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Rescue Me ♫ - OneRepublic

 

Whatif

by Shel Silverstein

 

Last night, while I lay thinking here,

Some Whatifs crawled inside my ear

And pranced and partied all night long

Whatif I'm dumb in school?

Whatif they've closed the swimming pool?

Whatif I get beat up?

Whatif dad is in jail For not paying his taxes

Whatif I start to call 911

Whatif I call Frankie for pizza pie

What is my plane was late

Whatif nobody likes me?

Whatif a bolt of lightning strikes me?

Whatif I don't grow talle?

Whatif my head starts getting smaller?

Whatif the fish won't bite?

Whatif the wind tears up my kite?

Whatif they start a war?

Whatif my parents get divorced?

Whatif the bus is late?

Whatif my teeth don't grow in straight?

Whatif I tear my pants?

Whatif I never learn to dance?

Everything seems well, and then

The nighttime Whatifs strike again!

LARGE View On Black

http://www.flickr.com/groups/tous_les_noms_friends/

 

............all dahlias had personalities like this!

What if a demon were to creep after you one night, in your loneliest loneliness, and say, ‘This life which you live must be lived by you once again and innumerable times more; and every pain and joy and thought and sigh must come again to you, all in the same sequence. The eternal hourglass will again and again be turned and you with it, dust of the dust!’ Would you throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse that demon? Or would you answer, ‘Never have I heard anything more divine’?

-Friedrich Nietzsche

 

😂 so this is my take on Halloween 🎃 ... because this is perhaps the scariest thought of all.

And I’m interested to know your answers :-)

 

🌷I’m almost back my friends,... just dotting the eyes and crossing the tees 😀

Not sure why he stood there staring at the food.

"Every generation has a legend..."

 

Left to right:

 

-Jedi Master Finn

-Jedi Grand Master Rey Skywalker

-Senator Poe Dameron

-Jedi Knight Ben Skywalker

-Leia Dameron

-Kes Dameron

 

Basically, this a "what-if" figbarf for the inevitable Star Wars X.

 

What do you think happens after The Rise of Skywalker? Will the Final Final Order emerge? Will the galaxy be invaded by a mysterious alien species? Will the Porgs take over the universe? Comment below! 👇

What feels like the End is often the Beginning...

When I have nervous energy, I cook and bake. It’s true. If there’s a funeral, I cook. If I’m working through a stressful decision, I cook. If I’m incredibly happy and need to celebrate, I bake! Basically, I’m in the kitchen a lot. I do love and appreciate the enveloping comfort that comes from preparing meals and feeding people. I have a heartfelt want to help others feel better.

 

Personally, writing is another outlet that relaxes me. The writing, on the other hand, feels more like a self-indulgent comfort. One that I limitlessly enjoy, a guilty pleasure. And for that, I forgive myself, smiling. Rarely sharing the words, but when doing so it is with a hopeful heart. A candid wish to reach another person and whisper words of assurance or a line of comfort. More often tucking the darlings away and absorbing sustenance in the activity of penciling words to paper.

 

Do you migrate towards a particular task when you’re anxious? Maybe you do and you do it so automatically that you don’t consider it a reaction to nervous energy? What creative interest to you turn to most often?

 

This is my attempt at reproducing official LEGO packaging with a build I created to celebrate Disney+ and the launch of the new Marvel "What If...?" series coming in 2021!

Website

Facebook

Twitter

 

What if...?

 

Taskmaster often ends up the foil of my pics, so I figured it was about time I gave him his due.

 

By asking what would happen if he killed Captain America! *gasp*

 

Have fun, and happy snapping!

After dabbling into whatifs designs (here and there) I decided to go back to a more canon version of the iconic snubfighter. Also I needed the challenge.

Seeing how many great T-65 there has been in the past months I do not see how I could add anything to a Lego 'classic' X-wing as of today. And the split wing idea proved too enticing anyway :)

 

Interestingly enough, the starting point of those three models is exactly the same combination of 5 parts : two curved slopes and wedge bricks to make up the rear section of the fuselage.

