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William D. Welsh was a member of the organization known as Woodmen of the World which was based out of Omaha, Nebraska. I did a little digging and found out that one of the benefits of membership in the organization was that they provided a grave marker. Due the cost and the onset of the Great Depression the practice we stopped in 1930. William passed away in 1908 and must of had a big policy with the company as (as Alison pointed out) it's made from marble.

 

And speaking of Alison, this was taken on our BDay Shoot.......Vol. II

 

Here's a group dedicated to Woodmen of the World grave markers.

 

We discovered this most unusual grave marker in the Faith Union Cemetery in southern Alberta. It belongs to a Henry Crawford who was a member of the organization Woodmen of the World which was based out of Omaha, Nebraska. I did a little digging and found out that one of the benefits of membership was that they provided a grave marker.

 

Here are a couple of links for you reading pleasure:

A blurb about the grave markers, plus a little bit on it's history.

 

I haven't found anything online about Henry Crawford, but I've pretty much pegged his birth and passing dates from looking closely at the RAW files, it appears he was born on Feb 24, 1864 and

died on May 29, 1916.

Located in front of the McLennan County Courthouse

Notice the difference between the two... They aren't that far apart date wise either..

 

The Woodmen of the World en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodmen_of_the_World

 

The symbol on a tombstone.

Died on Halloween... They didn't use this stone too much, it's not common to see. But this red color stone they started using shortly after but just as a normal "block" stone.

 

The Woodmen of the World en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodmen_of_the_World

This one is a little different then the generic treestone. I like the scroll type thing hanging from a rope and the ruffled moss (or whatever it is) on the top

 

The Woodmen of the World en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodmen_of_the_World

  

Cornwall, Vermont USA • The Julius Peck grave site in Evergreen Cemetery: b. March 21, 1845; d. August 15, 1911. • This treestone was provided by his insurance company Woodmen of the World.

 

WOW was founded as a Benevolent Secret Beneficiary Fraternity, by Joseph Cullen Root, on June 6, 1890, in Omaha, Nebraska. The organization offers insurance to its members and helps those in need, to this day.

 

• At one time in its history, WOW did offer grave monuments to families of deceased members. Sometimes these monuments have the motto “Dum Tacet Clamat,” which means “Though Silent, He Speaks” etched on the stone.

 

In cemeteries (mostly in the Southwest & West) you will sometimes see gravestones with “Here Lies a Woodman of the World” engraved on them. Usually these will be accompanied by a symbol like this example. Logs, along with axes and other woodworking tools, are common motifs. Sometimes the grave markers themselves will be in the shape of logs or tree stumps, called treestones. • Regardless of its shape or size, Woodmen gravestones serve as a lasting tribute to its members and the ideals of Woodcraft. They also serve the Society's long standing motto that "no Woodmen shall rest in an unmarked grave."

 

• Here's another link from the official website of Falls City, Oregon, with a nice summary & more pix. • Of course, I should have started with Wikipedia.

New Orleans, 1990

1983 photo scanned from negative.

 

The Woodmen Tower was built 1969 and stood as Omaha's tallest building until 2002. The architect was Leo Daly Company.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodmen_Tower

New Orleans, LA November 2013

Paper Ephemera • This Beneficiary Certificate (used with permission of the Masonic Museum) website of Phoenixmasonry, Inc., was provided an interesting insurance company Woodmen of the World.

 

WOW was founded as a Benevolent Secret Beneficiary Fraternity, by Joseph Cullen Root, on June 6, 1890, in Omaha, Nebraska. The organization offers insurance to its members and helps those in need, to this day.

 

• At one time in its history, WOW did offer grave monuments to families of deceased members. Sometimes these monuments have the motto “Dum Tacet Clamat,” which means “Though Silent, He Speaks” etched on the stone.

 

In cemeteries (mostly in the Southwest & West) you will sometimes see gravestones with “Here Lies a Woodman of the World” engraved on them. Usually these will be accompanied by a symbol like this example. Logs, along with axes and other woodworking tools, are common motifs. Sometimes the grave markers themselves will be in the shape of logs or tree stumps, called treestones. • See an example I found in the Evergreen Cemetery in Cornwall, Vermont. • Regardless of its shape or size, Woodmen gravestones serve as a lasting tribute to its members and the ideals of Woodcraft. They also serve the Society's long standing motto that "no Woodmen shall rest in an unmarked grave."

