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Monday, September 14, 2009.

Louis Armstrong

Armstrong, Daniel Louis (Satchmo)

singer, leader, trumpet

Born; New Orleans, La., 8-4-1901

Died; 4-6-1971

Louis Armstrong was the first vital jazz soloist to attain world wide influence as trumpeter, entertainer, and show business personality. He was a strong force in spreading the influence of jazz throughout his life. Through his trumpet solos and vocal interpretations alike, jazz fans immortalize him. His “Hot Five” and “Hot Seven” recordings done in the mid 1920’s had no parallel in jazz. He is also a well-recognized Pop music figure by his personable and throaty, charming and guttural jazz vocals.

A common misconception about this legend is his date of birth; Louis Armstrong was born August 4th, 1901. For many years the public believed Armstrong to have been born on the Fourth Of July in 1900. The story, a fabrication created by crafty public relations men, made good print. Although he went along with the stunt, his influence in jazz, still being felt today, would be just as far reaching if he had laid claim to being born on "Groundhog Day."

 

Armstrong had what many, today, would refer to as a traumatic or dysfunctional childhood. Out of this environment was born a desire to succeed, be admired, and make people happy. Louis learned at an early age that music could lead to fame and money. He and his friends would sing for nickels and pennies on the streets of his native New Orleans and he saw how popular the musicians who played the funeral and celebratory parades were with the public. On New Year’s Eve 1913, just 12 years old, Armstrong was caught firing a gun into the air and sentenced to a boys home for waifs. It was here under the tutelage of Peter Davis, who ran the home, that Armstrong learned how to play the cornet and he was soon playing picnics and parades. Later in life Louis returned year after year to the same waifs home to spread his joy to whoever was housed there. He never forgot Peter Davis or the kids.

 

After his release Satchmo, as he became known, worked in a variety of jobs, occasionally playing background music in the houses of ill repute located mainly in the Storyville section of New Orleans. He was befriended by Joe "King" Oliver who became his mentor and sole musical influence but Oliver moved North to Chicago during a time when many Southern Blacks were heading North in search of a better life. Armstrong's playing continued to improve as he gained even more experience by taking the “Kings” chair in the Kid Ory band after Oliver left. In July of 1922 Oliver contacted Louis to join him in Chicago and Armstrong headed North.

 

Soon the level of the student's playing had surpassed that of his mentor. In 1924, urged by his wife Lil Armstrong, Louis set out to test his abilities with the sleek Fletcher Henderson band in New York which had a steady gig at the Roseland ballroom. After a long road tour with the band he left in 1925 to return to Chicago where wife Lil now had her own band.

 

1926 found Louis working several jobs; one in Carroll Dickerson’s orchestra at the Sunset Cabaret where Louis was billed as “The World’s Greatest Trumpet Player.” The owner of the club was Joe Glaser who became Armstrong’s longtime manager in 1935.

 

During the mid 1920’s Armstrong began recording the sessions that would become legendary with his “Hot Five” and “Hot Seven” groups. His first record under his own name was “My Heart” cut November 12th 1925. For better than three years Armstrong remained in Chicago churning out a number of famous recordings that earned him worldwide acclaim. Many were with a pianist he had worked with in the Dickerson band named Earl “Fatha” Hines. By the time he returned to New York in 1929 both black and white audiences knew Armstrong the world over.

 

While in New York, this time around, Armstrong reached a pivotal point in his career; he led the Dickerson band and doubled in a roll on Broadway in the revue called “Hot Chocolates.” His first “popular song” hit came from this show; a song written by Fats Waller called “Ain’t Misbehavin’.”

