.

 

Since the late 1990s, Madonna has been a devotee of the Kabbalah Centre and a disciple of its head Rabbi Philip Berg and his wife Karen. Madonna and husband Guy Ritchie attend Kabbalah classes and have been reported to have adopted a number of aspects of the movement associated with Judaism.

 

On August 11, 2000, Madonna gave birth to a son, Rocco John Ritchie in Los Angeles, California, with Guy Ritchie, whom she had met in 1999 through mutual friends Sting and his wife, Trudie Styler. On December 22, 2000, Madonna and Ritchie were married in Scotland. As of 2007, Madonna resides in Marylebone, London and her country estate in Wiltshire, with Ritchie and their 3 children.

 

Update: Madonna and Guy Richie are divorced. She took over in their London House and he their Wiltshire mansion. I assume that she will move back to the USA now.

 

Adapted from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madonna_(entertainer)

  

via

 

2009 candid photo by John DeAmara

 

this post has been inspired by the alarming number of botched/detrimentally consequential/scary experiences being reported to me by women as of late. specifically, the last few months. I know for certain that these are spiritual tests for them. prior to the past few months, I had not thought heavily about this subject (aging/plastic surgery), nor had I really discussed it. I have taken my recent conversations around the above as a sign to write about these subjects candidly. it feels like I’m being guided to do it, and perhaps it will assist someone, one way or another.

 

for a huge part of my entire early life I was conflicted about the way that I looked, mostly because against my will, my head was nearly shaven twice during my prepubescent years — specifically beginning at 8/9 years old. this was actually a horrifying experience for me. I had beautiful long hair, and I felt that from outside appearances, I fit in with my peers. as you may know, prepubescent years are extremely formative. certain events during this time can make or break a person, or sit with them for a long time. ironically (or not), these are the years that a lot of people are molested. if I had a dollar for every person who shared horrible experiences with me that had occurred around age 9… anyhow, it may sound dramatic, but I will never forget how I felt when my 16 inch locks were shaven off. I will try to find a picture — better yet, before and after pictures — to insert here at some point. I went from not fitting in with my peers so much emotionally (I was a year younger than all of them — I started kindergarten at age 4) as I was less mature — and I also had a ton of stuff going on in my immediate environment that was outside of my control — to not fitting in emotionally OR physically. my hair was about an inch long all around, with the “bangs” so short they spiked up because they couldn’t be combed or lay flat. for nearly two years of my life as I entered puberty, everyone thought I was a boy. the night after I was shaved, I recall wanting to disappear. I went to school the next day and I was the laughing-stock. I hid in the bathroom, and my teacher came in to console me. while I was in there, she must have told the kids to compliment my new styles. “hey, I like your haircut” said one person, which was obviously a joke. because when I landed in line for school that morning unrecognizable, there was a new toy out that you could ask questions and it would answer robotically “yes” or “no” — kind of like a magic 8 ball that was prevalent in the 80s, except this one would answer back. “is her haircut good”, one kid asked. “no!”, the machine robotically yelled. the entire line burst into laughter. in retrospect, it’s funny. but at the time, I was in a tortured state. and you might use your best psych hat guesses as to why this was done to me. anyway, clearly those around me who knew me knew that I was a girl, but when I would travel beyond the confines of home or school, people would say things like “hey, do you and your brother want xyz?” to my sibling. it was…awful. I was stripped of my physical identity (the only thing left to take from me at that time, by the way), and there was nothing I could do about it. the night before the cut I cried myself to sleep. after it was done, and re-done months later, I obsessed over the way I looked. I stared at myself in the mirror and wanted the little girl back. I wasn’t old enough to have a shaved head and have people know I was a girl. parents of friends would remark about how much I would stare in the mirror at birthday parties or when getting ready to go somewhere. I was looking for that beautiful girl who, even though she didn’t feel normal, looked normal.

 

eventually time passed, and that horrible buzz cut started to grow back in time for middle school. there was another horrible cut, somewhere in between that time, and it was not a buzz cut, yet still along the same lines. thankfully I was allowed to grow it out by the time I was 12 or 13. I recall vowing to never go short again. I don’t really remember if I liked my looks or not in middle school, at least not more or less than the average kid. I’m not sure how I got lucky that way, because I did not obsess over anything. that said, my nose had been fractured once already, and around 12 it was growing cartilage across the bridge that was definitely not organic to my bone structure. the difference between 10 and 12 was major when I looked at photos of myself, and the first time I noticed this was during my 6th or 7th grade class photo. even my family was surprised. one of them used to say how surprised they were because I was supposed to look like “xyz person” from school, yet overnight I woke up looking like another person entirely. the entire bridge was swollen across, with elevated cartilage on both sides, totally uneven. I recall being surprised, because it did not look the way it used to. when it was fractured, it bled and hurt, but a that stuff happens to lots of kids and they recover without surgery. but it definitely threw off my natural structure. the rest of my nose was fine, and I particularly liked the tip — it was pointy and defined, and I thought it was nice. then I got to highschool. by this time, my nose was larger than the rest of my face, as my face was trying to catch up to it. not to mention, the cartilage was at its peak of size and imbalance. during this time, both immediate family members and kids in school called me “the bird”. I would walk through the halls and they would crow or caw. lol. it sounds funny now, and almost cute. it made me feel super insecure at the time though. when we would drive by the zoo in Florida, one of my caretakers would joke and threaten to drop me off with my real family members — the herons and birds held captive, because we looked alike. this was actually mentioned on a weekly basis, and probably daily in school, and I am surprised I never asked for a nose job then. I felt like I should accept myself the way that I was, and that it was a sin to get surgery to change things. I always prided myself on working with what I was given. I never craved a boob job, even though I had just over a handful. my peers actually seemed more focused on their looks than I was at this point. by the time I was 15, I got a fair amount of attention from boys. my face was starting to grow into balance, despite my fractured nose that did not look like anyone elses in my family — not even extended or distant relatives. I stopped thinking about it. when I turned 16 I highlighted my hair with sun-in (remember that?), and spent my summer outside getting really tan. I remember being happy with the way that I looked despite the bumps in the road in the past. I was still teased by people close to me about looking like a bird or exotic animal, and it was not a compliment. but I didn’t seem to have any trouble attracting boys, and at that age, that was important to most of us. I had my first boyfriend and by this time all physical insecurities had vanished. I had a very robust butt, and the kids in my highschool would yell things at me when I walked down the hall like “rumpshaker!!!” or “rumpROAST!”. I did not mind one bit, for whatever reason. I was proud to be a woman with a large butt. my boyfriend felt proud to be seen with me. then I got to college.

 

I felt more confident than ever in college. that said, the fracture in my nose started to bother me. I recall researching nose jobs, but I was so afraid of looking like a different person that I did not pursue it. my face started to change in my 20s like faces naturally do, and I was still happy with my appearance all around. during this time, boob jobs were all the rage and I had no interest. then I visited the first psychic I ever went to, at 26. she mentioned right away that I was supposed to be seen and heard, and that I would be on a popular soap opera as a start. she said that this was important to my life’s purpose, and to go for it. then, she told me to get reconstructive surgery on part of my bridge where the cartilage was messed up from two fractures (there was a second one at 14, but by that time most of the damage was done). I had tremendous sinus infections all throughout highschool and in my 20s, and I knew that some of this was probably due to the messy bone structure in my nose. different ENTs had suggested surgery, but I was just too afraid to mess up my looks further. after seeing the psychic, I knew that she was trying to help me because she was familiar with the vanity of the entertainment world. I definitely trusted her, and did not feel she was putting me down in any way. she said “fix the right side where all of that cartilage is built up and make it match the left side”. I said “ok”. I started my research for surgeons, and pretty much caved with the first one I found. he was super old — well, old for a surgeon. 70ish? his wife had been a popular soap actress and he showed me photos of her before and afters — which he doctored. I made it clear to him that I did not want a different nose, that I just wanted my original nose. I brought a photo from when I was 10 or 11, which was a tough read considering our faces change. but he looked at the noses of my relatives and got a feel for whatever was not germane to me. insurance covered it, because obviously, I had a fracture and the right side of my nose (which was always flooded with infections) was collapsed inside. the surgeon understood exactly what my aim was. the day of the surgery, one of the nurses said to me on my way into the OR “don’t you want to fix the tip too?” I said “HELL NO!”. I couldn’t believe her suggestion. it was my favorite part of my nose, after all. after the surgery, I waited. there was a subtle difference that some people saw and others didn’t. my boyfriend at the time didn’t really see the difference. but I breathed better, and I think it looked way smoother in photos. I had an actual bridge for the first time, and all of the messy cartilage looked “put together”. I was happy. it took a lot of consideration on my part, and I was so afraid of being or looking “fake”. then I realized that we have to do what makes us happy, and what is natural or instinctual to us. I never wanted a surgery ever again, because the recovery process was awful (for me).

 

fast forward and I went on my soap opera, ended a very significant relationship at close to 30, and felt really great inside and out. I worked out and ate well. I didn’t care about what other people looked like, and I can honestly say I loved my appearance for the most part. I did work hard to put myself together, and I will note that my hair WAS and still IS a huge point of contention for me, lol. I imagine 90% of that is past trauma. I went on to do photoshoots to remember my youth, because we never go back in time. I did some modeling. nothing serious. I think because I was happy inside, and had done a TON of self work, and did not cave to the social norm that says “marry by 30 no matter what”, my happiness and authenticity was showing on the outside. the next thing I did was have my teeth matched in color. my new friend was a cosmetic dentist and she offered me something lovely. it did not change my face and I did not get fake teeth/veneers. I even questioned myself in the process, as I had still considered myself a very “real” and “natural” person, and I worried that I was somehow cheating or setting a bad example for insecure younger women. I got over it fast because my teeth came out GREAT. and they were still my teeth. so that was my next real/fake “thing”. as I got into my 30s, I really felt better than ever. I had been doing hot yoga for a few years, I went nearly vegan, and I started sleeping 8-10 hours per night (a contrast to my 9-5 days when it was like 6). I was now out of the corporate world, and though I was broke AF, I was SO happy and rested, all of the time. this made a huge difference as far as my appearance was concerned. I looked younger than I did 10 years prior, no lie. I had been through many personal internal hells with breakups and other issues from the past, and I was working them out through taking good care of myself. it showed on the outside. to this day, I will say that the best recipe for maintaining youth is internal happiness…you can be the ugliest troll and I promise you that if you are happy on the inside, it will shine through to the outside and the world will be your oyster. I mean this. THIS IS ENERGY. the right energy will make you beautiful at all challenges.

 

in my early 30s, I can honestly say that I never looked better, mostly because I was so happy. and, well, I was taking EXCELLENT care of myself and not making sell-out decisions to fit in with society because I was weak-willed. and then, my mid 30s hit. this is the first time I started to realize that my face was…aging. I thought “well ok, fine”. I also wondered how much I could sleep in order to stop it, lol. to set the stage here, I am now LATE 30s. and so this piece is timely for me to write for a number of reasons. anyhow — in my late 30s, I began to see some “new” things. my face looked fuller. I thought, wow, I have always been so bony, with bony features, I have been waiting for this! I liked it. but then, I noticed things I was not so keen on. they began to happen when 1) I was not rested and 2) I did not work out 3) I did not eat well 4) I was overworked 5) I was not personally balanced or fulfilled with my personal life. and then I realized “oh, this is called aging”. which no one prepares anyone for. my lower face got fuller and there seemed to be way more space between the bottom of my nose (the tip I always loved!), and my upper lip. my upper face started to lose some volume, and I had normal crows feet. well, this is called being a human, I thought. but I also thought…I wonder what…procedures…I could consider without being afraid of them…that will “help me age more gracefully”…and so I started some research and conversations. which brings me right to this blog post…

 

obviously I do not live under a rock (well not totally), and I knew/know about botox. but for some reason, I never wanted to do it. my smile and laugh lines make me feel youthful. even the crows feet around the eyes. I like them. call me crazy. and then, I know of 20 year olds who have been shooting botox since their teens. to each their own. this blog post is not an opinion post. it’s a share that will maybe resonate with someone in a way that helps them figure out their own appearance stuff. I started to see a lot more blue veins in my face, and I researched dermatologists. then a younger patient friend of mine referred me to hers. she was great. she told me “don’t do botox”. she is exactly my age and she has 3 kids. I was grateful for her honesty. she told me I could consider what is called IPL, which is a laser treatment that targets big blue veins in the face, that could help minimize the appearance of aging. I said ok. I had always been super veiny. so I did it. I looked “better”. I liked it! and then I really started to research…this is the rabbit hole of focusing on appearance, by the way! I still didn’t want to do botox and I had no real reason for not doing it. others I know did it and they looked great. the feeling not to do it was purely gut level. then I heard about fillers. I had honestly never researched or thought about these things, and I’m late 30s. ok, so what is a filler? it’s an acid that your face makes naturally. I thought about that. hm. ok, I can consider that. so a year ago I wanted to soften my jowls without surgery and decided to see “the best of the best” — seriously, he does tons of actors faces. he did a laser on me which improved some blue lines, and then he filled my chin. I liked it for about a month or two. then, what happens, is the filler dissolves — at different speeds, because different parts of your face metabolize differently I decided I never wanted that kind of face filler again. it’s about 100% dissolved now, and some of my jowls are back. they go away when I sleep a lot, and they go away when I do hot yoga, and when I am super happy. ok, so I can deal with this part of aging. I also found out about lip fillers. I had always sworn I would never do anything like that. a few years back I had seen a surgeon who specialized in ENT, and I went to check on my nose. it was losing structure in the middle from the first surgery, and it was frail because I did not want anything cosmetic done, and the middle was unsupported. he put a “stint” in the middle, made of my own cartilage, which not only physically felt more supportive, but I could breathe even better. it didn’t really change my appearance, but again I hate surgery and I was afraid of looking like a different person. thankfully neither one of these procedures did that. well anyhow, he also did lip injections etc and I felt he was trustworthy. I said ok, let’s do it. and I did. and it hurt like a mother at first. I was so scared of looking like Joan Rivers (RIP Joan, I love you), because I have been such a granola my whole life – I went years without even highlighting my hair because I thought it was “fake” (those days have passed). I was even afraid to try eyelash extensions, and when I first did, I cried hysterically because I felt I would pay for my sins of altering my appearance by way of some bad karma coming to teach me a lesson. fortunately I’m not blind, I was ok, just like most people who have done that. so anyhow I did the lip contouring, and it really just added back what I had in my 20s plus made things more symmetrical. they dissolve in months, and they are made from your own natural substances. I won’t say to do it or not do it, because I never even thought about it until I noticed gravity and this space between the tip of my nose and upper lip — likely from the stint put in to support the middle frame of it. then I researched other things like lasers that lift and tighten the skin, and those are another rabbit hole. even like a facelift, none of them is permanent, and there are risks. and they can hurt, a lot. at this point, I’m somewhere in the middle of considering going back for an IPL for my veiny face and some lip maintenance. my face feels like my face and I don’t care what other people look like. I have never and do not have the desire to look like anyone but myself. the things that have given me the most flack in life (my pointy bird nose and my big butt) were and are my favorite things about myself. so there’s that.

 

I write this to first preface my honest to goodness personal experience with appearance, because so many people we “look up to” are not willing to share on this front, and I want to provide some kind of general support or solace for those who feel like they have questions no one will answer. maybe this blog post will answer it. maybe not. but I will say that my bottom line is this: I have never felt more beautiful than I did when I was 16-26 and totally surgery-free/natural, and then again in my early 30s when I began to age and had not even looked into anything anti-aging. I was at my happiest both at those times, and again NOW! no amount of anything can replicate that on the outside, so quite frankly it does not matter and I hope that is the point I can make most clear.

 

now, for the actual reason that I began this post today. over the past few months, I have been contacted by a variety of women I know whom, have gone under the knife. for breast surgeries, facelifts, botox, and God knows what else. I still don’t know the whole menu of aesthetic offerings. and, these recent reach-outs, have been chock full of warnings by way of sad stories, personal disappointments and fear, by way of trying to enhance or anti-age their appearance. I have never in my life been contacted by women in this way, because typically they are too embarrassed or proud to share what they are “doing” to themselves because there is the weird and fucked up shame over the way we look, which is a sin in and of itself. it is a sin that an instagram page can make a young woman feel insecure. I didn’t have to deal with that growing up. I didn’t have internet, HA. but even now, I think it would take an earthquake to make me feel moved over someone elses face or body in an instagram or otherwise post. because I know myself. and I know my insides. I love myself! this is my eternal protection to falling prey to the illusion that we are somehow happier or better because we have “fixed” ourselves physically. the fact is, our physical selves “fix” themselves only after our inner selves do. again, I promise you this fact.

 

the women who reached out to me over the past few months — and again, I can’t believe how many it is, considering this has never happened to me before! — I know are messengers to all of us, to help us rethink our beauty. the horror stories I heard include under the knife surgeries gone wrong to nearly fatal close calls, botched anti-aging procedures (that had never gone wrong prior to this year), and so on. one of them happened to be botox, and it really hit me since it was something I had considered but fortunately had excellent feedback on, telling me “you don’t need it”. there have been other things I have considered as well, as I am in my late 30s and we start to see a difference in the mirror, and sometimes we do not recognize the face staring back at us all of a sudden. I feel like my considerations, while already slow, have been halted with a resounding and loud message about what I have known my whole life despite different experiences: focus on my happiness like never before. when in doubt or hesitation, about any procedure, WAIT. maybe botox works wonderfully for friends and patients of mine, but I had the instinct to not do it…and then I heard real horror story about it from someone I had not expected to hear it from. when we spoke about it, she presented the fact that a “beauty spell” is the classic downfall of a woman’s appearance that will backfire when she spiritually knows where her true beauty comes from. I do believe this to be true. for those of us who have done that inner work, perhaps taking the outer risk is not worth it and will backfire. perhaps we need to look at ourselves with different eyes altogether, even when procedures are at an all-time high. this can be particularly difficult for public figures. I’ve worked with a number of them. I’ve worked with women who have been criticized for their appearance or what they have “done” to their appearance, and I have worked with women who have been glorified for their appearance, while clearly having “done” things to achieve that classic cult-look. they range in ages from 20-60. and at the end of the day, I can guarantee you that none of them is more or less beautiful because of their plastic surgery. what it actually boils down to is how we feel about ourselves, and then what we can “safely” negotiate upon with ourselves, because we are excited to put a little “spunk” back into our look after having kids or hitting late 30s or whatever someone’s desire is. even if you are 20 or 40 or 60 or whatever, and you want to do xyz because you find it exciting, then YOU DO YOU! — no one should judge that, and this is not a commentary of opinion. but what should happen, is inner knowing and happiness first. this will avoid feeling like something needs to be done to “prevent” something — like the lack of acceptance from otherwise romantic prospects, or rejection from peers. when we take the offensive with respect to our feels ad looks, we are typically in good and far better graces than trying to “fix” something. the defensive is a lack of acceptance of self. doing or not doing something to your physical appearance is neither here nor there — it is not “fake” or sinful, and it is also not “necessary”. what it will bottom-line down to is your personal rationale and background, and taking strong “pro” /on-the-offense with excitement approach. I hope I have adequately explained the difference…and just to reiterate, I am pro-do-YOU — WHATEVER that is.

 

I share my story/background with my physical appearance because it’s actually not super important to me in terms of how it defines me. I used to shame myself for looking like a boy, and then I used to shame myself for being pretty because I was afraid of being judged on my looks (like, seen as not smart — which has happened and still happens a lot by the way and it’s my greatest filter for being underestimated). you can’t win when you worry either way. I am now loud and proud of the way I look and I will rock that until I die. if there is anything my prepubescent buzz cut and disruptive living circumstances taught me, it was that all I had was my inner self. it took me completely OUT of the physical. and now the physical is just part of being a human for me. I share this also because not too long ago, someone had commented on one of my news articles that I had a “pretty and fake face” — this is particularly interesting because 1) it was a man (shocking), and 2) I had NO procedures whatsoever happening in that photograph except for mascara. in addition there was like zero photoshop or filter happening in the photo. I thought “wow, people are really hyper-focused on the physical, more than will ever be willing to understand”. I realize how harshly women in particular may judge themselves or measure themselves and I hope that part of my share — and this seemingly alarming message from my recent conversations with women of botched procedures — can serve somehow. in our new age of tech there will always be trolls, and it won’t matter what we do or don’t do. people will draw conclusions and that’s all irrelevant stuff. what is relevant is who are you, what do you want, and why? and, if you are one of the super “woke” who is already beautiful inside and out, remember one thing: you might be tested. you might be tested to KNOW your true beauty, that comes only from within. this is what I see when I see people by the way, I can’t usually see the physical first. in fact, some of the most physically “attractive” people, I have been so utterly repulsed by with no real “reason” (except for the fact that they are hideous inside). and others have witnessed it with me! if you are woke and tested, you may end up with a botched procedure just to remind you of what and who you truly are. and perhaps that will create the gratitude that is wanting to surface like a high-tide. and make you more beautiful than ever. I am grateful for those who have recently shared their experiences with me, because I think that for some reason it will create something positive for anyone reading this. and, for me — perhaps I was going to pull the botox trigger for the first time (I have been specifically debating it for the past few months), and now I am not because this feels like a personal message from above for me.

 

there is no beauty as powerful as energy. it does not even exist.

 

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Jayne Mansfield (born Vera Jayne Palmer; April 19, 1933 – June 29, 1967) was an American actress in film, theatre, and television. She was also a nightclub entertainer, a singer, and one of the early Playboy Playmates. She was a major Hollywood sex symbol of the 1950s and early 1960s and 20th Century Fox's alternative to Marilyn Monroe who came to be known as the "Working Man's Monroe".[1][2] She was also known for her well-publicized personal life and publicity stunts, such as wardrobe malfunctions.[3][4] She was one of Hollywood's original blonde bombshells,[5] and, although many people have never seen her movies,[6] Mansfield remains one of the most recognizable icons of 1950s celebrity culture.[6]

 

Mansfield became a major Broadway star in 1955, a major Hollywood star in 1956, and a leading celebrity in 1957.[7] While Mansfield's film career was short-lived, she had several box office successes and won a Theatre World Award and a Golden Globe. She enjoyed success in the role of fictional actress Rita Marlowe, both in the 1955–56 Broadway version and the 1957 Hollywood film version of Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?. Her other major movie performances were for The Girl Can't Help It (1956), The Wayward Bus (1957), and Too Hot to Handle (1960).

 

With decreased demand for big-breasted blonde bombshells and an increased negative backlash against her over-publicity, she became a box-office has-been by the early 1960s,[7] but she remained a popular celebrity, continuing to attract large crowds outside the United States and in lucrative and successful nightclub acts. In the sexploitation film Promises! Promises! (1963), she became the first major American actress to have a nude starring role in a Hollywood motion picture.

 

Mansfield's professional name came from her first husband, public relations professional Paul Mansfield, with whom she had a daughter. She was the mother of three children from her second marriage to actor–bodybuilder Mickey Hargitay. She had a son with her third husband film director Matt Cimber. In 1967, Mansfield died in a car accident at the age of 34

Completing the 1001 book version wouldn't be possible for me, but movies, well, maybe, but don't know if i wanted to.

 

This book's listing doesn't reach 1001 titles, but goes up to about 974, dated from 1902 up until 2003. I think its about time they update. I've marked the one I saw with an Astrix (*), two for the one I like. It looks like i've got a long way to go.

 

So far I'm not that impressed with all the movie in the list, so I'll check internet reviews before i add them to my viewing list.

