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Humpback whale jumping, sea around Sainte Marie island, Madagascar

 

In Southern winter - from June to the end of September - the sea around Sainte Marie island, on the Eastern shore of Madagascar, offers one of the most natural fascinating spectacles in the world. Large groups of humpback whales - Megaptera novaeangliae - make their annual migration from the Antarctic to the sheltered waters around Ste Marie island where they calve, nurse their young and engage in their spectacular courtship rituals between the end of June and September.

For months, humpback whales can be seen wondering in the ocean as they move and jump out of the sea in the narrow canal that separates the island from the mainland.

 

© www.myplanetexperience.com

Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)

 

Each year thousands of these gentle giants rest, play and nurture their young in the sheltered waters of Hervey Bay. A real treat to watch them.

 

Hervey Bay, Fraser Coast Region, Queensland

Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)

 

Each year thousands of these gentle giants rest, play and nurture their young in the sheltered waters of Hervey Bay. A real treat to watch them.

 

Hervey Bay, Fraser Coast Region, Queensland

Kiakoura NZ

 

First post this year!

I hope you are all doing well.

 

Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)

 

Each year thousands of these gentle giants rest, play and nurture their young in the sheltered waters of Hervey Bay. A real treat to watch them.

 

Hervey Bay, Fraser Coast Region, Queensland

Humpback whales among icebergs

I recently returned from an Alaskan cruise and land tour. We took several excursions and whale watching was one of them.

 

This day started out raining but when we got to the viewing location thankfully the rain stopped and we were able to walk out onto the front of our boat.

 

This one was taken in Icy Strait Point. We were fortunate to see a mother and her calf out and about. The calf was the only one breaching the water. Fortunately he jumped several times because this is one of only a few I got in focus.

Reflection of whale watching hut at Fisherman's wharf in Victoria BC Canada.

Featuring: Designer Circle - Boardwalk Event - Salacity

 

More pics, Details & Slurls at cejascurvychic.com/2019/07/17/whale-watching/

Humpback whales in the Ilulissat icefjord in Greenland. At some moments six of them were in the fjord. They come to the surface only very shortly so it is a challenge to photograph them. They are often along the icebergs where there is more food in the upper water layers.

This humpback whale off the coast of Maui was "spy hopping" to get a closer look at our whale watch expedition.

Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)

 

Each year thousands of these gentle giants rest, play and nurture their young in the sheltered waters of Hervey Bay. A real treat to watch them.

 

Hervey Bay, Fraser Coast Region, Queensland

Builders in the Little Bow Creek area of Docklands, now known as Trinity Buoy Wharf, have recreated some of the old signs on buildings scheduled for redevelopment as the Goodluck Hope housing scheme. James Mather died in 1796 and his company ceased trading in 1803. Whaling itself went into decline after WW2 and was made illegal in 1973.

From a whale watching cruise on the St. Lawrence River in 2008 (processed with a touch of digital art).

 

A whale's tail is called its flukes. A whale's tail is composed of two lobes, each of which is called a fluke. There is a notch, a v-shaped indentation where the flukes (or lobes) of a whale's tail meet. Flukes move up and down to propel the whale through the water.

Mother and calf.

Moorea - French Polynesia

23-09-2020

Mother and Calve of humpback whales swimming in really shallow waters

Humpback Whale tail fin or flukes in blue water offshore from the coast of Port Stephens. If you look closly you can see the fine bits of spray from the flukes. NSW, Australia.

 

www.robertdowniephotography.com

Love Life, Love Photography

taken just out of Sydney Harbour during the annual whale migration up the Australian coast..awesome experience!

Listen ✧♫♪ Whale Song - LMN Productions ♪♫✧

  

Picture Before : gyazo.com/ec9e90f2ebae3c2dd6fdb9cf37bc9a30

 

Visit Eterea : maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Sexy%20Isle/59/103/28

A little magic piece of art in Second Life.