 

From then until the mid 1940’s Louis played with a big band, his material now becoming “pop” songs of the day, rather than blues or original instrumental compositions. His singing took on a more dominant role in his performances and recordings and some of the groups his record label Decca paired him with were at best questionable. Jazz critics find much of his output from the mid 1930’s forward to be of a lesser regard than his pioneering efforts in the 1920’s even though Armstrong continued to spread the appeal of jazz, as popular music, around the globe as no one else could. While some of his “swing” recordings from the 1930’s and 1940’s provided many with the opportunity to enjoy him in a more "easy to relate to" and popular manner, others see them as evidence of Armstrong selling out to pop music.

 

One bright spot for improvisation's sake took place at the 1944 Esquire All American Jazz Concert. Louis took his rightful place that evening at the top of a list of jazz all-stars selected by Esquire magazine. He later humbly expressed his enthusiasm and appreciation of being there and playing with all the "greats" that evening but to a man, they had Satchmo to thank for making their careers more fruitful.

 

His new manager Joe Glaser had no trouble in booking and overbooking Armstrong during this period. The schedule he had Louis on was unbelievable, if not downright ludicrous. Many times Armstrong’s lips were so overused they bled from his performances. Because Glaser had him moving about so much doing live performances, Armstrong was not recorded as much in the studio with quality backing as he should have been even into the 1950’s.

 

In 1947 Armstrong led a sextet that was to become known as simply “Louis Armstrong And His All-Stars.” This small group, playing mainly Dixieland based jazz, proved an immediate success and became Armstrong’s permanent touring setting.

 

In the 1950’s and 1960’s, following his Decca affiliation, Armstrong was recorded in a variety of settings; from small groups with Oscar Peterson on piano, to two albums with Ella Fitzgerald, to big band and orchestral accompaniment. The bulk of these recordings can be found on the Verve record label. He can also be heard on a live Verve LP called “Jazz At The Hollywood Bowl” as recorded in the mid 1950’s. Although his “Blueberry Hill” and “Hello Dolly” were big pop hits at the end of his career they offer little for jazz and swing music fans. A more interesting and representative pop recording from his latter career would be “A Kiss To Build A Dream On” arranged by Sy Oliver and another hit.

 

Armstrong was given a bad rap by some as being an “Uncle Tom,” a judgment laid on him by detractors that viewed his “clowning” akin to that of a minstrel act. However his love for Harlem, where he made his home, never ceased. Armstrong was outspoken and took an active role in Civil Rights issues starting as early as the Eisenhower era in the 1950’s.

 

Louis Armstrong was the first great trumpet soloist in jazz. His unmistakable trumpet and vocals, while not as “hot” or improvisational in latter years, continued doing what he loved most, making people happy.

   

Romanian postcard by Casa Filmului Acin.

 

With his sleepy eyes, distinctive eyebrows and deep, gravelly voice, English actor David Hemmings (1941 – 2003) was one of the princes of the ‘swinging London’ of the 1960’s. His role as the fashion photographer in Michelangelo Antonioni’s classic thriller Blow Up (1966) made him an international cinema icon.

 

David Edward Leslie Hemmings was born in Guildford, Great Britain in 1941 to a cookie merchant and his wife. He was educated at Alleyn's School and the Glyn Grammar School (now the Glyn Technology School). This led the 9-year old to start a professional career performing as a boy soprano in several operatic works by the composer Benjamin Britten. Hemmings played the title role in Britten's The Little Sweep (1952), which was part of Britten's Let's Make An Opera! children's production. Most notably, Hemmings created the role of Miles in Britten's chamber opera Turn of the Screw (1954) with the English Opera Group. He was renowned for his mature and intelligent vocal interpretations of these parts. His close friendship with Britten is described in John Bridcut's book Britten's Children (2006). Although many commentators identified Britten's relationship with Hemmings as based on an infatuation, throughout his life the actor maintained categorically that Britten's conduct with him was beyond reproach at all times. He briefly left the musical world when his voice changed. He studied painting at the Epsom School of Art and staged his first exhibition at 15. He returned to singing in his early 20’s, first in nightclubs, then on the musical stage. As a child actor he had made his film debut in the drama The Rainbow Jacket (1954, Basil Dearden) for Ealing Studios. He also had bit part in Saint Joan (1957, Otto Preminger) featuring Jean Seberg. When the youth culture hit Britain in the late 1950’s, Jon C Hopwood writes at IMDb: “Hemmings was in the right place at the right time to capitalize on his skills and looks. Boyish-looking, with large, protuberant blue eyes covered with heavy lids, his face was at once startling and decadent while simultaneously conveying an air of fragility”. He appeared as misunderstood youths and belligerent ‘Teddy Boys’, such as in the teen musicals Some People (1962, Clive Donner), Live It Up! (1964, Lance Comfort), and Be My Guest (1965, Lance Comfort). He also played opposite Oliver Reed in the drama The System/The Girl-Getters (1964, Michael Winner).