 

"1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die"

 

1. A Trip to the Moon (1902)

2. The Great Train Robbery (1903)

3. The Birth of a Nation (1915)

4. Les Vampires (1915)

5. Intolerance (1916)

6. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919)

7. Broken Blossoms (1919)

8. Way Down East (1920)

9. Within Our Gates (1920)

10. The Phantom Carriage (1921)

11. Orphans of the Storm (1921)

12. The Smiling Madame Beudet (1922)

13. Dr. Mabuse, Parts 1 and 2 (1922)

14. Nanook of the North (1922)

15. Nosferatu, A Symphony of Terror(1922)

16. Haxan (1923)

17. Foolish Wives (1922)

18. Our Hospitality (1923)

19. The Wheel (1923)

20. The Thief of Bagdad (1924)

21. Strike (1924)

22. Greed (1924)

23. Sherlock, Jr. (1924)

24. The Last Laugh (1924)

25. Seven Chances (1925)

26. The Phantom of the Opera (1925)*

27. The Battleship Potemkin (1925)

28. The Gold Rush (1925)

29. The Big Parade (1925)

30. Metropolis (1927)

31. Sunrise (1927)

32. The General (1927)

33. The Unknown (1927)

34. October (1927)

35. The Jazz Singer (1927)

36. Napoleon (1927)

37. The Kid Brother (1927)

38. The Crowd (1928)

39. The Docks of New York (1928)

40. An Andalusian Dog (1928)

41. The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

42. Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928)

43. Storm over Asia (1928)

44. Blackmail (1929)

45. The Man with the Movie Camera (1929)

46. Pandora's Box (1929)

47. The Blue Angel (1930)

48. The Age Of Gold (1930)

49. Earth (1930)

50. Little Caesar (1930)

51. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

52. Freedom For Us (1931)

53. The Million (1931)

54. Tabu (1931)

55. Dracula (1931)

56. Frankenstein (1931)

57. City Lights (1931)

58. The Public Enemy (1931)

59. M (1931)

60. The Bitch (1931)

61. The Vampire (1932)

62. Love Me Tonight (1932)

63. Boudu Saved from Drowning (1932)

64. I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932)

65. Trouble in Paradise (1932)

66. Scarface: The Shame Of A Nation (1932)

67. Shanghai Express (1932)

68. Freaks (1932)

69. Me and My Gal (1932)

70. Zero for Conduct (1933)

71. 42nd Street (1933)

72. Footlight Parade (1933)

73. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

74. She Done Him Wrong (1933)

75. Duck Soup (1933)

76. Queen Christina (1933)

77. Land Without Bread (1933)

78. King Kong (1933)

79. The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933)

80. Sons of the Desert (1933)

81. It's a Gift (1934)

82. Triumph of the Will (1934)

83. L'Atalante (1934)

84. The Black Cat (1934)

85. Judge Priest (1934)

86. It Happened One Night (1934)

87. The Thin Man (1934)

88. Captain Blood (1935)

89. Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)

90. A Night at the Opera (1935)

91. The 39 Steps (1935)

92. Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

93. Top Hat (1935)

94. A Day in the Country (1936)

95. Modern Times (1936)

96. Swing Time (1936)

97. My Man Godfrey (1936)

98. Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

99. Camille (1936)

100. Sabotage (1936)

101. Dodsworth (1936)

102. Things to Come (1936)

103. The Story of a Cheat (1936)

104. Captains Courageous (1937)

105. Midnight Song (1937)

106. Grand Illusion (1937)

107. Stella Dallas (1937)

108. The Life of Emile Zola (1937)

109. Make Way for Tomorrow (1937)

110. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)

111. The Awful Truth (1937)

112. Pepe Le Moko (1937)

113. Jezebel (1938)

114. The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)*

115. Angels with Dirty Faces (1938)

116. Olympia (1938)

117. The Baker's Wife (1938)

118. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

119. Stagecoach (1939)

120. The Story of the Late Chrysanthemums (1939)

121. Babes in Arms (1939)

122. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

123. The Wizard of Oz (1939)

124. Destry Rides Again (1939)

125. Only Angels Have Wings (1939)

126. Gone With the Wind (1939)

127. Daybreak (1939)

128. Gunga Din (1939)

129. Ninotchka (1939)

130. The Rules of the Game (1939)

131. Wuthering Heights (1939)

132. His Girl Friday (1940)

133. Rebecca (1940)

134. Fantasia (1940)

135. The Philadelphia Story (1940)

136. The Grapes of Wrath (1940)

137. Dance, Girl, Dance (1940)

137. Pinocchio (1940)

138. The Mortal Storm (1940)

139. The Bank Dick (1940)

140. Citizen Kane (1941)

141. The Lady Eve (1941)

142. The Wolf Man (1941)

143. The Maltese Falcon (1941)*

144. Sergeant York (1941)

145. Dumbo (1941)

146. High Sierra (1941)

147. Sullivan's Travels (1941)

148. How Green Was My Valley (1941)

149. The Palm Beach Story (1942)

150. Now, Voyager (1942)

151. Casablanca (1942)

152. To Be or Not to Be (1942)

153. Cat People (1942)

154. The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

155. Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)

156. Meshes of the Afternoon (1943)

157. Fires Were Started (1943)

158. The Man in Grey (1943)

158. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)

159. I Walked with a Zombie (1943)

160. The Seventh Victim (1943)

161. The Ox-Bow Incident (1943)

162. Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

163. Ossessione (1943)

164. Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

165. To Have and Have Not (1944)

166. Laura (1944)

167. Gaslight (1944)

168. Henry V (1944)

169. Ivan the Terrible, Parts One and Two (1944)

170. Double Indemnity (1944)

171. Murder, My Sweet (1944)

172. The Battle of San Pietro (1945)

173. Spellbound (1945)

174. Mildred Pierce (1945)

175. The Children of Paradise (1945)

176. Open City (1945)

177. The Lost Weekend (1945)

178. Detour (1945)

179. I Know Where I'm Going! (1945)

180. The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)

181. Brief Encounter (1946)

182. Paisan (1946)

183. The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946)

184. My Darling Clementine (1946)

185. The Stranger (1946)

186. Beauty and the Beast (1946)

187. The Big Sleep (1946)

188. The Killers (1946)

189. A Matter of Life and Death (1946)

190. Great Expectations (1946)**

191. Notorious (1946)

192. Black Narcissus (1946)

193. It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

194. Gilda (1946)

195. Monsieur Verdoux (1947)

196. Out of the Past (1947)

197. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947)

198. Odd Man Out (1947)

199. The Bicycle Thief (1948)

200. Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948)

201. Secret Beyond the Door (1948)

202. Force of Evil (1948)

203. Spring in a Small Town (1948)

204. Red River (1948)

205. Rope (1948)

206. The Snake Pit (1948)

207. The Lady from Shanghai (1948)

208. The Paleface (1948)

209. The Red Shoes (1948)

210. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)

211. Louisiana Story (1948)

212. The Heiress (1949)

213. Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)

214. Gun Crazy (1949)

215. Adam's Rib (1949)

216. Whiskey Galore! (1949)

217. White Heat (1949)

218. The Reckless Moment (1949)

219. The Third Man (1949)

220. On the Town (1949)

221. Orpheus (1949)

222. The Asphalt Jungle (1950)

223. Rashomon (1950)

224. Winchester '73 (1950)

225. Rio Grande (1950)

226. All About Eve (1950)

227. Sunset Blvd. (1950)

228. Los Olvidados (1950)

229. In a Lonely Place (1950)

230. The Big Carnival (1951)

231. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

232. Strangers on a Train (1951)

233. The Lavender Hill Mob (1951)

234. Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951)

235. The African Queen (1951)

236. Diary of a Country Priest (1951)

237. An American in Paris (1951)

238. A Place in the Sun (1951)

239. The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

240. The Quiet Man (1952)

241. Forbidden Games (1952)

242. Angel Face (1952)

243. Singin' in the Rain (1952)

244. To Live (1952)

245. Europa '51 (1952)

246. The Bad and the Beautiful (1952)

247. The Big Sky (1952)

248. High Noon (1952)

249. Umberto D (1952)

250. The Golden Coach (1952)

251. The Bigamist (1953)

252. The Band Wagon (1953)

253. Madame De… (1953)

254. From Here to Eternity (1953)

255. Tokyo Story (1953)

256. Roman Holiday (1953)

257. Wages of Fear (1953)

258. The Naked Spur (1953)

259. Pickup on South Street (1953)

260. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

261. The Big Heat (1953)

262. M. Hulot's Holiday (1953)

263. Voyage in Italy (1953)

264. Tales of Ugetsu (1953)

265. Shane (1953)

266. Beat the Devil (1953)

267. Johnny Guitar (1954)

268. On the Waterfront (1954)

269. Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954)

270. Les Diaboliques (1954)

271. Animal Farm (1954)

272. Rear Window (1954)

273. A Star Is Born (1954)

274. The Barefoot Contessa (1954)

275. The Road (1954)

276. The Seven Samurai (1954)

277. The Wanton Countess (1954)

278. Silver Lode (1954)

279. Carmen Jones (1954)

280. Sansho the Baliff (1954)

281. Salt of the Earth (1954)

282. Artists and Models (1955)

283. Guys and Dolls (1955)

284. Pather Panchali (1955)

285. Bad Day at Black Rock (1955)

286. The Mad Masters (1955)

287. Hill 24 Doesn't Answer (1955)

287. The Ladykillers (1955)

288. Marty (1955)

289. Ordet (1955)

290. Bob the Gambler (1955)

291. Kiss Me Deadly (1955)

292. The Man from Laramie (1955)

293. Rebel Without a Cause (1955)

294. The Phenix City Story (1955)

295. Smiles of a Summer Night (1955)

296. Night and Fog (1955)

297. The Night of the Hunter (1955)

298. The Sins of Lola Montes (1955)

299. Forbidden Planet (1956)

300. The Burmese Harp (1956)

301. The Searchers (1956)

302. A Man Escaped (1956)

303. Written on the Wind (1956)

304. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

305. Giant (1956)

306. All That Heaven Allows (1956)

307. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

308. The Wrong Man (1956)

309. Bigger Than Life (1956)

310. High Society (1956)

311. The Ten Commandments (1956)

312. 12 Angry Men (1957)

313. The Seventh Seal (1957)

314. An Affair to Remember (1957)

315. Wild Strawberries (1957)

316. The Nights of Cabiria (1957)

317. Throne of Blood (1957)

318. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)

319. The Unvanquished (1957)

320. Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957)

321. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

322. Mother India (1957)

323. The Cranes Are Flying (1957)

324. Paths of Glory (1957)

325. Sweet Smell of Success (1957)

326. Man of the West (1958)

327. Touch of Evil (1958)

328. Cairo Station (1958)

328. Gigi (1958)

329. The Defiant Ones (1958)

330. Vertigo (1958)

331. Ashes and Diamonds (1958)

332. Horror of Dracula (1958)

333. My Uncle (1958)

334. The Music Room (1958)

335. The 400 Blows (1959)

336. North by Northwest (1959)

337. Some Like It Hot (1959)

338. Anatomy of a Murder (1959)

339. Eyes without a Face (1959)

340. Ride Lonesome (1959)

341. Black Orpheus (1959)

342. Shadows (1959)

343. The World of Apu (1959)

344. Breathless (1959)

345. Ben-Hur (1959)**

346. Pickpocket (1959)

347. Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959)

348. Rio Bravo (1959)

349. The Hole (1959)

350. Floating Weeds (1959)

351. Rocco and His Brothers (1960)

352. La Dolce Vita (1960)

353. Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960)

354. Shoot the Piano Player (1960)

355. The Adventure (1960)

356. The Young One (1960)

357. The Cloud-Capped Star (1960)

358. The Housemaid (1960)

358. Psycho (1960)

359. Revenge of the Vampire / Black Sunday (1960)

360. Peeping Tom (1960)

361. The Apartment (1960)

362. Spartacus (1960)

363. Splendor in the Grass (1961)

364. Last Year at Marienbad (1961)

365. The Pier (1961)

366. One-Eyed Jacks (1961)

367. Lola (1961)

368. Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)

369. The Night (1961)

370. Jules and Jim (1961)

371. Viridiana (1961)

372. The Ladies Man (1961)

373. Through a Glass Darkly (1961)

374. Chronicle of a Summer (1961)

375. The Hustler (1961)

376. West Side Story (1961)

377. A Dog's Life (1962)

378. Cleo from 5 to 7 (1962)

379. Dog Star Man (1962)

380. An Autumn Afternoon (1962)

381. The Eclipse (1962)

382. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

383. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

384. The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

385. Lolita (1962)

386. Keeper of Promises (1962)

387. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)

388. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962)

389. My Life to Live (1962)

390. Heaven and Earth Magic (1962)

390. The Birds (1963)

391. The Nutty Professor (1963)

392. Blonde Cobra (1963)

393. The Cool World (1963)

393. 8 1/2 (1963)

394. Passenger (1963)

395. Contempt (1963)

396. Hud (1963)

397. Winter Light (1963)

398. Flaming Creatures (1963)

399. The Great Escape (1963)

400. Shock Corridor (1963)

401. The Leopard (1963)

402. Barren Lives (1963)

403. Mediteranee (1963)

403. The House is Black (1963)

404. The Haunting (1963)

405. An Actor's Revenge (1963)

406. The Servant (1963)

407. Goldfinger (1964)**

408. Scorpio Rising (1964)

409. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964)

410. Marnie (1964)

411. My Fair Lady (1964)

412. Woman in the Dunes (1964)

413. Dr. Strangelove (1964)

414. A Hard Day's Night (1964)

415. The Red Desert (1964)

416. Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (1964)

417. The Masque of the Red Death (1964)

418. Before the Revolution (1964)

419. Gertrud (1964)

420. The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964)

421. Black God, White Devil (1964)

422. The Demon (1964)

423. Vinyl (1965)

424. The Shop on Main Street (1965)

425. Doctor Zhivago (1965)

426. The War Game (1965)

427. Tokyo Olympiad (1965)

428. The Battle of Algiers (1965)

429. The Sound of Music (1965)

430. The Saragossa Manuscript (1965)

431. Alphaville (1965)

432. Chimes at Midnight (1965)

433. Repulsion (1965)

434. Juliet of the Spirits (1965)

435. Pierrot Goes Wild (1965)

436. Faster, Pussy Cat! Kill! Kill! (1965)

437. Golden River (1965)

438. The Man Who Had His Hair Cut Short (1965)

439. Hold Me While I'm Naked (1966)

440. Blowup (1966)

441. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966)

442. Daisies (1966)

443. Come Drink with Me (1966)

444. Seconds (1966)

445. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)

446. Persona (1966)

447. Masculine-Feminine (1966)

448. Balthazar (1966)

449. In the Heat of the Night (1967)

450. Two or Three Things I Know About Her (1967)

451. The Graduate (1967)

452. Playtime (1967)

453. Report (1967)

453. Hombre (1967)

454. Belle de Jour (1967)

455. The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967)

456. Week End (1967)

457. The Godson (1967)

458. Cool Hand Luke (1967)

459. Point Blank (1967)

460. Wavelength (1967)

461. Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

462. The Red and the White (1967)

463. Marketa Lazarova (1967)

464. The Jungle Book (1967)

465. The Fireman's Ball (1967)

466. Earth Entranced (1967)

467. Closely Watched Trains (1967)

468. Vij (1967)

469. The Cow (1968)

470. Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

471. Planet of the Apes (1968)

472. Faces (1968)

473. Rosemary's Baby (1968)

474. If… (1968)

475. Memories of Underdevelopment (1968)

476. The Producers (1968)

477. David Holzman's Diary (1968)

477. Shame (1968)

478. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)**

479. Hour of the Wolf (1968)

480. Targets (1968)

481. Night of the Living Dead (1968)

482. My Night with Maud (1969)

483. Lucia (1969)

483. A Touch of Zen (1969)

484. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)

485. Midnight Cowboy (1969)

486. Satyricon (1969)

487. Z (1969)

488. The Conformist (1969)

489. Easy Rider (1969)

490. High School (1969)

491. In the Year of the Pig (1969)

492. The Wild Bunch (1969)

493. Andrei Rublev (1969)

494. The Butcher (1969)

495. The Color of Pomegranates (1969)

496. Kes (1969)

497. Tristana (1970)

498. Five Easy Pieces (1970)

499. El Topo (1970)

500. Woodstock (1970)

501. Deep End (1970)

502. The Spider's Stratagem (1970)

503. Little Big Man (1970)

504. The Ear (1970)

505. Patton (1970)

506. M*A*S*H (1970)

507. Performance (1970)

508. Gimme Shelter (1970)

509. Zabriskie Point (1970)

510. The Bird with The Crystal Plumage (1970)

511. The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1970)

512. Wanda (1971)

512. W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism (1971)

513. A Clockwork Orange (1971)

514. The Sorrow and the Pity (1971)

515. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971)

516. McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971)

517. Walkabout (1971)

518. Klute (1971)

519. Harold and Maude (1971)

520. Red Psalm (1971)

521. Get Carter (1971)

522. The French Connection (1971)

523. Shaft (1971)

524. Dirty Harry (1971)

525. Murmur of the Heart (1971)

526. Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971)

527. The Last Picture Show (1971)

528. Straw Dogs (1971)

529. Two-Lane Blacktop (1971)

530. The Heartbreak Kid (1972)

531. Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972)

532. Cabaret (1972)

533. Last Tango in Paris (1972)

534. High Plains Drifter (1972)

535. Sleuth (1972)

536. Deliverance (1972)

537. Solaris (1972)

538. The Godfather (1972)

539. Cries and Whispers (1972)

540. Fat City (1972)

541. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)

542. The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant (1972)

543. Frenzy (1972)

544. Pink Flamingos (1972)

545. Superfly (1972)

546. The Sting (1973)

547. The Mother and the Whore (1973)

548. Badlands (1973)

549. American Graffiti (1973)

550. Papillon (1973)

551. Enter the Dragon (1973)

552. Mean Streets (1973)

553. The Long Goodbye (1973)

554. The Wicker Man (1973)

555. Day for Night (1973)

556. Don't Look Now (1973)

557. Sleeper (1973)

558. Serpico (1973)

559. The Exorcist (1973)

560. Turkish Delight (1973)

561. The Spirit of the Beehive (1973)

562. Fantastic Planet (1973)

563. Amarcord (1973)

564. The Harder They Come (1973)

565. Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973)

566. Dersu Uzala (1974)

567. The Conversation (1974)

568. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)*

569. The Mirror (1974)

570. A Woman Under the Influence (1974)

571. Young Frankenstein (1974)

572. Chinatown (1974)

573. Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974)

574. Blazing Saddles (1974)

575. The Godfather Part II (1974)**

576. Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974)

577. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974)

578. Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

579. One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

580. Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai Du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975)

581. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)

582. The Wall (1975)

583. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

584. Barry Lyndon (1975)

585. Fox and His Friends (1975)

586. India Song (1975)

586. Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975)

587. Manila in the Claws of Brightness (1975)

588. Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975)

589. Nashville (1975)

590. Cria! (1975)

591. The Travelling Players (1975)

592. Jaws (1975)*

593. The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976)

594. Carrie (1976)*

595. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)

596. All the President's Men (1976)

597. Rocky (1976)**

598. Taxi Driver (1976)

599. Network (1976)

600. Ascent (1976)

601. In the Realm of the Senses (1976)

602. 1900 (1976)

603. The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

604. Star Wars (1977)*

605. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

606. The Last Wave (1977)

607. Annie Hall (1977)

608. Last Chants for a Slow Dance (1977)

608. Stroszek (1977)

609. Man of Marble (1977)

610. Saturday Night Fever (1977)

611. Killer of Sheep (1977)

612. Eraserhead (1977)

613. Ceddo (1977)

613. The American Friend (1977)

614. The Hills Have Eyes (1977)

615. Soldier of Orange (1977)

616. Suspiria (1977)

617. The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978)

618. Five Deadly Venoms (1978)

619. The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978)

620. The Deer Hunter (1978)

621. Grease (1978)**

622. Days of Heaven (1978)

623. Dawn of the Dead (1978)

624. Shaolin Master Killer (1978)

625. Up in Smoke (1978)

626. Halloween (1978)

627. The Marriage of Maria Braun (1979)

628. Real Life (1979)

628. My Brilliant Career (1979)

629. Stalker (1979)

630. Alien (1979)*

631. Breaking Away (1979)

632. The Tin Drum (1979)

633. All That Jazz (1979)

634. Being There (1979)

635. Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)

636. Life of Brian (1979)

637. Apocalypse Now (1979)

638. The Jerk (1979)

639. The Muppet Movie (1979)

640. Manhattan (1979)

641. Mad Max (1979)

642. Nosferatu: Phantom Of The Night (1979)

643. Ordinary People (1980)

644. Atlantic City (1980)

645. The Last Metro (1980)

646. The Shining (1980)*

647. Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back (1980)**

648. The Elephant Man (1980)

649. The Big Red One (1980)

650. Loulou (1980)

651. Airplane! (1980)

652. Raging Bull (1980)

653. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)*

654. The Boat (1981)

655. Gallipoli (1981)

656. Chariots of Fire (1981)*

657. Body Heat (1981)

658. Reds (1981)

659. An American Werewolf in London (1981)*

660. Three Brothers (1981)

660. Man of Iron (1981)

661. Too Early, Too Late (1981)

661. Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1981)

662. E.T.: The Extra-Terestrial (1982)**

663. The Thing (1982)

664. Poltergeist (1982)

665. Blade Runner (1982)

666. The Evil Dead (1982)

667. Tootsie (1982)**

668. Yol (1982)

669. Diner (1982)

670. Fitzcaraldo (1982)

671. Gandhi (1982)***

672. The Night of the Shooting Stars (1982)

673. A Question of Silence (1982)

673. Fanny and Alexander (1982)

674. A Christmas Story (1983)

675. El Norte (1983)

676. Videodrome (1983)

677. Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (1983)*

678. The Big Chill (1983)

679. Sunless (1983)

680. The Last Battle (1983)

681. Money (1983)

682. Utu (1983)

683. Terms of Endearment (1983)

684. The Fourth Man (1983)

685. The King of Comedy (1983)

686. The Right Stuff (1983)*

687. Koyaanisqatsi (1983)

688. Once Upon a Time in America (1983)

689. Scarface (1983)**

690. The Ballad of Narayama (1983)

691. Amadeus (1984)

692. The Terminator (1984)

693. Paris, Texas (1984)

694. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

695. This Is Spinal Tap (1984)

696. Beverly Hills Cop (1984)*

697. Ghostbusters (1984)**

698. A Passage to India (1984)

699. Stranger Than Paradise (1984)

700. The Killing Fields (1984)

701. The Natural (1984)

702. The Breakfast Club (1985)

703. Ran (1985)

704. Come and See (1985)

705. The Official Story (1985)

706. Out of Africa (1985)

707. The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985)

708. Back to the Future (1985)**

709. The Time to Live and the Time to Die (1985)

710. Brazil (1985)

711. Kiss of the Spider Woman (1985)

712. The Quiet Earth (1985)

713. Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985)

714. Prizzi's Honor (1985)

715. Vagabond (1985)

716. Shoah (1985)

717. The Color Purple (1985)

718. Manhunter (1986)

719. Stand By Me (1986)***

720. Blue Velvet (1986)

721. Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)

722. She's Gotta Have It (1986)

723. The Decline of the American Empire (1986)

724. The Fly (1986)**

725. Aliens (1986)

726. Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986)

727. Down by Law (1986)

728. A Room with a View (1986)

729. Children of a Lesser God (1986)

730. Platoon (1986)*

731. Caravaggio (1986)

732. Tampopo (1986)

733. Peking Opera Blues (1986)

734. Salvador (1986)

735. Top Gun (1986)**

736. Sherman's March (1986)

736. The Horse Thief (1986)

737. Brightness (1987)

738. Wings of Desire (1987)

739. Project A, Part II (1987)

740. Babette's Feast (1987)

741. Raising Arizona (1987)

742. Full Metal Jacket (1987)

743. Withnail and I (1987)

744. Good Morning, Vietnam (1987)

745. Goodbye Children (1987)

746. Broadcast News (1987)

747. Housekeeping (1987)

747. The Princess Bride (1987)

748. Moonstruck (1987)

749. The Untouchables (1987)**

750. Red Sorghum (1987)

751. The Dead (1987)

752. Fatal Attraction (1987)*

753. A Chinese Ghost Story (1987)

754. Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988)

755. The Vanishing (1988)

756. Bull Durham (1988)

757. Ariel (1988)

758. The Thin Blue Line (1988)

759. Akira (1988)

760. Cinema Paradiso (1988)

761. Hotel Terminus: The Life and Times of Klaus Barbie (1988)

761. A Fish Called Wanda (1988)*

762. The Naked Gun (1988)*

763. Big (1988)*

764. Dangerous Liaisons (1988)

765. Grave of the Fireflies (1988)

766. Landscape in the Mist (1988)

767. The Decalogue (1988)

768. Die Hard (1988)**

769. A Tale of the Wind (1988)

770. Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)**

771. Rain Man (1988)**

772. The Story of Women (1988)

773. The Accidental Tourist (1988)

774. Alice (1988)

775. Batman (1989)*

776. When Harry Met Sally (1989)**

777. Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989)

778. The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover (1989)

779. Drugstore Cowboy (1989)

780. My Left Foot (1989)

781. The Killer (1989)

782. Do the Right Thing (1989)

783. Roger & Me (1989)

784. Glory (1989)

785. The Asthenic Syndrome (1989)

786. Sex, Lies and Videotape (1989)

787. Say Anything (1989)

788. The Unbelievable Truth (1989)

789. A City of Sadness (1989)

790. No Fear, No Die (1990)

790. Reversal of Fortune (1990)

791. Goodfellas (1990)

792. Jacob's Ladder (1990)

793. King of New York (1990)

794. Dances with Wolves (1990)**

795. Europa Europa (1990)

796. Pretty Woman (1990)*

797. Archangel (1990)

798. Trust (1990)

799. Close-Up (1990)

800. Edward Scissorhands (1990)**

801. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1990)

802. Total Recall (1990)*

803. Once Upon a Time in China (1991)

804. Boyz 'n the Hood (1991)

805. Raise the Red Lantern (1991)

806. Delicatessen (1991)

807. A Brighter Summer Day (1991)

808. Naked Lunch (1991)

809. The Beautiful Troublemaker (1991)**

810. The Rapture (1991)

811. My Own Private Idaho (1991)

812. Thelma & Louise (1991)

813. Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)**

814. The Silence of the Lambs (1991)**

815. JFK (1991)

816. Slacker (1991)

817. Tongues Untied (1991)

818. Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (1991)

819. The Double Life of Veronique (1991)

820. Strictly Ballroom (1992)

821. The Player (1992)

822. Reservoir Dogs (1992)

823. Romper Stomper (1992)

824. Glengarry Glen Ross (1992)

825. Unforgiven (1992)**

826. Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992)

827. Candy Man (1992)

828. A Tale of Winter (1992)

829. Aileen Wuornos: The Selling of a Serial Killer (1992)

830. The Crying Game (1992)**

831. Man Bites Dog (1992)

832. The Actress (1992)

833. Farewell My Concubine (1993)

834. Thirty Two Films about Glenn Gould (1993)

835. Groundhog Day (1993)

836. Short Cuts (1993)

837. Philadelphia (1993)**

838. Jurassic Park (1993)**

839. The Age of Innocence (1993)

840. The Puppetmaster (1993)

841. Schindler's List (1993)**

842. Three Colors: Blue (1993)

843. The Piano (1993)

844. The Blue Kite (1993)

845. The Wedding Banquet (1993)

846. Three Colors: Red (1994)

847. Hoop Dreams (1994)

848. Forrest Gump (1994)**

849. Clerks (1994)

850. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994)**

851. The Lion King (1994)*

852. Satantango (1994)

853. Natural Born Killers (1994)*

854. The Last Seduction (1994)

855. Pulp Fiction (1994)***

856. The Shawshank Redemption (1994)**

857. The Wild Reeds (1994)

858. Chungking Express (1994)

859. Crumb (1994)

860. Heavenly Creatures (1994)

861. Through the Olive Trees (1994)

862. Riget (1994)

863. Dear Diary (1994)

864. Casino (1995)

865. Deseret (1995)

865. Babe (1995)*

866. Toy Story (1995)**

867. Strange Days (1995)

868. Braveheart (1995)**

869. Safe (1995)

870. Clueless (1995)*

871. Heat (1995)*

872. Zero Kelvin (1995)

872. Seven (1995)

873. Smoke (1995)

874. The White Balloon (1995)

875. Cyclo (1995)

876. Underground (1995)

877. The Brave Heart Will Take the Bride (1995)

878. Dead Man (1995)

879. The Usual Suspects (1995)

880. The Pillow Book (1996)

881. Three Lives and Only One Death (1996)

882. Fargo (1996)

883. Independence Day (1996)*

884. Secrets and Lies (1996)

885. Breaking the Waves (1996)

886. The English Patient (1996)**

887. Gabbeh (1996)

888. Lone Star (1996)

889. Trainspotting (1996)

890. Scream (1996)

891. Deconstructing Harry (1997)

892. L.A. Confidential (1997)

893. Happy Together (1997)

894. Princess Mononoke (1997)

895. Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control (1997)

896. The Butcher Boy (1997)

897. The Ice Storm (1997)

898. Boogie Nights (1997)

899. Kundun (1997)

900. The Sweet Hereafter (1997)

901. Funny Games (1997)

902. Taste of Cherry (1997)

903. Open Your Eyes (1997)

904. Mother and Son (1997)

905. Titanic (1997)*

906. Tetsuo (1998)

907. The Celebration (1998)

908. Saving Private Ryan (1998)*

909. Buffalo 66 (1998)

910. Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998)

911. Run Lola Run (1998)

912. Rushmore (1998)

913. Pi (1998)

914. Happiness (1998)

915. The Thin Red Line (1998)

916. The Idiots (1998)

917. Sombre (1998)

917. Ring (1998)

918. There's Something About Mary (1998)**

919. Magnolia (1999)*

920. Beau Travail (1999)

921. The Blair Witch Project (1999)*

922. Taboo (1999)

923. Rosetta (1999)

924. All About My Mother (1999)

925. Three Kings (1999)**

926. The Wind Will Carry Us (1999)

927. The Audition (1999)

928. Time Regained (1999)

929. Fight Club (1999)**

930. Being John Malkovich (1999)*

931. American Beauty (1999)***

932. Attack the Gas Station! (1999)

933. Eyes Wide Shut (1999)*

934. The Sixth Sense (1999)**

935. The Matrix (1999)***

936. Nine Queens (2000)

937. The Captive (2000)

938. In the Mood for Love (2000)

939. Ali Zaoua, Prince of the Streets (2000)

940. Gladiator (2000)**

941. Kippur (2000)

942. A One and a Two (2000)

943. Requiem for a Dream (2000)

944. Amores Perros (2000)

945. Meet the Parents (2000)**

946. Signs & Wonders (2000)

946. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)**

947. Traffic (2000)**

948. The Gleaners and I (2000)

949. Memento (2000)

950. Dancer in the Dark (2000)

951. O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000)

952. Amelie (2001)

953. What Time Is It There? (2001)

954. And Your Mother Too (2001)

955. Kandahar (2001)

956. Spirited Away (2001)

957. The Piano Teacher (2001)**

958. The Son's Room (2001)

959. No Man's Land (2001)

960. Moulin Rouge (2001)**

961. Monsoon Wedding (2001)

962. Fat Girl (2001)

963. Mulholland Dr. (2001)

964. The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

965. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

966. A.I.: Artificial Intelligence (2001)

967. Gangs of New York (2002)

968. The Pianist (2002)*

969. Talk to Her (2002)

970. City of God (2002)

971. Russian Ark (2002)

972. Chicago (2002)**

973. The Barbarian Invasions (2003)

974. Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)***

 

I am going to try and go after the older films done back in the 80s, 70s and earlier, at the time didn't get appreciate (way too young / havn't been born) I 'm also interested to see which of these are your favorites, maybe i'll chase after them too.

