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Explore #195 2011 08 23 / Getty Image

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Monumenta 2011

Anish Kapoor exhibition -Monumenta " Leviathan" 2011. Le Grand Palais .Paris .France

  

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On a walk around the city catching on progress. Christchurch April 3, 2016 New Zealand.

 

Christchurch is ranked alongside New York, Barcelona, Berlin and London as one of the street art capitals of the world in a new Lonely Planet book.

 

The book names Christchurch as one of 39 cities around the world with a rich street art scene.

 

It credits the birth of the Christchurch street art scene with the 2011 Canterbury earthquakes and the RISE street art festival and exhibition in 2013.

For more Info and photos of Street Art: i.stuff.co.nz/travel/90284773/christchurch-ranked-as-a-gl...

 

i.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/76266235/culprits-tracked-do...

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Please do not use my photos on websites, blogs or other media without my permission.

© All rights reserved.

 

Explore highest position: #52 on Saturday, August 20, 2011

Photo featured: The Sailor by Joost van den Broek. World Press Photo 2011 Exhibition.

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Today, he is highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “(self-expressing) artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 400 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

  

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice 9full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated November 24, 2012)

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.photobucket.com/albums/k130/katiecavell/NYC%2008/Coney%20Island/?action=view&current=SeaRabbitVid.mp4

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/about

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

(updated November 24, 2012)

 

Visa Pour l'Image 2011 - international festival of photojurnalism in Perpignan, France.

 

www.maciejdakowicz.com - JUST UPDATED. India in Nov and Jan!

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Theater District, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

 

The Music Box Theater survives today as one of the historic playhouses that symbolize American theater for both New York and the nation. Constructed shortly after the end of World War I, the Music Box was built by producer Sam Harris to house Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues.

 

Sam Harris was a legendary Broadway producer, who first reached fame through his successful partnership with George M. Cohan, and then collaborated with Irving Berlin and later with Kaufman and Hart. Irving Berlin is among the greatest and best-known American songwriters of this century. Together they staged Berlin's Music Box Revues for the first five years of the 1920s.

 

C. Howard Crane was a nationally prominent theater architect when Harris and Berlin hired him, along with his associate E. George Kiehler, to design the Music Box. Besides his two Broadway houses (the Music Box and the Guild -- now the Virginia), he designed legitimate theaters and grand movie palaces in cities across the country, and later in England.

 

The Music Box Theater represents a special and important aspect of the nation's theatrical history. Beyond its historical importance, its facade is an unusually handsome Palladian-inspired design.

 

For over half a century, beginning with the Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues, the Music Box Theater has served as home to countless numbers of the plays through which the Broadway theater has come to personify American theater. As such, it continues to help define the Broadway theater district, the largest and most famous concentration of legitimate stage theaters in the world.

 

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

 

The development of the Broadway Theater District

 

The area of midtown Manhattan known today as the Broadway theater district encompasses the largest concentration of legitimate playhouses in the world. The theaters located there, some dating from the turn of the century, are significant for their contributions to the history of the New York stage, for their influence upon American theater as a whole, and in many cases for their architectural design.

 

The development of the area around Times Square as New York's theater district at the end of the 19th century occurred as a result of two related factors: the northward movement of the population of Manhattan Island (abetted by the growth of several forms of mass transportation), and the expansion of New York's role in American theater. The northward movement of Manhattan's residential, commercial, and entertainment districts had been occurring at a steady rate throughout the 19th century. In the early 1800s, businesses, stores, hotels, and places of amusement had clustered together in the vicinity of lower Broadway. As New York's various businesses moved north, they began to isolate themselves in more or less separate areas: the financial institutions remained downtown; the major retail stores situated themselves on Broadway between 14th and 23rd Streets, eventually moving to Herald Square and Fifth Avenue after the turn of the century; the hotels, originally located near the stores and theaters, began to congregate around major transportation centers such as Grand Central Terminal or on the newly fashionable Fifth Avenue; while the mansions of the wealthy spread farther north on Fifth Avenue, as did such objects of their beneficence as the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

The theater district, which had existed in the midst of stores, hotels, and other businesses along lower Broadway for most of the 19th century, spread northward in stages, stopping for a time at Union Square, then Madison Square, then Herald Square. By the last two decades of the 19th century, far-sighted theater managers had begun to extend the theater district even farther north along Broadway, until they had reached the area that was then known as Long Acre Square and is today called Times Square.

 

A district of farmlands and rural summer homes in the early 1800s, Long Acre Square had by the turn of the century evolved into a hub of mass transportation. A horsecar line had run across 42nd Street as early as the 1860s, and in 1871, with the opening of Grand Central Depot and the completion of the Third and Sixth Avenue Elevated Railways, it was comparatively simple for both New Yorkers and out-of-towners to reach Long Acre Square. Transportation continued to play a large part in the development of the area; in 1904 New York's subway system was inaugurated, with a major station located at 42nd Street and Broadway. The area was then renamed Times Square in honor of the newly erected Times Building. The evolution of the Times Square area as a center of Manhattan's various mass transit systems made it a natural choice for the location of legitimate playhouses, which needed to be easily accessible to their audiences.

 

The theater business that invaded Long Acre Square at the end of the 19th century consisted of far more than a few playhouses, for at that time New York was the Starting-point for a vast, nationwide entertainment

 

network known as "the road." This complex theater operation had its beginnings in the 1860s when the traditional method of running a theater, the stock system, was challenged by the growing popularity of touring "combination" shows. In contrast to the stock system, in which a theater manager engaged a company of actors for a season and presented them in a variety of plays, the combination system consisted of a company of actors appearing in a single show which toured from city to city, providing its own scenery, costumes, and sometimes musical accompaniment. Helped by the expansion of the nation's railroads after the Civil War, the combination system soon killed off the majority of stock companies. By 1904 there were some 420 combination companies touring through thousands of theaters in cities and towns across the country.

 

Of crucial importance to the operation of the combination system was a single location where combination shows could be cast, rehearsed, tried out, and then booked for a cross-country tour. Since New York was already regarded as the most important theater city in America, it is not surprising that it became the headquarters for the combination system. In addition to the many theaters needed for an initial Broadway production for the combinations before they went on tour, New York's theater district encompassed rehearsal halls, the headquarters of scenery, costume, lighting, and makeup companies, offices of theatrical agents and producers, theatrical printers and newspapers, and other auxiliary enterprises. Close to the theater district were boarding houses catering to the hundreds of performers who came to New York in the hope of being hired for a touring show or a Broadway production.

 

As theaters were built farther uptown, the auxiliary enterprises also began to move north. By the turn of the century,

 

the section of Broadway between 37th Street and 42nd Street was known as the Rialto. Theater people gathered or promenaded there. Producers could sometimes cast a play by looking over the actors loitering on the Rialto; and out-of-town managers, gazing out of office windows, could book tours by seeing who was available.^

 

The theater district that began to move north to Long Acre Square in the 1890s was thus a vast array of business enterprises devoted to every facet of theatrical production.

 

The movement of the theater district north along Broadway had proceeded at a steady pace during the latter part of the 19th century. The Casino Theater was opened on the southeast corner of Broadway and 39th Street in 1882. A year later, it was joined by a most ambitious undertaking--the construction of the Metropolitan Opera House on Broadway between 39th and 40th Streets. In 1888, the Broadway Theater was erected on the southwest corner of Broadway and 41st Street. Five years later, the American Theater opened its doors at Eighth Avenue between 41st and 42nd Streets, as did Abbey's Theater at Broadway and 38th Street and the Empire Theater at Broadway and Fortieth Street.

 

It remained for Oscar Hammerstein I to make the move into Long Acre Square itself. At the close of the 19th century, Long Acre Square housed Manhattan's harness and carriage businesses, but was little used at night,

 

when it seems to have become a "thieves' lair."^ In 1895 Hammerstein erected an enormous theater building on Broadway between 44th and 45th Streets. The original plan for the Olympia called for a "perfect palace of entertainment--which would have included three theaters, a bowling alley, a turkish bath, cafes and restaurants." Only part of this visionary plan ever became a reality. On November 25, 1895, Hammerstein opened the Lyric Theater section of the building, and a little over three weeks later he inaugurated the Music Hall section. Never a financial success, the Olympia closed its doors two years after it opened. Nevertheless, it earned Hammerstein the title of "Father of Times Square."

 

By the turn of the century Hammerstein had built two more theaters in the Long Acre Square area, and in the years 1901-1920 a total of forty-three additional theaters appeared in midtown Manhattan, most of them in the side streets east and west of Broadway. Much of this theater-building activity was inspired by the competition between two major forces in the industry, the Theatrical Syndicate and the Shubert Brothers, for control of the road. As each side in the rivalry drew its net more tightly around the playhouses it owned or controlled, the other side was forced to build new theaters to house its attractions. The result was a dramatic increase in the number of playhouses, both in New York and across the country. After World War I, as the road declined and New York's theatrical activity increased, the general economic prosperity made possible the construction of thirty additional playhouses in the Times Square area, expanding the boundaries of the theater district so that it stretched from just west of

 

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Eighth Avenue to Sixth Avenue, and from 39th Street to Columbus Circle.

 

The stockmarket crash of 1929 and the resulting Depression causec a shrinkage in theater activity. Some playhouses were torn down, many were converted to motion picture houses, and later to radio and television studios. From the time of the Depression until the 1960s no new Broadway playhouses were constructed. Fortunately, the theaters that survive from the early part of the century represent a cross - section of types and styles, and share among them a good deal of New York's rich theatrical history.

 

Evolution of Theater Design

 

The frenzy of theater construction that occurred in New York during the first thirty years of this century brought with it an evolution in architecture and decoration. At the close of the 19th century American theaters were still being built in the style of traditional European opera houses, with high proscenium arches, narrow auditoriums, two or three balconies built in a horseshoe configuration, and dozens of boxes, some set into the front of the first balcony. Although contemporary notices of the theaters attributed specific (though often vague) styles or periods to them, their interiors were more often than not a melange of styles and colors.

 

With the increase of theater construction after the turn of the century came a new attitude toward theater architecture and decoration as firms such as Herts and Tallant, Thomas W. Lamb, and others, began to plan the playhouse's exterior and interior as a single, integrated design. The

 

Art Nouveau style New Amsterdam Theater, which opened in 1903, signalled this new seriousness in theater design.

 

Perhaps influenced by such European experiments as Wagner's Festival Theater at Bayreuth, American theater architects after the turn of the century began to structure their playhouses along different lines. Proscenium openings were made lower and wider, auditoriums were made shallower, seating was planned in a fan shape, and the number of balconies was usually reduced to one. Boxes were cut back to a minimum. The theaters that were built just before and after World War I for the most part shared this new configuration.

 

Because many of New York's extant playhouses were built during the period in which New York was serving as the starting-point for nationwide tours, they represent a style of theater architecture that is characteristic not only of New York but also of other cities across the United States, for a show which was originally produced in a New York theater would require similar conditions in the theaters in which it toured, and theater owners often hired the same architects to design and build theaters in several cities. Thus, New York's theaters set the standard for theater construction across the United States, as an inspection of designs for theaters in various cities will show.

 

The Broadway Theater in American Theatrical History

 

The playhouses scj.ll standing in the Broadway theater district share among them over eighty years of American theatrical history. In the early years of the century, when American theater was still heavily influenced by Europe, the theaters played host to such great international stars as Sarah Bernhardt, Eleonora Duse, and Mrs. Patrick Campbell, and to adaptations of such European successes as The Merry Widow and Floradora.

 

It was in the Broadway theaters that the beginnings of a distinctly American drama could be seen in the Western melodramas of David Belasco, the social comedies of Clyde Fitch and Langdon Mitchell, and the problem plays of Edward Sheldon and Eugene Walter. With the rise of the "little theater" movement in the second decade of the century, it seemed that theatrical leadership had passed from Broadway to such experimental "art" theaters as the Provincetown Playhouse and the Neighborhood Playhouse. Before long, however, the innovations of the little theaters infused Broadway with new life. Beginning with the production of Eugene O'Neill's first full-length play, Beyond the Horizon, on Broadway in 1920, the playhouses of Broadway presented the work of a new generation of playwrights, including, in addition to O'Neill, Maxwell Anderson, Philip Barry, S.N. Behrman, Rachel Crothers, Sidney Howard, George S. Kaufman, George Kelly and Elmer Rice.

 

The Depression of the 1930s brought with it a new concern with political and social issues, and the dramas presented in the Broadway playhouses reflected that concern. Commercial producers gave us plays by Lillian Hellman, Robert E. Sherwood, and Thornton Wilder, whle the Group Theater and other new organizations introduced such writers as Clifford Odets and Sidney Kingsley. The Broadway theaters continued to house

 

challenging plays during the 1940s and 1950s, when new talents such as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Killer, and William Inge first began writing for the theater.

 

Meanwhile, musical comedy had blossomed from the adaptations and imitations of European operetta popular at the turn of the century to a uniquely American art form. By the 1940s and 1950s the works of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, and many others, were being exported from the stages of Broadway to theaters around the world.