 

Then, the 24 year old David Hemmings landed his career defining role. Italian film director Michelangelo Antonioni sought to find a fresh young face for the lead in his existential thriller Blow Up/Blowup (1966) co-starring Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles, Jane Birkin and Veruschka. He found Hemmings acting in a small stage theatre in London. Hemmings character was a fashionable photographer reportedly based on David Bailey. In his obituary of Hemmings in The Guardian, Tim Pulleine describes how the character “is eventually brought face to face with the illusoriness not only of success but of reality itself. The film's conclusion, in which the photographer is gradually torn into participation in an imaginary game of tennis, must surely rank as one of the most mesmerising in all cinema. Hemmings's physical demeanour, combining down-to-earth chippiness with an almost ethereal air of fragility, admirably embodied the themes of a groundbreaking movie, which dissolved the barriers between art and popular cinema.” Blowup made Hemmings an international star and pin-up for a while, a darling of the pop culture filmmaking that was expected to revolutionize the English-speaking cinema in the 1960’s. Following Blow Up, Hemmings appeared in a string of major British films, including the musical Camelot (1967, Joshua Logan), the war film The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968, Tony Richardson) and in the title role in the epic film Alfred the Great (1969, Clive Donner) with Michael York. His short stature, sleepy eyes and undershot jaw made him an unconventional leading man, but unconventional was right for the times, and he became one of the icons of the ‘swinging London’ scene. In 1967, Hemmings recorded a pop single, Back Street Mirror and a studio album, David Hemmings Happens, in Los Angeles, California. The album featured instrumental backing by several members of The Byrds. Later, Hemmings provided the narration for Rick Wakeman's progressive-rock album Journey to the Centre of the Earth (1974) – an adaptation of Jules Verne's science-fiction novel A Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864). He also appeared as Dildano in the pop art fantasy Barbarella (1968, Roger Vadim) featuring Jane Fonda, convincingly portrayed a troubled schoolmaster in Unman, Wittering and Zigo, (1971, John MacKenzie) and appeared in the dud The Love Machine (1971, Jack Haley Jr.), starring John Phillip Law and based on Jacqueline Susann’s bestseller.

 