 

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Theme Borrowed from the mystery novel:

Tread softly into the Darkness.

Subtit“Folle est la brebis qui au loup se confesse!”le:

*************************************

 

He had just walked out of the Gentlemen’s smoking lounge, when he felt a hand placed upon his shoulder, and a whiff of perfume. From behind his back came a soft feminine voice with a slight Yank drawl.

 

Excuse me sir, can I ask you do me the kindness of a favor? He turned, looking down into the most enchanting pair of smiling blue eyes. He beamed into her worried face, watching with pleasure as she gave him a timid smile back. If I am able mi-lady he honestly answered, deciding in a split second that this damsel was indeed was in a bit of distress, as his sharp grey eyes wolfishly drank her image in.

 

Her long blond hair was held up in back held in back, secured by a pair of twin diamond clips that erupted out expensive glitters in a fierce storm of intense colours as she moved her head. Her ears were home to a set of dangling diamond earrings that sparkled expensively, beckoningly, as they attracted interest to her face. She was quite nice-looking, in a mousey sort of way, her appearance helped by the flattering longish hunters green gown she wore: a long soft velvet skirt with a tight glossy satin bodice. Her gloveless hands and wrists were bare of any jewel to take away notice from her face. She had a black satin cape draped over one arm, along with a pair of green velvet gloves held tightly in one hand, along with a rhinestone clasped clutch matching her gown. As a movie producer, the man had learned that first impressions mean everything, and that for one as busy as himself, he needed to garner as much info as he could from them. He could tell this one wanted to ask him something, and seemed nervous about the proposal.

 

This is rather awkward she said, her eyes becoming large like a frightened kitten, but my date sort of left with someone else, and I realized that I have to walk to my car alone. I tried to ask one of the staff, but he just laughed in my face. Her lips drooped at this last part. Then I saw you leaving, and was hoping…. Her voice trailed off meekly.

 

He was surprised, he had just thought she had recognized him and was going to ask for an autograph, so much for his ego he reasoned. And his heart was touched by the wretchedness of this poor creature too scared to venture out into the parking lot alone, albeit, it did have very poor lighting he reasoned as he spoke in answer to her plea. He studied her for a few seconds, the look of hope in her face reaching out to him. No, he thought in a fatherly manner, as his eyes watched her dangling diamond earrings, A timid creature like this should not be out walking alone. Any thief in the area would zero in on her and her expensive finery like a honey drone to the flower. This is what he thought, what he said was:

  

Well, I wasn’t leaving, rather actually just heading upstairs to meet up with my wife, but with a smile, added that he would be most honored to escort the young lady out. Taking her arm and he lead her towards the main lobby. American he asked? Montana she admitted sweetly, the nasally lisping twang of her western accent endearingly gripped the producer, who had a well-known fondness for American westerns.

  

At the door he helped her on with her wrap, she faced him, her eyes brimming with gratitude. She reached up and stroked the side of his face; you’re a dear for doing this! You really are! She hugged him tightly, her warm figure feeling quite nice against his, as he felt her beating heart. As she started to slowly put on her long soft gloves, He made the mistake of asking how she ended up here in England? Ten minutes later she was still going strong in her story, standing on the spot and showing no sign of moving. He finally had to gently take her by the arm guide her out the door to her destination, as the talkative enchantress kept on with her story, never missing a beat.

 

He led her happily across the roundabout and along the path to the lot. Her car, a red roadster, was parked at the very furthest end. They reached it, and he opened the door for her, she threw her satin cape in the back, and Just before getting in she reached out, and with a gleam in her eyes, gave him another all-encompassing embrace. Ohh thank you, kind sir she cried happily, and breaking away, entered the car and started the engine roaring to life. He closed the door and watched as she drove away, giving him a wave as she turned the corner going out onto the road that bordered the park that surrounded the civic center-hotel complex.

 

He turned and walked back towards the lobby. Whistling to himself as he thought about his good deed completed for the rather charming damsel in distress. Out of habit he started to check his W &D Rolex Timepiece. Damn he said, missing it as he felt his silk vest pockets, damn It ! , I must have lost it in the lounge. He headed back there immediately, losing all thought of the charming young lady from Montana he had just left.

 

20 minutes earlier

 

In the bar of the Ballroom located 2 floors below the Gentlemen’s smoking lounge where a certain well-known movie producer was just finishing his cigar and brandy before venturing out and running into a certain petite Blonde form Montana.

 

A man outfitted as a waiter, coming out of a side corridor, enters the massive Ballroom. For a second, as he leaves the darkened corridor, he is blinded by the bright lights and dazzling displays laid out ever so appealingly before him.

 

A lady clad in a flowing, glittering gown, her neck, ears , wrist, and fingers laden with brite rubies, swayed past him, eyeing him indignantly as she did so. “Folle est la brebis qui au loup se confesse”, he thought to himself as he watched her swish away.

 

Then he continued looking around, letting it all soak in for a few tantalizing seconds, before spying the rather regal looking lady, holding herself every bit as the film star she was. Wearing a long satin strapless number that looked as though it had been poured over her figure, it fitted her that tightly. She was drinking by a long oak bar that took up one whole end of the mammoth, brightly lit room.

  

He walked up to her; thankfully she was alone, although it really would not have made any difference, only less likely for her to become hysterical without an audience to watch. He laid a hand upon her bare shoulder; she looked contemptuously at him, with the red bloodshot eyes of one who had been to freely imbibing of the house liquor. Pardon my interruption miss ( she liked being called that, he could see) but I’m afraid your husband has met with a small mishap. She looked into his eyes with her deep grey ones, he sensed she was possibly not all that alarmed by his statement. If you will come with me, I will take you to the ambulance that has been called for him. With a small flourish she sat her glass down. She picked up a shimmering jeweled purse that matched her gown up from the finely polished oak bar. He watched as her multiple rings flashing brilliantly as they rippled in the light. One ring in particular captured his notice, a large egg shaped diamond that emitted a peculiarly yellow light as it flashed from her ring finger. In a swirl of satin, the lady turned and followed him willingly enough to the back corridor. Only upon reaching it did she start to question him as to what on earth had happened, hiding her concern incredibly well he thought, wondering if indeed she was hiding anything.

  

Stopping to collect her wrap, a long Russian mink, he led her downstairs and to a side exit. This is a short cut he explained, as he held the door opened for him. She passed him, her hells clicking, gown whisper along the stone pathway outside. Just through these woods and around the corner he directed her as she headed off, with him keeping pace closely behind.

  

20 minutes later

 

The red roadster jarred to a stop along the, deserted, dark wooded road: causing the dangling earrings of the female driver to sparkle dimly in the moons light. She killed the round head lights and waited patiently, all sign of the worry and helplessness she had displayed earlier replaced by a coolly calm demeanor.

 

She looked around, her green gown shimmering in the bright moons light. Vie ne est pas d'attendre que la tempête , mais d'apprendre à danser sous la pluie , she whispered to herself, her voice losing its western drawl completely.

 

Reaching up she undid the expensive clips, and pulled off the wind swept yellow wig. Undoing her long , naturally flaming blood red coloured hair, she let it down, spilling down ever so like hot molten lava over the backside of her green satin gown, and along her well defined breasts, tightly outlined by the hunter’s green satin bodice in front. She then popped out the blue tinted contacts, her naturally green eyes shining with wicked pleasures in the moon lit car. She tossed both the wig and the contacts into the woods. She sat back in her seat with a contented little sigh, and prepared to wait it out.

  

She reached down and opened a man’s alligator billfold and casually started leafing through it. Then she heard it, her head raised up as her ears perked…. an owl’s hoot came from off in the distance inside the black woods. She unceremoniously threw the wallet down and restarted the engine. From those woods emerged the shadowy form of a male, wearing the white shirt, white tux and black pants of a staff servant for the nearby posh complex. He opened the passenger door, threw a heavy shiny bundle into the rumble seat and jumping over the door, climbed into the seat next to her. He leaned over and happily, deeply kissed the lady driver, and settled back contentedly as she gave gas to the motor, sending the engine racing before driving leisurely off.

  

He turned to her, wolfishly eyeballing the pretty lady driving the roadster. How did you make out my love, he asked his sweet wife. The red headed siren in green satin began speaking in her native dialect, decidedly not an American one. Her deep Irish brogue rolled the words along her tongue as she related how her part of the scheme had carried out.

  

Well Husband of mine ; after stalling him as long as He let me, I relieved him of both his fancy watch, and a wallet with over three hundred pounds she remarked triumphantly. Adding happily as she looked into his grinning face, it looks like you did pretty well yourself lover! She glanced at the bundle in the seat behind her, lying on top of a blanket, which concealed a pair of suitcases.

  

The mink and gown was a bonus he admitted. But I relieved the lady of her purse and jewels as planned stated wryly. All of her jewels she asked, licking her lips as if savoring some recent memory of the lady in question; which she in reality was, have had the opportunity to scope her out in the ballroom before attending the movie star’s husband.

  

All of them, right down to the last diamond pinky ring. Any troubles she asked, knowing full well what the answer would be. None he smirked, snaking a hand around her silky waist. He broke into an impersonation of the American actor Bogart: Darling, the dame never knew what hit her! He reached in the back and started to hide the bundle away out of obvious site.

  

But why her gown, she enquired, why chance taking the time?. It was your size he stated. Not hardly she snorted at him, but thank you for the compliment my love. So, did you have a reason other than wanting to get kicks from seeing a half-naked movie star, she teased poking him in the side.

  

Actually, my love, there was a method to my madness, he retorted. I knew that with her vanity, she will wait to find a way to somehow clothe herself before going into public to scream bloody murder about losing her jewels. And, we have the beacon for our efforts he said, grinning wickedly.

  

Excited by his words, she started to speed up a little. He squeezed his arm around her slippery slick waist, no need to hurry love, he told her in a comfortingly reassuring manner. We have plenty of time to make the morning ferry to the city of Douglas.

  

Once there, would they have time to freshen up before meeting with the mysterious dark skinned man with the heavy accent who was the acting intermediary willing to pay them the balance of the 25,000 pounds upon receipt of the yellowish looking , vulgarly large, diamond ring that a certain actress had been displaying for a time that evening.

  

Postscript:

In the early years of the Nazi regime, the Wellesley’s, a well-known Jewish family , possessed a Large yellow tinted diamond known as the Harwicke Beacon. It was the center stone of a magnificent necklace. The jewel was said to bring fortune to whomever had it in their possession. Although it had not been living up to its reputation for the family, once wealthy, had fallen upon hard times. Then to compound their misfortunes, the had to leave the family manor and flee to Switzerland under pressure from the Nazi political machine. They were caught, and the necklace was taken just as the border to freedom was in sight. They had been betrayed by a mysterious dark skinned informant from another country.

 

the Harwicke Beacon was believed to have been one of the occult relics sought by the Nazis to test and see if the mysterious powers could be harnessed for the good of the war effort.

 

Its whereabouts currently unknown, the Harwicke Beacon’s reappearance in today’s world may prove a vital clue to the treasure trove of similar occult related items( both religious and non) that were hidden by the Himmler during the collapse of Nazi Germany…..

*************************************************************************************

“Folle est la brebis qui au loup se confesse!”

(Silly is the sheep who to the wolf confesses)

 

Répétrer dans les ténèbres.

Tread softly into the Darkness.

 

Vie ne est pas d'attendre que la tempête , mais d'apprendre à danser sous la pluie .

Life is not about waiting out the storm, but about learning to dance in the rain.

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German postcard by Film und Bild, Berlin-Charlottenburg, no. A 1799. Photo: J. Arthur Rank Film.

 

English actress Hayley Mills (1946) began her acting career as a popular child star and was hailed as a promising newcomer for Tiger Bay (1959), and Pollyanna (1960). During the late 1960s she played in more mature roles. Although she has not maintained the box office success she experienced as a child actress, she has always continued to make films.

 

Hayley Catherine Rose Vivien Mills was born in London, England in 1946. She was the daughter of actor Sir John Mills and playwright Mary Hayley Bell, and the younger sister of actress Juliet Mills. As an infant she made her first film appearance in her father’s So Well Remembered (1947). At 12 she was noticed playing at her parent's home by director J. Lee Thompson. He was looking for a boy to play the lead role of a murder witness in his thriller Tiger Bay (1959) opposite Horst Buchholz and John Mills, but immediately cast Mills’ tomboy daughter. For her role she won the BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer and a Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival. Walt Disney's wife, Lillian Disney, saw her performance and suggested that Mills be given the lead role in Pollyanna (1960, David Swift). The role of the orphaned but infectiously optimistic girl who moves in with her crusty aunt Polly (Jane Wyman) made Mills a superstar in the USA. She earned a special Juvenile Oscar and a Golden Globe. Disney subsequently cast Mills as twins Sharon and Susan who reunite their divorced parents (Brian Keith and Maureen O’Hara) in the charming and highly entertaining The Parent Trap (1961, David Swift), based on the classic book by Erich Kästner. In the film, Mills sings the song Let's Get Together, which reached no. 8 on the Billboard Hot 100. The success led to the album Let's Get Together with Hayley Mills, which also included her only other hit song, Johnny Jingo (1962). She made four additional films for Disney in a four-year span, including In Search of the Castaways (1962, Robert Stevenson) with Maurice Chevalier, and Summer Magic (1963, James Neilson). Her final two Disney films, The Moon-Spinners (1964, James Neilson) with Pola Negri, and the suspense comedy That Darn Cat! (1965, Robert Stevenson), did well at the box office. During her six-year run at Disney, Mills was arguably the most popular child actress of the era. In addition to her Disney movies, Mills starred in several British films. Opposite Alan Bates she appeared in Whistle Down the Wind (1961, Bryan Forbes), based on the book of the same title written by her mother Mary Hayley Bell. The Chalk Garden (1964, Ronald Neame) with Deborah Kerr was based on a play by Enid Bagnold, and in The Truth About Spring (1965, Richard Thorpe) her real father, John Mills, was cast as her father. The 16-year-old Mills was considered for the role of Lolita Haze in Stanley Kubrick's film version of Lolita (1962). However, Walt Disney discouraged the casting, feeling the role was not up to Disney's wholesome standard, and the part eventually went to Sue Lyon. In later years, Mills admitted that she regretted not taking the part.

 

After her contract with Disney expired in 1965, Hayley Mills starred in the comedy The Trouble with Angels (1966, Ida Lupino), opposite Rosalind Russell. Looking to break from her sunny, innocent Pollyanna image, Mills returned to England to appear as a mentally challenged teenager in the film Sky West and Crooked (1966), which was directed by her father and written by her mother. She made her stage debut in a West End revival of Peter Pan (1966). Shortly thereafter, Mills starred with Hywell Bennett in the comedy The Family Way (1966, Roy Boulting) as a couple of newlyweds having difficulty consummating their marriage. The film, in which she played a brief nude scene, featured a score by Paul McCartney and arrangements by Beatles producer George Martin. She then starred as the protagonist of Pretty Polly (1967, Guy Green) , opposite famous Indian film actor Shashi Kapoor in Singapore, and another film for director Roy Boulting, the thriller Twisted Nerve (1968) again opposite Hywell Bennett. While filming The Family Way, the 20-year-old Mills had fallen in love with Boulting, who was 53-year-old and married. After his divorce, they married in 1971. Boulting took control of his young wife’s career, and, as a result, she made bad film choices that left critics and audiences cold, such as the Agatha Christie adaptation Endless Night (1972, Sidney Gilliat) co-starring Britt Ekland and George Sanders. After the even worse drama The Kingfisher Caper (1975, Dirk de Villiers) and the comedy What Changed Charley Farthing? (1976, Sidney Hayers), Mills dropped out of the film industry for a few years. In 1977 she divorced Boulting. And as Tommy Peter at IMDb observes: “her film career had pretty much tanked”.

 

In 1981 Hayley Mulls made a come-back in a starring role in the TV Mini-series The Flame Trees of Thika (1981, Roy Ward Baker), based on Elspeth Huxley's memoir of her childhood in East Africa. The series was well-received, prompting Mills to accept more acting roles. She returned to the US, and hosted for TV an episode of Disneyland (1981), sparking renewed interest in her Disney work. In 1986 she reprised her roles as twins Sharon and Susan for a trio of Parent Trap television movies: The Parent Trap II (1986, Ronald F. Maxwell), The Parent Trap III (1989, Mollie Miller), and The Parent Trap IV: Hawaiian Honeymoon (1989, Mollie Miller). Mills also starred as the title character in the Disney Channel-produced television series Good Morning, Miss Bliss (1987-1989). The show was cancelled after 14 episodes, and the rights were acquired by NBC, which reformatted Good Morning, Miss Bliss into Saved by the Bell (without Mills). Hayley Mills was involved with the ‘Hare Krishna’ movement, and wrote the preface to The Hare Krishna Book of Vegetarian Cooking (1984). In 1988 she co-edited, with Marcus Maclaine, the book My God, which consisted of brief letters from celebrities on their beliefs (or lack thereof) regarding God and the life to come. She then concentrated on a stage career and had success as Anna in The King and I, which she played in touring stage productions throughout the 1990's. In 2000 she made her Off Broadway debut in Sir Noël Coward's Suite in Two Keys, for which she won a Theatre World Award. In recognition for her work with The Walt Disney Company, Mills was awarded the prestigious Disney Legends award in 1998. Mills recalled her childhood in the documentary film Sir John Mills' Moving Memories (2000) which was written by her brother Jonathan. Later she appeared in the acclaimed short film, Stricken (2005, Jayce Bartok), the ITV1 African vet drama Wild at Heart (2007-) with her sister Juliet Mills, and in the family adventure Mandie and the Cherokee Treasure (2010, Joy Chapman), based on one of the popular Mandie novels of Lois Gladys Leppard. Most recently she was seen in Foster (2011, Jonathan Newman) with Toni Colette. In 2008, Mills was diagnosed with breast cancer. She had surgery and chemotherapy and told Good Housekeeping Magazine in January 2012 that she had recovered. Hayley Mills currently lives in New York City. Her son, Crispian Mills (1973), is known as the lead singer and guitarist of the psychedelic rock band Kula Shaker. He is now part of The Jeevas. She has a second son, Jason Lawson, from British actor Leigh Lawson, with whom she had a relationship between 1976 and 1984.

 

Sources: Tommy Peter (IMDb), Reel Classics, Wikipedia, and IMDb.

German postcard by ISV, no. T-13.

 

American film, stage and television actress Carroll Baker (1931) enjoyed popularity as both a serious dramatic actress and as a sex symbol. Cast in a wide range of roles during her heyday in the 1960s, Baker was especially memorable playing brash, flamboyant women, due to her beautiful features, striking blonde hair, and distinctive Southern drawl. In the late 1960s she moved to Italy, where she starred in numerous giallo thrillers and horror films.

 

Carroll Baker was born Karolina Piekarski in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 1931. Her parents were Virginia (née Duffy) and Polish born William Watson Baker (Piekarski), who was a travelling salesman. After spending a year in college, she began working as the assistant of magician the Great Volta and joined a dance company. Baker moved to New York City. In 1953, she married furrier Louie Ritter, but the marriage ended the same year. She studied acting under Lee Strasberg, eventually becoming part of the famed Actors Studio, where she was an acquaintance of Marilyn Monroe and became a close friend of James Dean. Baker began her film career with a small part in Easy to Love (Charles Walters, 1953). After appearing in television commercials, she took a role in the Broadway production of All Summer Long. Then director Elia Kazan cast her as the title character in his controversial Baby Doll (1956), based on a script by Tennessee Williams. Her role as the thumb-sucking teenage bride to a failed middle-aged cotton gin owner (Karl Malden) brought Baker instant fame as well as a certain level of notoriety. It earned her an Oscar nomination and a Golden Globe. She also appeared in Giant (George Stevens, 1956) alongside Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean.

 

Carroll Baker would go on to work steadily in films throughout the late fifties and early sixties. She appeared in a variety of genres: romances, such as The Miracle (Irving Rapper, 1959), co-starring a young Roger Moore, and But Not for Me (Walter Lang, 1959) with Clark Gable, as well as westerns, including The Big Country (William Wyler, 1958) and a lead role in the epic How the West Was Won (Henry Hathaway, John Ford, George Marshall, 1962); and steamy melodramas, including the controversial independent film Something Wild (1961), directed by her then-husband Jack Garfein, in which she plays a rape victim; and Station Six-Sahara (1962). Baker was also chosen by MGM for the lead in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, but her contract with Warner Brothers prevented her from accepting the role, which ultimately went to Elizabeth Taylor. Baker's portrayal of a Jean Harlow-type movie star in The Carpetbaggers (Edward Dmytryk, 1964) brought her a second wave of notoriety. The film was the top money-maker of that year, with domestic box-office receipts of $13,000,000 and marked the beginning of a tumultuous relationship with the film's producer, Joseph E. Levine. Based on her Carpetbaggers performance, Levine began to develop Baker as a sex symbol, casting her in the title roles of Sylvia (Gordon Douglas, 1965) and Harlow (Joseph E. Levine, 1965). Despite much pre-publicity, the latter film was not a success, and relations between Baker and Levine soured.

 

In the late 1960s, Carroll Baker moved to Italy after a protracted legal battle with Paramount Pictures, as well as a divorce from her second husband, Jack Garfein. The next decade, she starred in a multitude of Italian films. These included several horror films and giallo thrillers such as L’Harem/Her Harem (Marco Ferreri, 1967) with Renato Salvatori, Il dolce corpo di Deborah/The Sweet Body of Deborah (Romolo Guerrieri, 1968) opposite Jean Sorel, and Il diavolo a sette face/The Devil Has Seven Faces (Osvaldo Civirani, 1971). She became a favourite of cult director Umberto Lenzi who directed her in the horror films Così dolce... così perversa/So Sweet... So Perverse (1969) with Jean-Louis Trintignant, Orgasmo/Paranoia (1969) with Lou Castel, Paranoia/A Quiet Place to Kill (1970), and Il coltello di ghiaccio/Knife of Ice (1972). She followed her roles in Lenzi's films with a leading role in Baba Yaga/Black Magic (Corrado Farina, 1973) as the titular witch, alongside George Eastman. In those years, film locations would take her all around the world, including Spain, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Mexico. She returned to American cinema with a leading part as a beauty salon owner who provides hit men with jobs in Andy Warhol's Bad (Jed Johnson, 1977). She played a washed-up actress living among expatriates in a Spanish village in Las flores del vicio/The Sky Is Falling (Silvio Narizzano, 1979) with Dennis Hopper. She appeared in British theatre productions of Bell, Book, and Candle; Rain, Lucy Crown, and Motive. There she met her third husband, stage actor Donald Burton. Baker starred in the Walt Disney-produced horror film, The Watcher in the Woods (John Hough, 1980), alongside Bette Davis and played the mother of Dorothy Stratten in Star 80 (Bob Fosse, 1983). She also played Jack Nicholson's wife in Ironweed (Héctor Babenco, 1987). She later had supporting roles in Kindergarten Cop (Ivan Reitman, 1990) and the acclaimed thriller The Game (David Fincher, 1997), before retiring in 2002. During a career spanning 50 years, Carroll Baker appeared in over 80 roles in film, television, and theatre. In 1983, Baker published a well-received autobiography entitled Baby Doll: An Autobiography, and later wrote two other books, To Africa with Love, and a novel entitled A Roman Tale. Baker has two children with Jack Garfein, Blanche Baker (1956) and Herschel Garfein (1958).