 

The 1960s and 1970s were decades of ferment and change, both in and out of the theater. As in the 1920s, the impetus for theatrical experimentation came from outside of Broadway, and as in the 1920s, the experimentation helped to revitalize the Broadway theater. Today, the playhouses of Broadway are showcases for the best plays of the Off- and Off-Off Broadway theaters, as well as for exciting productions from theatrical workshops, regional theaters, and outstanding foreign companies.

 

Having moved gradually northward all during the 19th century, New York's theater district finally came to rest at Times Square, where it has remained for almost ninety years. The economic Depression of the 1930s discouraged speculative ventures such as the construction of new theaters, while after prosperity returned in the wake of World War II, the cost of renting land and constructing a theater was prohibitively high. The northward movement of the theater district may also have been discouraged for a number of years by the existence of the Sixth Avenue Elevated Railway, which crossed from Sixth to Ninth Avenues 53rd Street, thereby providing a natural northern boundary for the theater district.

 

The Music Box Theater, as one of the Broadway playhouses surviving today in the theater district, contributes to the totality of the district's history by virtue of its participation in that history.

 

Irving Berlin and Sam H. Harris

 

The Music Box was built for Sam Harris and Irving Berlin, legendary Broadway figures who each played an important role in shaping the history of American theater entertainment. Sam Harris was a soft-spoken, behind-the-scenes genius whose percentage of hits is still one of the highest in Broadway history.^ Irving Berlin is one of the great American

 

songwriters of this century. Together they created the Music Box Theater and made it what one writer called "the home of the hits!"

 

Sam Harris, a native New Yorker, was born February 3, 1872, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. He left school at the age of fourteen, and by the age of seventeen was organizing local holiday entertainment and athletic exhibitions. Harris also raised thoroughbred racing horses and promoted prize fighters, including the featherweight champion of 1897, "Terrible Terry" McGovern. The enterprising Harris figured "Terrible Terry" could do more than just box in the ring, so beginning in 1898 he had McGovern delivering punch lines on the stage, first in The Bowery After Dark, a financial success which went on to tour the country, and then in The Gay Morning Glories, not nearly as popular.

 

In 1904, Sam Harris began a lengthy collaboration with composer George M. Cohan. Their first great success was Little Johnnie Jones. It was Cohan's show; he acted in it and wrote the music, including the songs "Give My Regards to Broadway." Harris, however, knew better than anyone the

 

business end of good popular entertainment; together Cohan and Harris are still regarded as one of the most successful teams in Broadway history.

 

Harris also controlled several theaters with Cohan: in 1913, they built the Bronx Opera House on East 149th Street and Third Avenue (extant), and together they took control of the Cohan and Harris Theater. Their personal lives were linked through their marriages to sisters, Alice Nolan (Harris's first wife), and Agnes Nolan (Cohan's wife). Their partnership eventually dissolved over a disagreement during the actors' strike which preceded the formation of Actors' Equity in 1920. Despite their feud, Cohan and Harris remained good friends and even revived their partnership in 1937 to produce one more show, Fulton of Oak FalIs.

 

When Harris parted with Cohan, he joined Irving Berlin in the Music Box Theater project. In addition to Berlin, Harris went on to collaborate with George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart on a number of productions, including Once In a Lifetime, Dinner At Eight, and The Man Who Came To Dinner. Three of his productions won Pulitzer Prizes: Icebound in 1923, Of Thee I Sing in 1932, and You Can't Take It With You in 1937. Harris died in 1941, a successful and respected stage figure whose name, Max Gordon once said, "stood for impeccable taste and something called for lack of a better word, 'class.'"

 

Irving Berlin, still alive today at the age of 99, has been one of the most versatile and popular songwriters of the twentieth century. Born May 11, 1888, in Eastern Russia, Israel Baline immigrated to the United States with his family in 1892 when he was only four years old."* His first published song (1907) was "Mario From Sunny Italy." A printer's error on the cover spelled his name I. Berlin, and he kept the name. Unable to read music and without any formal training, Berlin nonetheless has had over 1500 songs published, many of them internationally known. He can play the piano only in the key of F-sharp, and even has a special instrument furnished with a clutch that enables him to switch automatically to any key.

 

At the beginning of his career, Irving Berlin was a "Tin Pan Alley" pioneer, helping to win wide acceptance for ragtime jazz and the accompanying dance craze. His first great musical success, "Alexander's Ragtime Band," became an international hit when vaudeville star Emma Carus introduced its syncopated march rhythms to Chicago audienpes in 1911. By 1915, the song had sold over two million sheet copies and Berlin had become identified in the public mind with ragtime.

 

In 1914 Berlin wrote his first complete score for the Vernon and Irene Castle revue Watch Your Step that popularized "Play a Simple Melody." At that time he was also performing in vaudeville, appearing at such theaters as the London Hippodrome, where he was billed as the "king of ragtime." Drafted into the army in 1918, Berlin wrote and starred in Yip-Yip Yaphank, a service musical in which he first introduced "I Hate to Get Up in the Morning."

 

In 1919, the songwriter formed his own musical publishing company, Irving Berlin, Inc. During the 1920s Berlin wrote for a number of revues including the Ziegfeld Follies of 1920 and 1927 and his own Music Box Revues of 1921-24. In 1925, he scored his first musical comedy, The Cocoanuts, for the Marx Brothers. His work took on a more sober tone in

 

the early 1930s with two political satires, Face the Music (1932) and As Thousands Cheer (1933), the latter featuring his holiday classic, "Easter Parade." In 1935 Berlin began writing for the movies. Bing Crosby, Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland owed some of their greatest hits to him. Top Hat (1935) featured Rogers and Astaire dancing to "Isn't This a Lovely Day" and "Cheek to Cheek," Crosby introduced "White Christmas" in Holiday Inn (1942), and Garland and Astaire walked up the avenue in Easter Parade (1948). On Broadway, Berlin was particularly identified with Ethel Merman who starred in his greatest hit Annie Get Your Gun (1944) and later spoofed Perle Mesta in Call Me Madam (1950).

 

In 1954 Berlin went into retirement. He returned to Broadway in 1962 with the score for Mr. President, a great popular success despite a lukewarm reception from the critics. In 1955, President Eisenhower presented Berlin with a gold medal "in recognition of his services in composing warm patriotic songs," the most famous of these being "God Bless America."

 

(PD, GH)

 

C. Howard Crane and E. George Kiehler

 

During a career that spanned almost fifty years, Charles Howard Crane designed more than two hundred theaters in the United States and some 125 more in Canada and Great Britain. Among the most widely publicized of these were his only two Broadway playhouses, the Music Box (1921) and the Guild (later the ANTA, currently the Virginia; 1924-25). Quite different from each other in appearance - - the GuiId is mode 1 ed on a Tuscan villa while the Music Box is severely Palladian in style -- both theaters display Crane's academically correct eclecticism. Crane believed that

 

theaters ought to exemplify architecture as an art of dramatization. Unlike many other theater architects of the time, who blended various historical elements into a personal style, Crane never developed a "signature" in his work.

 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1885, Crane began his career in that city in 1904. He moved to Detroit in 1905 where he apprenticed himself to Albert Kahn. Only a year later he had become the chief draftsman for the firm of Field, Hynchman & Smith, and by 1909 he had established his own practice. His expertise in theater design and construction, and specifically in acoustics, gained him a solid reputation and kept his services in constant demand, particularly during the 1920s. At one time he employed fifty-three draftsmen who assisted him with projects in almost every major American city. In Detroit alone, he designed almost fifty theaters, the most heralded two being the Majestic (1917) and Orchestra Hall (1919).

 

Crane employed two senior associates: Ben A. Dore, chief designer in the Detroit office, who collaborated on, or was in charge of, many mid-western projects' and Kenneth Franzheim (1891-1959), who ran Crane's New York City office. Two well publicized examples of Crane and Franzheim's collaboration were the twin Selwyn and Harris Theaters in Chicago. Archie and Edgar Selwyn, both prominent New York producers, commissioned one; and Sam Harris, impressed with his architect's 1921 Music Box design, commissioned Crane to build the other. The two separate but adjoining structures were roughly the same size and consisted of similarly fashioned Renaissance style facades. Another Crane and Franzheim collaboration was the Capitol Theater and Office Building in Boston in 1926. This elaborate design incorporated a two-story Ionic colonnaded facade into a standard fourteen-story office tower with an extremely plush and decorative interior. E. George Kiehler was also a collaborator on some of Crane's theater projects, including the Music Box, but his specific contributions are not known.

 

At the height of Crane's career, shortly before the Depression, many American film studios and theater corporations had attained their greatest financial and popular success. Individual theaters and theater chains became one part of an expanding entertainment empire. Beginning in 1925, for example, the Fox Theater Corporation embarked on a campaign to build or acquire what would amount to 800 theaters by the year 1929. Crane alone was commissioned by Fox to design twenty-five new theaters. Two of them, the Detroit Fox and the St. Louis Fox, both completed in 1928, were among the largest theaters in the country. Typically for Crane, the style of the Detroit Fox blended East Indian, Byzantine and Baroque motifs. Another similar theater in the Fox chain, the Brooklyn Fox, also by Crane in 1928, had a seating capacity of 4,305, and became a famous showcase for first-run motion pictures.

 

United Artists took advantage of Crane's talents too in 1927 when they commissioned him to design the Spanish Gothic style United Artists Theater in Los Angeles. With a lobby that resembled a vaulted Spanish cathedral, the theater also featured intricate tracery and a mirrored auditorium ceiling.^

 

In 1932, one of the worst years of the Depression, Crane moved to Europe, first to Milan where he designed Italy's first skyscraper, then to London where he settled permanently. Although his reasons for leaving the United States remain unclear, Crane continued to build theaters in England and maintained his office in Detroit. Perhaps his greatest architectural challenge, and certainly his finest engineering accomplishment, resulted in 1937 in his Earl's Court Exhibition Hall, sports and amusement center. Faced with a triangular twelve-acre site above a network of railway tracks, Crane created a modern curvilinear structure with a 118-foot high arena and five exhibition halls which could be opened into one vast amphitheater seating 30,000. It also featured an Olympic-sized swimming pool which could be raised, frozen for skating, or used as a stage or playing field. All this, it Is said, was erected without stopping a single train below the construction.

 

During and after World War II, Crane rechanneled his efforts into industrial design while working on the rebuilding of London factories and the modernization of other British plants. He continued to visit the United States frequently to lecture, but resided in London until his death there in 1952.

 

(PD, FD)

 

The Music Box Theater

 

According to one account, Sam Harris first mentioned his interest in building a theater to Irving Berlin in 1919. Berlin responded, "If you ever do, I have a great title for you." "A title for a song?" asked Harris. "No, a title for a theater, the Music Box," replied Berlin.

 

The following year Harris joined with Berlin to build the Music Box Theater, shortly after the termination of Harris's partnership with George M. Coh an. Harris built the Music Box Theater specifically to house Berlin's Music Box Revues. (Harris and Berlin were joined in the venture by a mutual friend, motion picture magnate Joseph Schenck, who soon after the theater's completion sold his interest to the Shubert Organization.) A site on 45th Street was purchased from the Astor Realty Co., and on September 22, 1921 the Music Box Theater opened with an extravaganza Berlin wrote especially for the new house. The property cost $400,000, the building $600,000, and more than $240,000 was spent for Hassard Short to produce and stage the first show. Theatre Magazine's reviewer obviously thought the expense well worthwhile, for he proclaimed Berlin's Music Box Revue and the Music Box theater "a wonderful new show in a superlatively beautiful new theatre.""*

 

For another reviewer the theater and show were "the most eye-filling and appealing combination of play and playhouse that local playgoers accustomed as they are to things gorgeous theatrically -- have ever been treated to." "Say It With Music" became Berlin's theme song for the theater and for his Music Box Revues of 1921, 1922, 1923, and 1924.

 

The Music Box was one of the small number of theaters built in the 1920s for an individual producer, rather than for a large organization like the Shuberts or the Chanins. Harris and Berlin turned to C. Howard Crane for an unusual and individual design that would mark the theater as the home of Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues.

 

Crane's design for the Music Box combined Palladian and Adamesque motifs from an architectural tradition that was essentially English and neo-Georgian. Its most prominent feature was a delicate limestone Ionic

 

colonnade screening the gallery, with pedimented doorways and finely designed lanterns. The bays on either side were framed by double pilasters and punctuated by Palladian windows on the second level, and a single window on the third. The theater was then crowned by a mansard roof with four dormer windows and a decorative wrought-iron balustrade running the length of the 100 foot theater. As described by the contemporary architectural press:

 

The delicate limestone colonnade and gallery with its finely designed doorways and lanterns is the central feature. Pylon like at the sides the structural masses give strength and proportion to the design and the mansard roof with its dormer windows and balustrades is decidedly a crowning feature. The freedom of the front from the blatant electric advertising sign is a relief. Two signs of small size designed and proportioned in keeping with the whole scheme proclaim the purpose of the building and the marquise-a concession to the needs of a stormy night-is so submerged as not to obtrude to the detriment of the composition.