David Hemmings’ career took a new turn when he founded the Hemdale Corporation with business partner John Daly, as a tax shelter and to give him greater control both before and behind the camera. He directed his first film, the suspense thriller Running Scared (1972, David Hemmings) starring his wife at the time, Gayle Hunnicutt. In the 1970’s, he relocated to Malibu, California to live with Hunnicutt, and the fabled beach community which was his home for the next generation. His next film, the drama The 14 (1973, David Hemmings), won the Silver Bear at the 23rd Berlin International Film Festival. He appeared in the disaster film Juggernaut (1974, Richard Lester) starring Richard Harris, and the Italian Giallo Profondo Rosso/Deep Red (1975, Dario Argento). He directed David Bowie and Marlene Dietrich in the drama Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo/Just a Gigolo (1978, David Hemmings). The film was poorly received, with Bowie describing it as "my 32 Elvis Presley movies rolled into one". As an actor he worked on the Sherlock Holmes film Murder by Decree (1979, Bob Clark) with Christopher Plummer and James Mason, and played a vindictive cop in the docudrama film Beyond Reasonable Doubt (1980) about a New Zealand farmer innocently jailed for a double murder but later pardoned. Hemmings directed the horror film The Survivor (1981, David Hemmings), starring Robert Powell and Jenny Agutter. In the 1980’s he became one of the top directors of American action TV series, as Magnum, P.I. (1980), The A-Team (1983), Airwolf (1984), and Quantum Leap (1989). In some episodes of Airwolf he also played the role of Doctor Charles Henry Moffet, Airwolf's twisted creator. For the cinema, he directed the thriller Race for the Yankee Zephyr (1981, David Hemmings), starring Ken Wahl, and the drama film Dark Horse (1992, David Hemmings). After a six-year absence, he returned as an actor to feature films to play Uncle Henry in Ken Russell's asaptation of DH Lawrence's The Rainbow (1989). He also returned to the voyeuristic preoccupations of his Blow Up character with a plum part as the Big he Brother-esque villain in the season-three opener for the television horror anthology series Tales From the Crypt (1991).

 

David Hemmings had a come-back on the screen as Cassius in the historical epic Gladiator (2000, Ridley Scott), with Russell Crowe. He had become bulkier and the following years he appeared as a character actor in the drama Last Orders (2001, Fred Schepisi) the film version of Graham Swift's elegiac novel with Michael Caine and Tom Courtenay, and the espionage film Spy Game (2001, Tony Scott) starring Robert Radford and Brad Pitt. He appeared as Mr. Schemerhorn in the historical film Gangs of New York (2002, Martin Scorsese) starring Leonardo DiCaprio. Shortly before his death, he had cameo appearances in the science-fiction film Equilibrium (2002, Kurt Wimmer) starring Christian Bale, and the superhero film The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003, Stephen Norrington), with Sean Connery. In 2003, David Hemmings died, at age 62,. He was in Bucharest, Romania, on the film set of the horror film Blessed (2004, Simon Fellows) starring Heather Graham. After playing his scenes for the day, he had a fatal heart attack. His funeral was held in Calne, Wiltshire, where he had made his home for several years. David Hemmings was married four times, to Genista Ouvry, to actress Gayle Hunnicutt; to Prudence J. de Casembroot and to Lucy Williams. He had a daughter, Deborah, by his marriage to Ouvry; a son, actor Nolan Hemmings, by his marriage to Hunnicutt; and four children, George, Edward, Charlotte and William, by his marriage to de Casembroot. In 2004, his autobiography Blow Up... and Other Exaggerations – The Autobiography of David Hemmings (2004) was published.

 

Sources: Tim Pulleine (The Guardian), Jon C. Hopwood (IMDb), Hal Erickson (AllMovie), Anne-Marie Thomas (Encyclopedia of British Film), TCM, Wikipedia, and IMDb.

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer.

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

The spectacular Club Harlem show...

 

"Host Maurice Hines will have you fingers snapping throughout as a stunning roster of top contemporary talent takes to the stage. Three-time Grammy Award-winning vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater flaunts her flawless technique and Tony-Award winning theatricality.

 

Rising-star Cécile McLorin Salvant offers sumptuous and sensual vocal interpretations from the great American songbook. Dormeshia, the greatest female tap dancer alive, spits out complex rhythms a mile a minute. Storyboard P, a 21st century reincarnation of the notorious Snakehips, displays untapped genius in a dance style that is pure poetry in motion.

 

David Berger, an internationally renowned expert on the music of Duke Ellington and the Swing Era, provides the show’s musical direction, and accomplished conductor Daryl Waters leads a 16-piece Jazz orchestra through an exhilarating barrage of hits including Fine and Mellow, One O’Clock Jump, Drop Me Off in Harlem and Paper Moon. Broadway veteran Emilio Sosa and master designer Burke Wilmore make the evening shimmer and shine with gorgeous costumes and exquisite lighting. Orchestra-level, nightclub seating features table-service, dancing and drinks. "

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

 

All images are protected by copyright © Janos KOVACS. All rights reserved.