 

Sources: AllMovie, Glamour Girls of the Silver Screen, Wikipedia and IMDb.

srilankaactressmodel.blogspot.com/2010/12/srilankan-modls...

 

She’s bold. She’s beautiful. She’s intelligent. She is everything in one package. She is Sarah Stephani Walker – a new generation model who is blessed with all the right features.

 

You are just 19…but you appear to be more mature then your age?

“Well, I don’t think maturity comes with age, it comes with experience and attitude towards life.

   

Are you happy about your journey so far in the glamour world?

“Of course, there’s nothing to grumble about. I have posed for magazines as a model and have also done a couple of popular visuals. I believe I have a long journey to make in this field.

  

Are you happy with the feedback you are getting now?

“It’s so flattering to know that you are recognized by the people. However I make it a point to change my outlook quite regularly and that makes people wonder who this new girl is. I like to be different at all times. I love changes in life and my looks. Looking different is so lovely, I should say.

   

Any links to glamour in your family?

“No, not in my immediate family circle but I had a cousin called Tissa who really supported and motivated me into this field. I am also grateful to Rozanne Diasz who helped m a lot.

   

What kind of person is this ‘Sarah’?

“Oh she is a shy reserved type of person who comes out of her shell when the camera is switched on. I respect people and their views. I hate people who try to show off. I always want to have my feet firmly placed on the ground.

   

Was it your dream to become a model some day?

“Not really, but these thoughts were playing up in my mind from my schooldays as well. I was also dreaming of becoming a teacher, just like any other girl. I will be following a pre school teacher training course soon. Whatever I do, I want to do them in a professional manner. I must thank my director Rasika who helps me maintain this standard in the field.

   

Are you happy about your journey so far in the glamour world?

“Of course, there’s nothing to grumble about. I have posed for magazines as a model and have also done a couple of popular visuals. I believe I have a long journey to make in this field.

  

Are you happy with the feedback you are getting now?

“It’s so flattering to know that you are recognized by the people. However I make it a point to change my outlook quite regularly and that makes people wonder who this new girl is. I like to be different at all times. I love changes in life and my looks. Looking different is so lovely, I should say.

   

Any links to glamour in your family?

“No, not in my immediate family circle but I had a cousin called Tissa who really supported and motivated me into this field. I am also grateful to Rozanne Diasz who helped m a lot.

   

What kind of person is this ‘Sarah’?

“Oh she is a shy reserved type of person who comes out of her shell when the camera is switched on. I respect people and their views. I hate people who try to show off. I always want to have my feet firmly placed on the ground.

   

Was it your dream to become a model some day?

“Not really, but these thoughts were playing up in my mind from my schooldays as well. I was also dreaming of becoming a teacher, just like any other girl. I will be following a pre school teacher training course soon. Whatever I do, I want to do them in a professional manner. I must thank my director Rasika who helps me maintain this standard in the field.

Spadina Avenue Looking North

 

Oh, thanks for taking the video link down (WMG I suppose...) - Mike

 

*****

 

"Disco is a French movie directed by Fabien Onteniente, which was released on 2 April 2008, with Franck Dubosc as 'Didier Travolta' in the main role.

 

The main subject of this movie is the rebirth of disco music at the mid-2000s in a town of France. The film is at first humorous, with a lot of clichés about Saturday Night Fever, but it doesn't disparage the disco culture at any time. In fact, all the people involved in this film are fans of disco, dance and funk music.

 

The soundtrack to the film contains a cover version of the Bee Gees' 'Night Fever' performed by Australian singer and songwriter Tina Arena." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disco_(film)

 

*****

 

"'Night Fever', is a disco song, written and performed by The Bee Gees. It first appeared on the soundtrack to Saturday Night Fever. Producer Robert Stigwood wanted to call the film Saturday Night, but singer Robin Gibb expressed hesitation at the title. Stigwood liked the title Night Fever but was wary of marketing a movie with that name. He combined the two suggestions and the idea for Saturday Night Fever as a motion picture was born.

 

'Night Fever' remained the number one Billboard Hot 100 single for over two months in 1978. It also replaced Andy Gibb's 'Love Is Thicker Than Water' at number one, and was in turn replaced by Yvonne Elliman's 'If I Can't Have You' - all of which were written and produced by the Gibb brothers.

 

After the success of 'Night Fever,' the Governor of Florida, Reubin O'Donovan Askew, made the three men 'honorary citizens' of the state, due to the amount of time they spent each year recording singles in Miami.

 

In addition to Saturday Night Fever, the song has also appeared in the movie and on the soundtrack for Mystery Men.

 

A rare music video was made for the song, however it wasn't shown to the public until 2004 despite the fact the video didn't contain any uncensored content. An interesting note, in the video Barry Gibb was shown without his trademark beard.

 

The song lists at #33 on Billboard's All Time Top 100." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_Fever

 

*****

 

"The Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb. The multiple award-winning group was successful for most of its forty years of recording music, but the trio had two distinct periods of exceptional success: as a harmonic 'soft rock' act in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and as the foremost stars of the disco music era in the late 1970s. The group sang three-part tight harmonies that were instantly recognizable; brother Robin's clear vibrato lead was a hallmark of their earlier hits, while Barry's R&B falsetto became a signature sound during the disco years. The three brothers co-wrote most of their own hits, as well as writing and producing several major hits for other artists.

 

Born on the Isle of Man to English parents, the family lived in various locales that included Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester, England, United Kingdom and Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, where they began their musical careers. After early chart success in Australia, they returned to the United Kingdom where producer Robert Stigwood promoted them to a worldwide audience. It has been estimated that the Bee Gees' record sales total more than 200 million, making them one of the best-selling music artists of all time. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997; fittingly, the presenter of the award to 'Britain's first family of harmony' was Brian Wilson, historical leader of the Beach Boys, America's first family of rock harmony. Their Hall of Fame citation says 'Only Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Michael Jackson, Garth Brooks and Paul McCartney have outsold the Bee Gees'.

 

Barry and Robin Gibb ended the group after forty-five years of activity, when Maurice suddenly died on January 12, 2003." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bee_Gees

 

*****

 

"Tina Arena is an Australian singer, songwriter and musical theatre actress. Over her long career in the entertainment industry she has won numerous awards, most notably 5 ARIA Awards and in both 1996 and 2000 she received the World Music Award for the world's best selling Australian artist. She has sold over 7.5 million albums worldwide to date." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tina_Arena

 

Listen to the ground:

there is movement all around.

There is something goin' down

and I can feel it.

 

On the waves of the air,

there is dancin' out there.

If it's somethin' we can share,

we can steal it.

 

And that sweet city woman,

She moves through the light,

Controlling my mind and my soul.

When you reach out for me

Yeah, and the feelin' is bright,

 

Then I get night fever, night fever.

We know how to do it.

Gimme that night fever, night fever.

We know how to show it.

 

Here I am,

Prayin' for this moment to last,

Livin' on the music so fine,

Borne on the wind,

Makin' it mine.

 

Night fever, night fever.

We know how to do it.

Gimme that night fever, night fever.

We know how to show it.

 

In the heat of our love,

Don't need no help for us to make it.

Gimme just enough to take us to the mornin'.

I got fire in my mind.

I got higher in my walkin'.

And I'm glowin' in the dark;

I give you warnin'.

 

And that sweet city woman,

She moves through the light,

Controlling my mind and my soul.

When you reach out for me

Yeah, and the feelin' is bright,

 

Then I get night fever, night fever.

We know how to do it.

Gimme that night fever, night fever.

We know how to show it.

 

Here I am,

Prayin' for this moment to last,

Livin' on the music so fine,

Borne on the wind,

Makin' it mine.

 

Night fever, night fever.

We know how to do it.

Gimme that night fever, night fever.

We know how to show it.

 

BOSNIAN MERMAID - ALEKSANDRA at CONEY ISLAND BEACH, NYC

 

You can see the entire session here:

BOSNIAN MERMAID

 

photo by:

Roman Kajzer @FotoManiacNYC

FACEBOOK / INSTAGRAM / FLICKR / TWITTER

 

HISTORY OF THE BIKINI

 

Time magazine list of top 10 bikinis in popular culture

 

-Micheline Bernardini models the first-Ever Bikini (1946)

-"Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini" (1960)

-Annette Funicello and Beach Party (1960's)

-The belted Bond-girl bikini (1962)

-Sports Illustrated's first Swimsuit Issue (1964)

-Raquel Welch's fur bikini in One Million Years B.C. (1966)

-Phoebe Cates' Bikini in Fast Times at Ridgemont High

-Princess Leia's golden bikini in Return of the Jedi (1983)

-Official uniform of the female Olympic Beach Volleyball team (1996)

-Miss America pageant's bikini debut (1997)

 

The history of the bikini can be traced back to antiquity. Illustrations of Roman women wearing bikini-like garments during competitive athletic events have been found in several locations. The most famous of them is Villa Romana del Casale. French engineer Louis Réard introduced the modern bikini, modeled by Micheline Bernardini, on July 5, 1946, borrowing the name for his design from the Bikini Atoll, where post-war testing on the atomic bomb was happening.

 

French women welcomed the design, but the Catholic Church, some media, and a majority of the public initially thought the design was risque or even scandalous. Contestants in the first Miss World beauty pageant wore them in 1951, but the bikini was then banned from the competition. Actress Bridget Bardot drew attention when she was photographed wearing a bikini on the beach during the Cannes Film Festival in 1953. Other actresses, including Rita Hayworth and Ava Gardner, also gathered press attention when they wore bikinis. During the early 1960's, the design appeared on the cover of Playboy and Sports Illustrated, giving it additional legitimacy. Ursula Andress made a huge impact when she emerged from the surf wearing what is now an iconic bikini in the James Bond movie Dr. No (1962). The deer skin bikini Raquel Welch wore in the film One Million Years B.C. (1966) turned her into an international sex symbol and was described as a definitive look of the 1960's.

 

The bikini gradually grew to gain wide acceptance in Western society. According to French fashion historian Olivier Saillard, the bikini is perhaps the most popular type of female beachwear around the globe because of "the power of women, and not the power of fashion". As he explains, "The emancipation of swimwear has always been linked to the emancipation of women." By the early 2000's, bikinis had become a US $ 811 million business annually, and boosted spin-off services like bikini waxing and the sun tanning.

 

IN ANTIQUITY

 

Pre-Roman

 

In the Chalcolithic era around 5600 BC, the mother-goddess of Çatalhöyük, a large ancient settlement in southern Anatolia, was depicted astride two leopards wearing a costume somewhat like a bikini. Two-piece garments worn by women for athletic purposes are depicted on Greek urns and paintings dating back to 1400 BC. Active women of ancient Greece wore a breastband called a mastodeton or an apodesmos, which continued to be used as an undergarment in the Middle Ages. While men in ancient Greece abandoned the perizoma, partly high-cut briefs and partly loincloth, women performers and acrobats continued to wear it.

 

Roman

 

Artwork dating back to the Diocletian period (286-305 AD) in Villa Romana del Casale, Sicily, excavated by Gino Vinicio Gentile in 1950-60, depicts women in garments resembling bikinis in mosaics on the floor. The images of ten women, dubbed the "Bikini Girls", exercising in clothing that would pass as bikinis today, are the most replicated mosaic among the 37 million colored tiles at the site. In the artwork "Coronation of the Winner" done in floor mosaic in the Chamber of the Ten Maidens (Sala delle Dieci Ragazze in Italian) the bikini girls are depicted weight-lifting, discus throwing, and running. Some activities depicted have been described as dancing, as their bodies resemble dancers rather than athletes. Coronation in the title of the mosaic comes from a woman in a toga with a crown in her hand and one of the maidens holding a palm frond. Some academics maintain that the nearby image of Eros, the primordial god of lust, love, and intercourse, was added later, demonstrating the owner's predilections and strengthening the association of the bikini with the erotic. Similar mosaics have been discovered in Tellaro in northern Italy and Patti, another part of Sicily. Prostitution, skimpy clothes and athletic bodies were related in ancient Rome, as images were found of female sex workers exercising with dumbbells/clappers and other equipment wearing costumes similar to the Bikini Girls.

 

Charles Seltman, a fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, curator of the Archaeology Museum there and an editor of The Cambridge Ancient History, illustrated a chapter titled "The new woman" in his book Women in Antiquity with a 1950's model wearing an identical bikini against the 4th-century mosaics from Piazza Armerina as part of a sisterhood between the bikini-clad female athletes of ancient Greco-Romans and modern woman. A photograph of the mosaic was used by Sarah Pomeroy, Professor of Classics at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, in the 1994 British edition of her book Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves to emphasize a similar identification. According to archaeologist George M.A. Hanfmann the bikini girls made the learned observers realize "how modern the ancients were".

 

In ancient Rome, the bikini-style bottom, a wrapped loincloth of cloth or leather, was called a subligar or subligaculum ("little binding underneath"), while a band of cloth or leather to support the breasts was called strophium or mamillare. The exercising bikini girls from Piazza Armenia wear subligaria, scanty briefs made as a dainty version of a man's perizoma, and a strophium band about the breasts, often referred to in literature as just fascia, which can mean any kind of bandage. Observation of artifacts and experiments shows bands had to be wrapped several times around the breasts, largely to flatten them in a style popular with flappers in the 1920's. These Greco-Roman breastbands may have flattened big breasts and padded small breasts to look bigger. Evidence suggests regular use. The "bikini girls" from Piazza Armenia, some of whom sport the braless look of the late 20th century, do not depict any propensity of such popularity in style. One bottom, made of leather, from Roman Britain was displayed at the Museum of London in 1998. There has been no evidence that these bikinis were for swimming or sun-bathing.

 

Finds especially in Pompeii show the so-called Roman goddess Venus wearing a bikini. A statue of the so-called Venus in a bikini was found in a cupboard in the southwest corner in Casa della Venere, others were found in the front hall. A statue of the so-called Venus was recovered from the tablinum of the house of Julia Felix, and another from an atrium in the garden at Via Dell'Abbondanza. Naples National Archaeological Museum, which opened its limited viewing gallery of more explicit exhibits in 2000, also exhibits a "Venus in Bikini". However, the Naples National Archaeological Museum is keen to stress that this statue actually depicts her Greek counterpart Aphrodite as she is about to untie her sandal, a common theme among other works depicting Aphrodite. The museum's exhibits include female statues wearing see-through gold lamé brassiere, basque and knickers. The Kings of Naples discovered these Pompeii artifacts, including the one meter tall, almost unclothed statue of Venus painted in gold leaf with something like a modern bikini. They found them so shocking that for long periods the secret chamber was opened only to "mature persons of secure morals". Even after the doors were opened, only 20 visitors were to be admitted at a time, and children under 12 were not allowed into the new part of the museum without their parents' or a teacher's permission.

 

There are references to bikinis in ancient literature as well. Ovid, the writer ranked alongside Virgil and Horace as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature, suggests the breastband or long strip of cloth wrapped around the breasts and tucked in the ends, is a good place to hide love-letters. Martial, a Latin poet from Hispania who published between AD 86 and 103, satirized a female athlete he named Philaenis, who played ball in a bikini-like garb quite bluntly, making her drink, gorge and vomit in abundance and hinting at her lesbianism. In an epigram on Chione, Martial strangely mentions a sex worker who went to the bathhouse in a bikini, while it was more natural to go unclothed. Reportedly Theodora, the 6th century empress of the Byzantine Empire wore a bikini when she appeared as an actress before she captured the heart of emperor Justinian I.

 

There is evidence of ancient Roman women playing expulsim ludere, an early version of handball, wearing a costume that has been identified as bikinis.

 

Interval

 

Between the classical bikinis and the modern bikini there has been a long interval. Swimming or outdoor bathing were discouraged in the Christian West and there was little need for a bathing or swimming costume till the 18th century. The bathing gown in the 18th century was a loose ankle-length full-sleeve chemise-type gown made of wool or flannel, so that modesty or decency was not threatened. In the first half of 19th century the top became knee-length while an ankle-length drawer was added as a bottom. By the second half of 19th century, in France, the sleeves started to vanish, the bottom became shorter to reach only the knees and the top became hip-length and both became more form fitting. In the 1900's women wore wool dresses on the beach that were made of up to 9 yards (8.2 m) of fabric. That standard of swimwear evolved into the modern bikini in the first of half of the 20th century.

 

Breakthrough

 

In 1907, Australian swimmer and performer Annette Kellerman was arrested on a Boston beach for wearing a form-fitting sleeveless one-piece knitted swimming tights that covered her from neck to toe, a costume she adopted from England, although it became accepted swimsuit attire for women in parts of Europe by 1910. Even in 1943, pictures of the Kellerman swimsuit were produced as evidence of indecency in Esquire v. Walker, Postmaster General. But, Harper's Bazaar wrote in June 1920 (vol. 55, no. 6, p. 138) - "Annette Kellerman Bathing Attire is distinguished by an incomparable, daring beauty of fit that always remains refined." The following year, in June 1921 (vol. 54, no. 2504, p. 101) it wrote that these bathing suits were "famous ... for their perfect fit and exquisite, plastic beauty of line."

 

Female swimming was introduced at the 1912 Summer Olympics. In 1913, inspired by that breakthrough, the designer Carl Jantzen made the first functional two-piece swimwear, a close-fitting one-piece with shorts on the bottom and short sleeves on top. Silent films such as The Water Nymph (1912) saw Mabel Normand in revealing attire, and this was followed by the daringly dressed Sennett Bathing Beauties (1915–1929). The name "swim suit" was coined in 1915 by Jantzen Knitting Mills, a sweater manufacturer who launched a swimwear brand named the Red Diving Girl,. The first annual bathing-suit day at New York's Madison Square Garden in 1916 was a landmark. The swimsuit apron, a design for early swimwear, disappeared by 1918, leaving a tunic covering the shorts.

 

During the 1920's and 1930's, people began to shift from "taking in the water" to "taking in the sun," at bathhouses and spas, and swimsuit designs shifted from functional considerations to incorporate more decorative features. Rayon was used in the 1920's in the manufacture of tight-fitting swimsuits, but its durability, especially when wet, proved problematic, with jersey and silk also sometimes being used. Burlesque and vaudeville performers wore two-piece outfits in the 1920's. The 1929 film "Man with a Movie Camera" shows Russian women wearing early two-piece swimsuits which expose their midriff, and a few who are topless. Films of holidaymakers in Germany in the 1930's show women wearing two-piece suits,

 

Necklines and midriff

 

By the 1930's, necklines plunged at the back, sleeves disappeared and sides were cut away and tightened. With the development of new clothing materials, particularly latex and nylon, through the 1930's swimsuits gradually began hugging the body, with shoulder straps that could be lowered for tanning. Women's swimwear of the 1930's and 1940's incorporated increasing degrees of midriff exposure. Coco Chanel made suntans fashionable, and in 1932 French designer Madeleine Vionnet offered an exposed midriff in an evening gown. They were seen a year later in Gold Diggers of 1933. The Busby Berkeley film Footlight Parade of 1932 showcases aqua-choreography that featured bikinis. Dorothy Lamour's The Hurricane (1937) also showed two-piece bathing suits.

 

The 1934 film, Fashions of 1934 featured chorus girls wearing two-piece outfits which look identical to modern bikinis. In 1934, a National Recreation Association study on the use of leisure time found that swimming, encouraged by the freedom of movement the new swimwear designs provided, was second only to movies in popularity as free time activity out of a list of 94 activities. In 1935 American designer Claire McCardell cut out the side panels of a maillot-style bathing suit, the bikini's forerunner. The 1938 invention of the Telescopic Watersuit in shirred elastic cotton ushered into the end the era of wool. Cotton sun-tops, printed with palm trees, and silk or rayon pajamas, usually with a blouse top, became popular by 1939. Wartime production during World War II required vast amounts of cotton, silk, nylon, wool, leather, and rubber. In 1942 the United States War Production Board issued Regulation L-85, cutting the use of natural fibers in clothing and mandating a 10% reduction in the amount of fabric in women's beachwear. To comply with the regulations, swimsuit manufacturers produced two-piece suits with bare midriffs.

 

Postwar

 

Fabric shortage continued for some time after the end of the war. Two-piece swimsuits without the usual skirt panel and other excess material started appearing in the US when the government ordered a 10% reduction in fabric used in woman's swimwear in 1943 as wartime rationing. By that time, two-piece swimsuits were frequent on American beaches. The July 9, 1945, Life shows women in Paris wearing similar items. Hollywood stars like Ava Gardner, Rita Hayworth and Lana Turner tried similar swimwear or beachwear. Pin ups of Hayworth and Esther Williams in the costume were widely distributed. The most provocative swimsuit was the 1946 Moonlight Buoy, a bottom and a top of material that weighed only eight ounces. What made the Moonlight Buoy distinctive was a large cork buckle attached to the bottoms, which made it possible to tie the top to the cork buckle and splash around au naturel while keeping both parts of the suit afloat. Life magazine had a photo essay on the Moonlight Buoy and wrote, "The name of the suit, of course, suggests the nocturnal conditions under which nude swimming is most agreeable."

 

American designer Adele Simpson, a Coty American Fashion Critics' Awards winner (1947) and a notable alumna of the New York art school Pratt Institute, who believed clothes must be comfortable and practical, designed a large part of her swimwear line with one-piece suits that were considered fashionable even in early 1980's. This was when Cole of California started marketing revealing prohibition suits and Catalina Swimwear introduced almost bare-back designs. Teen magazines of late 1940's and 1950's featured designs of midriff-baring suits and tops. However, midriff fashion was stated as only for beaches and informal events and considered indecent to be worn in public. Hollywood endorsed the new glamour with films such as Neptune's Daughter (1949) in which Esther Williams wore provocatively named costumes such as "Double Entendre" and "Honey Child". Williams, who also was an Amateur Athletic Union champion in the 100 meter freestyle (1939) and an Olympics swimming finalist (1940), also portrayed Kellerman in the 1952 film Million Dollar Mermaid (titled as The One Piece Bathing Suit in UK).

 

Swimwear of the 1940's, 50's and early 60's followed the silhouette mostly from early 1930's. Keeping in line with the ultra-feminine look dominated by Dior, it evolved into a dress with cinched waists and constructed bust-lines, accessorized with earrings, bracelets, hats, scarves, sunglasses, hand bags and cover-ups. Many of these pre-bikinis had fancy names like Double Entendre, Honey Child (to maximize small bosoms), Shipshape (to minimize large bosoms), Diamond Lil (trimmed with rhinestones and lace), Swimming In Mink (trimmed with fur across the bodice) and Spearfisherman (heavy poplin with a rope belt for carrying a knife), Beau Catcher, Leading Lady, Pretty Foxy, Side Issue, Forecast, and Fabulous Fit. According to Vogue the swimwear had become more of "state of dress, not undress" by mid-1950's.

 

The modern bikini

 

French fashion designer Jacques Heim, who owned a beach shop in the French Riviera resort town of Cannes, introduced a minimalist two-piece design in May 1946 which he named the "Atome," after the smallest known particle of matter. The bottom of his design was just large enough to cover the wearer's navel.

 

At the same time, Louis Réard, a French automotive and mechanical engineer, was running his mother's lingerie business near Les Folies Bergères in Paris. He noticed women on St. Tropez beaches rolling up the edges of their swimsuits to get a better tan and was inspired to produce a more minimal design. He trimmed additional fabric off the bottom of the swimsuit, exposing the wearer's navel for the first time. Réard's string bikini consisted of four triangles made from 30 square inches (194 cm2) of fabric printed with a newspaper pattern.

 

When Réard sought a model to wear his design at his press conference, none of the usual models would wear the suit, so he hired 19 year old nude dancer Micheline Bernardini from the Casino de Paris. He introduced his design to the media and public on July 5, 1946, in Paris at Piscine Molitor, a public pool in Paris. Réard held the press conference five days after the first test of a nuclear device (nicknamed Able) over the Bikini Atoll during Operation Crossroads. His swimsuit design shocked the press and public because it was the first to reveal the wearer's navel.

 

To promote his new design, Heim hired skywriters to fly above the Mediterranean resort advertising the Atome as "the world's smallest bathing suit." Not to be outdone by Heim, Réard hired his own skywriters three weeks later to fly over the French Riviera advertising his design as "smaller than the smallest bathing suit in the world."

 

Heim's design was the first to be worn on the beach, but the name given by Réard stuck with the public. Despite significant social resistance, Réard received more than 50,000 letters from fans. He also initiated a bold ad campaign that told the public a two-piece swimsuit was not a genuine bikini "unless it could be pulled through a wedding ring." According to Kevin Jones, curator and fashion historian at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, "Réard was ahead of his time by about 15 to 20 years. Only women in the vanguard, mostly upper-class European women embraced it."