 

The overall effect of Crane's design for the Music Box was distinctly domestic. The combination of Palladian and neo-Georgian elements was suggestive of a grand country house. Such an approach was not new to the

 

theater district; a number of earlier theaters built as headquarters/homes for theatrical impresarios followed similar themes. David Belasco's Stuyvesant Theater (today the Belasco) used a neo-Georgian facade to suggest an Intimate, if luxurious, 1ivingroom housing his productions. Winthrop Ames's Little Theater used a similarly styled facade to suggest a domestic home for his intimate "little theater" productions, and his architects, Ingalls & Hoffman, did something similar for Henry Miller's Theater a few years later. Contemporary with the Music Box was the Theater Guild's home (also designed by Crane), whose Italian pa1azzo-inspired facade deliberately evoked the homes of the Renaissance princes who patronized the theatrical arts. This connection between neo-Georgian architecture and intimate theater appears to have been generally understood at the time, and a contemporary architectural periodical noted of the Music Box:

 

This small theatre seats one thousand and is designed for the so-called "intimate" production. This idea is well carried into the design by the use of the style of the Georgian period following the delicacy of domestic architecture more than the monumental.

 

From the first the Broadway critics were impressed with the beauty and refinement of the Music Box's design. Jack Lait of Variety called it "the daintiest theatre in America," and the Evening Telegram's reviewer dubbed it "a theatre unparalleled....so beautiful and so satisfying that its like is not to be found here or even on the continent.." For the Herald's reviewer the Music Box's facade provided a welcome contrast to the more mundane theater buildings then going up in the Broadway area:

 

The audience which gathered to witness the brilliant opening of the Music Box last night had its first surprise on approaching the building. The new theater actually has a front -- it even deserves to be called a facade -- Vith pillars and other dignified architectural decorations....

 

The architectural press was equally enthusiastic, though perhaps less colorful in its praise. A number of journals published photos, plans, and descriptions of the Music Box. The American Architect-Architectural Review devoted eight pages to Crane's playhouse in the February 1, 1922, issue, calling it one of the most "artistic additions to New York's large number of theaters." The journal added "how remarkable" the Music Box was "for the quiet dignity of its desien and in its plan for those elements of comfort and luxurious ease____"

 

A few years later in the American Spirit in Architecture, Talbot Hamlin ranked the Music Box "among the most beautiful of modern theaters" saying:

 

It is in a modernized Adam style, and borrows much from our own native tradition in its quiet wall and roof surfaces and its delicately proportioned loggia. Proportion, detail, atmosphere make its facade a true ornament to the city, and prove that gayety is quite compatible with repose and dignity.

 

Berlin presented a Music Box Revue in each of the next four years. He moved on to other creative projects after 1925 but maintained his controlling interest with Sam Harris in the Music Box Theater. Their careful supervision of outside productions using the theater gave the Music Box an outstanding performance record: in its first twenty-five years only three shows ran less than 100 performances.

 

Today Irving Berlin retains a share in the ownership of the Music Box Theater -- "What the hell does a songwriter want with a theater?" he said in 1971. "I've sold real estate, but I've held on to the Music Box. It's a sentimental interest." The Music Box remains remarkably intact inside and out, its facade largely unaltered from the day it was built.

 

The Music Box as a Playhouse^

 

Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues occupied the Music Box Theater for its first four years. The Mail called the Revue of 1922 "four hours of jazz, girls, gorgeous costuming, spectacles that at times were dazzling, dancing acrobatics, arui all the hurly-burly of color movement associated with its predecessor."

 

The first straight play produced at the Music Box following Berlin's Revues was The Cradle Snatchers (1925), whose cast included the young Humphrey Bogart. Two more hit comedies followed, Chicago with Charles Bickford and Francine Larrimore in 1926 and Philip Barry's Paris Bound with Hope Williams in 1927. Music returned to the theater in 1928 with Cole Porter's Paris starring the glamorous Irene Bordoni. The following year Clifton Webb, Fred Allen and Libby Holman appeared in the Little Show revue. In 1931, the third edition of this series also appeared at the Music Box featuring Bea Lillie's rendition of Noel Coward's "Mad Dogs and Englishmen." For the most part, however, during the 'thirties the Music Box was given over to the the works of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart who either together or in collaboration with others supplied the house with one hit after another. The decade opened with Kaufman and Hart's first joint effort,

 

Once in a Lifetime, a Hollywood satire with Jean Dixon that convulsed audiences for 410 performances. Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind collaborated on the Music Box's next production, the Gershwin musical Of Thee Sing, which ran 446 performances in 1931-32 and won the first Pulitzer Prize awarded to a musical. Subsequent productions involving Kaufman or Hart included Dinner at Eight (1932, Kaufman and Edna Ferber), As Thousands Cheer (1933, book by Hart), Merrily We Roll Along (19 34, Kaufman and Hart), First Lady (1935, Kaufman and Katherine Dayton), Stage Door (19 36, Kaufman and Ferber) and The Man Who Came to Dinner (19 39, Kaufman and Hart). Kaufman also directed all of the above productions as well as John Steinbeck's dramatization of his novel Of Mice and Men which won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1938.

 

Following the death of Sam Harris in 1941 the Music Box was leased to independent producers on a show-by-show basis. Continuing to attract strong productions, it retained its reputation as one of the most successful theaters on Broadway. Contributing to this success was Mike Todd's Star and Garter, a rowdy revue starring Gypsy Rose Lee that racked up an impressive 605 performances in 1942-43. Rodgers and Hammerstein's productions of John Van Druten's I Remember Mama also enjoyed great success with 714 performances in 1944-45. The young Marlon Brando made his Broadway debut in this production which also starred Mady Christians and Oscar Homolka. Other notable productions from the forties included Tennessee Williams' Summer and Smoke (1948) and the Maxwell Anderson-Kurt Weill musical Lost in the Stars (1949).

 

The fifties were marked by a happy association between the Music Box and playwright William Inge who supplied the theater with three hits: the Pulitzer Prize winning Picnic (1953), Bus Stop (1954), and Dark at the Top £f the Stairs (1958). Other highlights of the 'fifties included Separate Tables which featured a Tony Award-winning performance by actress Margaret Leighton, and Five Finger Excercise which won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for best foreign play of the 1959/60 season.

 

During the 1960s the Music Box housed a number of distinguished dramas, inc luding A Far Country (1961) with Steven Hill and Kim Stanley, and The Homecoming (1967) with Ian Holm and Vivien Merchant. Its most popular attraction, however, was a romantic comedy Any Wednesday (1964) which ran 983 performances and and garnered paeans of praise from the critics for actress Sandy Dennis.

 

Two thrillers dominated the 1970s, Anthony Shaffer's Sleuth (1970), a British import with Anthony Quayle and Keith Baxter, and Ira Levin's Deathtrap (1978), the Music Box's longest running play to date. In addition there was another long running comedy with Sandy Dennis, Absurd Person Singular (1974), and a revue of songs by Stephen Sondheim, Side by Side by Sondheim (1977), with Millicent Martin and Julie McKenzie. In recent years the Music Box has housed the stark drama Agnes of God (1983) with Elizabeth Ashley, Geraldine Page and Amanda Plummer, a charming revival of Noel Coward's Hay Fever (1985) with Rosemary Harris and Roy Dotrice, and a critically acclaimed production by the Royal Shakespeare Company of Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1987).

 

The success of the Music Box as a theater may be best summarized in the words of Moss Hart:

 

The Music Box is everybody's dream of a theatre. If there is such a thing as a theatre's making a subtle contribution to the play being given on its stage, the Music Box is that theatre. Except for the Haymarket Theatre in London, I know of no other that possesses so strong an atmosphere of its own, as living and as personal, as the Music Box. Even in broad daylight, as we stepped inside its doors and into its darkened auditorium, there was an undefinable sense that here the theatre was always at its best.

 

Description

 

The Music Box Theater has a symmetrically-organized facade which is wider than it is high. The ground floor, which is of stone (with concrete infill and patches) is dominated by its doorways. Four pairs of original bronze and glass doors adorned with curvilinear motifs, lead into the ticket lobby at the right (east). These are flanked by original bronze -painted wood and glass signboards, framed by colonnettes with grotesques and crowned by stylized pediments (of sheetmetal over wood) composed of waves f 1 ank ing lyres in wreath surrounds. A modern marquee extends out over the entrance doors. Three pairs of original bronze and gl ass exit doors from the auditorium are flanked by similar s ignboards of bronze -painted iron, and doorways, that to the east with a single door, and that to the west with a decorative painted wrought - iron gate at the foot of the fire stairs. Decorative iron railings flank the two granite steps leading from the gate. Two large original iron signboards are placed on the wall adjacent to the recessed paired bronze stage doors.

 

A single bronze stage door in an iron frame is at the western end. These two stage door openings flank a single original sign board. The ground floor is surmounted by a cornice with a wide Adamesque frieze containing vertical ribs, urns, and swags. The major portion of the facade, rising from the ground floor base, is faced with stone and is organized into a colonnaded center section with flanking end bays. Double-height fluted columns with stylized Corinthian capitals are linked by wrought-iron railings with cast-iron panels which shield a recessed portion of the facade. The gallery thus created serves as the exit for a set of fire stairs at the east and for the three doorways from the balcony level of the auditorium. These doorways have pane led doors and are surmounted by entablatures with urn- and swag-adorned friezes supporting triangular pediments (at the outer doors) and a scrol led broken pediment with pineapple finial (at the center door). Three wrought-iron and glass lanterns are suspended from the ceiling of the gallery. The end bays are flanked by pilasters with stylized Corinthian capitals.

 

A Palladianesque window with fan-filled tympanum is placed at the second floor of each bay. The windows have multi-paned casement sash. At the third floor of each bay is a window with a simple molded surround. The sash are mul ti-paned casements. A vertical sign projects from the wall of the eastern bay. An entablature with rosette-adorned frieze, dentils, and modi 11ioned cornice spans the facade. This is surmounted by a slate -covered sloping roof punctuated by round-arched sheetmetal dormers with multi-paned sash. Wrought - and cast - iron railings are placed above the cornice and at the roofline.

 

- From the 1987 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

Mejor pincha aquí para ver en grande sobre negro o pulsa 'L'.

Better click here to view this large on black or press 'L'.

:copyright: Derechos de Autor. Esta fotografía no podra usarse sin mi consentimiento escrito.

:copyright: All rights reserved, don´t use this image without my permission.

Sevilla: Album/Set

 

Canon 450D + ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/21, @21mm, 1/640 sec, f/5,6, ISO 100

No Tripod, Manual exposure, Date 08/5/2011 12:50:35

 

Explore: 27 December 2011 in # 6

 

Ahora puedes seguirme en:/ Now you can follow me in:

500px | Getty | Twitter | Blurb | 123rf | fotolia | Tumblr | Fluidr | Flickriver

 

Como se hizo: Imagen procedente de un sólo archivo RAW. No es HDR.

 

Quiero aprovechar para presentar mi primer libro de fotografía, podeis verlo en el siguiente link.

 

La Plaza de España de Sevilla constituye un conjunto arquitectónico encuadrado en el Parque de María Luisa, configura uno de los espacios más espectaculares de la arquitectura regionalista.

La Plaza de España constituyó el proyecto más emblemático de la Exposición Iberoamericana del año 1929, fue proyectada por el arquitecto sevillano Aníbal González, que también era arquitecto director del evento expositivo, fue ayudado por un buen conjunto de colaboradores, entre los que se encontraban el ingeniero José Luis de Casso y el arquitecto Aurelio Gómez Millán. Las obras de construcción comenzaron en el año 1914, resultando el proyecto más ambicioso y costoso de la Exposición, llegando a trabajar en su construcción mil hombres al mismo tiempo, puede resultar asombroso, cómo una ciudad en situación económica difícil en esos años, se embarcó en un proyecto de semejante magnitud. Algunos aspectos del proyecto suscitaron algunos rechazos, la Academia de Bellas Artes se opuso a la altura prevista de las dos torres que podían rivalizar con la Giralda y Forestier, diseñador del Parque de María Luisa rechazaba la construcción de la ría que rodea la plaza, para una ciudad con gran escasez de agua como Sevilla. En 1926, tras la dimisión de Aníbal González de su cargo de director de la Exposición, asume la finalización del proyecto el arquitecto Vicente Traver, que terminó los cerramientos del recinto y añadió la fuente del centro de la Plaza.

La plaza de España ha sido utilizada como escenario de algunas películas conocidas, entre ellas:

* En la película Lawrence de Arabia, la plaza representaba el cuartel general del Ejército británico en el Cairo

* En la película Star Wars Episodio II: El Ataque de los Clones de la saga de la Guerra de las Galaxias, la plaza representa el planeta Naboo, aunque el escenario de la filmación fue modificado digitalmente.

 

English:

Making off: Edited from a RAW file. No HDR.

 

I want present my first book of photography, in this book you can see the selection of my best Spanish landscapes, you can see or buy in the next link.