 

I still consider it a WIP of kinds or at least an early prototype. There still room for a lot of tweaking and tinkering. And at the same time this is showable enough. Plus I just reckon this is the right time of the year ;)

 

I don't think the spliting wings have ever been done this exact way : it has pros and cons obviously but I'm really curious about how you guys feel about it.

 

Some credits are due to atlas_er for I originally replicated his solution for engine cowlings before eventually going on a slightly different path. But more importantly for making me want to build my own T-70 :]

what if Johan Gustafsson was an airline pilot instead of a glider pilot..

"What's Old is Blue Again", operating jetBlue 188 to Las Vegas, heads out via Mike for Spot 1.

In shadowy space, in the loneliness of the final frontier, well out of Hubble’s reach both sweet and savoury comestibles spin around their own axis. Are these, in the interstellar emptiness spinning tops, which seem to float in-between dimension and space, snacks of the Starchild, canteen waste of the Imperial fleet or was the teleport perhaps acting up agin? All possibilities are infinitely improbable, ou quoi Valérian?

 

See the whole series.

What if

 

What if

We did

Kiss

And touch

And dance

And cook up a stew

Uncork a bottle

Or two

Toast each other

Spill some wine

Drink until the sun

Sleeping through the night

Rose

Finally

To brighten the sky

Smile upon us

Light the way

 

What if we did?

  

© Jamie McKenzie, all rights reserved

You will find more of my poems and songs here

and in The Storm in Its Passing and Flights of Fancy.

 

My songs are at

www.youtube.com/user/edtech2008/videos

+++ DISCLAIMER +++

Nothing you see here is real, even though the conversion or the presented background story might be based historical facts. BEWARE!

 

A small Luft '46 project, but not an OOB kit but rather a massive kit conversion which comes close to scratch-building: the rather weird Messerschmitt 334, a true 'paper plane'.

 

Some background

The Me 334 (the project number's origins are not clear, the designation has never been officially accepted by the RLM) is one of the few plane designs that was intended as a conversion from a jet/rocket-powered plane into a piston-engine design, namely the Me 163 Komet.

 

Due to the early unavailability of the Walter rocket engines for the Me 163 in 1942/43, the Me 334 was derived as an alternative. Dr. Lippisch, the Me 163' designer, modified this aircraft to accept a Daimler Benz DB 605 12-cylinder piston engine. The wings were taken from the Me 163. They were mounted mid-fuselage and swept back at a 23.4 degree angle. The main landing gear retracted inwards and the front gear retracted to the rear - a revolutionary design for its time. The DB 605 would drive a pusher propeller through an extension shaft, alle the way through the fuselage, and the vertical stabilizer was re-located under the fuselage as a protection for the propeller on the ground.

 

Further development was abandoned when the Walter engines finally became operational and available, and Lippisch designed the P.20 as another evolutionary step of the basic design, but this time with a jet engine.

 

The Me 334 was never built, and its performance can only be guessed. Sources consider the Me equivalent or even slightly superior to the contemporary Me 109G.

 

General characteristics

Crew: 1

Length: 7.0 m

Wing span: 9.3 m

Height: 3.72 m

Wing area: 17.3 m²

Aspect ratio: 5.0

Weight: 2.800–3.000 kg

Performance: slightly better than a Me 109G

Engine: 1 Daimler-Benz DB 605 with 1.475 hp

Armament: Two MG 131 13mm machine guns on top of the engine cowl.

  

The kit and its assembly

Information and details are scarce, so I decided to take the same approach Dr. Lippisch did: take a Me 163, add a piston engine and see where it goes.

The basis for my kit is a Me 163 from Academy - a very good model kit, which nor only comes with a tractor for the model but also offers two fuselage versions: the single seated interceptor and the two-seated trainer version. The latter would be perfect for my conversion, because I could use the complete rear cockpit and its interior!

