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View allAll Photos Tagged vocal+interpretation

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

 

All images are protected by copyright © Janos KOVACS. All rights reserved.

If you want to use these pics, please contact me at:

office@jkovacsphotography.com

Monday, September 14, 2009.

Louis Armstrong

Armstrong, Daniel Louis (Satchmo)

singer, leader, trumpet

Born; New Orleans, La., 8-4-1901

Died; 4-6-1971

Louis Armstrong was the first vital jazz soloist to attain world wide influence as trumpeter, entertainer, and show business personality. He was a strong force in spreading the influence of jazz throughout his life. Through his trumpet solos and vocal interpretations alike, jazz fans immortalize him. His “Hot Five” and “Hot Seven” recordings done in the mid 1920’s had no parallel in jazz. He is also a well-recognized Pop music figure by his personable and throaty, charming and guttural jazz vocals.

A common misconception about this legend is his date of birth; Louis Armstrong was born August 4th, 1901. For many years the public believed Armstrong to have been born on the Fourth Of July in 1900. The story, a fabrication created by crafty public relations men, made good print. Although he went along with the stunt, his influence in jazz, still being felt today, would be just as far reaching if he had laid claim to being born on "Groundhog Day."

 

Armstrong had what many, today, would refer to as a traumatic or dysfunctional childhood. Out of this environment was born a desire to succeed, be admired, and make people happy. Louis learned at an early age that music could lead to fame and money. He and his friends would sing for nickels and pennies on the streets of his native New Orleans and he saw how popular the musicians who played the funeral and celebratory parades were with the public. On New Year’s Eve 1913, just 12 years old, Armstrong was caught firing a gun into the air and sentenced to a boys home for waifs. It was here under the tutelage of Peter Davis, who ran the home, that Armstrong learned how to play the cornet and he was soon playing picnics and parades. Later in life Louis returned year after year to the same waifs home to spread his joy to whoever was housed there. He never forgot Peter Davis or the kids.

 

After his release Satchmo, as he became known, worked in a variety of jobs, occasionally playing background music in the houses of ill repute located mainly in the Storyville section of New Orleans. He was befriended by Joe "King" Oliver who became his mentor and sole musical influence but Oliver moved North to Chicago during a time when many Southern Blacks were heading North in search of a better life. Armstrong's playing continued to improve as he gained even more experience by taking the “Kings” chair in the Kid Ory band after Oliver left. In July of 1922 Oliver contacted Louis to join him in Chicago and Armstrong headed North.

 

Soon the level of the student's playing had surpassed that of his mentor. In 1924, urged by his wife Lil Armstrong, Louis set out to test his abilities with the sleek Fletcher Henderson band in New York which had a steady gig at the Roseland ballroom. After a long road tour with the band he left in 1925 to return to Chicago where wife Lil now had her own band.

 

1926 found Louis working several jobs; one in Carroll Dickerson’s orchestra at the Sunset Cabaret where Louis was billed as “The World’s Greatest Trumpet Player.” The owner of the club was Joe Glaser who became Armstrong’s longtime manager in 1935.

 

During the mid 1920’s Armstrong began recording the sessions that would become legendary with his “Hot Five” and “Hot Seven” groups. His first record under his own name was “My Heart” cut November 12th 1925. For better than three years Armstrong remained in Chicago churning out a number of famous recordings that earned him worldwide acclaim. Many were with a pianist he had worked with in the Dickerson band named Earl “Fatha” Hines. By the time he returned to New York in 1929 both black and white audiences knew Armstrong the world over.

 

While in New York, this time around, Armstrong reached a pivotal point in his career; he led the Dickerson band and doubled in a roll on Broadway in the revue called “Hot Chocolates.” His first “popular song” hit came from this show; a song written by Fats Waller called “Ain’t Misbehavin’.”

 

From then until the mid 1940’s Louis played with a big band, his material now becoming “pop” songs of the day, rather than blues or original instrumental compositions. His singing took on a more dominant role in his performances and recordings and some of the groups his record label Decca paired him with were at best questionable. Jazz critics find much of his output from the mid 1930’s forward to be of a lesser regard than his pioneering efforts in the 1920’s even though Armstrong continued to spread the appeal of jazz, as popular music, around the globe as no one else could. While some of his “swing” recordings from the 1930’s and 1940’s provided many with the opportunity to enjoy him in a more "easy to relate to" and popular manner, others see them as evidence of Armstrong selling out to pop music.

 

One bright spot for improvisation's sake took place at the 1944 Esquire All American Jazz Concert. Louis took his rightful place that evening at the top of a list of jazz all-stars selected by Esquire magazine. He later humbly expressed his enthusiasm and appreciation of being there and playing with all the "greats" that evening but to a man, they had Satchmo to thank for making their careers more fruitful.