 

The Plaza de España ("Spain Square", in English) is a plaza located in the Parque de María Luisa (Maria Luisa Park), in Seville, Spain built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929. It is a landmark example of the Renaissance Revival style in Spanish architecture.

In 1929 Seville hosted the Ibero-American Exposition World's Fair, located in the celebrated Maria Luisa Park (Parque de María Luisa). It was designed by Jean-Claude Nicolas Forestier. The entire southern end of the city was redeveloped into an expanse of gardens and grand boulevards. The centre of it is Parque de María Luisa, a 'Moorish paradisical style' with a half mile of: tiled fountains, pavilions, walls, ponds, benches, and exhedras; lush plantings of palms, orange trees, Mediterranean pines, and stylized flower beds; and with vine hidden bowers. Numerous buildings were constructed in it for the exhibition.

The Plaza de España, designed by Aníbal González, was a principal building built on the Maria Luisa Park's edge to showcase Spain's industry and technology exhibits. González combined a mix of 1920s Art Deco and 'mock Mudejar', and Neo-Mudéjar styles. The Plaza de España complex is a huge half-circle with buildings continually running around the edge accessible over the moat by numerous beautiful bridges. In the centre is a large fountain. By the walls of the Plaza are many tiled alcoves, each representing a different province of Spain.

Today the Plaza de España mainly consists of Government buildings. The Seville Town Hall, with sensitive adaptive redesign, is located within it. The Plaza's tiled 'Alcoves of the Provinces' are backdrops for visitors portrait photographs, taken in their own home province's alcove. Towards the end of the park, the grandest mansions from the fair have been adapted as museums. The farthest contains the city's archaeology collections. The main exhibits are Roman mosaics and artefacts from nearby Italica.

The Plaza de España was used for location shooting some scenes in the films Lawrence of Arabia and Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones.

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 450 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

 

In recent decade, Dr. Yamada became highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “self-expressing artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as stag beetle with butterfly wings and two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses. In 2013, Dr. Takeshi Yamada won the highest score and the second highest score in the first season of the AMC cable television’s new unscripted series about competitive taxidermy show, IMMORTALIZED with his monumental artworks and stage performances against challengers.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice (full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated March 1, 2013)

 

===========================================

 

Reference: Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” of the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013:

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/immortalized-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/spoilers-the-final-reve...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-epi...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SrTXdjikw

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/news/article_17114...

www.rlslog.net/immortalized-s01e01-hdtv-x264-bajskorv/

trailerrss.com/immortalized-amc-series-premiere-promo

thegame4.com/immortalized-clip-meet-takeshi-yamada/

www.outdoorhub.com/news/man-vs-fur-amcs-new-competitive-t...

www.avclub.com/articles/freakshowimmortalized,92526/

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/freakshow-immortalized...

www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/02/amcs-immortalized/

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

www.factpile.com/8874-watch-immortalized-on-amc/

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

twitpic.com/c1q9rx

www.michigandaily.com/blog/wire/alumni-profile-takeshi-ya...

art-design.umich.edu/news/takeshi_yamada_featured_on_amcs...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoD-OptXgk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9aROKs_iSQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4msQyZqOrOY&NR=1&feature=...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalizer-ta...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-episode-3-the-odyssey/

www.dragonblogger.com/about-immortalized-amcs-new-unscrip...

idownloadg.eu/tag/size-matters/

horrorboom.com/tag/takeshi-yamada/

  

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

www.teoti.com/art-comics/15119-takeshi-yamada-s-creative-...

pinterest.com/lmartin84/taxidermy-i-know-it-s-weird/

secretscienceclub.blogspot.com/2007/11/long-live-taxiderm...

www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/48/24_taxidermycontest_2...

boingboing.net/2006/11/21/takeshi-yamadas-curi.html

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

www.digplanet.com/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

superforest.org/2010/11/takeshi-yamada-rogue-taxidermist/

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

www.thewheelhousereview.com/2012/07/18/person-of-interest...

crappytaxidermy.com/page/25

 

(updated March 4, 2013)

 

takeshiyamada.weebly.com

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada via his official art website and his email there. See the first page and/or the last page of this website for details.

   

Thunbergia mysorensis is a species of the genus, Thunbergia that comprises of about 200 species of annual or perennial vines that are indigenous to tropical Africa, Asia and Madagascar. It is considered to be the prettiest flowering vine in the world as acclaimed in the book, Vines of the World. This spectacular vine grows very vigorously, often reaches 6-10 meters long in humid and warm tropical regions, but probably slow to moderate growth in cooler climes.

Source: www.jaycjayc.com/thunbergia-mysorensis-clockvine/

 

Included in the "Flowers 58 (1397)" Gallery (www.flickr.com/photos/danvartanian/galleries/721576297398...)

 

Best seen on black: press L to view.

Super artist Dr. Takeshi Yamada and his new giant multi-media rogue taxidermy artwork. It was created for the AMC cable television's new unscripted series, IMMORTALIZED (episode 3, ODYSSEY), which is a competitive taxidermy show.

 

The episode 3 of AMC unscripted television series, IMMORTALIZED entitled ODYSSEY was a competition between Dr. Takeshi Yamada (fine art sculptor/painter & sideshow gaff master) and the seasoned professional taxidermist, Mike McCullough. It was first aired on 2/28. Yamada created and displayed a giant bat winged, dragon-tailed, fived-headed goat/fox monster, which was circled by three dragons above it, with the 12x15 feet hand-painted backdrop of the Hell behind. His Challenger showed a group of painted fiberglass fish in the ancient ruin props. At the end Dr. Yamada won with the score of 86 point, which is only 4 point away from the perfect score 90 points (also he made nearly 30 point gap to his challenger).

 

“When I first heard the theme ODYSSEY, I immediately came an idea of creating five headed monster. For me, Odyssey is not about a story of a man lived in the past. This is a story about my life, how I faced 5 destructive forces of life, and how I overcame the five-headed monster of life to transfer myself from a common man to a hero. These fives represent the Hell Hunger Animosity, Anger, and the Devil in the Sixth Heaven, that were stated in sutras of Buddhism. I faced and defeated many such monsters in my life. One of the biggest challenge in my recent life was the Hurricane Sandy, which directly stroke my house and destroy it. It tried to kill me when I creating my artwork here. I completed my artworks in the destroyed house with no heat, no electricity, no phone lines, no gas at the end of the freezing October. I defeated the five-headed monster of life and overcame the most difficult time for creating my heroic artwork. Here is my interpretation of the Odyssey! Shazam! Hahahahahahahahaha----”

 

This magnificent mythic rogue taxidermy artwork, "ODYSSEY" by Dr. Takeshi Yamada won the recognition of the "BEST TAXIDERMY ARTWORK OF THE IMMORTALIZED, SEASON 1, 2013" with the highest score -- 86 points out of the perfect score of 90 poins.

 

This episode entitled ODYSSEYwas first aired on February 28, 2013.

 

Dr. Yamada says, "For me, the Odyssey is not a heroic fictional story of the ancient man but a story of my life today. It is about how I faced the five-headed monster of life -- Hell Hunger. Animosity, Anger, and the Devil in the Sixth Heaven, as stated in Buddhist Sutras. This is a story of how a common man transformed to a hero by defeating the five-headed monster of life. Just like Odysseus, I have overcome many evil five-headed monster and dragons of life and became a hero. Recently, I was nearly killed by the direct assault of the Hurricane Sandy, which completely destroyed my house with over five feet of flood on October 29, 2013. This heroic artwork was completed when I faced the most difficult conditions and challenge of my life; no heat, no electricity, no gas, no home phones, no, cell phones, no internet, no computer, no operating grocery stores or any stores, no operating trains, no operating busses -- as if I lived like a caveman. My area, Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York was completely shut down and looked like a war zone -- police were almost every street corner and they told me there were numbers of burglars breaking into houses in the area. I had to finish this artwork with just a handful of tools. Also, I I had to wait and protect this artwork from burglars until it was picked up and sent to Los Angels by the shipping company from the out of state (New Jersey). Finally. Over a week after the hurricane’s attack and destructions, my artworks finally left my house, and I also left the city just before the night’s temperature to hit only 27F degree.”

 

Photographed in the filming studio in Los Angels, California on November 20, 2012.

 

“By the way, the backdrop is 12x15 feet. I painted it all by myself for 1 day in the front yard of my house. (I am also a famous sideshow banner painter worked for many sideshow companies internationally, although I am more known as a sideshow gaff master.) Instead of producing a sideshow banner for my ODYSSEY, I decided to create this backdrop to go with the main rogue taxidermy artwork to enhance the appearance of it. Taxidermists create “habitats” but they NEVER paint diorama or backdrop. They think painting on a flat surface is not their job. Nevertheless, I did those for many amusement parks (including Six Flags in Baltimore and Luna Park in Coney Island) and sideshows for decades. So, I decided to do this for my ODYSSEY.”

 

==============================

 

AMC's unscripted series brings viewers into the captivating and provocative world of creative and competitive taxidermy. Immortalized explores the passionate detail and artistic expression that goes into creating this compelling art. Each episode will feature one of four highly regarded "Immortalizers" facing off against a "Challenger" in a competition. Their task is to create a piece to be judged on three criteria: originality, craftsmanship and interpretation of the designated theme. Whether the artists are known for their classic or rogue creations, each week they will work to perfect this centuries-old art form in an unprecedented battle.

 

Immortalized centers on the art and craft of taxidermy. The hides used in the artists’ work were procured through a variety of ways, all of which are in strict accordance with the law.

 

Immortalized airs Thursdays at 10/9c, as part of AMC Real Original Thursdays.

   

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

 

===========================================

 

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 450 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

 

In addition to those accomplishments as a fine art gallery artists, in recent decades, Dr. Takeshi Yamada became highly media-featured and internationally famed “rogue taxidermy artist” for his “rogue taxidermy” artworks. He calls them “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “self-expressing artist“. “My artworks are NOT objects of art and science; they are objects of magic and religion. I reject the idea of creativity. I do NOT create; I give birth to them. I am NOT an artist; I am art”, he states. Nevertheless, he did not started it recently. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten. He collected natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“) before he even knew about it. At age eight, he started creating series of “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as stag beetle with butterfly wings and two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses. With the passion for creating artworks of “fictional/invisible entities” in the style of the “super realism” in variety of art forms such as paintings, photographs, mixed media works, original jewelry pieces, fine art prints, sculptures, and rogue taxidermy artworks has been evident throughout his creative life. Nevertheless, it was after his move to Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York, where his rogue taxidermy artworks became the forefront of his creative activities. In less than 100 years ago, Coney Island was the world center of the circus sideshow, freak show, and all the entertainment industry. “I did not choose Coney Island. Coney Island chose me”, Dr, Yamada says. He started creating many important commissioned sideshow gaffs and rogue taxidermy artworks for freak shows, dime museums and private collectors around the world. In 2006, Dr. Yamada won the “Best of the Show” (Grand Prize) at the annual taxidermy contest hosted by the Minnesota Association of Rogue Taxidermists and Secret Science Club in Brooklyn New York. Since then, he won awards from every taxidermy competitions he participated.

 

In 2013, Dr. Takeshi Yamada participated AMC cable television’s new unscripted series about competitive taxidermy show called IMMORTALIZED. He was one of four “Immortalizers” and faced two challengers, who are also seasoned and highly decorated professional taxidermists. At the end, Dr. Yamada won the highest score of 86 points (out of the perfect score of 90 points) among all the twelve participated world’s top class taxidermy artists. In short, Dr. Yamada won the “Best of the Show” of the AMC television’s international IMMORTALIZED taxidermy competition.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”.

 

Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, Canada. Examples of them are AMC (Immortalized, competitive fine art reality show), The Hour (“Rogue taxidermy“) in Canada, A&E History Channel (“Rats, Bats and Bugs“), Brooklyn Cable Access Television, Brooklyn Independent Television (Caught In The Act: Takeshi Yamad, Rogue Taxidermist), “CPS (“Chicago’s Very Own”) in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID, etc.

 

Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States.

 

In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally . Examples of them are The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), New York Daily (full page, color), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index (full page, color), New American Paintings (full page, color), Village Voice (full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover, 2 additional pages, color), Chicago Art Scene 2 (2 pages, color), Chicago Tribune Magazine (three pages, major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune, etc.

 

(updated March 10, 2013)

 

===========================================

 

Reference: Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” of the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013:

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/immortalized-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/spoilers-the-final-reve...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-epi...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SrTXdjikw

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/news/article_17114...

www.rlslog.net/immortalized-s01e01-hdtv-x264-bajskorv/

trailerrss.com/immortalized-amc-series-premiere-promo

thegame4.com/immortalized-clip-meet-takeshi-yamada/

www.outdoorhub.com/news/man-vs-fur-amcs-new-competitive-t...

www.avclub.com/articles/freakshowimmortalized,92526/

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/freakshow-immortalized...

www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/02/amcs-immortalized/

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

www.factpile.com/8874-watch-immortalized-on-amc/

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

twitpic.com/c1q9rx

www.michigandaily.com/blog/wire/alumni-profile-takeshi-ya...

art-design.umich.edu/news/takeshi_yamada_featured_on_amcs...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoD-OptXgk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9aROKs_iSQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4msQyZqOrOY&NR=1&feature=...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalizer-ta...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-episode-3-the-odyssey/

www.dragonblogger.com/about-immortalized-amcs-new-unscrip...

idownloadg.eu/tag/size-matters/

horrorboom.com/tag/takeshi-yamada/

articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-02-13/entertainment/3707...

tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2012/11/28/comic-book-men-freak...