 

From this Me 163S, more or less the complete fuselage and the wings were taken, but donations from several other kits were used to "create" something that would resemble a Me 334 (all 1:72 scale):

 

- Engine from a Matchbox Me 410

- Landing gear from a Hasegawa J7W Shinden

- Main wheels from a Hasegawa XF8U

- Main landing gear covers from an Italieri Fw 190D

- Canopy from an Airfix P-38

- Propeller blades from a Matchbox Fw 190A

- Air intake and jet fan parts from a Kovozavody Su-25

- Exhaust pipes from an Italierei He 111

 

Many other details like the front grille or the landing gear covers were built from scratch.

Lots of putty was necessary to melt the engine and the fuselage into "one", as well as the P-38 canopy, which is actually a bit oversized for the tiny aircraft.

 

The propeller was built from scratch - it is the tip of a supersonic drop tank, a wire shaft sits in a plastic tube in the plane's tail. The propeller blades come from a Matchbox Fw 190 - I thought that these characteristic, spade-like blades would add to the "German" look.

 

All the landing gear wells had to be cut open manually, and filled with some details. This was easier than expected, just the front wheel bay was a bit difficult to install since it would be placed on the intersection of fuselage and engine.

 

Since I am not certain what would be inside of the radiator intake in the Me 334's front, I decided to put a mesh inside and add a small fan which would be barely visible - a nice effect.

 

I used the original cockpit from the Me 163 Academy kit, just added safety belts and a radio set behind the seat. Since fitting the canopy was rather complicated and messy, I left it unopened and without a pilot.

 

Painting

As a true "Whif" plane, total design freedom! But as usual with Luft '46 models, I tried to stay true to contemporary Luftwaffe camouflage and marking designs. The Me 334 would have been ready for trials in late 1943, so I thought that a machine from a fictional "Erprobungskommando 334" (or "EK 334" for short, a temporary testing unit, where a new type would be introduced to real life service, a common Luftwaffe practice at that time) would be fine.

 

Since all-grey fighters were only about to appear at that time, I settled on conservative colours:

 

* Wing surfaces in RLM 71/02 (Dunkelgrün/Grau, actually Humbrol #116 and Testors Testors #2071; it is a colour scheme that was common on Bf 109’s, after the original RLM 70/71 turned out to be much too dark an low in contrast)

 

* Lower surfaces RLM 65 (Lichtblau, Humbrol #65)

 

* Fuselage surface RLM 75/02 (Humbrol #106 Ocean Grey with additional mottles of Humbrol #140 Gull Grey)

 

* All interior surfaces including the landing gear were painted in RLM 66 (Schwarzgrau).

 

Markings come from the donation kit Academy Me 163 and from the scrap box. Among the extras are squadron batches and insignia for the technical officer’s plane (the chevron symbol with the dot instead of a number) from TL Decals, plus some ‘kill’ markings for planes and balloons on the tai fin, also from a TL Decals sheet.

+++ DISCLAIMER +++

Nothing you see here is real, even though the conversion or the presented background story might be based historical facts. BEWARE!

 

A small Luft '46 project, but not an OOB kit but rather a massive kit conversion which comes close to scratch-building: the rather weird Messerschmitt 334, a true 'paper plane'.

 

Some background

The Me 334 (the project number's origins are not clear, the designation has never been officially accepted by the RLM) is one of the few plane designs that was intended as a conversion from a jet/rocket-powered plane into a piston-engine design, namely the Me 163 Komet.

 

Due to the early unavailability of the Walter rocket engines for the Me 163 in 1942/43, the Me 334 was derived as an alternative. Dr. Lippisch, the Me 163' designer, modified this aircraft to accept a Daimler Benz DB 605 12-cylinder piston engine. The wings were taken from the Me 163. They were mounted mid-fuselage and swept back at a 23.4 degree angle. The main landing gear retracted inwards and the front gear retracted to the rear - a revolutionary design for its time. The DB 605 would drive a pusher propeller through an extension shaft, alle the way through the fuselage, and the vertical stabilizer was re-located under the fuselage as a protection for the propeller on the ground.

 

Further development was abandoned when the Walter engines finally became operational and available, and Lippisch designed the P.20 as another evolutionary step of the basic design, but this time with a jet engine.

 

The Me 334 was never built, and its performance can only be guessed. Sources consider the Me equivalent or even slightly superior to the contemporary Me 109G.