 

Social resistance

 

Bikini sales did not pick up around the world as women stuck to traditional two-piece swimsuits. Réard went back to designing conventional knickers to sell in his mother's shop. According to Kevin Jones, curator and fashion historian at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, "Réard was ahead of his time by about 15 to 20 years. Only women in the vanguard, mostly upper-class European women embraced it, just like the upper-class European women who first cast off their corsets after World War I." It was banned in the French Atlantic coastline, Spain, Belgium and Italy, three countries neighboring France, as well as Portugal and Australia, and it was prohibited in some US states, and discouraged in others.

 

In 1951, the first Miss World contest (originally the Festival Bikini Contest), was organized by Eric Morley. When the winner, Kiki Håkansson from Sweden, was crowned in a bikini, countries with religious traditions threatened to withdraw delegates. Håkansson remains the first and last Miss World to be crowned in her bikini, a crowning that was condemned by Pope Pius XII who declared the swimsuit to be sinful. Bikinis were banned from beauty pageants around the world after the controversy. In 1949 the Los Angeles Times reported that Miss America Bebe Shopp on her visit to Paris said she did not approve the bikini for American girls, though she did not mind French girls wearing them. Actresses in movies like My Favorite Brunette (1947) and the model on a 1948 cover of LIFE were shown in traditional two-piece swimwear, not the bikini.

 

In 1950, Time magazine interviewed American swimsuit mogul Fred Cole, owner of Cole of California, and reported that he had "little but scorn for France's famed Bikinis," because they were designed for "diminutive Gallic women". "French girls have short legs," he explained, "Swimsuits have to be hiked up at the sides to make their legs look longer." Réard himself described it as a two-piece bathing suit which "reveals everything about a girl except for her mother's maiden name." Even Esther Williams commented, "A bikini is a thoughtless act." But, popularity of the charms of Pin-up queen and Hollywood star Williams were to vanish along with pre-bikinis with fancy names over the next few decades. Australian designer Paula Straford introduced the bikini to Gold Coast in 1952. In 1957, Das moderne Mädchen (The Modern Girl) wrote, "It is unthinkable that a decent girl with tact would ever wear such a thing." Eight years later a Munich student was punished to six days cleaning work at an old home because she had strolled across the central Viktualienmarkt square, Munich in a bikini.

 

The Cannes connection

Despite the controversy, some in France admired "naughty girls who decorate our sun-drenched beaches". Brigitte Bardot, photographed wearing similar garments on beaches during the Cannes Film Festival (1953) helped popularize the bikini in Europe in the 1950's and created a market in the US. Photographs of Bardot in a bikini, according to The Guardian, turned Saint-Tropez into the bikini capital of the world. Cannes played a crucial role in the career of Brigitte Bardot, who in turn played a crucial role in promoting the Festival, largely by starting the trend of being photographed in a bikini at her first appearance at the festival, with Bardot identified as the original Cannes bathing beauty. In 1952, she wore a bikini in Manina, the Girl in the Bikini (1952) (released in France as Manina, la fille sans voiles), a film which drew considerable attention due to her scanty swimsuit. During the 1953 Cannes Film Festival, she worked with her husband and agent Roger Vadim, and garnered a lot of attention when she was photographed wearing a bikini on every beach in the south of France.

 

Like Esther Williams did a decade earlier, Betty Grable, Marilyn Monroe and Brigitte Bardot all used revealing swimwear as career props to enhance their sex appeal, and it became more accepted in parts of Europe when worn by fifties "love goddess" actresses such as Bardot, Anita Ekberg and Sophia Loren. British actress Diana Dors had a mink bikini made for her during the 1955 Venice Film Festival and wore it riding in a gondola down Venice's Grand Canal past St. Mark's Square.

 

In Spain, Benidorm played a similar role as Cannes. Shortly after the bikini was banned in Spain, Pedro Zaragoza, the mayor of Benidorm convinced dictator Francisco Franco that his town needed to legalize the bikini to draw tourists. In 1959, General Franco agreed and the town became a popular tourist destination. Interestingly, in less than four years since Franco's death in 1979, Spanish beaches and women had gone topless.

 

Legal and moral resistance

 

The swimsuit was declared sinful by the Vatican and was banned in Spain, Portugal and Italy, three countries neighboring France, as well as Belgium and Australia, and it remained prohibited in many US states. As late as in 1959, Anne Cole, a US swimsuit designer and daughter of Fred Cole, said about a Bardot bikini, "It's nothing more than a G-string. It's at the razor's edge of decency." In July that year the New York Post searched for bikinis around New York City and found only a couple. Writer Meredith Hall wrote in her memoir that till 1965 one could get a citation for wearing a bikini in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire.

 

In 1951, the first Miss World contest, originally the Festival Bikini Contest, was organized by Eric Morley as a mid-century advertisement for swimwear at the Festival of Britain. The press welcomed the spectacle and referred to it as Miss World, and Morley registered the name as a trademark. When, the winner Kiki Håkansson from Sweden, was crowned in a bikini, countries with religious traditions threatened to withdraw delegates. The bikinis were outlawed and evening gowns introduced instead. Håkansson remains the only Miss World crowned in a bikini, a crowning that was condemned by the Pope. Bikini was banned from beauty pageants around the world after the controversy. Catholic-majority countries like Belgium, Italy, Spain and Australia also banned the swimsuit that same year.

 

The National Legion of Decency pressured Hollywood to keep bikinis from being featured in Hollywood movies. The Hays production code for US movies, introduced in 1930 but not strictly enforced till 1934, allowed two-piece gowns but prohibited navels on screen. But between the introduction and enforcement of the code two Tarzan movies, Tarzan, the Ape Man (1932) and Tarzan and His Mate (1934), were released in which actress Maureen O'Sullivan wore skimpy bikini-like leather outfits. Film historian Bruce Goldstein described her clothes in the first film as "It's a loincloth open up the side. You can see loin." All at sea was allowed in the USA in 1957 after all bikini-type clothes were removed from the film. The girl in the bikini was allowed in Kansas after all the bikini close ups were removed from the film in 1959.

 

In reaction to the introduction of the bikini in Paris, American swimwear manufacturers compromised cautiously by producing their own similar design that included a halter and a midriff-bottom variation. Though size makes all the difference in a bikini, early bikinis often covered the navel. When the navel showed in pictures, it was airbrushed out by magazines like Seventeen. Navel-less women ensured the early dominance of European bikini makers over their American counterparts. By the end of the decade a vogue for strapless styles developed, wired or bound for firmness and fit, along with a taste for bare-shouldered two-pieces called Little Sinners. But, it was the halterneck bikini that caused the most moral controversy because of its degree of exposure. So much so as bikini designs called "Huba Huba" and "Revealation" were withdrawn from fashion parades in Sydney as immodest.

 

Rise to popularity

 

The appearance of bikinis kept increasing both on screen and off. The sex appeal prompted film and television productions, including Dr. Strangelove. They include the surf movies of the early 1960's. In 1960, Brian Hyland's song "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini" inspired a bikini-buying spree. By 1963, the movie Beach Party, starring Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon, followed by Muscle Beach Party (1964), Bikini Beach (1964), and Beach Blanket Bingo (1965) that depicted teenage girls wearing bikinis, frolicking in the sand with boys, and having a great time.

 

The beach films led a wave of films that made the bikini pop-culture symbol. In the sexual revolution in 1960's America, bikinis became quickly popular. Hollywood stars like Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, Gina Lollobrigida, and Jane Russell helped further the growing popularity of bikinis. Pin-up posters of Monroe, Mansfield, Hayworth, Bardot and Raquel Welch also contributed significantly to its increasing popularity. In 1962, Playboy featured a bikini on its cover for the first time. Two years later, Sports Illustrated featured Berlin-born fashion model Babette March on the cover wearing a white bikini. The issue was the first Swimsuit Issue. It gave the bikini legitimacy, became an annual publication and an American pop-culture staple, and sells millions of copies each year. In 1965, a woman told Time it was "almost square" not to wear one. In 1967 the magazine wrote that 65% of "the young set" were wearing bikinis.

 

When Jayne Mansfield and her husband Miklós Hargitay toured for stage shows, newspapers wrote that Mansfield convinced the rural population that she owned more bikinis than anyone. She showed a fair amount of her 40-inch (1,000 mm) bust, as well as her midriff and legs, in the leopard-spot bikini she wore for her stage shows. Kathryn Wexler of The Miami Herald wrote, "In the beginning as we know it, there was Jayne Mansfield. Here she preens in leopard-print or striped bikinis, sucking in air to showcase her well noted physical assets." Her leopard-skin bikini remains one of the earlier specimens of the fashion.

 

In 1962, Bond Girl Ursula Andress emerged from the sea wearing a white bikini in Dr. No. The scene has been named one of the most memorable of the series. Channel 4 declared it the top bikini moment in film history, Virgin Media puts it ninth in its top ten, and top in the Bond girls. The Herald (Glasgow) put the scene as best ever on the basis of a poll. It also helped shape the career of Ursula Andress, and the look of the quintessential Bond movie. Andress said that she owed her career to that white bikini, remarking, "This bikini made me into a success. As a result of starring in Dr. No as the first Bond girl, I was given the freedom to take my pick of future roles and to become financially independent." In 2001, the Dr. No bikini worn by Andress in the film sold at auction for US$61,500. That white bikini has been described as a "defining moment in the sixties liberalization of screen eroticism". Because of the shocking effect from how revealing it was at the time, she got referred to by the joke nickname "Ursula Undress". According to the British Broadcasting Corporation, "So iconic was the look that it was repeated 40 years later by Halle Berry in the Bond movie Die Another Day."

 

Raquel Welch's fur bikini in One Million Years B.C. (1966) gave the world the most iconic bikini shot of all time and the poster image became an iconic moment in cinema history. The poster image of the deer skin bikini in One Million Years B.C. made her an instant pin-up girl. Welch was featured in the studio's advertising as "wearing mankind's first bikini" and the bikini was later described as a "definitive look of the 1960's". Her role wearing the leather bikini raised Welch to a fashion icon and the photo of her in the bikini became a best-selling pinup poster. One author said, "although she had only three lines in the film, her luscious figure in a fur bikini made her a star and the dream girl of millions of young moviegoers". In 2011, Time listed Welch's B.C. bikini in the "Top Ten Bikinis in Pop Culture".

 

In the 1983 film Return of the Jedi, Star Wars' Princess Leia Organa was captured by Jabba the Hutt and forced to wear a metal bikini complete with shackles. The costume was made of brass and was so uncomfortable that actress Carrie Fisher described it as "what supermodels will eventually wear in the seventh ring of hell." The "slave Leia" look is often imitated by female fans at Star Wars conventions. In 1997, 51 years after the bikini's debut, and 77 years after the Miss America Pageant was founded, contestants were allowed wear two-piece swimsuits, not just the swimsuits (nicknamed "bulletproof vests") traditionally issued by the pageant. Two of the 17 swimsuit finalists wore two-piece swimsuits, and Erika Kauffman, representing Hawaii, wore the briefest bikini of all and won the swimsuit competition. In 2010, the International Federation of Bodybuilders recognized Bikini as a new competitive category.

 

In India

 

Bollywood actress Sharmila Tagore appeared in a bikini in An Evening in Paris (1967), a film mostly remembered for the first bikini appearance of an Indian actress. She also posed in a bikini for the glossy Filmfare magazine. The costume shocked the conservative Indian audience, but it also set a trend of bikini-clad actresses carried forward by Parveen Babi (in Yeh Nazdeekiyan, 1982), Zeenat Aman (in Heera Panna 1973; Qurbani, 1980) and Dimple Kapadia (in Bobby, 1973) in the early 1970's. Wearing a bikini put her name in the Indian press as one of Bollywood's ten hottest actresses of all time, and was a transgression of female identity through a reversal of the state of modesty, which functions as a signifier of femininity in Bombay films. By 2005, it became usual for actors in Indian films to change outfits a dozen times in a single song — starting with a chiffon sari and ending up wearing a bikini. But, when Tagore was the chairperson of the Central Board of Film Certification in 2005, she expressed concerns about the rise of the bikini in Indian films.

 

Acceptance

 

In France, Réard's company folded in 1988, four years after his death. By that year the bikini made up nearly 20% of swimsuit sales, more than any other model in the US. As skin cancer awareness grew and a simpler aesthetic defined fashion in the 1990s, sales of the skimpy bikini decreased dramatically. The new swimwear code was epitomized by surf star Malia Jones, who appeared on the June 1997 cover of Shape Magazine wearing a halter top two-piece for rough water. After the 90's, however, the bikini came back again. US market research company NPD Group reported that sales of two-piece swimsuits nationwide jumped 80% in two years. On one hand the one-piece made a big comeback in the 1980's and early 1990's, on the other bikinis became briefer with the string bikini in the 1970's and 80's.

 

The "-kini family" (as dubbed by author William Safire), including the "-ini sisters" (as dubbed by designer Anne Cole) has grown to include a large number of subsequent variations, often with a hilarious lexicon — string bikini, monokini or numokini (top part missing), seekini (transparent bikini), tankini (tank top, bikini bottom), camikini (camisole top and bikini bottom), hikini, thong, slingshot, minimini, teardrop, and micro. In just one major fashion show in 1985, there were two-piece suits with cropped tank tops instead of the usual skimpy bandeaux, suits that are bikinis in front and one-piece behind, suspender straps, ruffles, and daring, navel-baring cutouts. To meet the fast changing tastes, some of the manufacturers have made a business out of making made-to-order bikinis in around seven minutes. The world's most expensive bikini, made up of over 150 carats (30 g) of flawless diamonds and worth a massive £20 million, was designed in February 2006 by Susan Rosen.

 

Actresses in action films like Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle (2003) and Blue Crush (2002) have made the two-piece "the millennial equivalent of the power suit", according to Gina Bellafonte of The New York Times, On September 9, 1997, Miss Maryland Jamie Fox was the first contestant in 50 years to compete in a two-piece swimsuit to compete in the Preliminary Swimsuit Competition at the Miss America Pageant. PETA used celebrities like Pamela Anderson, Traci Bingham and Alicia Mayer wearing a bikini made of iceberg-lettuce for an advertisement campaign to promote vegetarianism. A protester from Columbia University used a bikini as a message board against a New York City visit by Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

 

By the end of the century, the bikini went on to become the most popular beachwear around the globe, according to French fashion historian Olivier Saillard due to "the power of women, and not the power of fashion". As he explains, "The emancipation of swimwear has always been linked to the emancipation of women", though one survey tells 85% of all bikinis never touch the water. According to Beth Dincuff Charleston, research associate at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, "The bikini represents a social leap involving body consciousness, moral concerns, and sexual attitudes." By the early 2000's, bikinis had become a US $811 million business annually, according to the NPD Group, a consumer and retail information company. The bikini has boosted spin-off services like bikini waxing and the sun tanning industries.

 

Continued controversies

 

The bikini remained a hot topic for the news media. In May 2011, Barcelona, Spain made it illegal to wear bikinis in public except in areas near the beaches. Violators face fines of between 120 and 300 euros. In 2012, two students of St. Theresa's College in Cebu, the Philippines were barred from attending their graduation ceremony for "ample body exposure" because their bikini pictures were posted on Facebook. The students sued the college and won a temporary stay in a regional court.

 

In May 2013, Cambridge University banned the Wyverns Club of Magdalene College from arranging its annual bikini jelly wrestling. In June 2013, actress Gwyneth Paltrow, who also is interested in fashion, produced a bikini for her clothing line that is designed to be worn by girls 4 to 8 years old. She was criticized for sexualizing young children by Claude Knight of Kidscape, a British foundation that strives to prevent child abuse. He commented, "We remain very opposed to the sexualization of children and of childhood ... is a great pity that such trends continue and that they carry celebrity endorsement."

 

Four women were arrested over the 2013 Memorial Day weekend in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina for indecent exposure when they wore thong bikinis that exposed their buttocks. In June 2013, the British watchdog agency Advertising Standards Authority banned a commercial that showed men in an office fantasizing about their colleague, played by Pamela Anderson, in a bikini for degrading women.

 

Links:

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_bikini

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bikini_variants

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bikini

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swimsuit

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bikini_in_popular_culture

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indecent_exposure

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indecent_exposure_in_the_United_States

Edwin Georgi Artist (1896 - 1964)

Circa ?

Read More about Edwin Georgi at the end of the story

 

Theme Borrowed from the mystery novel:

Tread softly into the Darkness.

Subtit“Folle est la brebis qui au loup se confesse!”le:

*************************************

 

He had just walked out of the Gentlemen’s smoking lounge, when he felt a hand placed upon his shoulder, and a whiff of perfume. From behind his back came a soft feminine voice with a slight Yank drawl.

 

Excuse me sir, can I ask you do me the kindness of a favor? He turned, looking down into the most enchanting pair of smiling blue eyes. He beamed into her worried face, watching with pleasure as she gave him a timid smile back. If I am able mi-lady he honestly answered, deciding in a split second that this damsel was indeed was in a bit of distress, as his sharp grey eyes wolfishly drank her image in.

 

Her long blond hair was held up in back held in back, secured by a pair of twin diamond clips that erupted out expensive glitters in a fierce storm of intense colours as she moved her head. Her ears were home to a set of dangling diamond earrings that sparkled expensively, beckoningly, as they attracted interest to her face. She was quite nice-looking, in a mousey sort of way, her appearance helped by the flattering longish hunters green gown she wore: a long soft velvet skirt with a tight glossy satin bodice. Her gloveless hands and wrists were bare of any jewel to take away notice from her face. She had a black satin cape draped over one arm, along with a pair of green velvet gloves held tightly in one hand, along with a rhinestone clasped clutch matching her gown. As a movie producer, the man had learned that first impressions mean everything, and that for one as busy as himself, he needed to garner as much info as he could from them. He could tell this one wanted to ask him something, and seemed nervous about the proposal.

 

This is rather awkward she said, her eyes becoming large like a frightened kitten, but my date sort of left with someone else, and I realized that I have to walk to my car alone. I tried to ask one of the staff, but he just laughed in my face. Her lips drooped at this last part. Then I saw you leaving, and was hoping…. Her voice trailed off meekly.

 

He was surprised, he had just thought she had recognized him and was going to ask for an autograph, so much for his ego he reasoned. And his heart was touched by the wretchedness of this poor creature too scared to venture out into the parking lot alone, albeit, it did have very poor lighting he reasoned as he spoke in answer to her plea. He studied her for a few seconds, the look of hope in her face reaching out to him. No, he thought in a fatherly manner, as his eyes watched her dangling diamond earrings, A timid creature like this should not be out walking alone. Any thief in the area would zero in on her and her expensive finery like a honey drone to the flower. This is what he thought, what he said was:

  

Well, I wasn’t leaving, rather actually just heading upstairs to meet up with my wife, but with a smile, added that he would be most honored to escort the young lady out. Taking her arm and he lead her towards the main lobby. American he asked? Montana she admitted sweetly, the nasally lisping twang of her western accent endearingly gripped the producer, who had a well-known fondness for American westerns.

  

At the door he helped her on with her wrap, she faced him, her eyes brimming with gratitude. She reached up and stroked the side of his face; you’re a dear for doing this! You really are! She hugged him tightly, her warm figure feeling quite nice against his, as he felt her beating heart. As she started to slowly put on her long soft gloves, He made the mistake of asking how she ended up here in England? Ten minutes later she was still going strong in her story, standing on the spot and showing no sign of moving. He finally had to gently take her by the arm guide her out the door to her destination, as the talkative enchantress kept on with her story, never missing a beat.

 

He led her happily across the roundabout and along the path to the lot. Her car, a red roadster, was parked at the very furthest end. They reached it, and he opened the door for her, she threw her satin cape in the back, and Just before getting in she reached out, and with a gleam in her eyes, gave him another all-encompassing embrace. Ohh thank you, kind sir she cried happily, and breaking away, entered the car and started the engine roaring to life. He closed the door and watched as she drove away, giving him a wave as she turned the corner going out onto the road that bordered the park that surrounded the civic center-hotel complex.

 

He turned and walked back towards the lobby. Whistling to himself as he thought about his good deed completed for the rather charming damsel in distress. Out of habit he started to check his W &D Rolex Timepiece. Damn he said, missing it as he felt his silk vest pockets, damn It ! , I must have lost it in the lounge. He headed back there immediately, losing all thought of the charming young lady from Montana he had just left.

 

20 minutes earlier

 

In the bar of the Ballroom located 2 floors below the Gentlemen’s smoking lounge where a certain well-known movie producer was just finishing his cigar and brandy before venturing out and running into a certain petite Blonde form Montana.

 

A man outfitted as a waiter, coming out of a side corridor, enters the massive Ballroom. For a second, as he leaves the darkened corridor, he is blinded by the bright lights and dazzling displays laid out ever so appealingly before him.

 

A lady clad in a flowing, glittering gown, her neck, ears , wrist, and fingers laden with brite rubies, swayed past him, eyeing him indignantly as she did so. “Folle est la brebis qui au loup se confesse”, he thought to himself as he watched her swish away.

 

Then he continued looking around, letting it all soak in for a few tantalizing seconds, before spying the rather regal looking lady, holding herself every bit as the film star she was. Wearing a long satin strapless number that looked as though it had been poured over her figure, it fitted her that tightly. She was drinking by a long oak bar that took up one whole end of the mammoth, brightly lit room.

  

He walked up to her; thankfully she was alone, although it really would not have made any difference, only less likely for her to become hysterical without an audience to watch. He laid a hand upon her bare shoulder; she looked contemptuously at him, with the red bloodshot eyes of one who had been to freely imbibing of the house liquor. Pardon my interruption miss ( she liked being called that, he could see) but I’m afraid your husband has met with a small mishap. She looked into his eyes with her deep grey ones, he sensed she was possibly not all that alarmed by his statement. If you will come with me, I will take you to the ambulance that has been called for him. With a small flourish she sat her glass down. She picked up a shimmering jeweled purse that matched her gown up from the finely polished oak bar. He watched as her multiple rings flashing brilliantly as they rippled in the light. One ring in particular captured his notice, a large egg shaped diamond that emitted a peculiarly yellow light as it flashed from her ring finger. In a swirl of satin, the lady turned and followed him willingly enough to the back corridor. Only upon reaching it did she start to question him as to what on earth had happened, hiding her concern incredibly well he thought, wondering if indeed she was hiding anything.

  

Stopping to collect her wrap, a long Russian mink, he led her downstairs and to a side exit. This is a short cut he explained, as he held the door opened for him. She passed him, her hells clicking, gown whisper along the stone pathway outside. Just through these woods and around the corner he directed her as she headed off, with him keeping pace closely behind.

  

20 minutes later

 

The red roadster jarred to a stop along the, deserted, dark wooded road: causing the dangling earrings of the female driver to sparkle dimly in the moons light. She killed the round head lights and waited patiently, all sign of the worry and helplessness she had displayed earlier replaced by a coolly calm demeanor.

 

She looked around, her green gown shimmering in the bright moons light. Vie ne est pas d'attendre que la tempête , mais d'apprendre à danser sous la pluie , she whispered to herself, her voice losing its western drawl completely.

 

Reaching up she undid the expensive clips, and pulled off the wind swept yellow wig. Undoing her long , naturally flaming blood red coloured hair, she let it down, spilling down ever so like hot molten lava over the backside of her green satin gown, and along her well defined breasts, tightly outlined by the hunter’s green satin bodice in front. She then popped out the blue tinted contacts, her naturally green eyes shining with wicked pleasures in the moon lit car. She tossed both the wig and the contacts into the woods. She sat back in her seat with a contented little sigh, and prepared to wait it out.

  

She reached down and opened a man’s alligator billfold and casually started leafing through it. Then she heard it, her head raised up as her ears perked…. an owl’s hoot came from off in the distance inside the black woods. She unceremoniously threw the wallet down and restarted the engine. From those woods emerged the shadowy form of a male, wearing the white shirt, white tux and black pants of a staff servant for the nearby posh complex. He opened the passenger door, threw a heavy shiny bundle into the rumble seat and jumping over the door, climbed into the seat next to her. He leaned over and happily, deeply kissed the lady driver, and settled back contentedly as she gave gas to the motor, sending the engine racing before driving leisurely off.

  

He turned to her, wolfishly eyeballing the pretty lady driving the roadster. How did you make out my love, he asked his sweet wife. The red headed siren in green satin began speaking in her native dialect, decidedly not an American one. Her deep Irish brogue rolled the words along her tongue as she related how her part of the scheme had carried out.

  

Well Husband of mine ; after stalling him as long as He let me, I relieved him of both his fancy watch, and a wallet with over three hundred pounds she remarked triumphantly. Adding happily as she looked into his grinning face, it looks like you did pretty well yourself lover! She glanced at the bundle in the seat behind her, lying on top of a blanket, which concealed a pair of suitcases.

  

The mink and gown was a bonus he admitted. But I relieved the lady of her purse and jewels as planned stated wryly. All of her jewels she asked, licking her lips as if savoring some recent memory of the lady in question; which she in reality was, have had the opportunity to scope her out in the ballroom before attending the movie star’s husband.

  

All of them, right down to the last diamond pinky ring. Any troubles she asked, knowing full well what the answer would be. None he smirked, snaking a hand around her silky waist. He broke into an impersonation of the American actor Bogart: Darling, the dame never knew what hit her! He reached in the back and started to hide the bundle away out of obvious site.

  

But why her gown, she enquired, why chance taking the time?. It was your size he stated. Not hardly she snorted at him, but thank you for the compliment my love. So, did you have a reason other than wanting to get kicks from seeing a half-naked movie star, she teased poking him in the side.

  

Actually, my love, there was a method to my madness, he retorted. I knew that with her vanity, she will wait to find a way to somehow clothe herself before going into public to scream bloody murder about losing her jewels. And, we have the beacon for our efforts he said, grinning wickedly.

  

Excited by his words, she started to speed up a little. He squeezed his arm around her slippery slick waist, no need to hurry love, he told her in a comfortingly reassuring manner. We have plenty of time to make the morning ferry to the city of Douglas.