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

horrorboom.com/tag/immortalized-on-amc/

thetwistgossip.com/2013/03/05/amcs-immortalized-is-the-st...

www.dlhog.com/category/immortalized/

tvlistings.zap2it.com/tv/immortalized/EP01671667?aid=zap2it

  

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

www.teoti.com/art-comics/15119-takeshi-yamada-s-creative-...

pinterest.com/lmartin84/taxidermy-i-know-it-s-weird/

secretscienceclub.blogspot.com/2007/11/long-live-taxiderm...

www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/48/24_taxidermycontest_2...

boingboing.net/2006/11/21/takeshi-yamadas-curi.html

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

www.digplanet.com/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/yamadaimmortalized2/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

superforest.org/2010/11/takeshi-yamada-rogue-taxidermist/

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

www.thewheelhousereview.com/2012/07/18/person-of-interest...

crappytaxidermy.com/page/25

 

(updated March 9, 2013)

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada at yamada108@verizon.net

  

The Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) of Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York – This unique sea-dwelling rabbit, which is actually a close relative of the sea lion, was officially discovered and investigated by Henry Hudson when he first visited this land to colonize the area by order of the Dutch government. It was named New Amsterdam -- today’s New York City. This island was named after he saw the beach covered with strange swimming wild rabbits. The word “Coney Island” means “wild rabbit island” in Dutch (originally Conyne Eylandt, or Konijneneiland in modern Dutch spelling). Sea rabbits were also referred mermaid rabbit, merrabbit, rabbit fish or seal rabbit in the natural history documents in the 17th century. The current conservation status, or risk of extinction, of the sea rabbit is Extinct in the Wild.

 

This website features two species of sea rabbits, which have been taken care of by Dr. Takeshi Yamada (山田武司) at the Coney Island Sea Rabbit Repopulation Center, which is a part of the Marine biology department of the Coney Island University in Brooklyn, New York. They are – Coney Island Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) called “Seara” and Coney Island Tiger-striped Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus konjinicus) called “Stripes”.

 

The photographs and videos featured in this website chronicle adventures of the Coney Island sea rabbits and the world as seen by them. This article also documented efforts of Dr. Takeshi Yamada for bringing back the nearly extinct sea rabbits to Coney Island in the City of New York and beyond. Dr. Yamada produced a series of public lectures, workshops, original public live interactive fine art performances and fine art exhibitions about sea rabbits at a variety of occasions and institutions in the City of New York and beyond. Dr. Yamada is an internationally active educator, book author, wildlife conservationist and high profile artist, who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sea Rabbit

 

Other Common Names: Coney Island Sea Rabbit, Beach Rabbit, Seal Rabbit, mer-rabbit, merrabbit, Atlantic Sea Rabbit.

 

Latin Name: Monafluffchus americanus

 

Origin: Atlantic coast of the United States

 

Description of the specimen: In the early 17th century’s European fur craze drove the fleet of Dutch ships to the eastern costal area of America. Then Holland was the center of the world just like the Italy was in the previous century. New York City was once called New Amsterdam when Dutch merchants landed and established colonies. Among them, Henry Hudson is probably the most recognized individual in the history of New York City today. “This small island is inhabited by two major creatures which we do not have in our homeland. The one creature is a large arthropod made of three body segments: the frontal segment resembles a horseshoe, the middle segment resembles a spiny crab and its tail resembles a sharp sword. Although they gather beaches here in great numbers, they are not edible due to their extremely offensive odor. Another creature which is abundant here, has the head of wild rabbit. This animal of great swimming ability has frontal legs resemble the webbed feet of a duck. The bottom half of the body resembles that of a seal. This docile rabbit of the sea is easy to catch as it does not fear people. The larger male sea rabbits control harems of 20 to 25 females. The meat of the sea rabbit is very tender and tasty.” This is what Hadson wrote in his personal journal in 1609 about the horseshoe crab and the sea rabbit in today’s Coney Island area of Brooklyn, New York. Sadly, just like the Dodo bird and the Thylacine, the sea rabbit was driven to extinction by the European settlers’ greed. When Dutch merchants and traders arrived here, sea rabbits were one of the first animals they hunted down to bring their furs to homeland to satisfy the fur craze of the time. To increase the shipment volume of furs of sea rabbit and beavers from New Amsterdam, Dutch merchants also started using wampum (beads made of special clam shells) as the first official currency of this country.

 

At the North Eastern shores of the United States, two species of sea rabbits were commonly found. They are Coney Island Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) and Coney Island Tiger-striped Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus konjinicus). Sadly, due to their over harvesting in the previous centuries, their conservation status became “Extinct in the Wild” (ET) in the Red List Endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Currently, these sea rabbits are only found at breeding centers at selected zoos and universities such as Coney Island Aquarium and Coney Island University in Brooklyn, New York. The one shown in this photograph was named "Seara" and has been cared by Dr. Takeshi Yamada at Coney Island University.

 

The sea rabbit is one of the families of the Pinniped order. Pinnipeds (from Latin penna = flat and pes/pedis = foot) are sea-mammals: they are homeothermic (i.e having high and regulated inner temperature), lung-breathing (i.e dependant on atmospheric oxygen) animals having come back to semi aquatic life. As soon as they arrive ashore, females are caught by the nearest adult male. Males can maintain harems of about 20 females on average. Several hours to several days after arriving ashore, pregnant females give birth to eight to ten pups with a dark brown fur. As soon as birth occurs, the mother’s special smell and calls help her pups bond specifically to her. The mother stays ashore with her pup for about one week during which the pup gains weight. During the first week spent with her newborn, the mother becomes receptive. She will be impregnated by the bull, which control the harem. Implantation of the embryo will occur 3 months later, in March-April. During the reproductive period, the best males copulate with several tens females. To do so, males have to stay ashore without feeding in order to keep their territory and their harem. In mid-January, when the last females have been fecundated, males leave at sea to feed. Some of them will come back later in March-April for the moult. The other ones will stay at sea and will come back on Coney Island only in next November. After fecundation, the mother goes at sea for her first meal. At sea, mothers feed on clams, crabs, shrimps, fish (herring, anchovy, Pollock, capelin etc.) and squids. When she is back, the mother recovers her pups at the beach she left them. Suckling occurs after auditive and olfactory recognition had occured. In March-April, the dark brown fur is totally replaced by an adult-like light brownish grey fur during the moult that lasts 1-2 months. This new fur is composed by 2 layers. Externally, the guard fur is composed by flat hairs that recover themselves when wet. By doing so, they make a water-proof barrier for the under fur. The underfur retains air when the seal is dry. Because of isolating properties of the air, the underfur is the insulating system of the fur. In March-April, the fur of adults is partially replaced. First reproduction occurs at 1-yr old in females. Males are physiologically matures at 1 year old but socially matures at +2 years old.

 

NOTE: The name of Coney Island is commonly thought to be derived from the Dutch Konijn Eylandt or Rabbit Island as apparently the 17th century European settlers noted many rabbits running amuck on the island.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 400 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

 

In recent years, Dr. Yamada is highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “(self-expressing) artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice 9full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated January 1, 2013)

 

===========================================

 

Reference (Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” and cast in the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013):

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...(ANIMAL)

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

 

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

 

(updated February 17, 2013)

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada. His email address is posted in the chapter page (the last page or the first page).

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Today, he is highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “(self-expressing) artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 400 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

  

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice 9full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated November 24, 2012)

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.photobucket.com/albums/k130/katiecavell/NYC%2008/Coney%20Island/?action=view&current=SeaRabbitVid.mp4

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/about

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

(updated November 24, 2012)

 

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 450 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

 

In recent decade, Dr. Yamada became highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “self-expressing artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as stag beetle with butterfly wings and two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses. In 2013, Dr. Takeshi Yamada won the highest score and the second highest score in the first season of the AMC cable television’s new unscripted series about competitive taxidermy show, IMMORTALIZED with his monumental artworks and stage performances against challengers.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice (full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated March 1, 2013)

 

===========================================

 

Reference: Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” of the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013:

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/immortalized-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/spoilers-the-final-reve...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-epi...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SrTXdjikw

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/news/article_17114...

www.rlslog.net/immortalized-s01e01-hdtv-x264-bajskorv/

trailerrss.com/immortalized-amc-series-premiere-promo

thegame4.com/immortalized-clip-meet-takeshi-yamada/

www.outdoorhub.com/news/man-vs-fur-amcs-new-competitive-t...

www.avclub.com/articles/freakshowimmortalized,92526/

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/freakshow-immortalized...

www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/02/amcs-immortalized/

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

www.factpile.com/8874-watch-immortalized-on-amc/

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

twitpic.com/c1q9rx

www.michigandaily.com/blog/wire/alumni-profile-takeshi-ya...

art-design.umich.edu/news/takeshi_yamada_featured_on_amcs...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoD-OptXgk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9aROKs_iSQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4msQyZqOrOY&NR=1&feature=...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalizer-ta...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-episode-3-the-odyssey/

www.dragonblogger.com/about-immortalized-amcs-new-unscrip...

idownloadg.eu/tag/size-matters/

horrorboom.com/tag/takeshi-yamada/

  

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

www.teoti.com/art-comics/15119-takeshi-yamada-s-creative-...

pinterest.com/lmartin84/taxidermy-i-know-it-s-weird/

secretscienceclub.blogspot.com/2007/11/long-live-taxiderm...

www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/48/24_taxidermycontest_2...

boingboing.net/2006/11/21/takeshi-yamadas-curi.html

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

www.digplanet.com/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

superforest.org/2010/11/takeshi-yamada-rogue-taxidermist/

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

www.thewheelhousereview.com/2012/07/18/person-of-interest...

crappytaxidermy.com/page/25

 

(updated March 4, 2013)

 

Dr. Takeshi Yamada's official art website is takeshiyamada@weebly.com.

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada via his email.

takeshiyamadaart@gmail.com.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 

Disclaimer: This website features Dr. Takeshi Yamada's about 200 "artworks", often with their descriptions/stories/statements. These were produced in the time-honored traditional manner and style of the classical European Cabinet of Curiosities and the modern American circus sideshows (Dime Museums). Therefore, some or all of the visuals and literal information contained in this website article including the opinions/statements of the author and resources many be completely fictional and figments of the imagination, and in such cases, any resemblance of them to the things in the real life are mere coincidental.

 

takeshiyamada.weebly.com

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada via his official art website and his email there. See the first page and/or the last page of this website for details.

 

Taken in the abandoned village of Doel, Belgium.

 

I just loved this fence and the house and clouds behind it. I think B&W is the best choice for this one.

========================================================================

 

I have got an email from TNT world press photo contest that this picture was nominated 1 of 58 out of 7000 pictures!

In the category actuality. I have 6 other people whom are nominated in that category.

 

The 17th of May there was an award ceremony at The World Press photo exhibition in Amsterdam. And i won 3rd prize in the category actuality!

 

For me it's an honor to be even nominated out of 7000 pictures!

 

Link of all the winners in every category. I am at the bottem of the page.

fotowedstrijd.tntpost.nl/42/fotowedstrijd/startpagina/?co...

 

link of my picture and story: fotowedstrijd.tntpost.nl/137/fotowedstrijd/details/?photo...

   

www.takeshiyamada.weebly.com

 

Dr. Takeshi Yamada surrounded by rogue taxidermy works at Museum of World Wonders in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York. This photographs and extentive interview were featured in the weekly TimeOut New York magazine (December 7 – 12, 2006 issue). (Copyright by TimeOut New York magazine)

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 450 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

 

In recent decade, Dr. Yamada became highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “self-expressing artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as stag beetle with butterfly wings and two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses. In 2013, Dr. Takeshi Yamada won the highest score and the second highest score in the first season of the AMC cable television’s new unscripted series about competitive taxidermy show, IMMORTALIZED with his monumental artworks and stage performances against challengers.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice (full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated March 1, 2013)

 

===========================================

 

Reference: Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” of the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013:

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/immortalized-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/spoilers-the-final-reve...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-epi...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SrTXdjikw

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/news/article_17114...

www.rlslog.net/immortalized-s01e01-hdtv-x264-bajskorv/

trailerrss.com/immortalized-amc-series-premiere-promo

thegame4.com/immortalized-clip-meet-takeshi-yamada/

www.outdoorhub.com/news/man-vs-fur-amcs-new-competitive-t...

www.avclub.com/articles/freakshowimmortalized,92526/

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/freakshow-immortalized...

www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/02/amcs-immortalized/

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

www.factpile.com/8874-watch-immortalized-on-amc/

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

twitpic.com/c1q9rx

www.michigandaily.com/blog/wire/alumni-profile-takeshi-ya...

art-design.umich.edu/news/takeshi_yamada_featured_on_amcs...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoD-OptXgk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9aROKs_iSQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4msQyZqOrOY&NR=1&feature=...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalizer-ta...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-episode-3-the-odyssey/

www.dragonblogger.com/about-immortalized-amcs-new-unscrip...

idownloadg.eu/tag/size-matters/

horrorboom.com/tag/takeshi-yamada/

  

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

www.teoti.com/art-comics/15119-takeshi-yamada-s-creative-...

pinterest.com/lmartin84/taxidermy-i-know-it-s-weird/

secretscienceclub.blogspot.com/2007/11/long-live-taxiderm...

www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/48/24_taxidermycontest_2...

boingboing.net/2006/11/21/takeshi-yamadas-curi.html

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

www.digplanet.com/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

superforest.org/2010/11/takeshi-yamada-rogue-taxidermist/

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

www.thewheelhousereview.com/2012/07/18/person-of-interest...

crappytaxidermy.com/page/25

 

(updated March 4, 2013)

 

takeshiyamada.weebly.com

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada via his official art website and his email there. See the first page and/or the last page of this website for details.