 

General characteristics

Crew: 1

Length: 7.0 m

Wing span: 9.3 m

Height: 3.72 m

Wing area: 17.3 m²

Aspect ratio: 5.0

Weight: 2.800–3.000 kg

Performance: slightly better than a Me 109G

Engine: 1 Daimler-Benz DB 605 with 1.475 hp

Armament: Two MG 131 13mm machine guns on top of the engine cowl.

  

The kit and its assembly

Information and details are scarce, so I decided to take the same approach Dr. Lippisch did: take a Me 163, add a piston engine and see where it goes.

The basis for my kit is a Me 163 from Academy - a very good model kit, which nor only comes with a tractor for the model but also offers two fuselage versions: the single seated interceptor and the two-seated trainer version. The latter would be perfect for my conversion, because I could use the complete rear cockpit and its interior!

 

From this Me 163S, more or less the complete fuselage and the wings were taken, but donations from several other kits were used to "create" something that would resemble a Me 334 (all 1:72 scale):

 

- Engine from a Matchbox Me 410

- Landing gear from a Hasegawa J7W Shinden

- Main wheels from a Hasegawa XF8U

- Main landing gear covers from an Italieri Fw 190D

- Canopy from an Airfix P-38

- Propeller blades from a Matchbox Fw 190A

- Air intake and jet fan parts from a Kovozavody Su-25

- Exhaust pipes from an Italierei He 111

 

Many other details like the front grille or the landing gear covers were built from scratch.

Lots of putty was necessary to melt the engine and the fuselage into "one", as well as the P-38 canopy, which is actually a bit oversized for the tiny aircraft.

 

The propeller was built from scratch - it is the tip of a supersonic drop tank, a wire shaft sits in a plastic tube in the plane's tail. The propeller blades come from a Matchbox Fw 190 - I thought that these characteristic, spade-like blades would add to the "German" look.

 

All the landing gear wells had to be cut open manually, and filled with some details. This was easier than expected, just the front wheel bay was a bit difficult to install since it would be placed on the intersection of fuselage and engine.

 

Since I am not certain what would be inside of the radiator intake in the Me 334's front, I decided to put a mesh inside and add a small fan which would be barely visible - a nice effect.

 

I used the original cockpit from the Me 163 Academy kit, just added safety belts and a radio set behind the seat. Since fitting the canopy was rather complicated and messy, I left it unopened and without a pilot.

 

Painting

As a true "Whif" plane, total design freedom! But as usual with Luft '46 models, I tried to stay true to contemporary Luftwaffe camouflage and marking designs. The Me 334 would have been ready for trials in late 1943, so I thought that a machine from a fictional "Erprobungskommando 334" (or "EK 334" for short, a temporary testing unit, where a new type would be introduced to real life service, a common Luftwaffe practice at that time) would be fine.

 

Since all-grey fighters were only about to appear at that time, I settled on conservative colours:

 

* Wing surfaces in RLM 71/02 (Dunkelgrün/Grau, actually Humbrol #116 and Testors Testors #2071; it is a colour scheme that was common on Bf 109’s, after the original RLM 70/71 turned out to be much too dark an low in contrast)

 

* Lower surfaces RLM 65 (Lichtblau, Humbrol #65)

 

* Fuselage surface RLM 75/02 (Humbrol #106 Ocean Grey with additional mottles of Humbrol #140 Gull Grey)

 

* All interior surfaces including the landing gear were painted in RLM 66 (Schwarzgrau).

 

Markings come from the donation kit Academy Me 163 and from the scrap box. Among the extras are squadron batches and insignia for the technical officer’s plane (the chevron symbol with the dot instead of a number) from TL Decals, plus some ‘kill’ markings for planes and balloons on the tai fin, also from a TL Decals sheet.

+++ DISCLAIMER +++

Nothing you see here is real, even though the conversion or the presented background story might be based historical facts. BEWARE!

 

A small Luft '46 project, but not an OOB kit but rather a massive kit conversion which comes close to scratch-building: the rather weird Messerschmitt 334, a true 'paper plane'.