If you want to use these pics, please contact me at:

office@jkovacsphotography.com

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

Soprano Yoko Watanabe – I’m convinced her vocal interpretations were exactly what Puccini had intended them to be.

 

When writing the caption for this experimental portrait of Yoko Watanabe, the enchanting Japanese opera diva extraordinaire, I was greatly saddened to discover that she had recently, after a three year battle, lost her fight with cancer at the relatively young age of 50. Like the recent demise of the great Luciano Pavarotti, it is a huge loss to the world of Opera. Mere words cannot describe what a shock the news of this was for me, and what an exceptional lady she was.

 

I first photographed Yoko in 1985, when she was engaged by the Performing Arts Council of the Transvaal’s (PACT) opera company to sing in our Manon Lescaut.

 

Although her performance in Manon was critically acclaimed. It is strangely enough because of that rare combination not usually found in sopranos, (a diminutive figure and a marvellous voice,) that she, as the little 15 year old Cio-Cio- San, in Madam Butterfly. throughout her short life, won world-wide acclaim. I feel therefore, that in honour of her tragic passing, I should write about her incredible success in this particular role.

 

Puccini created an indelible Cio-Cio-San as the tragic little geisha of ''Madama Butterfly'', but in doing so he also created a severe problem for most sopranos, who assume the title role. Though his orphan girl from Nagasaki is one of opera's most vulnerable and fragile, women, he assigns to her music that requires a soaring dramatic voice of the type seldom found in petite female bodies. That is probably why ''Butterfly'' has been sung, and believably so, by such large-voiced sopranos as Maria Callas, Renata Tebaldi and Leontyne Price even though the eye may have resisted total belief in the character portrayed. Callas’ performance for instance, although absolutely stunning, gave little Cio-Cio-San a ‘Medea-like’ proportion, whom any Lieutenant Pinkerton would only have betrayed or deserted at his deadly peril.

 

Yoko Watanabe’s Cio-Cio-San balanced these conflicting requirements with rare and absolute success. With the exceptional plausibility of her enchanting oriental delicacy and mannerisms, she brought enough beauty in her singing to the role's more taxing moments, to blend in with the vocal picture as well. Her Japanese background certainly lent an aura of stylish credibility to her ''Butterfly,'' but she did not rely on that advantage. She was not merely a soprano dressed as Cio-Cio-San, she was that betrayed creature. As always in good performances of ''Madam Butterfly,'' one could feel in the audience, an overwhelming urge to storm the stage and throttle the cad Pinkerton, an audience reaction which I feel sure Puccini obviously intended.

   

For me, however, the aspect of Yoko which drew me to her, quite apart from her brilliant reputation as Cio-Cio-San, and her stunning performance in our Manon Lecaut, was her openness, friendliness and warmth, with all who worked with her. I will never ever forget this wonderful girl.

 

Yasuku Hayashi – exactly the Cio-Cio-San Puccini must have had in mind

 

I had already covered a number of different productions of this opera, which is one of my favourites and, for me, the ultimate in operatic tragedy. The one that I recall most vividly was Japanese soprano Yasuku Hayashi’s performance, which was mesmerising. Another performance featured the fine English soprano Elizabeth Vaughn which, though vocally adequate and beautifully presented, left me unmoved.

 

Even in the very early stages of the 1980 production, when I shot some of the preliminary rehearsals, I was struck firstly by Yasuku’s exquisite Japanese beauty. This, in my opinion, made her visually perfect for the role she was about to sing. When I heard her voice and vocal interpretation of Puccinni’s poor unfortunate ‘Cio-Cio-San’, however, I felt that, at last, here was not only a true, visual example of what she should be on stage, but that her vocal interpretation was exactly what Puccini must have intended it to be.