  

Once there, would they have time to freshen up before meeting with the mysterious dark skinned man with the heavy accent who was the acting intermediary willing to pay them the balance of the 25,000 pounds upon receipt of the yellowish looking , vulgarly large, diamond ring that a certain actress had been displaying for a time that evening.

  

Postscript:

In the early years of the Nazi regime, the Wellesley’s, a well-known Jewish family , possessed a Large yellow tinted diamond known as the Harwicke Beacon. It was the center stone of a magnificent necklace. The jewel was said to bring fortune to whomever had it in their possession. Although it had not been living up to its reputation for the family, once wealthy, had fallen upon hard times. Then to compound their misfortunes, the had to leave the family manor and flee to Switzerland under pressure from the Nazi political machine. They were caught, and the necklace was taken just as the border to freedom was in sight. They had been betrayed by a mysterious dark skinned informant from another country.

 

the Harwicke Beacon was believed to have been one of the occult relics sought by the Nazis to test and see if the mysterious powers could be harnessed for the good of the war effort.

 

Its whereabouts currently unknown, the Harwicke Beacon’s reappearance in today’s world may prove a vital clue to the treasure trove of similar occult related items( both religious and non) that were hidden by the Himmler during the collapse of Nazi Germany…..

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“Folle est la brebis qui au loup se confesse!”

(Silly is the sheep who to the wolf confesses)

 

Répétrer dans les ténèbres.

Tread softly into the Darkness.

 

Vie ne est pas d'attendre que la tempête , mais d'apprendre à danser sous la pluie .

Life is not about waiting out the storm, but about learning to dance in the rain.

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No Part of this can reprinted, duplicated, or copied be without the express written permission and approval of Chatwick University.

These photos and stories are works of fiction. Any resemblance to people, living or deceased, is purely coincidental.

As with any work of fiction or fantasy the purpose is for entertainment and/or educational purposes only, and should never be attempted in real life.

We accept no responsibility for any events occurring outside this website..

 

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Edwin Georgi

(1896 - 1964)

A leader in the second wave of "pretty-girl" artists: more like pin-ups without actually being pin-ups. Largely self-taught, learning his way up in ad and art agencies. A pilot in WWI. Style ranged from simple, posteresque lines and colors to his more famous pointillist pieces with boldly directed light, a unique use of warm shadows, and sparkling colors. Ads for Webster Cigars, Woodbury, Ford Mercury, Crane paper, Yardley, The Italian Line. In-demand illustrator for Goldenbook Magazine, Fortune, Redbook, Woman's Home Companion, Cosmo, True, Esquire, Ladies' Home Journal,Saturday Evening Post, American Girl, Liberty.

 

Edwin Georgi was born in 1896 and died in 1964 at the age of 68. He was a pilot in WWI– though I was unable to gather details about his specific tour of duty. Upon returning from the war, he attended Princeton. Eventually he abandoned his education to pursue writing as a full time profession. He was very ambitious, but a turn of fate pushed him another way. He was hired on to write copy for an ad agency , but was persuaded by his employer that he would make a better painter than a writer. Thus his career in illustration began.

 

Remarkably, he was largely self-taught. He worked his way up the artistic food chain with experience at various ad groups and agencies. His work is known in several national publications; Cosmo, Esquire, Redbook, Ladies’ Home Journal, and The Saturday Evening Post.

 

Edwin’s style is striking. Very few artists exude the dynamic movement of color as he does. His paintings have a texture that is entirely unique– his staccato strokes seem akin to pointillism, and weave a mesh of breathtaking pallets . Most noir art is obsessed with light and shadow, but Edwin Georgi’s art oscillates betwixt hue and contrast.

   

A Carved Archaic Pale Celadon Greenish White Jade Linking Nipple Grain Phoenix Twisted Ropes Totems Heaven Worship Bi of Nation Chu 475 B.C.–221 B.C. Eastern Zhou Dynasty Warring Times China

 

Bi Diameter 23 x Hole Diameter 4.9 x Depth 0.8cm 750g

 

The carving of this beautiful work of art in 475B.C.–221B.C. Eastern Zhou Dynasty Warring Times China by Archaic Jade (Ancient Old Jade) was still quite primitive and not made by modern machine tools, but using the popular "Handmade Shallow-Relief-Carvings" in ancient China. The carving techniques of this work of art were made simply, clearly, skillfully, and smoothly upon a thick and solid jade, the Twisted Ropes Totem at the middle circle of Bi, two side walls at the inner and outer circle edges of Bi body, as well as the Shallow-Relief-Carvings of Linking Phoenix and Nipple Grain Totems at both sides of Bi body were all the popular jade carved Bi working techniques and decoration totems used in Eastern Zhou Dynasty Warring Times China.

 

This work of art has also very clear and apparent yellow loess soakage color in the skin as the aged pale celadon greenish white jade in ancient China. Thus it’s "True Authenticity"!

 

Linking Phoenix Heaven Worship Bi was the best favorite by the ancient Kings of Nation Chu in Eastern Zhou Dynasty Warring Times China. The people in ancient Nation Chu worshiped Phoenix in the historic records. Therefore a Carved Archaic Pale Celadon Greenish White Jade Linking Nipple Grain Phoenix Twisted Ropes Totems Heaven Worship Bi of Nation Chu must have been used in the national heaven worship ceremonies by the Kings of Nation Chu in Eastern Zhou Dynasty Warring Times China.

 

Jades are beautiful semi-translucent precious stones that are denser than other stones and characterized by shiny, smooth, heavy surfaces and distinct sounds when knocked on. The beautiful characteristics of this work of art have lead to its value as a wonderful decorative keepsake, as well as a great collection for investment, due to the fact that the Archaic Jade (Ancient Old Jade) grows in value as it ages.

 

Jades are said to be protective stones that keep the wearer from harm by ancient Chinese. They are said to bring harmony and increase love and nurturing. Jade stone is a symbol of purity and serenity. It releases negative thoughts and soothes your mind. It helps you become who you really are. Jades are also said to help kidneys, skeletal system, childbirth, fertility, spleen, hips, body fluids, and adrenal glands by ancient Chinese.

 

What a wonderful stone Jade really is in ancient China!

 

This stunning fine work of art was carved with extremely smooth "His Imperial Majesty Dignity of Kings of Nation Chu in Eastern Zhou Dynasty Warring Times China" by the excellent imperial jade carving master in Eastern Zhou Dynasty Warring Times China. This is absolutely not to be done and copied by modern carvings. It was prodigious and wonderful God's masterpiece-like extremely beautiful imperial jade carving work of art used by the ancient emperors and kings in China.

 

西元前475年至西元前221年中國東周戰國時期古青白玉淺浮雕勾連乳丁穀紋鳳紋扭繩紋楚國祭天玉璧

 

璧外徑 23 x 好 (孔) 內徑 4.9 x 厚 0.8 cm 750 g

 

此西元前475年至西元前221年中國東周戰國時期古青白玉淺浮雕勾連乳丁穀紋鳳紋扭繩紋楚國祭天玉璧的古玉雕美麗藝術品, 其雕刻仍然甚為原始! 並非是使用現代的機械工具, 而是利用中國古代的 "手工淺浮雕法". 此 "古青白玉淺浮雕勾連乳丁穀紋鳳紋扭繩紋楚國祭天玉璧" 之雕琢厚實, 簡練, 而流暢, 其玉璧肉身中間圓圈內的扭繩紋, 玉璧肉身內緣及外緣兩側的牆邊, 及玉璧兩面的淺浮雕勾連乳丁穀紋鳳紋, 皆為中國東周戰國時期的常用玉璧雕琢工法與紋飾, 而此工藝品之玉皮上, 亦具備有非常清楚與明顯的中國古老青白玉黃土沁色, 故為真正.

 

勾連鳳紋祭天玉璧是中國東周戰國時期楚國楚王之最愛用玉璧. 於歷史記錄中, 中國古代楚國人民為崇拜鳳凰. 故中國東周戰國時期古青白玉淺浮雕勾連乳丁穀紋鳳紋扭繩紋楚國祭天玉璧必然為中國東周戰國時期楚國楚王所使用於祭天儀式中.

 

"玉" 為美麗半透光的貴重石頭. 具有表面光亮平滑, 手感沉重, 其密度與比重皆較其它石頭為大, 輕敲時聲音清脆悅耳的特性. 此件藝術品的美麗特質, 使它的價值適合作為一件奇妙的裝飾用紀念品, 或是一件投資性的大收藏品. 因為 "古玉雕" 的價值, 事實上就如同它的古老年齡一般, 年紀愈老, 價值愈增.

 

古代中國人傳說玉石是保護主人免於傷害的護身石頭. 它們可帶來和諧及增強愛情與養育. 玉石為純潔與平靜的象徵. 它可釋放出主人的負面思想而安撫主人的情緒. 它幫助主人成為真正的自我. 古代中國人也傳說玉石可幫助主人的腎, 骨骼, 助生育, 生殖力, 脾臟, 臀部, 體液, 及腎上腺等.

 

在中國古代玉石確實是奇妙而美麗的石頭!

 

此出色極美之精美藝術品具備中國東周戰國時期帝王玉工所雕 "楚國帝王尊貴威嚴的王者氣度神韻" 之極度流暢王玉工藝, 絕非是近現代玉工所能完成和仿制之, 為中國古代帝王所用帝王玉雕工藝的鬼斧神工絕美傑作.

  

2014 年世界拍賣總收入前 500 名畫家中之前 155 名中國畫家 Top 155 Chinese artists among the Top 500 artists by world auction revenue in 2014

2014 年世界拍賣總收入前 500 名畫家中之前 155 名中國畫家

Top 155 Chinese artists among the Top 500 artists by world auction revenue in 2014

 

共 155 名中國畫家占前 500 名畫家之 31 %

Total 155 Chinese artists / 500 artists = 31 %

 

假如你是西方油畫的收藏家,扣除 31 % 的中國畫家,再扣除 20 % 左右的中國瓷器、青銅器、珠寶玉器、漆器雜項類中國作家,2014年你只是在世界作者市場 49 % 以內經營藝術品而已;可能再過10年,你將成為只是在世界作者市場 30 % 以內經營。

 

If you are a collector of western oil paintings, deducting 31 % for Chinese artists of paintings and further deducting 20% for Chinese artists of ceramics、bronze、jades and jewelry、lacquer and miscellaneous works of art, in 2014 you are only operating works of art within 49% of the world artists market. Maybe after 10 years, you might become operating works of art within 30% of the world artists market.

 

列名 作者姓名 拍賣總收入(美金) 拍賣件數 最高落槌價(美金)

Rank Artist Auction Turnover ($) Sold Lots Top Hammer Price ($)

 

Page 84 (14 Chinese artists) 第84頁14位中國畫家

 

列名 作者姓名 拍賣總收入(美金) 拍賣件數 最高落槌價(美金)

Rank Artist Auction Turnover($) Sold Lots Top Hammer Price($)

 

7 QI Baishi (1864-1957) 齊白石 206,245,348 719 7,861,850

9 ZHANG Daqian (1899-1983) 張大千 193,242,992 817 7,476,199

13 ZAO Wou-ki (1921-2013) 趙無極 115,686,349 575 7,161,650

16 FU Baoshi (1904-1965) 傅抱石 103,465,331 142 4,944,050

17 XU Beihong (1895-1953) 徐悲鴻 102,449,141 219 6,532,000

19 HUANG Zhou (1925-1997) 黃冑 96,461,998 625 5,506,020

20 HUANG Binhong (1865-1955) 黃賓虹 88,082,380 303 8,839,900

26 WU Changshuo (1844-1927) 吳昌碩 80,942,833 560 5,463,850

31 LU Yanshao (1909-1993) 陸儼少 66,350,196 443 1,925,760

32 LI Keran (1907-1989) 李可染 65,946,710 207 7,294,500

37 CHU Teh-Chun (1920-2014) 朱德群 60,897,598 241 3,800,000

38 WU Guanzhong (1919-2010) 吳冠中 60,623,435 153 2,967,000

42 LIN Fengmian (1900-1991) 林風眠 54,514,729 253 2,449,500

50 ZENG Fanzhi (1964)曾梵志 43,080,328 50 3,606,400

 

Page 85 (17 Chinese artists) 第85頁17位中國畫家

 

53 PU Ru (1896-1963) 溥儒(溥心畬) 41,246,692 1,042 838,500

55 XIE Zhiliu (1910-1997) 謝稚柳 39,960,699 355 2,367,850

58 WU Hufan (1894-1968) 吳湖帆 37,900,898 320 3,412,500

59 WANG Duo (1592-1652) 王鐸 37,871,423 70 3,013,650

62 PAN Tianshou (1897-1971) 潘天壽 34,790,957 88 3,600,840

67 ZHU Da (1626-1705) 朱耷(八大山人) 32,277,125 38 6,190,200

71 SAN Yu (1901-1966) 常玉 30,027,262 41 9,151,899

75 ZHU Xinjian (1953-2014) 朱新建 28,619,279 1,202 898,150

78 QIANLONG Emperor (1711-1799) 乾隆皇帝 27,079,477 48 16,483,200

81 CHENG Shifa (1921-2007) 程十髮 25,987,069 486 1,959,600

83 QI Gong (1912-2005) 啟功 25,693,155 437 815,500

85 QIAN Songyan (1899-1985) 錢松喦 25,582,974 254 1,053,650

89 FAN Zeng (1938) 范曾 23,416,615 237 2,941,200

93 YU Youren (1879-1964) 于右任 23,032,037 718 521,279

95 ZHOU Chunya (1955) 周春芽 21,226,785 65 1,134,700

96 WANG Hui (1632-1717) 王翬 21,050,636 58 4,569,600

98 ZHANG Xiaogang (1958) 張曉剛 20,783,341 44 10,698,699

 

Page 86 (18 Chinese artists) 第86頁18位中國畫家

 

103 LIU Wei (1965) 刘炜 19,134,174 43 2,935,800

105 WANG Xuetao (1903-1982) 王雪濤 18,896,219 348 827,220

109 HUANG Yongyu (1924) 黄永玉 18,286,630 241 902,430

110 DONG Shouping (1904-1997) 董寿平 18,251,261 309 842,920

112 HE Haixia (1908-1998) 何海霞 17,310,468 144 3,266,000

114 CHEN Yifei (1946-2005) 陳逸飛 16,910,797 29 2,964,699

119 GUAN Liang (1900-1986) 關良 16,014,062 239 2,197,800

120 REN Yi (1840-1896) 任頤(任伯年) 15,959,015 167 1,199,520

128 DONG Qichang (1555-1636) 董其昌 14,722,727 123 2,769,300

130 WEN Zhengming (1470-1559) 文徵明 14,576,419 79 1,633,000

131 YU Fei'an (1888-1959) 于非闇 14,505,161 109 972,600

135 ZHENG Banqiao (1693-1765) 鄭板橋 14,208,977 76 2,200,000

136 LIU Dawei (1945) 刘大为 14,023,225 121 1,621,000

138 LI Kuchan (1899-1983) 李苦禪 13,918,988 276 786,240

139 LIN Sanzhi (1898-1989) 林散之 13,856,855 350 907,760

141 LUO Zhongli (1948) 羅中立 13,483,611 53 6,159,800

148 HONG Yi (1880-1942) 弘一(李叔同) 12,755,950 85 1,306,400

149 LIU Xiaodong (1963) 劉小東 12,589,594 15 7,470,400

 

Page 87 (19 Chinese artists) 第87頁19位中國畫家

 

152 LAI Shaoqi (1915-2000) 赖少其 12,209,093 144 5,538,600

153 CHEN Peiqiu (1922/23) 陈佩秋 12,101,206 194 1,040,000

157 YI Bingshou (1754-1815) 伊秉绶 11,964,497 55 3,242,000

161 LIU Haisu (1896-1994) 劉海粟 11,536,281 138 1,877,950

166 YANG Yan (1958) 楊彥 11,191,811 57 10,784,400

167 TANG Yun (1910-1993) 唐雲 11,031,461 493 293,940

172 FANG Lijun (1963) 方力均 10,814,787 30 6,697,600

178 TANG Yin (1470-1523) 唐寅(唐伯虎) 10,514,886 33 4,956,250

180 GUAN Shanyue (1912-2000) 關山月 10,378,961 119 2,850,750

182 LIU Guosong (1932) 劉國松 10,204,764 83 1,804,599

184 CHEN Shaomei (1909-1954) 陳少梅 10,172,762 89 3,000,700

185 SHI Guoliang (1956) 史國良(釋慧禪) 10,111,795 116 1,588,580

186 HUANG Junbi (1898-1991) 黃君璧 10,051,378 313 319,410

188 FU Shan (1607-1684) 傅山 9,945,247 23 3,890,400

189 HE Jiaying (1957) 何家英 9,919,579 54 859,130

190 ZHOU Sicong (1939-1996) 周思聪 9,888,000 174 1,377,850

191 ZHU Ming (1938) 朱銘 9,699,670 94 1,224,549

196 JIN Nong (1687-1763) 金農 9,367,369 48 1,732,040

200 LIU Danzhai (1931-2011) 刘旦宅 9,177,422 134 1,339,060

 

Page 88 (15 Chinese artists) 第88頁15位中國畫家

 

201 LI Xiongcai (1910-2001) 黎雄才 9,162,598 191 788,160

208 YA Ming (1924-2002) 亚明 8,916,735 251 1,172,160

215 BAI Xueshi (1915-2011) 白雪石 8,571,042 164 456,119

217 LEE Man Fong (1913-1988) 李曼峰 8,494,019 61 3,735,200

218 HONG Ren (1610-1663) 弘仁 8,467,043 5 7,542,300

221 FENG Zikai (1898-1975) 豐子愷 8,411,283 175 437,670

223 SONG Wenzhi (1919-1999) 宋文治 8,326,290 244 469,151

224 XU Lei (1963) 徐累 8,312,432 26 2,606,400

225 WANG Yidong (1955) 王沂東 8,284,639 30 1,458,900

227 WANG Mingming (1952) 王明明 8,207,562 130 453,600

234 JIA Youfu (1942) 賈又福 7,873,366 79 1,864,150

236 WU Zuoren (1908-1997) 吳作人 7,832,988 148 636,090

237 FAN Yang (1955) 范揚 7,806,488 233 243,750

242 WANG Yuanqi (1642-1715) 王原祁 7,678,320 39 1,465,200

250 AI Xuan (1947) 艾轩 7,467,339 43 749,800

 

Page 89 (12 Chinese artists) 第89頁12位中國畫家

 

258 PAN Yuliang (1895-1977) 潘玉良 7,179,153 11 3,870,351

262 ZHAO Zhiqian (1829-1884) 趙之謙 7,060,825 66 1,160,099

265 TIAN Liming (1955) 田黎明 6,999,979 95 315,900

266 EMPEROR KANGXI (1654-1722) 康熙皇帝 6,937,669 14 3,258,000

268 SHI Lu (1919-1982) 石魯 6,852,847 49 1,021,230

271 TIAN Shiguang (1916-1999) 田世光 6,803,606 123 781,920

276 CHOU Ying (1493-1560) 仇英 6,632,784 50 1,823,360

279 DING Yanyong (1902-1978) 丁衍庸 6,584,807 181 592,939

291 GUO Moruo (1892-1978) 郭沫若 6,218,480 61 1,102,280

294 XU Bing (1955) 徐冰 6,130,422 30 1,167,120

297 SHEN Zhou (1427-1509) 沈周 6,066,002 28 1,798,500

299 SHEN Yinmo (1883-1971) 沈尹默 6,003,213 185 1,218,750

 

Page 90 (14 Chinese artists) 第90頁14位中國畫家

 

303 YUE Minjun (1962) 岳敏君 5,851,974 22 1,296,800

306 ZHAO Shao'Ang (1905-1998) 趙少昂 5,809,681 247 259,520

309 XUE Liang (1956) 薛亮 5,717,377 95 1,103,640

316 CHEONG Soo Pieng (1917-1983) 钟泗滨 5,566,836 55 631,609

323 ZHANG Ruitu (1570-1641) 張瑞圖 5,495,433 30 761,870

328 CHEN Hongshou (1598-1652) 陳洪绶 5,458,659 20 1,945,200

329 REN Zhong (1976) 任重 5,452,237 56 423,540

331 ZHU Qizhan (1892-1996) 朱屺瞻 5,417,335 209 260,000

332 ZHAO Puchu (1907-2000) 趙樸初 5,382,881 175 486,300

336 WANG Jian (1598-1677) 王鑒 5,309,438 23 3,811,700

339 YANG Shanshen (1913-2004) 楊善深 5,279,455 184 1,427,360

341 KANG Youwei (1858-1927) 康有為 5,199,080 113 324,200

343 GU Wenda (1955) 谷文達 5,179,178 42 1,119,180

345 LIU Ye (1964) 劉野 5,117,193 34 891,550

 

Page 91 (18 Chinese artists) 第91頁18位中國畫家

 

351 PU Guang (XIII -XIV) 溥光 4,944,050 1 4,944,050

352 HE Shaoji (1799-1873) 何绍基 4,912,933 136 747,500

355 LIU Jiyou (1918-1983) 劉繼卣 4,891,144 108 399,595

358 CHEN Dayu (1912-2001) 陳大羽 4,855,807 247 454,160

365 SHI Tao (1642-1707) 石濤 4,796,775 27 2,269,400

368 ZHU Meicun (1911-1993) 朱梅邨 4,776,671 117 570,150

369 JIA Aili (1979) 贾蔼力 4,758,253 8 1,262,240

370 XI Dejin (1923-1981) 席德進 4,740,558 89 227,080

373 SHEN Peng (1931) 沈鹏 4,670,229 160 701,330

374 AI Weiwei (1957) 艾未未 4,663,696 32 966,749

375 XU Lele (1955) 徐樂樂 4,628,253 155 210,730

383 YE Qianyu (1907-1995) 葉淺予 4,530,685 118 356,620

389 ZHU Yunming (1460-1526) 祝允明 4,462,454 14 1,629,000

393 LI Jin (1958) 李津 4,372,647 94 212,160

394 ZHAN Wang (1962) 展望 4,360,124 13 2,709,000

395 FANG Chuxiong (1950) 方楚雄 4,355,333 148 262,080

397 LU Yushun (1962) 盧禹舜 4,336,840 61 884,520

399 CHEN Wenxi (1906-1991) 陳文希 4,242,709 71 1,095,650

 

Page 92 (13 Chinese artists) 第92頁13位中國畫家

 

402 CHENG Conglin (1954) 程叢林 4,177,932 3 4,052,500

404 TAO Lengyue (1895-1985) 陶冷月 4,141,462 138 457,240

405 HE Duoling (1948) 何多苓 4,131,489 12 1,419,000

409 LONG Rui (1946) 龍瑞 4,047,039 66 956,980

416 LU Yifei (1908-1997) 陸抑非 3,995,369 121 791,293

425 ZHANG Shanzi (1882-1940) 張善孖 3,840,085 90 324,200

428 WANG Guangyi (1957) 王廣義 3,799,843 37 1,167,120

430 WEI Zixi (1915-2002) 魏紫熙 3,791,768 120 235,190

432 YUN Shouping (1633-1690) 惲壽平 3,784,559 78 541,800

437 PAN Gongkai (1947) 潘公凯 3,737,332 16 2,141,040

443 SHA Menghai (1900-1992) 沙孟海 3,702,566 132 293,940

446 HUANG Shen (1687-c.1773) 黃慎 3,685,764 49 425,100

450 LIN Yong (1942) 林墉 3,650,618 117 259,360

 

Page 93 (15 Chinese artists) 第93頁15位中國畫家

 

456 LIAO Chi-Chun (1902-1976) 廖繼春 3,625,280 9 1,252,033

461 LI Shan (1686-1760) 李鱓 3,569,789 38 652,800

462 LAN Ying (1585-c.1664) 蓝瑛 3,562,896 42 438,210

464 YANG Zhiguang (1930) 楊之光 3,525,002 119 195,840

468 ZHANG Enli (1965) 张恩利 3,497,596 12 708,949

471 YANG Feiyun (1954) 杨飞云 3,467,338 14 734,400

472 ZHOU Jingxin (1959) 周京新 3,445,045 113 519,040

475 JIANG Hanting (1904-1963) 江寒汀 3,408,711 125 300,625

476 WANG Ziwu (1936) 王子武 3,404,947 51 653,200

478 LE PHO (1907-2001) 黎譜 3,396,747 96 696,059

479 LIU Yi (1957) 刘溢 3,370,316 20 615,980

481 NI Yuanlu (1593-1644) 倪元璐 3,350,382 10 1,100,000

492 CHIU Ya Tsai (1949-2013) 邱亞才 3,288,319 53 180,459

498 WEN Jia (1501-1583) 文嘉 3,261,051 17 1,986,160

500 WU Dayu (1903-1988) 吴大羽 3,248,689 9 772,800

 

資料來源: 法國 Art price 2014 年全世界藝術市場報告書第 84-93 頁 2014 年全世界拍賣總收入結果前 500 名畫家.