 

Some background

The Me 334 (the project number's origins are not clear, the designation has never been officially accepted by the RLM) is one of the few plane designs that was intended as a conversion from a jet/rocket-powered plane into a piston-engine design, namely the Me 163 Komet.

 

Due to the early unavailability of the Walter rocket engines for the Me 163 in 1942/43, the Me 334 was derived as an alternative. Dr. Lippisch, the Me 163' designer, modified this aircraft to accept a Daimler Benz DB 605 12-cylinder piston engine. The wings were taken from the Me 163. They were mounted mid-fuselage and swept back at a 23.4 degree angle. The main landing gear retracted inwards and the front gear retracted to the rear - a revolutionary design for its time. The DB 605 would drive a pusher propeller through an extension shaft, alle the way through the fuselage, and the vertical stabilizer was re-located under the fuselage as a protection for the propeller on the ground.

 

Further development was abandoned when the Walter engines finally became operational and available, and Lippisch designed the P.20 as another evolutionary step of the basic design, but this time with a jet engine.

 

The Me 334 was never built, and its performance can only be guessed. Sources consider the Me equivalent or even slightly superior to the contemporary Me 109G.

 

General characteristics

Crew: 1

Length: 7.0 m

Wing span: 9.3 m

Height: 3.72 m

Wing area: 17.3 m²

Aspect ratio: 5.0

Weight: 2.800–3.000 kg

Performance: slightly better than a Me 109G

Engine: 1 Daimler-Benz DB 605 with 1.475 hp

Armament: Two MG 131 13mm machine guns on top of the engine cowl.

  

The kit and its assembly

Information and details are scarce, so I decided to take the same approach Dr. Lippisch did: take a Me 163, add a piston engine and see where it goes.

The basis for my kit is a Me 163 from Academy - a very good model kit, which nor only comes with a tractor for the model but also offers two fuselage versions: the single seated interceptor and the two-seated trainer version. The latter would be perfect for my conversion, because I could use the complete rear cockpit and its interior!

 

From this Me 163S, more or less the complete fuselage and the wings were taken, but donations from several other kits were used to "create" something that would resemble a Me 334 (all 1:72 scale):

 

- Engine from a Matchbox Me 410

- Landing gear from a Hasegawa J7W Shinden

- Main wheels from a Hasegawa XF8U

- Main landing gear covers from an Italieri Fw 190D

- Canopy from an Airfix P-38

- Propeller blades from a Matchbox Fw 190A

- Air intake and jet fan parts from a Kovozavody Su-25

- Exhaust pipes from an Italierei He 111

 

Many other details like the front grille or the landing gear covers were built from scratch.

Lots of putty was necessary to melt the engine and the fuselage into "one", as well as the P-38 canopy, which is actually a bit oversized for the tiny aircraft.

 

The propeller was built from scratch - it is the tip of a supersonic drop tank, a wire shaft sits in a plastic tube in the plane's tail. The propeller blades come from a Matchbox Fw 190 - I thought that these characteristic, spade-like blades would add to the "German" look.

 

All the landing gear wells had to be cut open manually, and filled with some details. This was easier than expected, just the front wheel bay was a bit difficult to install since it would be placed on the intersection of fuselage and engine.

 

Since I am not certain what would be inside of the radiator intake in the Me 334's front, I decided to put a mesh inside and add a small fan which would be barely visible - a nice effect.

 

I used the original cockpit from the Me 163 Academy kit, just added safety belts and a radio set behind the seat. Since fitting the canopy was rather complicated and messy, I left it unopened and without a pilot.

 

Painting

As a true "Whif" plane, total design freedom! But as usual with Luft '46 models, I tried to stay true to contemporary Luftwaffe camouflage and marking designs. The Me 334 would have been ready for trials in late 1943, so I thought that a machine from a fictional "Erprobungskommando 334" (or "EK 334" for short, a temporary testing unit, where a new type would be introduced to real life service, a common Luftwaffe practice at that time) would be fine.