 

His new manager Joe Glaser had no trouble in booking and overbooking Armstrong during this period. The schedule he had Louis on was unbelievable, if not downright ludicrous. Many times Armstrong’s lips were so overused they bled from his performances. Because Glaser had him moving about so much doing live performances, Armstrong was not recorded as much in the studio with quality backing as he should have been even into the 1950’s.

 

In 1947 Armstrong led a sextet that was to become known as simply “Louis Armstrong And His All-Stars.” This small group, playing mainly Dixieland based jazz, proved an immediate success and became Armstrong’s permanent touring setting.

 

In the 1950’s and 1960’s, following his Decca affiliation, Armstrong was recorded in a variety of settings; from small groups with Oscar Peterson on piano, to two albums with Ella Fitzgerald, to big band and orchestral accompaniment. The bulk of these recordings can be found on the Verve record label. He can also be heard on a live Verve LP called “Jazz At The Hollywood Bowl” as recorded in the mid 1950’s. Although his “Blueberry Hill” and “Hello Dolly” were big pop hits at the end of his career they offer little for jazz and swing music fans. A more interesting and representative pop recording from his latter career would be “A Kiss To Build A Dream On” arranged by Sy Oliver and another hit.

 

Armstrong was given a bad rap by some as being an “Uncle Tom,” a judgment laid on him by detractors that viewed his “clowning” akin to that of a minstrel act. However his love for Harlem, where he made his home, never ceased. Armstrong was outspoken and took an active role in Civil Rights issues starting as early as the Eisenhower era in the 1950’s.

 

Louis Armstrong was the first great trumpet soloist in jazz. His unmistakable trumpet and vocals, while not as “hot” or improvisational in latter years, continued doing what he loved most, making people happy.

   

The spectacular Club Harlem show...

 

"Host Maurice Hines will have you fingers snapping throughout as a stunning roster of top contemporary talent takes to the stage. Three-time Grammy Award-winning vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater flaunts her flawless technique and Tony-Award winning theatricality.

 

Rising-star Cécile McLorin Salvant offers sumptuous and sensual vocal interpretations from the great American songbook. Dormeshia, the greatest female tap dancer alive, spits out complex rhythms a mile a minute. Storyboard P, a 21st century reincarnation of the notorious Snakehips, displays untapped genius in a dance style that is pure poetry in motion.

 

David Berger, an internationally renowned expert on the music of Duke Ellington and the Swing Era, provides the show’s musical direction, and accomplished conductor Daryl Waters leads a 16-piece Jazz orchestra through an exhilarating barrage of hits including Fine and Mellow, One O’Clock Jump, Drop Me Off in Harlem and Paper Moon. Broadway veteran Emilio Sosa and master designer Burke Wilmore make the evening shimmer and shine with gorgeous costumes and exquisite lighting. Orchestra-level, nightclub seating features table-service, dancing and drinks. "

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

avant garde pop album from [I]Mike Oldfield[/I]'s engineer & producer, featuring an array of musicians including [I]Jon Field, Mike Oldfield, Ned Callan, Chris Cutler[/I] and [I]Fred Frith[/I]. [I]Newman [/I]was previously in the one off Brit Psych band [B]July [/B]with [I]Field [/I]and [I]Tony Duhig[/I] who would go on to form [B]Jade Warrior[/B]. very cool stuff, including a mostly vocal interpretation of She Said, She Said.

Monday 3rd November 2014 - Sunday 9th November 2014

Fundación Albeniz-Escuela de Música Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

 

Ryland Davies established an international reputation as a leading operatic tenor some forty six years ago; he maintains that reputation to this day.

 

He is now passing on his teaching experience, of over twenty years, to up and coming young singers.

The crowd loved Sharon Martin vocal interpretations during her Tribute to Billy Holiday in the Economy Hall Tent on the first day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival on 27 April 2018.

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

Cano Estremera

 

Cambio De Sentido

CD (Combo 2105), Released 1994;

Reviews:

"A singer who exhibits a unique style of vocal interpretation with a voice full of energy and power." (Joe Gaines 96/97 Catalog)

Song titles include:

Por Tí Me Casaré 4:50

Con Ojos De Dolar 5:02

Despues De Amar 5:31

Pobre Diablo 4:51

Compañera De Trabajo 4:40

Alguien 4:53

Cantos De Sirena 5:19

Profesor De Decimo Grado 5:29

Category: Salsa/Son => Salsa => Puerto Rico

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer.

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog

Place Knuedler, June 2011, Luxembourg

 

Ladies of Soul, featured by the well known Big band Opus 78, were the opening act for Candy Dulfer, during her concert in June 2011, Luxembourg .

  

The high resolution file is on my My Website

 

My Website | My Blog