 

• Here's another link from the official website of Falls City, Oregon, with a nice summary & more pix. • Of course, I should have started with Wikipedia.

Paul and I went nighttime shooting last night - a wonderful, warm, humid, soaking wet sweating evening. :)

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Paul just uploaded one with the other reflection (read my tags) - to see it click here.

Valley View Cemetery, Clarkdale, AZ. Uploaded for my "Woodmen of the World" photo set. The phrase "Dum Tacet Clamat" translates to "Though silent, he speaks".

Logan's Ferry Presbyterian Church

Parnassus, New Kensington, PA

Ross Bay Cemetery, Victoria BC.

Toppling tree stone, Old Gray Cemetery, Knoxville, TN

Cornwall, Vermont USA • The Julius Peck grave site in Evergreen Cemetery: b. March 21, 1845; d. August 15, 1911. • This treestone was provided by his insurance company Woodmen of the World.

 

WOW was founded as a Benevolent Secret Beneficiary Fraternity, by Joseph Cullen Root, on June 6, 1890, in Omaha, Nebraska. The organization offers insurance to its members and helps those in need, to this day.

 

• At one time in its history, WOW did offer grave monuments to families of deceased members. Sometimes these monuments have the motto “Dum Tacet Clamat,” which means “Though Silent, He Speaks” etched on the stone.

 

In cemeteries (mostly in the Southwest & West) you will sometimes see gravestones with “Here Lies a Woodman of the World” engraved on them. Usually these will be accompanied by a symbol like this example. Logs, along with axes and other woodworking tools, are common motifs. Sometimes the grave markers themselves will be in the shape of logs or tree stumps, called treestones. • Regardless of its shape or size, Woodmen gravestones serve as a lasting tribute to its members and the ideals of Woodcraft. They also serve the Society's long standing motto that "no Woodmen shall rest in an unmarked grave."

 

• Here's another link from the official website of Falls City, Oregon, with a nice summary & more pix. • Of course, I should have started with Wikipedia.

To one who, journeying through night and fog, Is mired neck-deep in an unwholesome bog, Experience, like the rising of the dawn, Reveals the path that he should not have gone. --Joel Frad Bink”

 

Big Woods Cemetery, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

Christmas Day, 25 December 2008

Woodmen of the World Memorial

Woodmen of the World

Oak Grove Cemetery

Branch County Michigan

side view of Greenwood

Don't know if this was a marker or just a very elaborate bench, but it was quite nice. Saw no names on it, but I didn't examine it very closely.

Fraser Cemetery, New Westminster, the mighty Fraser River behind. Front right, grave marker of Robert Timlick who departed this mortal coil in 1901 at age 48.

Woodmen of the World

Back view- Long Marker

Ross Bay Cemetery, Victoria BC.

Not certain, but it could be a Woodmen of the World, but it is definite tree design. Nellie Davisson 1869- 1902

Lone Fir Cemetery in Portland, Oregon.

Chasing the cure for consumption. The region's altitude, dry climate, and clean air were the basis of the therapy. A hearty diet including six raw eggs and up to ten glasses of milk per day was prescribed.

 

This house was owned by the father of the Vickers brothers, who owned the store and many groves in the Sebastian area. The house is circa 1919

The headstones of George and Magdalena Schmidt, which are a pair of wonderful Woodmen of the World headstones taken at the Riverside Cemetery in Seguin, Texas.

 

George's (on the left) says:

George Schmidt

Born Dec. 27, 1821

in Curhessen Germany

came to Seguin in

June 1851

Died Mar. 8 1902

 

Magdalena's says:

Magdalena

wife of

Geo. Schmidt

Born in New Orleans

Jan.?/Jun.? 22, 1837

Died

??? 18, 1894

(inscription is perfectly legible, but my photo cut off part of it.)

 

Detail photos of George’s headstone are here and here. Detail photos of Magdalena’s headstone are here and here. And a rear three-quarter view of both is here

This house, often called the "Bamma Lawson House" is dated circa 1900. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Bamma Vickers Lawson was known for providing a library in this house for children of the area early in the century. She lived past age 100. Parris Lawson built houses.

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