 

Since all-grey fighters were only about to appear at that time, I settled on conservative colours:

 

* Wing surfaces in RLM 71/02 (Dunkelgrün/Grau, actually Humbrol #116 and Testors Testors #2071; it is a colour scheme that was common on Bf 109’s, after the original RLM 70/71 turned out to be much too dark an low in contrast)

 

* Lower surfaces RLM 65 (Lichtblau, Humbrol #65)

 

* Fuselage surface RLM 75/02 (Humbrol #106 Ocean Grey with additional mottles of Humbrol #140 Gull Grey)

 

* All interior surfaces including the landing gear were painted in RLM 66 (Schwarzgrau).

 

Markings come from the donation kit Academy Me 163 and from the scrap box. Among the extras are squadron batches and insignia for the technical officer’s plane (the chevron symbol with the dot instead of a number) from TL Decals, plus some ‘kill’ markings for planes and balloons on the tai fin, also from a TL Decals sheet.

+

 

You don't need a reason to do the things you like!

 

Facebook!

Instagram!

In shadowy space, in the loneliness of the final frontier, well out of Hubble’s reach both sweet and savoury comestibles spin around their own axis. Are these, in the interstellar emptiness spinning tops, which seem to float in-between dimension and space, snacks of the Starchild, canteen waste of the Imperial fleet or was the teleport perhaps acting up agin? All possibilities are infinitely improbable, ou quoi Valérian?

 

See the whole series.

youtu.be/NAOKzvL8dgk

Sinead O'Connor - Nothing Compares 2 U (Live)

 

Something I think the online universe lacks is the conversation you can have with someone's eyes when you're sitting across from them. Words can be used to convey a lot of emotion, for sure. The thing is, sometimes you don't want to be left to your own imagination as you are when reading a book. You want to look them in the eyes and read them. To see their body move in reaction to what's said or done. To feel their heartbeat. Second Life will never deliver that experience.

 

Speaking of delivering an experience. The video. Sinead conveys a lot of emotion performing that song! Wow!

What will the future bring?

We've arrived, so get used to it !

Another Black Dust Time Traveling Adventure.

 

If you have the chance to meet with yourself in the past, moments before you first shot, what do you say to yourself? A hint about the camera? Maybe too obvious and a lost opportunity. Something about the future? (My first thought was a bit harsh, better don't mention that.) There's another problem. If I know me well enough, whatever I had decided to say, I could hear a loud "Stop annoying me, moron!".

 

The original picture showing me at that day, here.

 

Note: Technically speaking, I'm smiling in the photo.

Whilst working on a shot taken from Islandhill, I was cycling through filter effects and up came Northern Lights. Not as magical as the real thing but possibly as close as I'll ever get? :)

+++ DISCLAIMER +++

Nothing you see here is real, even though the conversion or the presented background story might be based historical facts. BEWARE!

 

A small Luft '46 project, but not an OOB kit but rather a massive kit conversion which comes close to scratch-building: the rather weird Messerschmitt 334, a true 'paper plane'.

 

Some background

The Me 334 (the project number's origins are not clear, the designation has never been officially accepted by the RLM) is one of the few plane designs that was intended as a conversion from a jet/rocket-powered plane into a piston-engine design, namely the Me 163 Komet.

 

Due to the early unavailability of the Walter rocket engines for the Me 163 in 1942/43, the Me 334 was derived as an alternative. Dr. Lippisch, the Me 163' designer, modified this aircraft to accept a Daimler Benz DB 605 12-cylinder piston engine. The wings were taken from the Me 163. They were mounted mid-fuselage and swept back at a 23.4 degree angle. The main landing gear retracted inwards and the front gear retracted to the rear - a revolutionary design for its time. The DB 605 would drive a pusher propeller through an extension shaft, alle the way through the fuselage, and the vertical stabilizer was re-located under the fuselage as a protection for the propeller on the ground.

 

Further development was abandoned when the Walter engines finally became operational and available, and Lippisch designed the P.20 as another evolutionary step of the basic design, but this time with a jet engine.

 

The Me 334 was never built, and its performance can only be guessed. Sources consider the Me equivalent or even slightly superior to the contemporary Me 109G.