  

-----------------------------------------------------------------

 

Disclaimer: This website features Dr. Takeshi Yamada's about 200 "artworks", often with their descriptions/stories/statements. These were produced in the time-honored traditional manner and style of the classical European Cabinet of Curiosities and the modern American circus sideshows (Dime Museums). Therefore, some or all of the visuals and literal information contained in this website article including the opinions/statements of the author and resources many be completely fictional and figments of the imagination, and in such cases, any resemblance of them to the things in the real life are mere coincidental.

 

===============================

 

www.takeshiyamada.weebly.com

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada via his official art website and his email there. See the first page and/or the last page of this website for details.

 

4th Annual FotoWeek DC / Central at 1800 L Street, NW, Washington DC on Saturday afternoon, 5 November 2011 by Elvert Barnes Photography

 

World Press Photo Exhibition 2011

www.worldpressphoto.org/2011-photo-contest

 

Visit FotoWeek DC at fotoweekdc.org/

 

Visit Elvert Barnes 4th FotoWeek DC 2011 docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/FotoWeekDC2011

On the occasion of his solo fine art exhibition "Takeshi Yamada: Recent Paintings" at Brownsboro Gallery in Louisville, Kentucky in 1998, Dr. Takeshi Yamada created a series of site-specific artworks reflecting culture of the city. One is a series of large paintings on canvas reflecting the street scenes of louisville, and another series of paintings (miniature paintings) reflecting one of the major attractions of the city - horse racing.

 

Reference: Horse racing is one of the a major attractions in louisville, Kentucky. Churchill Downs is home to the Kentucky Derby, the largest sporting event in the state, as well as the Kentucky Oaks which together cap the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. Churchill Downs has also hosted the renowned Breeders' Cup on six occasions, most recently in 2006.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 400 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

 

In recent years, Dr. Yamada is highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “(self-expressing) artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice 9full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated January 1, 2013)

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Reference: Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” of the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013:

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/immortalized-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/spoilers-the-final-reve...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-epi...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SrTXdjikw

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/news/article_17114...

www.rlslog.net/immortalized-s01e01-hdtv-x264-bajskorv/

trailerrss.com/immortalized-amc-series-premiere-promo

thegame4.com/immortalized-clip-meet-takeshi-yamada/

www.outdoorhub.com/news/man-vs-fur-amcs-new-competitive-t...

www.avclub.com/articles/freakshowimmortalized,92526/

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/freakshow-immortalized...

www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/02/amcs-immortalized/

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

www.factpile.com/8874-watch-immortalized-on-amc/

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

twitpic.com/c1q9rx

www.michigandaily.com/blog/wire/alumni-profile-takeshi-ya...

art-design.umich.edu/news/takeshi_yamada_featured_on_amcs...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoD-OptXgk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9aROKs_iSQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4msQyZqOrOY&NR=1&feature=...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalizer-ta...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-episode-3-the-odyssey/

www.dragonblogger.com/about-immortalized-amcs-new-unscrip...

idownloadg.eu/tag/size-matters/

horrorboom.com/tag/takeshi-yamada/

  

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

www.teoti.com/art-comics/15119-takeshi-yamada-s-creative-...

pinterest.com/lmartin84/taxidermy-i-know-it-s-weird/

secretscienceclub.blogspot.com/2007/11/long-live-taxiderm...

www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/48/24_taxidermycontest_2...

boingboing.net/2006/11/21/takeshi-yamadas-curi.html

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

www.digplanet.com/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

superforest.org/2010/11/takeshi-yamada-rogue-taxidermist/

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

www.thewheelhousereview.com/2012/07/18/person-of-interest...

crappytaxidermy.com/page/25

 

(updated March 4, 2013)

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada, Art & Rogue Taxidermy, Museum of World Wonders, official website.

 

takeshiyamada.weebly.com

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada

 

Educator, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Lauren Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally.Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 400 video websites.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in major cities in the United States i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice 9full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Reference: Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” of the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013:

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/immortalized-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/spoilers-the-final-reve...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-epi...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SrTXdjikw

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/news/article_17114...

www.rlslog.net/immortalized-s01e01-hdtv-x264-bajskorv/

trailerrss.com/immortalized-amc-series-premiere-promo

thegame4.com/immortalized-clip-meet-takeshi-yamada/

www.outdoorhub.com/news/man-vs-fur-amcs-new-competitive-t...

www.avclub.com/articles/freakshowimmortalized,92526/

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/freakshow-immortalized...

www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/02/amcs-immortalized/

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

www.factpile.com/8874-watch-immortalized-on-amc/

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

twitpic.com/c1q9rx

www.michigandaily.com/blog/wire/alumni-profile-takeshi-ya...

art-design.umich.edu/news/takeshi_yamada_featured_on_amcs...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoD-OptXgk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9aROKs_iSQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4msQyZqOrOY&NR=1&feature=...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalizer-ta...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-episode-3-the-odyssey/

www.dragonblogger.com/about-immortalized-amcs-new-unscrip...

idownloadg.eu/tag/size-matters/

horrorboom.com/tag/takeshi-yamada/

  

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

www.teoti.com/art-comics/15119-takeshi-yamada-s-creative-...

pinterest.com/lmartin84/taxidermy-i-know-it-s-weird/

secretscienceclub.blogspot.com/2007/11/long-live-taxiderm...

www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/48/24_taxidermycontest_2...

boingboing.net/2006/11/21/takeshi-yamadas-curi.html

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

www.digplanet.com/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

superforest.org/2010/11/takeshi-yamada-rogue-taxidermist/

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

www.thewheelhousereview.com/2012/07/18/person-of-interest...

crappytaxidermy.com/page/25

 

(updated March 4, 2013)

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada, Art & Rogue Taxidermy, Museum of World Wonders, official website.

 

takeshiyamada.weebly.com

 

"Rhino Wars"

by Brent Stirton

Nature - 1st prize stories

 

With rhinoceros horn worth more than gold, the animals are the target of poachers. South Africa alone lost over 400 rhinos to illegal poaching in 2011. It is estimated there are only 16,000 rhinos left in the world, and the animal faces extinction.

 

www.luminafestival.it/en/exhibitions/world-press-photo-2012

The Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) of Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York – This unique sea-dwelling rabbit, which is actually a close relative of the sea lion, was officially discovered and investigated by Henry Hudson when he first visited this land to colonize the area by order of the Dutch government. It was named New Amsterdam -- today’s New York City. This island was named after he saw the beach covered with strange swimming wild rabbits. The word “Coney Island” means “wild rabbit island” in Dutch (originally Conyne Eylandt, or Konijneneiland in modern Dutch spelling). Sea rabbits were also referred mermaid rabbit, merrabbit, rabbit fish or seal rabbit in the natural history documents in the 17th century. The current conservation status, or risk of extinction, of the sea rabbit is Extinct in the Wild.

 

This website features two species of sea rabbits, which have been taken care of by Dr. Takeshi Yamada (山田武司) at the Coney Island Sea Rabbit Repopulation Center, which is a part of the Marine biology department of the Coney Island University in Brooklyn, New York. They are – Coney Island Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) called “Seara” and Coney Island Tiger-striped Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus konjinicus) called “Stripes”.

 

The photographs and videos featured in this website chronicle adventures of the Coney Island sea rabbits and the world as seen by them. This article also documented efforts of Dr. Takeshi Yamada for bringing back the nearly extinct sea rabbits to Coney Island in the City of New York and beyond. Dr. Yamada produced a series of public lectures, workshops, original public live interactive fine art performances and fine art exhibitions about sea rabbits at a variety of occasions and institutions in the City of New York and beyond. Dr. Yamada is an internationally active educator, book author, wildlife conservationist and high profile artist, who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sea Rabbit

 

Other Common Names: Coney Island Sea Rabbit, Beach Rabbit, Seal Rabbit, mer-rabbit, merrabbit, Atlantic Sea Rabbit.

 

Latin Name: Monafluffchus americanus

 

Origin: Atlantic coast of the United States

 

Description of the specimen: In the early 17th century’s European fur craze drove the fleet of Dutch ships to the eastern costal area of America. Then Holland was the center of the world just like the Italy was in the previous century. New York City was once called New Amsterdam when Dutch merchants landed and established colonies. Among them, Henry Hudson is probably the most recognized individual in the history of New York City today. “This small island is inhabited by two major creatures which we do not have in our homeland. The one creature is a large arthropod made of three body segments: the frontal segment resembles a horseshoe, the middle segment resembles a spiny crab and its tail resembles a sharp sword. Although they gather beaches here in great numbers, they are not edible due to their extremely offensive odor. Another creature which is abundant here, has the head of wild rabbit. This animal of great swimming ability has frontal legs resemble the webbed feet of a duck. The bottom half of the body resembles that of a seal. This docile rabbit of the sea is easy to catch as it does not fear people. The larger male sea rabbits control harems of 20 to 25 females. The meat of the sea rabbit is very tender and tasty.” This is what Hadson wrote in his personal journal in 1609 about the horseshoe crab and the sea rabbit in today’s Coney Island area of Brooklyn, New York. Sadly, just like the Dodo bird and the Thylacine, the sea rabbit was driven to extinction by the European settlers’ greed. When Dutch merchants and traders arrived here, sea rabbits were one of the first animals they hunted down to bring their furs to homeland to satisfy the fur craze of the time. To increase the shipment volume of furs of sea rabbit and beavers from New Amsterdam, Dutch merchants also started using wampum (beads made of special clam shells) as the first official currency of this country.

 

At the North Eastern shores of the United States, two species of sea rabbits were commonly found. They are Coney Island Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) and Coney Island Tiger-striped Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus konjinicus). Sadly, due to their over harvesting in the previous centuries, their conservation status became “Extinct in the Wild” (ET) in the Red List Endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Currently, these sea rabbits are only found at breeding centers at selected zoos and universities such as Coney Island Aquarium and Coney Island University in Brooklyn, New York. The one shown in this photograph was named "Seara" and has been cared by Dr. Takeshi Yamada at Coney Island University.

 

The sea rabbit is one of the families of the Pinniped order. Pinnipeds (from Latin penna = flat and pes/pedis = foot) are sea-mammals: they are homeothermic (i.e having high and regulated inner temperature), lung-breathing (i.e dependant on atmospheric oxygen) animals having come back to semi aquatic life. As soon as they arrive ashore, females are caught by the nearest adult male. Males can maintain harems of about 20 females on average. Several hours to several days after arriving ashore, pregnant females give birth to eight to ten pups with a dark brown fur. As soon as birth occurs, the mother’s special smell and calls help her pups bond specifically to her. The mother stays ashore with her pup for about one week during which the pup gains weight. During the first week spent with her newborn, the mother becomes receptive. She will be impregnated by the bull, which control the harem. Implantation of the embryo will occur 3 months later, in March-April. During the reproductive period, the best males copulate with several tens females. To do so, males have to stay ashore without feeding in order to keep their territory and their harem. In mid-January, when the last females have been fecundated, males leave at sea to feed. Some of them will come back later in March-April for the moult. The other ones will stay at sea and will come back on Coney Island only in next November. After fecundation, the mother goes at sea for her first meal. At sea, mothers feed on clams, crabs, shrimps, fish (herring, anchovy, Pollock, capelin etc.) and squids. When she is back, the mother recovers her pups at the beach she left them. Suckling occurs after auditive and olfactory recognition had occured. In March-April, the dark brown fur is totally replaced by an adult-like light brownish grey fur during the moult that lasts 1-2 months. This new fur is composed by 2 layers. Externally, the guard fur is composed by flat hairs that recover themselves when wet. By doing so, they make a water-proof barrier for the under fur. The underfur retains air when the seal is dry. Because of isolating properties of the air, the underfur is the insulating system of the fur. In March-April, the fur of adults is partially replaced. First reproduction occurs at 1-yr old in females. Males are physiologically matures at 1 year old but socially matures at +2 years old.