 

Source: The Art Market in 2014 Page 84-93 Top 500 artists by auction revenue in 2014 by Art price

  

99 Paintings 書畫 12 Antiques 古董

 

99 Fine Chinese Paintings and 12 Antiques in 2013

2013 年 99 幅中國書畫及 12 件古董精品

  

Chinese Painters 中國畫家:

 

(1) 張大千 Zhang Daqian 张大千 (32 幅/pcs)

(2) 齊白石 Qi Baishi 齐白石 (10 幅/pcs)

(3) 徐悲鴻 Xu Beihong 徐悲鸿 (8 幅/pcs)

(4) 吳冠中 Wu Guanzhong 吴冠中 (7 幅/pcs)

(5) 傅抱石 Fu Baoshi 傅抱石 (3 幅/pcs)

(6) 李可染 Li Keran 李可染 (1 幅/pc)

(7) 陸儼少 Lu Yanshao 陆俨少 (1 幅/pc)

(8) 黃冑 Huang Zhou 黃冑 (1 幅/pc)

(9) 黃賓虹 Huang Binhong 黄宾虹 (3 幅/pcs)

(10) 吳昌碩 Wu Changshuo 吴昌硕 (1 幅/pc)

(11) 林風眠 Lin Fengmian 林风眠 (4 幅/pcs)

(12) 吳湖帆 Wu Hufan 吴湖帆 (4 幅/pcs)

(13) 謝稚柳 Xie Zhiliu 谢稚柳 (1 幅/pc)

(14) 黃君璧 Huang Junbi 黄君璧 (2 幅/pc)

(15) 愛新覺羅 溥儒 Pu Ru 溥心畬 Pu Xinyu (1 幅/pc)

(16) 唐雲 Tang Yun 唐云 (1 幅/pc)

(17) 趙少昂 Zhao Shao’Ang 赵少昂 (3 幅/pcs)

(18) 何海霞 He Haixia 何海霞 (1 幅/pc)

(19) 關山月 Guan Shanyue 关山月 (1 幅/pc)

(20) 豐子愷 Feng Zikai 丰子恺 (1 幅/pc)

(21) 顏伯龍 Yan Bolong 颜伯龙 (4 幅/pcs)

(22) 愛新覺羅溥佐 Aisin Gioro Pu Zuo (1 幅/pc)

(23) 高逸鴻 Gao Yihong 高逸鸿 (1 幅/pc)

(24) 田世光 Tian Shiguang 田世光 (1 幅/pc)

(25) 袁松年 Yuan Songnian 袁松年 (1 幅/pc)

(26) 高奇峰 Gao Qifeng 高奇峰 (1 幅/pc)

(27) 陳之佛 Chen Zhifo 陈之佛 (1 幅/pc)

(28) 陳半丁 Chen Banding 陈半丁 (1 幅/pc)

(29) 馮超然 Feng Chaoran 冯超然 (1 幅/pc)

(30) 鄭板橋 Zheng Banqiao 郑板桥 (1 幅/pc)

  

Works of Art 藝術品:

 

(1) 古董 Antiques (2 件/pcs)

(2) 玉 Jades (8 件/pcs)

(3) 羊脂白玉 Mutton Fat White Jades (2 件/pcs)

  

99 Paintings 書畫 12 Antiques 古董

  

Works of Art List 藝術作品名錄

  

Paintings 書畫作品

  

Chinese Painters 中國畫家:

  

(1) 張大千 Zhang Daqian 张大千 (32 幅/pcs)

 

1. Zhang Daqian Happy Birthday to Chairman Chang Kaishek of the Government inscribed by Yu Youren 張大千作于右任題大觀高仕祝壽圖手卷

2. Zhang Daqian After the Rising and Warm Green Mountains by Huang Gongwang with Calligraphy 張大千作擬元代黃公望浮巒暖翠山水圖及書法立軸

3. Zhang Daqian Splashed Landscape Fuchun Mountain 張大千作富春山居潑彩山水圖

4. Zhang Daqian Mountain Emei May Be Crossed On Top 張大千作可以橫絕峨嵋巔潑彩山水圖

5. Zhang Daqian A Bird’s-eye View on Taiwan Cross-Island Road near Herhuan 張大千作台灣橫貫公路合歡山鳥瞰金碧潑彩山水圖

6. Zhang Daqian 18 Luohan Disciples Appointed to Witness to Buddhist Truth handscroll 張大千作十八羅漢圖手卷

7. Zhang Daqian The Dreamland of Mountain Qingcheng in Heavenly Place 張大千作夢入靑城天下幽人間仙境圖

8. Zhang Daqian The Heavenly Place in Mankind World 張大千作人家在仙堂潑彩山水圖

9. Zhang Daqian Sun is Rising and Darkness is Fallen allover the Mountain with Calligraphy 張大千作天開影墮潑彩山水圖及書法對聯

10. Zhang Daqian Painting the Elder Bintourlu after Technique of Song Dynasty 張大千作倣宋人畫賓頭盧尊者像

11. Zhang Daqian Listening to the Springs below the Mountains handscroll 張大千作山水生風聽泉入山麓金碧潑彩山水圖手卷

12. Zhang Daqian Waterfall in a Quiet Mountain Valley with Calligraphy 張大千作幽谷飛瀑潑彩山水圖及書法對聯

13. Zhang Daqian Recalling the Beautiful Scenery of Mountain Huang in China 張大千作遙思黃山故景潑彩山水圖

14. Zhang Daqian Splashed Colour Landscape of Beautiful Mountain Qingcheng 張大千作青城天下幽潑彩山水圖

15. Zhang Daqian Golden Outline Red Lotus and a Flying Bird 張大千作香清鈎金紅荷翔鳥圖

16. Zhang Daqian One Flower in One World White Lotus and attached calligraphy 張大千作一花一世界白荷花圖及書法立軸

17. Zhang Daqian Lady with a Fan Bamboos Parrot Hairpin in Tang’s Clothes 張大千作仿莫高窟初唐人衣飾鸚鵡簪髮飾新篁紈扇仕女圖

18. Zhang Daqian Beauty in Red Hair-kerchief Wooden Shoes White Robe Bamboos 張大千作脩竹紅髮巾木屐白袍裸肩日本美女圖

19. Zhang Daqian Han Changli Composed a Lyric Poem Derived from Chu Dynasty 張大千作韓昌黎作楚語圖

20. Zhang Daqian Scholars Appreciating Maples 張大千作高仕賞楓圖

21. Zhang Daqian Black Cloud Covering on Top of Mt. Emei among Blue Cloud 張大千作可以橫絕峨眉巔黑雲滿布山頂藍雲環繞山間奇景潑墨兼潑彩山水圖

22. Zhang Daqian Dwelling in the Mountain by the Lake Wuting 張大千作五亭湖上山居潑彩山水圖

23. Zhang Daqian Spring Cloud and Morning Mist dated 1979 張大千1979年作春雲曉靄潑彩山水圖

24. Zhang Daqian Spring Cloud and Morning Mist dated 1965 張大千1965年作春雲曉靄潑彩山水圖

25. Zhang Daqian Impressionistic Red Lotus 張大千作寫意紅荷圖

26. Zhang Daqian Golden Outlined Red Lotus and Double Mandarin Ducks 張大千作愛清氣鈎金紅荷花鴛鴦嘉耦潑彩圖

27. Zhang Daqian High Mountain and Deep Cloud 張大千作山高雲深山水圖

28. Zhang Daqian Golden Outlined Landscape 張大千作金碧山水圖

29. Zhang Daqian Lady with a Fan and Bamboos in Splashed Colors 張大千作潑彩竹葉紈扇仕女圖

30. Zhang Daqian Seven Character Calligraphy Couplet 張大千作七言書法對聯

31. Zhang Daqian Six Character Calligraphy Couplet 張大千作六言書法對聯

32. Zhang Daqian Splashed Color Golden Outlined Red Lotus on Gold Sheet 張大千作金箋潑彩描金紅荷花圖

  

(2) 齊白石 Qi Baishi 齐白石 (10 幅/pcs)

 

1. Qi Baishi Lotus Fish Frogs Shrimps and Crabs handscroll inscribed by Zhang Daqian 齊白石作張大千題香清荷花魚蛙蝦蟹圖手卷

2. Qi Baishi The Ten Elder Men in the Legend of China 齊白石作十全老人神賢圖

3. Qi Baishi Lotus Double Mandarin Ducks and Love Shrimps 齊白石作荷花鴛鴦雙蝦佳偶圖

4. Qi Baishi Wealth and Powerful Honour are Both to Come 齊白石作富貴有期圖

5. Qi Baishi Lotus and Shrimps 齊白石作荷花群蝦圖

6. Qi Baishi A Lotus Pond and Shrimps 齊白石作荷花池塘群蝦圖

7. Qi Baishi A Spring Voice and Great Luck 齊白石作春聲大吉圖

8. Qi Baishi Eagle Perching on the Pine 齊白石作松鷹圖

9. Qi Baishi Prolonging Life Impressionistic Squirrel on Pine Red Peach Double Screens 齊白石作寫意松樹上松鼠與紅桃益壽圖對屏

  

(3) 徐悲鴻 Xu Beihong 徐悲鸿 (8 幅/pcs)

 

1. Xu Beihong The Hard Water Drawing of the People Lived in Chongqing handscroll inscribed by Zhang Daqian 徐悲鴻作張大千題巴人汲水圖手卷

2. Xu Beihong Jiufang Gao People in the Chinese Ancient Historical Poem 徐悲鴻作九方皋圖

3. Xu Beihong People in Chinese Ancient Historical Poem of Six Dynasties 徐悲鴻作六朝人詩意圖

4. Xu Beihong China the Wounded Lion Sat Watching American Flying Tiger 徐悲鴻作中國負傷之獅遙望美國飛虎飛將軍

5. Xu Beihong Lions and Snake 徐悲鴻作獅與蛇

6. Xu Beihong The Single Flying Eagle and the Lion 徐悲鴻作獨飛老鷹與獅子圖

7. Xu Beihong Lion and Eagle 徐悲鴻作獅子老鷹圖

8. Xu Beihong Prolonging Life Auspicious Cranes Ganoderma Lucidum Fungus 徐悲鴻作祥鶴靈芝延年益壽圖

 

(4) 吳冠中 Wu Guanzhong 吴冠中 (7 幅/pcs)

 

1. Wu Guanzhong The People Live in Mali Village 吳冠中作馬里村頭人物風景圖

2. Wu Guanzhong The Dwellings by the River and Mountain in Southern China 吳冠中作江南民居風景圖

3. Wu Guanzhong The Lion Grove Garden (Lion Woods) 吳冠中作獅子林

4. Wu Guanzhong The Wu Gorge 吳冠中作巫峽魂

5. Wu Guanzhong Rocks by the Sea 吳冠中作海滨石

6. Wu Guanzhong The Single-Log Bridge 吳冠中作獨木橋

7. Wu Guanzhong Expressionistic Lotus 吳冠中作表現主義的荷花

 

(5) 傅抱石 Fu Baoshi 傅抱石 (3 幅/pcs)

 

1. Fu Baoshi Hwan Shyua Showed Painting to Guests in East Jin Dynasty handscroll inscribed by Yu Youren 傅抱石作于右任題詩入畫中桓玄出畫圖手卷

2. Fu Baoshi The Nine Elders of the Poetry by Bai Juyi in Tang Dynasty handscroll inscribed by Xu Beihong 傅抱石作徐悲鴻題元氣淋漓九老圖手卷

3. Fu Baoshi Premier Xie An Brought Beauties to the East Shan Mountain handscroll inscribed by Xie Zhiliu 傅抱石作謝稚柳題春風綠揚東山攜妓圖手卷

 

(6) 李可染 Li Keran 李可染 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Li Keran The Landscape of River Li being Well-known Forever 李可染作漓江山水傳千古圖

 

(7) 陸儼少 Lu Yanshao 陆俨少 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Lu Yanshao Spring and Rocks Landscape of Mountain Yandang 陸儼少作雁蕩泉石山水圖

 

(8) 黃冑 Huang Zhou 黃冑 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Huang Zhou The Children and Father Sitting on the Back of Camels 黃冑作駱駝背上的小學生與父親

 

(9) 黃賓虹 Huang Binhong 黄宾虹 (3 幅/pcs)

 

1. Huang Binhong Landscape 黃賓虹作山水圖

2. Huang Binhong Landscape Hanging Scroll (1) 黃賓虹作山水圖立軸(1)

3. Huang Binhong Landscape Hanging Scroll (2) 黃賓虹作山水圖立軸(2)

 

(10) 吳昌碩 Wu Changshuo 吴昌硕 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Wu Changshuo Annual Purely Floral and Fruity Tributes 吳昌碩作歲朝清供圖

 

(11) 林風眠 Lin Fengmian 林风眠 (4 幅/pcs)

 

1. Lin Fengmian Five Naked Ladies 林風眠作五裸女圖

2. Lin Fengmian Two Beautiful Ladies and the Vase 林風眠作二美與花瓶圖

3. Lin Fengmian Three Beautiful Ladies and the Vase 林風眠作三美與花瓶圖

4. Lin Fengmian Court Ladies and the Vase 林風眠作宮女與花瓶圖

 

(12) 吳湖帆 Wu Hufan 吴湖帆 (4 幅/pcs)

 

1. Wu Hufan Dwelling in the Mountains handscroll inscribed by Xie Zhiliu 吳湖帆作謝稚柳題春風綠揚枝山居圖手卷

2. Wu Hufan Dwelling in the Mountains 吳湖帆作山居圖

3. Wu Hufan Landscape after Zhao Mengfu 吳湖帆作擬趙孟頫山水圖

4. Wu Hufan Seven Character Calligraphy Couplet 吳湖帆作七言書法對聯

 

(13) 謝稚柳 Xie Zhiliu 谢稚柳 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Xie Zhiliu Landscape in Windy Spirit 謝稚柳作生風抖擻山水圖

 

(14) 黃君璧 Huang Junbi 黄君璧 (2 幅/pc)

 

1. Huang Junbi High Mountains and Flowing Waters Landscape 黃君璧作高山流水山水圖 (鏡片 mounted)

2. Huang Junbi High Mountains and Flowing Waters Landscape 黃君璧作高山流水山水圖 (立軸 hanging scroll)

 

(15) 愛新覺羅 溥儒 Pu Ru 溥心畬 Pu Xinyu (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Pu Ru Green Mountain and White Cloud handscroll inscribed by Zhang Daqian 溥儒作張大千題青山白雲山水圖手卷

 

(16) 唐雲 Tang Yun 唐云 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Tang Yun Birds and Flowers 唐雲作花鳥圖

 

(17) 趙少昂 Zhao Shao’Ang 赵少昂 (3 幅/pcs)

 

1. Zhao Shao’Ang Flowers and Bird Double Screen 趙少昂作花鳥圖對屏

2. Zhao Shao’Ang Tall Willow Tree Morning Cicada Bamboos and Little Bird 趙少昂作高柳曉蟬竹葉小鳥圖

 

(18) 何海霞 He Haixia 何海霞 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. He Haixia Landscape 何海霞作山水圖

 

(19) 關山月 Guan Shanyue 关山月 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Guan Shanyue Spring is coming to Southern Guangdong Landscape 關山月作春到南粵山水圖

 

(20) 豐子愷 Feng Zikai 丰子恺 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Feng Zikai A Small Table Three Friends and Plum Blossoms 豐子愷作小桌三朋梅花圖

 

(21) 顏伯龍 Yan Bolong 颜伯龙 (4 幅/pcs)

 

1. Yan Bolong Colorful Birds Flowers and Plants Four Screens 顏伯龍作彩鳥與花草小樹圖四條屏

 

(22) 愛新覺羅溥佐 Aisin Gioro Pu Zuo (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Aisin Gioro Pu Zuo Two Beautiful Horses 愛新覺羅溥佐作雙駿馬圖

 

(23) 高逸鴻 Gao Yihong 高逸鸿 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Gao Yihong Beautiful Flowers Attracting Bees 高逸鴻作群花爭艷招蜂圖

 

(24) 田世光 Tian Shiguang 田世光 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Tian Shiguang Flowers and Birds 田世光作花鳥圖

 

(25) 袁松年 Yuan Songnian 袁松年 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Yuan Songnian Landscape 袁松年作山水圖

 

(26) 高奇峰 Gao Qifeng 高奇峰 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Gao Qifeng Flowers and Bamboos 高奇峰作花竹圖

 

(27) 陳之佛 Chen Zhifo 陈之佛 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Chen Zhifo Wild Geese under Willow Shadow 陳之佛作柳蔭雁鴨圖

 

(28) 陳半丁 Chen Banding 陈半丁 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Chen Banding Flowers and Birds 陳半丁 ( 陳年 ) 作花鳥圖

 

(29) 馮超然 Feng Chaoran 冯超然 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Feng Chaoran Landscape 馮超然作山水圖

 

(30) 鄭板橋 Zheng Banqiao 郑板桥 (1 幅/pc)

 

1. Zheng Banqiao Orchids Bamboos and Rocks 鄭板橋作蘭竹石圖

  

Works of Art 藝術品:

  

Antiques 古董

 

(1) 古董 Antiques (2 件/pcs)

 

1. A Bronze Money-Shaking Fortune Tree Qing Dynasty China 中國清朝青銅搖錢樹

2. A Gilt-Bronze Guanyin Bodhisattva Figure Tang Dynasty China 中國唐朝銅鎏金觀音菩薩造像

 

(2) 玉 Jades (8 件/pcs)

 

1. A White Jade Pig-and-Bird-Winged Dragon Winged Mythical Beast Hongshan Culture China 中國紅山文化古白玉雕豬鳥翼形龍

2. A White Jade Persian Face Elephant Puzzle Han Dynasty China 中國漢朝古玉雕波斯人面大象紋益智拼圖

3. A Green Jade Sword Token of Imperial Authority by Emperor Shang Dynasty China 中國商朝古青玉雕玉劍令牌

4. A Jade Fish Wine-Cup Western Zhou Dynasty China 中國西周古玉雕魚形酒杯

5. A Red Jade Military Token Qing Dynasty China 中國清朝古紅玉雕軍事玉令牌

6. A White Jade Cavalrymen War Horses Halberds of Middle Sizes Militarism Worship Cong of the First Emperor of Qin 中國東周戰國至秦朝時期古白玉雕騎兵戰馬中戟紋秦始皇帝崇武玉琮

7. A Pale Celadon Greenish White Jade Linking Nipple Grain Phoenix Twisted Ropes Heaven Worship Bi of Nation Chu 中國東周戰國時期古青白玉淺浮雕勾連乳丁穀紋鳳紋扭繩紋楚國祭天玉璧

8. A Celadon Green Jade Twisted Ropes Triple Sitting Hornless Dragons Green-Dragon-Son-of-Heaven Pendant 中國西周時期古青玉雕扭繩紋三盤螭龍青龍天子珮

 

(3) 羊脂白玉 Mutton Fat White Jades (2 件/pcs)

 

1. A Mutton Fat White Jade Linking Clouds Royal Dragon Pendant Western Han Dynasty China 中國西漢古羊脂白玉透空圓雕勾連雲紋龍形珮

2. A Coincident Carved Khotan Russet Skin Mutton Fat White Jade Sitting Double-humped Camel Western Han Dynasty China 中國西漢和闐黑棗皮古羊脂白玉巧雕坐姿雙峯駱駝

  

Taiwan Web Museum

A Free Exhibition Museum in the Internet World

 

台灣網路藝術美術博物館

網路世界裡的免費博物館

 

台湾网络艺术美术博物馆

网络世界里的免费博物馆

  

Mr. Orion Hsu & Brothers (徐氏兄弟珍藏文物)

Private Museum preparatory office

中國書畫文物博物館籌備企劃辦公室

 

Worldwide Painting Sales Agent Wanted

誠徵世界各地書畫銷售代理商

 

orionandhsu@yahoo.com.tw

orionandhsu@gmail.com

  

參考文字 Reference Words :

 

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BOSNIAN MERMAID - ALEKSANDRA at CONEY ISLAND BEACH, NYC

 

You can see the entire session here:

BOSNIAN MERMAID

 

photo by:

Roman Kajzer @FotoManiacNYC

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HISTORY OF THE BIKINI

 

Time magazine list of top 10 bikinis in popular culture

 

-Micheline Bernardini models the first-Ever Bikini (1946)

-"Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini" (1960)

-Annette Funicello and Beach Party (1960's)

-The belted Bond-girl bikini (1962)

-Sports Illustrated's first Swimsuit Issue (1964)

-Raquel Welch's fur bikini in One Million Years B.C. (1966)

-Phoebe Cates' Bikini in Fast Times at Ridgemont High

-Princess Leia's golden bikini in Return of the Jedi (1983)

-Official uniform of the female Olympic Beach Volleyball team (1996)

-Miss America pageant's bikini debut (1997)

 

The history of the bikini can be traced back to antiquity. Illustrations of Roman women wearing bikini-like garments during competitive athletic events have been found in several locations. The most famous of them is Villa Romana del Casale. French engineer Louis Réard introduced the modern bikini, modeled by Micheline Bernardini, on July 5, 1946, borrowing the name for his design from the Bikini Atoll, where post-war testing on the atomic bomb was happening.

 

French women welcomed the design, but the Catholic Church, some media, and a majority of the public initially thought the design was risque or even scandalous. Contestants in the first Miss World beauty pageant wore them in 1951, but the bikini was then banned from the competition. Actress Bridget Bardot drew attention when she was photographed wearing a bikini on the beach during the Cannes Film Festival in 1953. Other actresses, including Rita Hayworth and Ava Gardner, also gathered press attention when they wore bikinis. During the early 1960's, the design appeared on the cover of Playboy and Sports Illustrated, giving it additional legitimacy. Ursula Andress made a huge impact when she emerged from the surf wearing what is now an iconic bikini in the James Bond movie Dr. No (1962). The deer skin bikini Raquel Welch wore in the film One Million Years B.C. (1966) turned her into an international sex symbol and was described as a definitive look of the 1960's.

 

The bikini gradually grew to gain wide acceptance in Western society. According to French fashion historian Olivier Saillard, the bikini is perhaps the most popular type of female beachwear around the globe because of "the power of women, and not the power of fashion". As he explains, "The emancipation of swimwear has always been linked to the emancipation of women." By the early 2000's, bikinis had become a US $ 811 million business annually, and boosted spin-off services like bikini waxing and the sun tanning.

 

IN ANTIQUITY

 

Pre-Roman

 

In the Chalcolithic era around 5600 BC, the mother-goddess of Çatalhöyük, a large ancient settlement in southern Anatolia, was depicted astride two leopards wearing a costume somewhat like a bikini. Two-piece garments worn by women for athletic purposes are depicted on Greek urns and paintings dating back to 1400 BC. Active women of ancient Greece wore a breastband called a mastodeton or an apodesmos, which continued to be used as an undergarment in the Middle Ages. While men in ancient Greece abandoned the perizoma, partly high-cut briefs and partly loincloth, women performers and acrobats continued to wear it.

 

Roman

 

Artwork dating back to the Diocletian period (286-305 AD) in Villa Romana del Casale, Sicily, excavated by Gino Vinicio Gentile in 1950-60, depicts women in garments resembling bikinis in mosaics on the floor. The images of ten women, dubbed the "Bikini Girls", exercising in clothing that would pass as bikinis today, are the most replicated mosaic among the 37 million colored tiles at the site. In the artwork "Coronation of the Winner" done in floor mosaic in the Chamber of the Ten Maidens (Sala delle Dieci Ragazze in Italian) the bikini girls are depicted weight-lifting, discus throwing, and running. Some activities depicted have been described as dancing, as their bodies resemble dancers rather than athletes. Coronation in the title of the mosaic comes from a woman in a toga with a crown in her hand and one of the maidens holding a palm frond. Some academics maintain that the nearby image of Eros, the primordial god of lust, love, and intercourse, was added later, demonstrating the owner's predilections and strengthening the association of the bikini with the erotic. Similar mosaics have been discovered in Tellaro in northern Italy and Patti, another part of Sicily. Prostitution, skimpy clothes and athletic bodies were related in ancient Rome, as images were found of female sex workers exercising with dumbbells/clappers and other equipment wearing costumes similar to the Bikini Girls.

 

Charles Seltman, a fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, curator of the Archaeology Museum there and an editor of The Cambridge Ancient History, illustrated a chapter titled "The new woman" in his book Women in Antiquity with a 1950's model wearing an identical bikini against the 4th-century mosaics from Piazza Armerina as part of a sisterhood between the bikini-clad female athletes of ancient Greco-Romans and modern woman. A photograph of the mosaic was used by Sarah Pomeroy, Professor of Classics at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, in the 1994 British edition of her book Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves to emphasize a similar identification. According to archaeologist George M.A. Hanfmann the bikini girls made the learned observers realize "how modern the ancients were".

 

In ancient Rome, the bikini-style bottom, a wrapped loincloth of cloth or leather, was called a subligar or subligaculum ("little binding underneath"), while a band of cloth or leather to support the breasts was called strophium or mamillare. The exercising bikini girls from Piazza Armenia wear subligaria, scanty briefs made as a dainty version of a man's perizoma, and a strophium band about the breasts, often referred to in literature as just fascia, which can mean any kind of bandage. Observation of artifacts and experiments shows bands had to be wrapped several times around the breasts, largely to flatten them in a style popular with flappers in the 1920's. These Greco-Roman breastbands may have flattened big breasts and padded small breasts to look bigger. Evidence suggests regular use. The "bikini girls" from Piazza Armenia, some of whom sport the braless look of the late 20th century, do not depict any propensity of such popularity in style. One bottom, made of leather, from Roman Britain was displayed at the Museum of London in 1998. There has been no evidence that these bikinis were for swimming or sun-bathing.

 

Finds especially in Pompeii show the so-called Roman goddess Venus wearing a bikini. A statue of the so-called Venus in a bikini was found in a cupboard in the southwest corner in Casa della Venere, others were found in the front hall. A statue of the so-called Venus was recovered from the tablinum of the house of Julia Felix, and another from an atrium in the garden at Via Dell'Abbondanza. Naples National Archaeological Museum, which opened its limited viewing gallery of more explicit exhibits in 2000, also exhibits a "Venus in Bikini". However, the Naples National Archaeological Museum is keen to stress that this statue actually depicts her Greek counterpart Aphrodite as she is about to untie her sandal, a common theme among other works depicting Aphrodite. The museum's exhibits include female statues wearing see-through gold lamé brassiere, basque and knickers. The Kings of Naples discovered these Pompeii artifacts, including the one meter tall, almost unclothed statue of Venus painted in gold leaf with something like a modern bikini. They found them so shocking that for long periods the secret chamber was opened only to "mature persons of secure morals". Even after the doors were opened, only 20 visitors were to be admitted at a time, and children under 12 were not allowed into the new part of the museum without their parents' or a teacher's permission.