 

*Note : Whale by HPMD

  

Thank You for Looking 👀

 

Whale watchers in the icefjord

another detail from the light whale

I could sit mesmerized for hours watching the whale tail (shaped) wake follow behind the boat.

Surrounded by water, mountains, blue sky with cloud formations and the foamy wake dancing beyond the transom has to be the best antidepressant and without a prescription.

To me there is nothing more peaceful and relaxing.

 

Pitt River

Pitt Meadows, BC

Canada

 

In fluid dynamics, a wake may either be:

The region of recirculating flow immediately behind a moving or stationary blunt body, caused by viscosity, which may be accompanied by flow separation and turbulence, or

the wave pattern on the water surface downstream of an object in a flow, or produced by a moving object (e.g. a ship), caused by pressure differences of the fluids above and below the free surface and gravity (or surface tension), or both. ( Wikipedia)

 

Charlie waiting for the beluga whale to show up.

You may be surprised by this picture because we are still at the Melbourne Zoo. It is a piece of modern scrimshaw: A folk art where whalers used to carve amazing detail onto pieces of whalebone or walrus teeth. These days, thankfully, whaling is an industry that is almost extinct. And the result is that whale numbers are returning. Very good news for whale watchers.

www.sea.museum/2016/02/12/scrimshaw-a-whalers-pastime

 

Every so often on Victoria's southern coastline a whale will be washed ashore. In most cases these will be dead whales. But occasionally (we still don't know why) pods of whales will beach themselves. After one such event the Melbourne Zoo collected some of the bones of a Blue Whale (the largest mammal that has ever existed on earth), and made a small display of them. This particular bone, a rib one would think, was then carved in the form of scrimshaw to convey an educational message about Blue Whales.

 

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And with that we conclude our short visit (I only had 90 minutes to spare) to the Melbourne Zoo. There is so much more to see.

 

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Tomorrow I will start to show you some photos from an evening horse race meeting in Launceston.

  

It's not quite that, but it looks like it.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCQBMcnXVwI

 

Minke Whale feeding off the coast of Mull, September 2020, alongside Gannets & Manx Shearwaters.

Amazing to watch.

 

Photo not by me , my brother took it whilst in Japan and i thought what a great pic well done brother John and thanks for letting me share it.

Whale watchers now watching seagulls on their return to Fisherman's Wharf.

Steveston, Richmond

Fraser River

BC

Canada

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A Humpback Whale tail splashes in the ocean waters of the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada

Two whales peacefully enjoying the dusk in the Ilulissat icefjord. Greenland is an amazing place !

5.1.2020, Near the shores of South Georgia

Whale watching at the coast of Victoria Island, Canada

Oh what stories they would have. A Humpback whale submerges after lunge feeding off the Antarctic coast. Their annual summer pilgrimage is driven by the availability of the largest biomass of animals in the world.......krill.

Diving whale off the east coast of Australia.

The blue whale skeleton suspended over the main atrium of The Natural History Museum, London.

Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) dives below the surface of a calm bay off the west coast near Work Channel and north of Prince Rupert, British Columbia, Canada.

 

23 July, 2019.

 

Slide # GWB_20190723_9365.CR2

 

Use of this image on websites, blogs or other media without explicit permission is not permitted.

© Gerard W. Beyersbergen - All Rights Reserved Worldwide In Perpetuity - No Unauthorized Use.

Humpback Whale Watching from "Pacific Explorer". Not much breaching today but lots of tail slapping.

This photo is from last May when we went out with a friend on Resurrection Bay in Seward, Alaska. When we were coming back to the harbor, to our surprise we encountered a humpbacked whale relatively close to shore. Sure enough, the whale gave us a nice whale tail shot as it dove. It's amazing to see all the barnacles and wear and tear on this animals tail.

 

Taken 22 May 2019 in Resurrection Bay, Seward, Alaska.

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