 

This was completely unlike our previous "Butterfly" productions, which I felt tended to feature imperious and dominating sopranos in the title role, who overwhelmed the male lead ‘Pinkertons’. This production however, boasted two absolute experts in soprano, Yasuku Hayashi and tenor, Enrico di Giuseppe, with other roles being wonderfully filled by Susan Braatved, Peter Knapp and George Kok it was directed once more by that doyen director of the opera, Neels Hansen, with the PACT orchestra in the pit, conducted by my old friend, Professor Leo Quayle (affectionately known as ‘Proff’ to everyone).

 

Worth mentioning is one of the authentic touches which Yasuku introduced to the director Neels Hansen in the choreography of her tragic ‘Jigai’ suicide scene. Apparently, part of the ancient ritual and preparation before committing ‘Jigai’, is to use the belt of the obi to tie the knees and ankles together, so that the body would be found in a dignified position, despite the convulsions of death.

 

Yasuku and I enjoyed a really good friendship during the run of the opera what I found so amazing about her, (being Japanese and also married to an Italian cellist), was her amazing ability with languages, she also spoke perfect English but, as is so often the case in the crazy world of the Theatre, after it was all over, we sadly lost touch.

 

Sharon Martin vocal interpretations nailed her Tribute to Billy Holiday in the Economy Hall Tent on the first day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on 27 April 2018.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

avant garde pop album from [I]Mike Oldfield[/I]'s engineer & producer, featuring an array of musicians including [I]Jon Field, Mike Oldfield, Ned Callan, Chris Cutler[/I] and [I]Fred Frith[/I]. [I]Newman [/I]was previously in the one off Brit Psych band [B]July [/B]with [I]Field [/I]and [I]Tony Duhig[/I] who would go on to form [B]Jade Warrior[/B]. very cool stuff, including a mostly vocal interpretation of She Said, She Said.

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

It's hard to read to Laurel. She can sit still for perhaps ten seconds before wanting to grab the book and put it in her mouth, no matter how compelling the narrative or adroit the reader's vocal interpretation.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

Sharon Martin vocal interpretations nailed her Tribute to Billy Holiday in the Economy Hall Tent on the first day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on 27 April 2018.

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

Caleb N. performs a unique vocal interpretation of a Russian song made famous by Edward Khil.

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

The crowd loved Sharon Martin vocal interpretations during her Tribute to Billy Holiday in the Economy Hall Tent on the first day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on 27 April 2018.

Identifier: aurora04oliv

Title: Aurora

Year: 1917 (1910s)

Authors: Olivet Nazarene University. Student body.

Subjects: College yearbooks Olivet Nazarene University, Student Body--Yearbooks

Publisher: Bourbonnais, Ill. : Olivet Nazarene University

Contributing Library: Olivet Nazarene University, Benner Library & Resource Center

Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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Text Appearing Before Image:

developed imagination. Withoutit, no matter Avhat he may say, his speech is lacking in interest.Dr. Curry says: When a speaker eliminates imagination andfeeling he becomes commonplace and his ideals and words fail tomove his fellows. While it is true expression is greatly aided by imagination,it is just as true that imagination is stimulated ;iii(l developed byexpression. The two are mutually helpful. Tbe speakei- musthave vision, which is supplied by innmiuation, before ho can stirhis hearers; but, on the other hand, vocal interpretation, (H llicact of giving expression to the finest poetry, proves the cxcclbnttraining for the imagination. It is, therefore, very imjxiitant that the stu(biit receive train-ing in vocal expression on account of the inlluencc wludi i1 liason the imaginative faculty—the faculty of the mind lo \\hi(dimaiikind owes its highest ideals and its kcMiiest enjoymenl. SEVA ELIjIS, Exi)i-essi(in di. Page Fifty-seven] i£xtirp00inn In&prgra&uatPB Aurora 17

 

Text Appearing After Image:

[Page Fifty-eight

  

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