 

There are references to bikinis in ancient literature as well. Ovid, the writer ranked alongside Virgil and Horace as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature, suggests the breastband or long strip of cloth wrapped around the breasts and tucked in the ends, is a good place to hide love-letters. Martial, a Latin poet from Hispania who published between AD 86 and 103, satirized a female athlete he named Philaenis, who played ball in a bikini-like garb quite bluntly, making her drink, gorge and vomit in abundance and hinting at her lesbianism. In an epigram on Chione, Martial strangely mentions a sex worker who went to the bathhouse in a bikini, while it was more natural to go unclothed. Reportedly Theodora, the 6th century empress of the Byzantine Empire wore a bikini when she appeared as an actress before she captured the heart of emperor Justinian I.

 

There is evidence of ancient Roman women playing expulsim ludere, an early version of handball, wearing a costume that has been identified as bikinis.

 

Interval

 

Between the classical bikinis and the modern bikini there has been a long interval. Swimming or outdoor bathing were discouraged in the Christian West and there was little need for a bathing or swimming costume till the 18th century. The bathing gown in the 18th century was a loose ankle-length full-sleeve chemise-type gown made of wool or flannel, so that modesty or decency was not threatened. In the first half of 19th century the top became knee-length while an ankle-length drawer was added as a bottom. By the second half of 19th century, in France, the sleeves started to vanish, the bottom became shorter to reach only the knees and the top became hip-length and both became more form fitting. In the 1900's women wore wool dresses on the beach that were made of up to 9 yards (8.2 m) of fabric. That standard of swimwear evolved into the modern bikini in the first of half of the 20th century.

 

Breakthrough

 

In 1907, Australian swimmer and performer Annette Kellerman was arrested on a Boston beach for wearing a form-fitting sleeveless one-piece knitted swimming tights that covered her from neck to toe, a costume she adopted from England, although it became accepted swimsuit attire for women in parts of Europe by 1910. Even in 1943, pictures of the Kellerman swimsuit were produced as evidence of indecency in Esquire v. Walker, Postmaster General. But, Harper's Bazaar wrote in June 1920 (vol. 55, no. 6, p. 138) - "Annette Kellerman Bathing Attire is distinguished by an incomparable, daring beauty of fit that always remains refined." The following year, in June 1921 (vol. 54, no. 2504, p. 101) it wrote that these bathing suits were "famous ... for their perfect fit and exquisite, plastic beauty of line."

 

Female swimming was introduced at the 1912 Summer Olympics. In 1913, inspired by that breakthrough, the designer Carl Jantzen made the first functional two-piece swimwear, a close-fitting one-piece with shorts on the bottom and short sleeves on top. Silent films such as The Water Nymph (1912) saw Mabel Normand in revealing attire, and this was followed by the daringly dressed Sennett Bathing Beauties (1915–1929). The name "swim suit" was coined in 1915 by Jantzen Knitting Mills, a sweater manufacturer who launched a swimwear brand named the Red Diving Girl,. The first annual bathing-suit day at New York's Madison Square Garden in 1916 was a landmark. The swimsuit apron, a design for early swimwear, disappeared by 1918, leaving a tunic covering the shorts.

 

During the 1920's and 1930's, people began to shift from "taking in the water" to "taking in the sun," at bathhouses and spas, and swimsuit designs shifted from functional considerations to incorporate more decorative features. Rayon was used in the 1920's in the manufacture of tight-fitting swimsuits, but its durability, especially when wet, proved problematic, with jersey and silk also sometimes being used. Burlesque and vaudeville performers wore two-piece outfits in the 1920's. The 1929 film "Man with a Movie Camera" shows Russian women wearing early two-piece swimsuits which expose their midriff, and a few who are topless. Films of holidaymakers in Germany in the 1930's show women wearing two-piece suits,

 

Necklines and midriff

 

By the 1930's, necklines plunged at the back, sleeves disappeared and sides were cut away and tightened. With the development of new clothing materials, particularly latex and nylon, through the 1930's swimsuits gradually began hugging the body, with shoulder straps that could be lowered for tanning. Women's swimwear of the 1930's and 1940's incorporated increasing degrees of midriff exposure. Coco Chanel made suntans fashionable, and in 1932 French designer Madeleine Vionnet offered an exposed midriff in an evening gown. They were seen a year later in Gold Diggers of 1933. The Busby Berkeley film Footlight Parade of 1932 showcases aqua-choreography that featured bikinis. Dorothy Lamour's The Hurricane (1937) also showed two-piece bathing suits.

 

The 1934 film, Fashions of 1934 featured chorus girls wearing two-piece outfits which look identical to modern bikinis. In 1934, a National Recreation Association study on the use of leisure time found that swimming, encouraged by the freedom of movement the new swimwear designs provided, was second only to movies in popularity as free time activity out of a list of 94 activities. In 1935 American designer Claire McCardell cut out the side panels of a maillot-style bathing suit, the bikini's forerunner. The 1938 invention of the Telescopic Watersuit in shirred elastic cotton ushered into the end the era of wool. Cotton sun-tops, printed with palm trees, and silk or rayon pajamas, usually with a blouse top, became popular by 1939. Wartime production during World War II required vast amounts of cotton, silk, nylon, wool, leather, and rubber. In 1942 the United States War Production Board issued Regulation L-85, cutting the use of natural fibers in clothing and mandating a 10% reduction in the amount of fabric in women's beachwear. To comply with the regulations, swimsuit manufacturers produced two-piece suits with bare midriffs.

 

Postwar

 

Fabric shortage continued for some time after the end of the war. Two-piece swimsuits without the usual skirt panel and other excess material started appearing in the US when the government ordered a 10% reduction in fabric used in woman's swimwear in 1943 as wartime rationing. By that time, two-piece swimsuits were frequent on American beaches. The July 9, 1945, Life shows women in Paris wearing similar items. Hollywood stars like Ava Gardner, Rita Hayworth and Lana Turner tried similar swimwear or beachwear. Pin ups of Hayworth and Esther Williams in the costume were widely distributed. The most provocative swimsuit was the 1946 Moonlight Buoy, a bottom and a top of material that weighed only eight ounces. What made the Moonlight Buoy distinctive was a large cork buckle attached to the bottoms, which made it possible to tie the top to the cork buckle and splash around au naturel while keeping both parts of the suit afloat. Life magazine had a photo essay on the Moonlight Buoy and wrote, "The name of the suit, of course, suggests the nocturnal conditions under which nude swimming is most agreeable."

 

American designer Adele Simpson, a Coty American Fashion Critics' Awards winner (1947) and a notable alumna of the New York art school Pratt Institute, who believed clothes must be comfortable and practical, designed a large part of her swimwear line with one-piece suits that were considered fashionable even in early 1980's. This was when Cole of California started marketing revealing prohibition suits and Catalina Swimwear introduced almost bare-back designs. Teen magazines of late 1940's and 1950's featured designs of midriff-baring suits and tops. However, midriff fashion was stated as only for beaches and informal events and considered indecent to be worn in public. Hollywood endorsed the new glamour with films such as Neptune's Daughter (1949) in which Esther Williams wore provocatively named costumes such as "Double Entendre" and "Honey Child". Williams, who also was an Amateur Athletic Union champion in the 100 meter freestyle (1939) and an Olympics swimming finalist (1940), also portrayed Kellerman in the 1952 film Million Dollar Mermaid (titled as The One Piece Bathing Suit in UK).

 

Swimwear of the 1940's, 50's and early 60's followed the silhouette mostly from early 1930's. Keeping in line with the ultra-feminine look dominated by Dior, it evolved into a dress with cinched waists and constructed bust-lines, accessorized with earrings, bracelets, hats, scarves, sunglasses, hand bags and cover-ups. Many of these pre-bikinis had fancy names like Double Entendre, Honey Child (to maximize small bosoms), Shipshape (to minimize large bosoms), Diamond Lil (trimmed with rhinestones and lace), Swimming In Mink (trimmed with fur across the bodice) and Spearfisherman (heavy poplin with a rope belt for carrying a knife), Beau Catcher, Leading Lady, Pretty Foxy, Side Issue, Forecast, and Fabulous Fit. According to Vogue the swimwear had become more of "state of dress, not undress" by mid-1950's.

 

The modern bikini

 

French fashion designer Jacques Heim, who owned a beach shop in the French Riviera resort town of Cannes, introduced a minimalist two-piece design in May 1946 which he named the "Atome," after the smallest known particle of matter. The bottom of his design was just large enough to cover the wearer's navel.

 

At the same time, Louis Réard, a French automotive and mechanical engineer, was running his mother's lingerie business near Les Folies Bergères in Paris. He noticed women on St. Tropez beaches rolling up the edges of their swimsuits to get a better tan and was inspired to produce a more minimal design. He trimmed additional fabric off the bottom of the swimsuit, exposing the wearer's navel for the first time. Réard's string bikini consisted of four triangles made from 30 square inches (194 cm2) of fabric printed with a newspaper pattern.

 

When Réard sought a model to wear his design at his press conference, none of the usual models would wear the suit, so he hired 19 year old nude dancer Micheline Bernardini from the Casino de Paris. He introduced his design to the media and public on July 5, 1946, in Paris at Piscine Molitor, a public pool in Paris. Réard held the press conference five days after the first test of a nuclear device (nicknamed Able) over the Bikini Atoll during Operation Crossroads. His swimsuit design shocked the press and public because it was the first to reveal the wearer's navel.

 

To promote his new design, Heim hired skywriters to fly above the Mediterranean resort advertising the Atome as "the world's smallest bathing suit." Not to be outdone by Heim, Réard hired his own skywriters three weeks later to fly over the French Riviera advertising his design as "smaller than the smallest bathing suit in the world."

 

Heim's design was the first to be worn on the beach, but the name given by Réard stuck with the public. Despite significant social resistance, Réard received more than 50,000 letters from fans. He also initiated a bold ad campaign that told the public a two-piece swimsuit was not a genuine bikini "unless it could be pulled through a wedding ring." According to Kevin Jones, curator and fashion historian at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, "Réard was ahead of his time by about 15 to 20 years. Only women in the vanguard, mostly upper-class European women embraced it."

 

Social resistance

 

Bikini sales did not pick up around the world as women stuck to traditional two-piece swimsuits. Réard went back to designing conventional knickers to sell in his mother's shop. According to Kevin Jones, curator and fashion historian at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, "Réard was ahead of his time by about 15 to 20 years. Only women in the vanguard, mostly upper-class European women embraced it, just like the upper-class European women who first cast off their corsets after World War I." It was banned in the French Atlantic coastline, Spain, Belgium and Italy, three countries neighboring France, as well as Portugal and Australia, and it was prohibited in some US states, and discouraged in others.

 

In 1951, the first Miss World contest (originally the Festival Bikini Contest), was organized by Eric Morley. When the winner, Kiki Håkansson from Sweden, was crowned in a bikini, countries with religious traditions threatened to withdraw delegates. Håkansson remains the first and last Miss World to be crowned in her bikini, a crowning that was condemned by Pope Pius XII who declared the swimsuit to be sinful. Bikinis were banned from beauty pageants around the world after the controversy. In 1949 the Los Angeles Times reported that Miss America Bebe Shopp on her visit to Paris said she did not approve the bikini for American girls, though she did not mind French girls wearing them. Actresses in movies like My Favorite Brunette (1947) and the model on a 1948 cover of LIFE were shown in traditional two-piece swimwear, not the bikini.

 

In 1950, Time magazine interviewed American swimsuit mogul Fred Cole, owner of Cole of California, and reported that he had "little but scorn for France's famed Bikinis," because they were designed for "diminutive Gallic women". "French girls have short legs," he explained, "Swimsuits have to be hiked up at the sides to make their legs look longer." Réard himself described it as a two-piece bathing suit which "reveals everything about a girl except for her mother's maiden name." Even Esther Williams commented, "A bikini is a thoughtless act." But, popularity of the charms of Pin-up queen and Hollywood star Williams were to vanish along with pre-bikinis with fancy names over the next few decades. Australian designer Paula Straford introduced the bikini to Gold Coast in 1952. In 1957, Das moderne Mädchen (The Modern Girl) wrote, "It is unthinkable that a decent girl with tact would ever wear such a thing." Eight years later a Munich student was punished to six days cleaning work at an old home because she had strolled across the central Viktualienmarkt square, Munich in a bikini.

 

The Cannes connection

Despite the controversy, some in France admired "naughty girls who decorate our sun-drenched beaches". Brigitte Bardot, photographed wearing similar garments on beaches during the Cannes Film Festival (1953) helped popularize the bikini in Europe in the 1950's and created a market in the US. Photographs of Bardot in a bikini, according to The Guardian, turned Saint-Tropez into the bikini capital of the world. Cannes played a crucial role in the career of Brigitte Bardot, who in turn played a crucial role in promoting the Festival, largely by starting the trend of being photographed in a bikini at her first appearance at the festival, with Bardot identified as the original Cannes bathing beauty. In 1952, she wore a bikini in Manina, the Girl in the Bikini (1952) (released in France as Manina, la fille sans voiles), a film which drew considerable attention due to her scanty swimsuit. During the 1953 Cannes Film Festival, she worked with her husband and agent Roger Vadim, and garnered a lot of attention when she was photographed wearing a bikini on every beach in the south of France.

 

Like Esther Williams did a decade earlier, Betty Grable, Marilyn Monroe and Brigitte Bardot all used revealing swimwear as career props to enhance their sex appeal, and it became more accepted in parts of Europe when worn by fifties "love goddess" actresses such as Bardot, Anita Ekberg and Sophia Loren. British actress Diana Dors had a mink bikini made for her during the 1955 Venice Film Festival and wore it riding in a gondola down Venice's Grand Canal past St. Mark's Square.

 

In Spain, Benidorm played a similar role as Cannes. Shortly after the bikini was banned in Spain, Pedro Zaragoza, the mayor of Benidorm convinced dictator Francisco Franco that his town needed to legalize the bikini to draw tourists. In 1959, General Franco agreed and the town became a popular tourist destination. Interestingly, in less than four years since Franco's death in 1979, Spanish beaches and women had gone topless.

 

Legal and moral resistance

 

The swimsuit was declared sinful by the Vatican and was banned in Spain, Portugal and Italy, three countries neighboring France, as well as Belgium and Australia, and it remained prohibited in many US states. As late as in 1959, Anne Cole, a US swimsuit designer and daughter of Fred Cole, said about a Bardot bikini, "It's nothing more than a G-string. It's at the razor's edge of decency." In July that year the New York Post searched for bikinis around New York City and found only a couple. Writer Meredith Hall wrote in her memoir that till 1965 one could get a citation for wearing a bikini in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire.

 

In 1951, the first Miss World contest, originally the Festival Bikini Contest, was organized by Eric Morley as a mid-century advertisement for swimwear at the Festival of Britain. The press welcomed the spectacle and referred to it as Miss World, and Morley registered the name as a trademark. When, the winner Kiki Håkansson from Sweden, was crowned in a bikini, countries with religious traditions threatened to withdraw delegates. The bikinis were outlawed and evening gowns introduced instead. Håkansson remains the only Miss World crowned in a bikini, a crowning that was condemned by the Pope. Bikini was banned from beauty pageants around the world after the controversy. Catholic-majority countries like Belgium, Italy, Spain and Australia also banned the swimsuit that same year.

 

The National Legion of Decency pressured Hollywood to keep bikinis from being featured in Hollywood movies. The Hays production code for US movies, introduced in 1930 but not strictly enforced till 1934, allowed two-piece gowns but prohibited navels on screen. But between the introduction and enforcement of the code two Tarzan movies, Tarzan, the Ape Man (1932) and Tarzan and His Mate (1934), were released in which actress Maureen O'Sullivan wore skimpy bikini-like leather outfits. Film historian Bruce Goldstein described her clothes in the first film as "It's a loincloth open up the side. You can see loin." All at sea was allowed in the USA in 1957 after all bikini-type clothes were removed from the film. The girl in the bikini was allowed in Kansas after all the bikini close ups were removed from the film in 1959.

 

In reaction to the introduction of the bikini in Paris, American swimwear manufacturers compromised cautiously by producing their own similar design that included a halter and a midriff-bottom variation. Though size makes all the difference in a bikini, early bikinis often covered the navel. When the navel showed in pictures, it was airbrushed out by magazines like Seventeen. Navel-less women ensured the early dominance of European bikini makers over their American counterparts. By the end of the decade a vogue for strapless styles developed, wired or bound for firmness and fit, along with a taste for bare-shouldered two-pieces called Little Sinners. But, it was the halterneck bikini that caused the most moral controversy because of its degree of exposure. So much so as bikini designs called "Huba Huba" and "Revealation" were withdrawn from fashion parades in Sydney as immodest.

 

Rise to popularity

 

The appearance of bikinis kept increasing both on screen and off. The sex appeal prompted film and television productions, including Dr. Strangelove. They include the surf movies of the early 1960's. In 1960, Brian Hyland's song "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini" inspired a bikini-buying spree. By 1963, the movie Beach Party, starring Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon, followed by Muscle Beach Party (1964), Bikini Beach (1964), and Beach Blanket Bingo (1965) that depicted teenage girls wearing bikinis, frolicking in the sand with boys, and having a great time.

 

The beach films led a wave of films that made the bikini pop-culture symbol. In the sexual revolution in 1960's America, bikinis became quickly popular. Hollywood stars like Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, Gina Lollobrigida, and Jane Russell helped further the growing popularity of bikinis. Pin-up posters of Monroe, Mansfield, Hayworth, Bardot and Raquel Welch also contributed significantly to its increasing popularity. In 1962, Playboy featured a bikini on its cover for the first time. Two years later, Sports Illustrated featured Berlin-born fashion model Babette March on the cover wearing a white bikini. The issue was the first Swimsuit Issue. It gave the bikini legitimacy, became an annual publication and an American pop-culture staple, and sells millions of copies each year. In 1965, a woman told Time it was "almost square" not to wear one. In 1967 the magazine wrote that 65% of "the young set" were wearing bikinis.

 

When Jayne Mansfield and her husband Miklós Hargitay toured for stage shows, newspapers wrote that Mansfield convinced the rural population that she owned more bikinis than anyone. She showed a fair amount of her 40-inch (1,000 mm) bust, as well as her midriff and legs, in the leopard-spot bikini she wore for her stage shows. Kathryn Wexler of The Miami Herald wrote, "In the beginning as we know it, there was Jayne Mansfield. Here she preens in leopard-print or striped bikinis, sucking in air to showcase her well noted physical assets." Her leopard-skin bikini remains one of the earlier specimens of the fashion.

 

In 1962, Bond Girl Ursula Andress emerged from the sea wearing a white bikini in Dr. No. The scene has been named one of the most memorable of the series. Channel 4 declared it the top bikini moment in film history, Virgin Media puts it ninth in its top ten, and top in the Bond girls. The Herald (Glasgow) put the scene as best ever on the basis of a poll. It also helped shape the career of Ursula Andress, and the look of the quintessential Bond movie. Andress said that she owed her career to that white bikini, remarking, "This bikini made me into a success. As a result of starring in Dr. No as the first Bond girl, I was given the freedom to take my pick of future roles and to become financially independent." In 2001, the Dr. No bikini worn by Andress in the film sold at auction for US$61,500. That white bikini has been described as a "defining moment in the sixties liberalization of screen eroticism". Because of the shocking effect from how revealing it was at the time, she got referred to by the joke nickname "Ursula Undress". According to the British Broadcasting Corporation, "So iconic was the look that it was repeated 40 years later by Halle Berry in the Bond movie Die Another Day."

 

Raquel Welch's fur bikini in One Million Years B.C. (1966) gave the world the most iconic bikini shot of all time and the poster image became an iconic moment in cinema history. The poster image of the deer skin bikini in One Million Years B.C. made her an instant pin-up girl. Welch was featured in the studio's advertising as "wearing mankind's first bikini" and the bikini was later described as a "definitive look of the 1960's". Her role wearing the leather bikini raised Welch to a fashion icon and the photo of her in the bikini became a best-selling pinup poster. One author said, "although she had only three lines in the film, her luscious figure in a fur bikini made her a star and the dream girl of millions of young moviegoers". In 2011, Time listed Welch's B.C. bikini in the "Top Ten Bikinis in Pop Culture".

 

In the 1983 film Return of the Jedi, Star Wars' Princess Leia Organa was captured by Jabba the Hutt and forced to wear a metal bikini complete with shackles. The costume was made of brass and was so uncomfortable that actress Carrie Fisher described it as "what supermodels will eventually wear in the seventh ring of hell." The "slave Leia" look is often imitated by female fans at Star Wars conventions. In 1997, 51 years after the bikini's debut, and 77 years after the Miss America Pageant was founded, contestants were allowed wear two-piece swimsuits, not just the swimsuits (nicknamed "bulletproof vests") traditionally issued by the pageant. Two of the 17 swimsuit finalists wore two-piece swimsuits, and Erika Kauffman, representing Hawaii, wore the briefest bikini of all and won the swimsuit competition. In 2010, the International Federation of Bodybuilders recognized Bikini as a new competitive category.

 

In India

 

Bollywood actress Sharmila Tagore appeared in a bikini in An Evening in Paris (1967), a film mostly remembered for the first bikini appearance of an Indian actress. She also posed in a bikini for the glossy Filmfare magazine. The costume shocked the conservative Indian audience, but it also set a trend of bikini-clad actresses carried forward by Parveen Babi (in Yeh Nazdeekiyan, 1982), Zeenat Aman (in Heera Panna 1973; Qurbani, 1980) and Dimple Kapadia (in Bobby, 1973) in the early 1970's. Wearing a bikini put her name in the Indian press as one of Bollywood's ten hottest actresses of all time, and was a transgression of female identity through a reversal of the state of modesty, which functions as a signifier of femininity in Bombay films. By 2005, it became usual for actors in Indian films to change outfits a dozen times in a single song — starting with a chiffon sari and ending up wearing a bikini. But, when Tagore was the chairperson of the Central Board of Film Certification in 2005, she expressed concerns about the rise of the bikini in Indian films.

 

Acceptance

 

In France, Réard's company folded in 1988, four years after his death. By that year the bikini made up nearly 20% of swimsuit sales, more than any other model in the US. As skin cancer awareness grew and a simpler aesthetic defined fashion in the 1990s, sales of the skimpy bikini decreased dramatically. The new swimwear code was epitomized by surf star Malia Jones, who appeared on the June 1997 cover of Shape Magazine wearing a halter top two-piece for rough water. After the 90's, however, the bikini came back again. US market research company NPD Group reported that sales of two-piece swimsuits nationwide jumped 80% in two years. On one hand the one-piece made a big comeback in the 1980's and early 1990's, on the other bikinis became briefer with the string bikini in the 1970's and 80's.

 

The "-kini family" (as dubbed by author William Safire), including the "-ini sisters" (as dubbed by designer Anne Cole) has grown to include a large number of subsequent variations, often with a hilarious lexicon — string bikini, monokini or numokini (top part missing), seekini (transparent bikini), tankini (tank top, bikini bottom), camikini (camisole top and bikini bottom), hikini, thong, slingshot, minimini, teardrop, and micro. In just one major fashion show in 1985, there were two-piece suits with cropped tank tops instead of the usual skimpy bandeaux, suits that are bikinis in front and one-piece behind, suspender straps, ruffles, and daring, navel-baring cutouts. To meet the fast changing tastes, some of the manufacturers have made a business out of making made-to-order bikinis in around seven minutes. The world's most expensive bikini, made up of over 150 carats (30 g) of flawless diamonds and worth a massive £20 million, was designed in February 2006 by Susan Rosen.

 

Actresses in action films like Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle (2003) and Blue Crush (2002) have made the two-piece "the millennial equivalent of the power suit", according to Gina Bellafonte of The New York Times, On September 9, 1997, Miss Maryland Jamie Fox was the first contestant in 50 years to compete in a two-piece swimsuit to compete in the Preliminary Swimsuit Competition at the Miss America Pageant. PETA used celebrities like Pamela Anderson, Traci Bingham and Alicia Mayer wearing a bikini made of iceberg-lettuce for an advertisement campaign to promote vegetarianism. A protester from Columbia University used a bikini as a message board against a New York City visit by Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

 

By the end of the century, the bikini went on to become the most popular beachwear around the globe, according to French fashion historian Olivier Saillard due to "the power of women, and not the power of fashion". As he explains, "The emancipation of swimwear has always been linked to the emancipation of women", though one survey tells 85% of all bikinis never touch the water. According to Beth Dincuff Charleston, research associate at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, "The bikini represents a social leap involving body consciousness, moral concerns, and sexual attitudes." By the early 2000's, bikinis had become a US $811 million business annually, according to the NPD Group, a consumer and retail information company. The bikini has boosted spin-off services like bikini waxing and the sun tanning industries.

 

Continued controversies

 

The bikini remained a hot topic for the news media. In May 2011, Barcelona, Spain made it illegal to wear bikinis in public except in areas near the beaches. Violators face fines of between 120 and 300 euros. In 2012, two students of St. Theresa's College in Cebu, the Philippines were barred from attending their graduation ceremony for "ample body exposure" because their bikini pictures were posted on Facebook. The students sued the college and won a temporary stay in a regional court.

 

In May 2013, Cambridge University banned the Wyverns Club of Magdalene College from arranging its annual bikini jelly wrestling. In June 2013, actress Gwyneth Paltrow, who also is interested in fashion, produced a bikini for her clothing line that is designed to be worn by girls 4 to 8 years old. She was criticized for sexualizing young children by Claude Knight of Kidscape, a British foundation that strives to prevent child abuse. He commented, "We remain very opposed to the sexualization of children and of childhood ... is a great pity that such trends continue and that they carry celebrity endorsement."

 

Four women were arrested over the 2013 Memorial Day weekend in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina for indecent exposure when they wore thong bikinis that exposed their buttocks. In June 2013, the British watchdog agency Advertising Standards Authority banned a commercial that showed men in an office fantasizing about their colleague, played by Pamela Anderson, in a bikini for degrading women.