 

NOTE: The name of Coney Island is commonly thought to be derived from the Dutch Konijn Eylandt or Rabbit Island as apparently the 17th century European settlers noted many rabbits running amuck on the island.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 450 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

 

In addition to those accomplishments as a fine art gallery artists, in recent decades, Dr. Takeshi Yamada became highly media-featured and internationally famed “rogue taxidermy artist” for his “rogue taxidermy” artworks. He calls them “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “self-expressing artist“. “My artworks are NOT objects of art and science; they are objects of magic and religion. I reject the idea of creativity. I do NOT create; I give birth to them. I am NOT an artist; I am art”, he states. Nevertheless, he did not started it recently. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten. He collected natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“) before he even knew about it. At age eight, he started creating series of “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as stag beetle with butterfly wings and two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses. With the passion for creating artworks of “fictional/invisible entities” in the style of the “super realism” in variety of art forms such as paintings, photographs, mixed media works, original jewelry pieces, fine art prints, sculptures, and rogue taxidermy artworks has been evident throughout his creative life. Nevertheless, it was after his move to Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York, where his rogue taxidermy artworks became the forefront of his creative activities. In less than 100 years ago, Coney Island was the world center of the circus sideshow, freak show, and all the entertainment industry. “I did not choose Coney Island. Coney Island chose me”, Dr, Yamada says. He started creating many important commissioned sideshow gaffs and rogue taxidermy artworks for freak shows, dime museums and private collectors around the world. In 2006, Dr. Yamada won the “Best of the Show” (Grand Prize) at the annual taxidermy contest hosted by the Minnesota Association of Rogue Taxidermists and Secret Science Club in Brooklyn New York. Since then, he won awards from every taxidermy competitions he participated. In 2013, Dr. Takeshi Yamada formally became to be known widely as the best taxidermy artist in the United States in the first season of the AMC cable television’s new unscripted series about competitive taxidermy show called IMMORTALIZED, by winning the highest score and the second highest score among all the twelve participated world’s top class taxidermy artists.

 

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”.

 

Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, Canada. Examples of them are AMC (Immortalized, competitive fine art reality show), The Hour (“Rogue taxidermy“) in Canada, A&E History Channel (“Rats, Bats and Bugs“), Brooklyn Cable Access Television, Brooklyn Independent Television (Caught In The Act: Takeshi Yamad, Rogue Taxidermist), “CPS (“Chicago’s Very Own”) in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID, etc.

 

Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States.

 

In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally . Examples of them are The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), New York Daily (full page, color), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index (full page, color), New American Paintings (full page, color), Village Voice (full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover, 2 additional pages, color), Chicago Art Scene 2 (2 pages, color), Chicago Tribune Magazine (three pages, major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune, etc.

 

(updated March 10, 2013)

 

===========================================

 

Reference: Dr. Takeshi Yamada as “Immortalizer” of the AMC cable television competitive fine art reality show, “Immortalized”, season 1, aired in 2013:

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized

www.facebook.com/ImmortalizedAMC?filter=1

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/cast/takeshi-yamada

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.imdb.com/media/rm471641344/tt2631416

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-cas...

www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/nyc-taxidermy...

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/immortalized-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/spoilers-the-final-reve...

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-season-1-epi...

amusingthezillion.com/2012/11/29/coney-island-taxidermist...

amusingthezillion.com/2013/01/30/video-of-the-day-meet-ta...

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-wood-duc...

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/on-air-trailer-real-ori...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0i6KqUN22E

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iLUTs-KSXI

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdxsl1HI5a4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nwsz0nRnWJg

www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8SrTXdjikw

mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr181713719

www.amctv.com/real-original-thursdays

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.poptower.com/news-52146/freakshow-immortalized-tv-sho...

iamturbo.com/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star-coney-isl...

tv.yahoo.com/news/amc-pits-taxidermists-against-each-othe...

animalnewyork.com/2013/new-taxidermy-reality-show-to-star...

www.sheepsheadbites.com/2013/02/takeshi-yamada-immortalized/

blogs.smithsonianmag.com/artscience/2013/02/outrageous-ta...

tv.nytimes.com/2013/02/14/arts/television/immortalized-an...

www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/freakshow-immortalized-t...

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

www.monstersandcritics.com/smallscreen/news/article_17114...

www.rlslog.net/immortalized-s01e01-hdtv-x264-bajskorv/

trailerrss.com/immortalized-amc-series-premiere-promo

thegame4.com/immortalized-clip-meet-takeshi-yamada/

www.outdoorhub.com/news/man-vs-fur-amcs-new-competitive-t...

www.avclub.com/articles/freakshowimmortalized,92526/

blogs.amctv.com/movie-blog/2013/02/freakshow-immortalized...

www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/02/amcs-immortalized/

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

www.factpile.com/8874-watch-immortalized-on-amc/

www.hollywood.com/photos/tv/55000551/amc-s-immortalized-t...

twitpic.com/c1q9rx

www.michigandaily.com/blog/wire/alumni-profile-takeshi-ya...

art-design.umich.edu/news/takeshi_yamada_featured_on_amcs...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FoD-OptXgk

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9aROKs_iSQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4msQyZqOrOY&NR=1&feature=...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalizer-ta...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/

www.gothic.net/immortalized-amc-taxidermy/immortalized-co...

www.gothic.net/immortalized-episode-3-the-odyssey/

www.dragonblogger.com/about-immortalized-amcs-new-unscrip...

idownloadg.eu/tag/size-matters/

horrorboom.com/tag/takeshi-yamada/

articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-02-13/entertainment/3707...

tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2012/11/28/comic-book-men-freak...

blog.zap2it.com/frominsidethebox/2013/02/immortalized-tax...

horrorboom.com/tag/immortalized-on-amc/

thetwistgossip.com/2013/03/05/amcs-immortalized-is-the-st...

www.dlhog.com/category/immortalized/

tvlistings.zap2it.com/tv/immortalized/EP01671667?aid=zap2it

  

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.cvltnation.com/god-of-freakstakeshi-yamada/

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

www.gobrooklynart.org/studio/takeshiyamada

spexyandheknowsit.tumblr.com/post/42840993672/spexy-guy-d...

www.teoti.com/art-comics/15119-takeshi-yamada-s-creative-...

pinterest.com/lmartin84/taxidermy-i-know-it-s-weird/

secretscienceclub.blogspot.com/2007/11/long-live-taxiderm...

www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/34/48/24_taxidermycontest_2...

boingboing.net/2006/11/21/takeshi-yamadas-curi.html

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

www.digplanet.com/wiki/Takeshi_Yamada

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/yamadaimmortalized2/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadaimmortalized/

www.flickr.com/people/searabbit16/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.amctv.com/immortalized/videos/who-is-takeshi-yamada-i...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.beta.photobucket.com/user/katiecavell/media/NYC%2008/...

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

www.ign.com/videos/2013/01/29/immortalized-meet-takeshi-y...

superforest.org/2010/11/takeshi-yamada-rogue-taxidermist/

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

www.thewheelhousereview.com/2012/07/18/person-of-interest...

crappytaxidermy.com/page/25

 

(updated March 9, 2013)

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada. His email address is posted in the chapter page (the last page or the first page).

About Dr. Takeshi Yamada:

 

Educator, medical assistant, author and artist Takeshi Yamada was born and raised at a traditional and respectable house of samurai in Osaka, Japan in 1960. He studied art at Nakanoshima College of Art in Osaka, Japan. As an international exchange student of Osaka Art University, he moved to the United States in 1983 and studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, CA and Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD in 1983-85, and completed his Bachelor of Fine Art degree in 1985.

 

Yamada obtained his Master of Fine Art Degree in 1987 at the University of Michigan, School of Art in Ann Arbor, MI. Yamada’s “Visual Anthropology Artworks” reflects unique, distinctive and often quickly disappearing culture around him. In 1987, Yamada moved to Chicago, and by 1990, Yamada successfully fused Eastern and Western visual culture and variety of cross-cultural mythology in urban allegories, and he became a major figure of the River North (“SUHU” district) art scene. During that time he also developed a provocative media persona and established his unique style of super-realism paintings furnishing ghostly images of people and optically enhanced pictorial structures. By 1990, his artworks were widely exhibited internationally. In 2000, Yamada moved to New York City.

 

Today, he is highly media-featured and internationally famed for his “rogue taxidermy” sculptures and large-scale installations, which he calls “specimens” rather than “artworks”. He also calls himself “super artist” and “gate keeper” rather than the “(self-expressing) artist“. His passion for Cabinet of Curiosities started when he was in kindergarten, collecting natural specimens and built his own Wunderkammer (German word to express “Cabinet of Curiosities“). At age eight, he started creating “rogue taxidermy monsters” such as two-headed lizards, by assembling different parts of animal carcasses.

 

Internationally, Yamada had over 600 major fine art exhibitions including 50 solo exhibitions including Spain, The Netherlands, Japan, Canada, Columbia, and the United States. Yamada also taught classes and made public speeches at over 40 educational institutions including American Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State Museum, Laurenand Rogers Museum of Art, International Museum of Surgical Science, University of Minnesota, Montana State University, Eastern Oregon University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Mount Vernon Nazarene College, Salem State College, Osaka College of Arts, Chemeketa Community College, Maryland Institute College of Art, etc. Yamada’s artworks are collection of over 30 museums and universities in addition to hundreds of corporate/private art collectors internationally. Yamada and his artworks were featured in over 400 video websites. In addition, rogue taxidermy artworks, sideshow gaffs, cryptozoological artworks, large sideshow banners and showfronts created by Yamada in the last 40 years have been exhibited at over 100 of state fairs and festivals annually nationwide, up to and including the present.

  

Yamada won numerous prestigious awards and honors i.e., “International Man of the Year”, “Outstanding Artists and Designers of the 20th Century”, “2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century”, “International Educator of the Year”, “One Thousand Great Americans”, “Outstanding People of the 20th Century”, “21st Century Award for Achievement”, “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in The World”. The Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana and Gary, Indiana awarded him the “Key to the City”. Yamada’s artworks are collections of many museums and universities/colleges i.e., Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Museum of Art, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Chicago Athenaeum Museum, Eastern Oregon University, Montana State University and Ohio State University.

 

Yamada was profiled in numerous TV programs in the United States, Japan and Philippine, Columbia, i.e., A&E History Channel, Brooklyn Cable Access Television, “Chicago’s Very Own” in Chicago, “Takeshi Yamada’s Divine Comedy” in New Orleans, and Chicago Public Television’s Channel ID. Yamada also published 22 books based on his each major fine art projects i.e., “Homage to the Horseshoe Crab”, Medical Journal of the Artist”, “Graphic Works 1996-1999”, “Phantom City”, “Divine Comedy”, “Miniatures”, “Louisville”, “Visual Anthropology 2000”, “Heaven and Hell”, “Citizen Kings” and “Dukes and Saints” in the United States. In prints, Yamada and his artworks have been featured in numerous books, magazine and newspapers internationally i.e., The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time out New York (full page color interview), Washington Times, The Fine Art Index, New American Paintings, Village Voice 9full page interview), Chicago Art Scene (front cover), Chicago Tribune Magazine (major color article), Chicago Japanese American News, Strong Coffee, Reader, Milwaukee Journal, Clarion, Kaleidoscope, Laurel Leader-Call, The Advertiser News, Times-Picayune (front page, major color articles), Michigan Alumnus (major color article), Michigan Today (major color article), Mardi Gras Guide (major color article), The Ann Arbor News (front covers), Park Slope Courier (color pages), 24/7 (color pages), Brooklyn Free Press (front cover) and The World Tribune.

 

(updated November 24, 2012)

 

Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UPzGvwq57g

s87.photobucket.com/albums/k130/katiecavell/NYC%2008/Coney%20Island/?action=view&current=SeaRabbitVid.mp4

www.animalnewyork.com/2012/what-are-you-doing-tonight-con...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeAdsChmSR8

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit15/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit14/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

www.amctv.com/shows/immortalized/about

blogs.amctv.com/photo-galleries/immortalized-cast-photos/...

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

www.artfagcity.com/2012/09/06/recommended-go-brooklyn-stu...

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

(updated November 24, 2012)

 

Mejor pincha aquí para ver en grande sobre negro o pulsa 'L'.

Better click here to view this large on black or press 'L'.

© Derechos de Autor. Esta fotografía no podra usarse sin mi consentimiento escrito.

© All rights reserved, don´t use this image without my permission.

Sevilla: Album/Set

Remembering old times...: Album/Set

Virados, B&W: Album/Set

 

Ahora puedes seguirme en:/ Now you can follow me in:

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Canon 450D + ZEISS Distagon T* 2,8/21, @21mm, 1/200 sec, f/5,6, ISO 100

No Tripod, Manual exposure, Date 08/5/2011 12:39:21

 

Explore: 19 October 2011 in # 3

 

Como se hizo: Imagen procedente de un sólo archivo RAW, pasada a blanco y negro con método ColorLab. No es HDR.

