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from the air over north west China, actually about 7.5 miles north-west of Sanjianfang in Xinjian Uygur. I've geotagged it if you care to take a look :)

 

To give some perspective, the image is about 4 miles across at the base, and about 6 miles at the railway line in the top.

 

Here's the link to it on Microsoft Virtual Earth

 

I've submitted a similar shot to 'Dreamscapes' on JPG Magazine here.

Go on over and vote me in if you like it :)

Or... Is that important ?! May be not for this butterfly !

What if.... you and me are on a 'virtual' earth that someone is spinning for fun ?

 

The artificial tropical rain forest, Copenhagen Zoo.

 

This photo is included in the second edition of Schmap Scandinavia Guide:

www.schmap.com/scandinavia/parks/#p=72239&i=72239_2.jpg

Taken during a talk by microsoft virtual earth dude about georelevance

Wow, I'm looking forward to when they post the videos for the ShowOff entries on Channel 9. This was very cool.

 

UPDATE: Great, the video is now live on Ch9.

Looking east toward Massachusetts Hall, the President's office, is just above the church steeple. In front of the light colored building (University Hall) in the center of the campus is the statue of John Harvard, of Charlestown, who left the college funds in his will (and his personal library, as well).

 

Using Google Earth, one can make use of their 3D models of buildings on the Harvard Campus.

You can download Microsoft's Virtual Earth and have an even better 3D experience - all major buildings in the area are "built" in cyberspace.

 

Slideshow: fiveprime.org/hivemind/User/eileansiar

 

www.flickriver.com/photos/eileansiar/popular-interesting/

 

www.flickr.com/photos/eileansiar/show/

 

www.flickriver.com/photos/eileansiar/random/

 

Blog: www.harvardsquare.blogspot.com/

 

www.heraldoflight.wordpress.com/

 

Harvard: www.harvard.edu/siteguide/listing/index.php

 

www.map.harvard.edu/level2.cfm?mapname=camb_allston&t...

A comparison between Virtual Earth, Google Maps, Google Earth and NASA World Wind. Read more.

MS Virtual Earth shows that somehow this has miraculously survived the 2007 drive of the Cradley Heath Inner Bypass that has removed the little township's Listed chain shops and Listed Theatre Royal

 

It manufactured pulleys and the wooden blocks that housed them.

The pulleys would presumablly have been cast on site.

 

Some records survive in local archives but the firm is otherwise undocumented: The fading paintwork tells us more about the factory that does the Internet!

  

The Daily Galaxy, an eclectic multimedia presentation of fascinating news and goings on from around the world, is edited and published by the Crimson Argonauts of Cambridge and San Francisco. Please send all inquires to Casey Kazan at Editor@dailygalaxy.com

    

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March 2007

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Subscribe to this blog's feed Video Signals from the Search for Planets Beyond the Solar System

This dazzling animation, composed by images gathered by the European Space Agency COROT satellite's 'exochannel' (the channel to look for exoplanets-planets orbiting other stars) between 31 January and 1 February 2007, shows three star candidates that will be studied by COROT in detail. The larger are the star 'spots', the higher is the temperature of the star’s surface. COROT's mission is to probe into the interiors of stars and to look for extra-solar planets, with the ultimate goal of finding planets that might have earthlike atmosphere's. Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

COROT Spacecraft Exochannel Video

 

Posted at 12:04 AM in Astronomy, Solar System, Extraterrestrial Life | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

 

March 08, 2007

The Coming 'Age of Robots'

 

In the 21st Century humanity will coexist with the first alien intelligence we have ever come into contact with - robots, an event rich in ethical, social and economic problems, suggests the European Robotics Research Network.

 

The BBC reported yesterday that The Robot Ethics Charter will cover standards for users and manufacturers and will be released later in 2007. It is being put together by a five member team of experts that includes futurists and a science fiction writer.

 

People may get addicted to interacting with them just as many internet users get hooked to the cyberworld, with profound social implications.

 

New guidelines could reflect the three laws of robotics put forward by author Isaac Asimov in his short story Runaround in 1942: "A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. A robot must obey orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law." Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

Other bodies are also thinking about the robotic future. Last year a United Kingdom government study predicted that in the next 50 years robots could demand the same rights as human beings.

 

BBC Story Link See Also: Google Leaping to an AI Future

 

Posted at 08:29 AM in Androids, Robotics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Antje Duvekot "Big Dream Boulevard" -Today's Hot Playlist Pick

German-born Antje Duvekot is being hailed as the next great American folk singer-songwriter by her peers. Take a listen to "Judas" from Big Dream Boulevard and you'll see why . The album is filled with contemporary folk-pop songs that "sound both melodic and richly poetic, merging the light and the dark." Posted by Jason McManus.

 

Judas

 

Antje Duvekot MySpace

 

Posted at 08:27 AM in Pop Music | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Colbert Report on 'Ice Cream & Fertility -Daily Comedy Classic

Priceless, Nation! Don't miss this Lord Colbert riff on Ben & Jerry's and fertility...Ha! Posted by Jason McManus.

 

Video

 

Posted at 12:04 AM in Comedy, Comedy Central | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 8: "Yes, Thank You HAL, Sign Me Up Today for Free Email Delivery of the Daily Galaxy"

The Daily Galaxy -News from Planet Earth & Beyond, is an eclectic text and video presentation of fascinating news and goings on from around the world.

 

Every day a new discovery...Get The Daily Galaxy sent to you free. Sign up today via Feedblitz.