 

General characteristics

Crew: 1

Length: 7.0 m

Wing span: 9.3 m

Height: 3.72 m

Wing area: 17.3 m²

Aspect ratio: 5.0

Weight: 2.800–3.000 kg

Performance: slightly better than a Me 109G

Engine: 1 Daimler-Benz DB 605 with 1.475 hp

Armament: Two MG 131 13mm machine guns on top of the engine cowl.

  

The kit and its assembly

Information and details are scarce, so I decided to take the same approach Dr. Lippisch did: take a Me 163, add a piston engine and see where it goes.

The basis for my kit is a Me 163 from Academy - a very good model kit, which nor only comes with a tractor for the model but also offers two fuselage versions: the single seated interceptor and the two-seated trainer version. The latter would be perfect for my conversion, because I could use the complete rear cockpit and its interior!

 

From this Me 163S, more or less the complete fuselage and the wings were taken, but donations from several other kits were used to "create" something that would resemble a Me 334 (all 1:72 scale):

 

- Engine from a Matchbox Me 410

- Landing gear from a Hasegawa J7W Shinden

- Main wheels from a Hasegawa XF8U

- Main landing gear covers from an Italieri Fw 190D

- Canopy from an Airfix P-38

- Propeller blades from a Matchbox Fw 190A

- Air intake and jet fan parts from a Kovozavody Su-25

- Exhaust pipes from an Italierei He 111

 

Many other details like the front grille or the landing gear covers were built from scratch.

Lots of putty was necessary to melt the engine and the fuselage into "one", as well as the P-38 canopy, which is actually a bit oversized for the tiny aircraft.

 

The propeller was built from scratch - it is the tip of a supersonic drop tank, a wire shaft sits in a plastic tube in the plane's tail. The propeller blades come from a Matchbox Fw 190 - I thought that these characteristic, spade-like blades would add to the "German" look.

 

All the landing gear wells had to be cut open manually, and filled with some details. This was easier than expected, just the front wheel bay was a bit difficult to install since it would be placed on the intersection of fuselage and engine.

 

Since I am not certain what would be inside of the radiator intake in the Me 334's front, I decided to put a mesh inside and add a small fan which would be barely visible - a nice effect.

 

I used the original cockpit from the Me 163 Academy kit, just added safety belts and a radio set behind the seat. Since fitting the canopy was rather complicated and messy, I left it unopened and without a pilot.

 

Painting

As a true "Whif" plane, total design freedom! But as usual with Luft '46 models, I tried to stay true to contemporary Luftwaffe camouflage and marking designs. The Me 334 would have been ready for trials in late 1943, so I thought that a machine from a fictional "Erprobungskommando 334" (or "EK 334" for short, a temporary testing unit, where a new type would be introduced to real life service, a common Luftwaffe practice at that time) would be fine.

 

Since all-grey fighters were only about to appear at that time, I settled on conservative colours:

 

* Wing surfaces in RLM 71/02 (Dunkelgrün/Grau, actually Humbrol #116 and Testors Testors #2071; it is a colour scheme that was common on Bf 109’s, after the original RLM 70/71 turned out to be much too dark an low in contrast)

 

* Lower surfaces RLM 65 (Lichtblau, Humbrol #65)

 

* Fuselage surface RLM 75/02 (Humbrol #106 Ocean Grey with additional mottles of Humbrol #140 Gull Grey)

 

* All interior surfaces including the landing gear were painted in RLM 66 (Schwarzgrau).

 

Markings come from the donation kit Academy Me 163 and from the scrap box. Among the extras are squadron batches and insignia for the technical officer’s plane (the chevron symbol with the dot instead of a number) from TL Decals, plus some ‘kill’ markings for planes and balloons on the tai fin, also from a TL Decals sheet.

...what if ? B&W

Camera: Nikon D90 (handheld).

Lens: Nikon Micro lens -60mm f/2.8,

Thank you all in advance for all faves, comments and visits.. ..as always guys, all comments are welcome ( those good or bad as well LOL). Have an awesome weekend ...take care guys !

*** All of my photographs are Copyrighted & All Rights Reserved *** Higher Resolution Images are available on request.

 

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