 

Quisiera dedicar esta foto a César, amigo y gran persona os invito a todos a visitar su galeria..

 

La Plaza de España de Sevilla constituye un conjunto arquitectónico encuadrado en el Parque de María Luisa, configura uno de los espacios más espectaculares de la arquitectura regionalista.

La Plaza de España constituyó el proyecto más emblemático de la Exposición Iberoamericana del año 1929, fue proyectada por el arquitecto sevillano Aníbal González, que también era arquitecto director del evento expositivo, fue ayudado por un buen conjunto de colaboradores, entre los que se encontraban el ingeniero José Luis de Casso y el arquitecto Aurelio Gómez Millán. Las obras de construcción comenzaron en el año 1914, resultando el proyecto más ambicioso y costoso de la Exposición, llegando a trabajar en su construcción mil hombres al mismo tiempo, puede resultar asombroso, cómo una ciudad en situación económica difícil en esos años, se embarcó en un proyecto de semejante magnitud. Algunos aspectos del proyecto suscitaron algunos rechazos, la Academia de Bellas Artes se opuso a la altura prevista de las dos torres que podían rivalizar con la Giralda y Forestier, diseñador del Parque de María Luisa rechazaba la construcción de la ría que rodea la plaza, para una ciudad con gran escasez de agua como Sevilla. En 1926, tras la dimisión de Aníbal González de su cargo de director de la Exposición, asume la finalización del proyecto el arquitecto Vicente Traver, que terminó los cerramientos del recinto y añadió la fuente del centro de la Plaza.

La plaza de España ha sido utilizada como escenario de algunas películas conocidas, entre ellas:

* En la película Lawrence de Arabia, la plaza representaba el cuartel general del Ejército británico en el Cairo

* En la película Star Wars Episodio II: El Ataque de los Clones de la saga de la Guerra de las Galaxias, la plaza representa el planeta Naboo, aunque el escenario de la filmación fue modificado digitalmente.

 

English:

Making off: Edited from a RAW file. BW with Color Lab method. No HDR.

 

This time I would like to dedicate this picture to my friend, César, i invite to view your photostream.

 

The Plaza de España ("Spain Square", in English) is a plaza located in the Parque de María Luisa (Maria Luisa Park), in Seville, Spain built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929. It is a landmark example of the Renaissance Revival style in Spanish architecture.

In 1929 Seville hosted the Ibero-American Exposition World's Fair, located in the celebrated Maria Luisa Park (Parque de María Luisa). It was designed by Jean-Claude Nicolas Forestier. The entire southern end of the city was redeveloped into an expanse of gardens and grand boulevards. The centre of it is Parque de María Luisa, a 'Moorish paradisical style' with a half mile of: tiled fountains, pavilions, walls, ponds, benches, and exhedras; lush plantings of palms, orange trees, Mediterranean pines, and stylized flower beds; and with vine hidden bowers. Numerous buildings were constructed in it for the exhibition.

The Plaza de España, designed by Aníbal González, was a principal building built on the Maria Luisa Park's edge to showcase Spain's industry and technology exhibits. González combined a mix of 1920s Art Deco and 'mock Mudejar', and Neo-Mudéjar styles. The Plaza de España complex is a huge half-circle with buildings continually running around the edge accessible over the moat by numerous beautiful bridges. In the centre is a large fountain. By the walls of the Plaza are many tiled alcoves, each representing a different province of Spain.

Today the Plaza de España mainly consists of Government buildings. The Seville Town Hall, with sensitive adaptive redesign, is located within it. The Plaza's tiled 'Alcoves of the Provinces' are backdrops for visitors portrait photographs, taken in their own home province's alcove. Towards the end of the park, the grandest mansions from the fair have been adapted as museums. The farthest contains the city's archaeology collections. The main exhibits are Roman mosaics and artefacts from nearby Italica.

The Plaza de España was used for location shooting some scenes in the films Lawrence of Arabia and Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones.

PRESS L TO SEE LARGE ON BLACK

ORIGINAL VERSION :

fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fichier:%C3%9Altima_Cena_-_Da_Vinci...

 

The last supper before the Bomb...

 

"Woe to the man who betrays the Son of Man ! It would be better for him if he had not been born."

 

"En vérité, en verité je vous le dis, l'un d'entre vous me livrera"

 

Jerusalem Bible, John, Chapter 13

 

Photography : Chris Midnight-digital Dessaigne.

thierry Ehrmann : Author Abode of Chaos/Demeure du Chaos.

Lightmaster : Marquis

 

Thanks from left to right to the Cyberpunk clergy, the Abode of Chaos Praetorians Guards :

 

- Thierry Loir aka "Giant"

- Marc del Piano

- The Androïd

- Luc

- Thomas Foucher

- J.B.H.

- thierry Ehrmann

- Kurt Ehrmann

- Sydney Ehrmann

- Pierrick aka Cart'1

- Laurent Lardon aka LoLo

- Laurent Courau

- Marquis

 

Location : the Bunker in the Abode of Chaos/Demeure du Chaos 1999/2010

 

This picture is a sample of the upcoming photo book (first semester of 2011) edited by the Organ Museum.

 

ABOUT THE ABODE OF CHAOS :

Abode of Chaos has been the subject of more than 900 press and media articles in 93 countries. According to the New York Times it is one of the most important and most emotional artistic adventures of the 21st century.

Turn a corner of this middle-class village in the heart of the Monts dOr, a wealthy suburb of Lyons, and golden masonry and bourgeois houses give way to this alchemical abode, inspired by Fulcanelli.

When a museum became a factory

 

In 1999, sculptor Thierry Ehrmann, founder of the Serveur Group and of Artprice, dedicated himself to creating a museum, known as LOrgane (the Organ). He very rapidly recognized that his project was becoming an institution. Should he recruit a curator, what form should the collection take? All details far removed from his original conception of life. The point was the convergence between desire and action. If he had to choose a model, it would not be that of a foundation but the way Andy Warhol envisaged art: the Factory. A fluid space as created by the Pop artist, where creativity lived from one day to the next in a random sensuality, to the beat of pure energy. Thierry Ehrmann invited artists to work with him in situ, creating connections between one endeavor and another, between countries and cultures. This perpetual activity which would finally be attuned to the perpetual movement of the world and its events.

Where chaos is an option

 

It was in this crucible that he was to mix one part exhibition, one part artwork and one part action to create a melting pot of crossbred energies. The project took on a life of its own. The original author became irrelevant, the idea was all. The question of a space dedicated only to art no longer mattered. Art was everywhere, gradually infiltrating the corpus of the space. First Thierry Ehrmann painted a salamander, followed by a battalion. As with living beings, they were everywhere. The artist Ben also became involved. Around a hundred artists continued the work.

The Abode of Chaos became porous to the world, events flowing through it and imbuing it with meaning. Does that mean it resembled chaos? Although it burned, turning a post-apocalyptic, carbonized black, it retained its core architecture, wearing the scars of its deconstruction like medals. In truth, the house as a whole become a museum. To others eyes it exhibits what more formal spaces do not: it shows art as a living being, part of our everyday lives. Open-air art, 2,700 works, reflecting our tragic or magnificent century as seen by the artist.

      

4th Annual FotoWeek DC / Central at 1800 L Street, NW, Washington DC on Saturday afternoon, 5 November 2011 by Elvert Barnes Photography

 

World Press Photo Exhibition 2011

www.worldpressphoto.org/2011-photo-contest

 

Visit FotoWeek DC at fotoweekdc.org/

 

Visit Elvert Barnes 4th FotoWeek DC 2011 docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/FotoWeekDC2011

,Pay Visit to my: Getty Image I Twitter I Face Book I My Blog I My Modern Met I Red Bubble I perf Spot I deviant ART Here

   

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206808042011-silica Gel-1

  

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.

.Description

 

.

Silica gel is a granular, vitreous, highly porous form of silica made synthetically from sodium silicate. Despite its name, silica gel is a solid. It is a naturally occurring mineral that is purified and processed into either granular or beaded form. As a desiccant, it has an average pore size of 2.4 nanometers and has a strong affinity for water molecules.

Silica gel is most commonly encountered in everyday life as beads packed in a vapor-permeable plastic. In this form, it is used as a desiccant to control local humidity in order to avoid spoilage or degradation of some goods. Because of poisonous dopants (see below) and their very high absorption of moisture, silica gel packets usually bear warnings for the user not to eat the contents. If consumed, the pure silica gel is unlikely to cause acute or chronic illness. Food-grade desiccant should not include any poisons which would cause long-term harm to humans if consumed in the quantities normally included with the items of food.

.

 

History

The synthetic route for producing silica gel was patented by chemistry professor Walter A. Patrick at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA in 1919. It was used in World War I for the absorption of vapors and gases in gas mask canisters, as part of his patent. The substance was in existence as early as the 1640s as a scientific curiosity.[3]

In World War II, silica gel was indispensable in the war effort for keeping penicillin dry, protecting military equipment from moisture damage, as a fluid cracking catalyst for the production of high octane gasoline, and as a catalyst support for the manufacture of butadiene from ethanol, feedstock for the synthetic rubber program.

Properties

Silica gel's high surface area (around 800 m²/g) allows it to absorb water readily, making it useful as a desiccant (drying agent). Once saturated with water, the gel can be regenerated by heating it to 120 °C (250 °F) for two hours. Some types of silica gel will "pop" when exposed to enough water.

Preparation

A solution of sodium silicate is acidified to produce a gelatinous precipitate that is washed, then dehydrated to produce colorless silica gel.[4] When a visible indication of the moisture content of the silica gel is required, ammonium tetrachlorocobaltate(II) (NH4)2CoCl4 or cobalt chloride CoCl2 is added.[4] This will cause the gel to be blue when dry and pink when hydrated.[4]

Applications

Desiccant

See also: Desiccant

In many items, moisture encourages the growth of mold and spoilage. Condensation may also damage other items like electronics and may speed the decomposition of chemicals, such as those in vitamin pills. Through the inclusion of silica gel packets, these items can be preserved longer.

Silica gel may also be used to keep the relative humidity (RH) inside a high frequency radio or satellite transmission system waveguide as low as possible. Excessive moisture buildup within a waveguide can cause arcing inside the waveguide itself, damaging the power amplifier feeding it. Also, the beads of water that form and condense inside the waveguide change the characteristic impedance and frequency, degrading the signal. It is common for a small compressed air system (similar to a small home aquarium pump) to be employed to circulate the air inside the waveguide over a jar of silica gel.

Silica gel is also used to dry the air in industrial compressed air systems. Air from the compressor discharge flows through a bed of silica gel beads. The silica gel absorbs moisture from the air, preventing damage at the point of use of the compressed air due to condensation or moisture. The same system is used to dry the compressed air on railway locomotives, where condensation and ice in the brake air pipes can lead to brake failure.

Silica gel is sometimes used as a preservation tool to control relative humidity in museum and library exhibitions and storage.

Other applications include diagnostic test strips, inhalation devices, syringes, drug test kits, bacteria and hospital sanitation kits.

Chemistry

In chemistry, silica gel is used in chromatography as a stationary phase. In column chromatography, the stationary phase is most often composed of silica gel particles of 40-63 μm. Different particle sizes are used for achieving a desired separation of certain molecular sizes. In this application, due to silica gel's polarity, non-polar components tend to elute before more polar ones, hence the name normal phase chromatography. However, when hydrophobic groups (such as C18groups) are attached to the silica gel then polar components elute first and the method is referred to as reverse phase chromatography. Silica gel is also applied toaluminium, glass, or plastic sheets for thin layer chromatography.

The hydroxy (OH) groups on the surface of silica can be functionalized to afford specialty silica gels that exhibit unique stationary phase parameters. These so-called functionalized silica gels are also used in organic synthesis and purification as insoluble reagents and scavengers.

Chelating groups have also been covalently bound to silica gel. These materials have the ability to remove metal ions selectively from aqueous media. Chelating groups can be covalently bound to polyamines that have been grafted onto a silica gel surface producing a material of greater mechanical integrity. Silica gel is also combined with alkali metals to form a M-SG reducing agent.

Silica gel is not expected to biodegrade in either water or soil.[5]

Cat litter

Silica gel is also used as cat litter,[6] by itself or in combination with more traditional materials, such as clays including bentonite. It is trackless and virtually odorless. Silica in this form can be a cost effective way for retail consumers easily to purchase silica gel for application in such things as maintaining the desired relative humidity in humidors, keeping tools rust free in damp environments, long term storage, and preservation of dried food for long term storage.

   

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A North Korean woman carries water she collected from the Yalu River in the North Korean city of Hyesan, which borders China's Changbai county, April 6, 2009. (REUTERS/Reinhard Krause)

Fishermen row a boat in the algae-filled Chaohu Lake in Hefei, Anhui province, China on June 19, 2009. China invested 51 billion yuan ($7.4 billion) towards the construction of 2,712 projects for the treatment of eight rivers and lakes in 2009, Xinhua News Agency reported. (REUTERS/Jianan Yu)