 

We're the new daily source for news and insights on science, technology, and popular culture (music, film, more) -Your daily eye on the universe for unpredictable, great, and often irreverent, zany content.

 

Posted at 12:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Da Vinci & Mozart's Requiem -Daily Video Classic

Put on your earphones, sit back and enjoy this visual feast of Leonardo's art set to Mozart's great masterpiece, his Requiem. I last heard the Requiem performed live at the Cathedral Madeleine in Paris. This visual and aural feast brings back the beauty and joy of that moment. (image left, John the Baptist). Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

Da Vinci Video

 

Posted at 12:03 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Superman -The Mechanical Monsters

A masterpiece of pop art. A great example of 40's animation. Pretty good Superman as Clark and alter ego try to figure out what kind of mechanical monster (which looks suspiciously like the Iron Giant) robbed the bank on the same day a ritzy jewelry store opens.

  

The Superman shorts were at one time the most expensive cartoon shorts ever produced. They pretty much bankrupted the Fleischer studios because while they were gorgeous and popular, they didn't make their money back. But watch them carefully, and, as one reviewer wrote, "you can't help but be impressed by them. They're beautiful, awesome, majestic. Nothing in superhero cartoons came close to rivaling them for the next 50 years..." Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

Video

 

Posted at 12:02 AM in Animated Film | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Speak Memory: Sleep May Erase Memories

Scientific American reports that for some 40 years, neuroscientists have believed that the brain forms memories by using a "sketch pad" to quickly record experiences and information learned throughout the day.

 

Researchers at Brown University and the Max Planck Institute in Copenhagan believe that rather than memories being transferred to the neocortex during sleep, they speculate that memories are stored in both the neocortex and the hippocampus. Then, during sleep, the hippocampus, acting as a temporary storage system, is cleared for another day of learning, while the memories are retained in the neocortex, which provides permanent storage much like a computer hard disk.

 

Bruce McNaughton, director of the Division of Neural Systems, Memory and Aging at the University of Arizona, believes that "the bottom line here is that this is a very very complicated system," he says, adding that he expects it to take another 20 years before the science community fully understands exactly how memories are formed and stored.

 

Source Link

 

Posted at 12:02 AM in Sleep, Memory | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

The Galactic Postcard

How'd you like to find this in your terrestrial snailmailbox! This postcard of Mars shows a section of surface covering 380 000 square kilometres, an area bigger than Germany. It contains 2.5 gigabytes of uncompressed data. The picture was taken from an altitude of between 275 and 830 kilometres by the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter.

 

The Postcard

 

Posted at 12:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

 

March 07, 2007

Microsoft vs Google: "World Wide Telescope"

Microsoft has side-swiped Google with an apparently early version of a "World Wide Telescope." While Google Earth or Microsoft's Virtual Earth are limited to data on Earth, this new project expands into space with the help of space images taken by the Hubble telescope. So far, the "World Wide Telescope" includes little more than a few images, but more coverage of the universe and the addition of rich data sets will translate into a valuable resource tool.

 

Meanwhile, Google has struck a partnership with scientists building a huge sky-scanning telescope, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), on a mountaintop in Chile, with hopes of helping the public with a "people's telescope" to provide access to real-time digital footage of asteroids, supernovas and distant galaxies. Officials say the telescope will open "a movie-like window" on nearby asteroids and far-off exploding stars, and help explore the mysterious "dark energy" believed to fuel the universe's expansion.

 

More on Google's Telesope World Wide Telescope

  

Posted at 12:05 AM in Microsoft, Google, World Wide Telescope, Hubble | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

"300" -5 Minute Footage of the Anicent Battle of Thermopylae

300 is a 2007 film adaptation of the graphic novel by Frank Miller about the Battle of Thermopylae, an epic battle between the ancient Greeks and Persians that changed the course of history. The film is directed by Zack Snyder and was shot mostly with bluescreen to mimic the original comic book work.

 

For a description of 300 and the historic Battle of Thermopylae click here.

 

300 Footage

 

Posted at 12:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

The Milky Way Tree -Photo of the Day

  

Posted on Flickr by Athos9

 

Posted at 12:03 AM in Photography, Flickr | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

The Hunt for Osama bin Laden Redux

Armed with fresh intelligence, the CIA is moving additional man power and equipment into Pakistan in the effort to find Osama bin Laden and his deputy Ayman al Zawahri, according to U.S. officials. We thought this would be a good time to re-publish a January Daily Galaxy post, Where in the World is Osama bin Laden.

 

Story Link

 

Where in the World is Osama bin Laden

 

Islamic Adhan -The Emerging Icon of the 21st Century

 

Posted at 12:03 AM in Clash of Civilizations | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Bob Dylan Live "Train of Love" -Today's Hot Playlist Pick

Don't miss this live tribute to Johnny Cash, with a rare performance of Bob Dylan singing "Train of Love." Cash and Dylan met in the mid-1960s, and became close friends when they were neighbors in Woodstock. Cash was keen on reintroducing the reclusive Dylan to his audience. Cash and Dylan sang a duet, "Girl from the North Country," on Dylan's country album Nashville Skyline, and also wrote the album's Grammy-winning liner notes. Cash said of Dylan, "Here in is one hell of a poet, and lot's of other things." I couldn't agree more. Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

Posted at 12:02 AM in Pop Music, Folk, Rock and Roll | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Lewis Black on Homeland Security -Daily Comedy Classic

With the CIA announcing a renewed hunt for bin Laden, images of 9/11 floated through our mind and we thought who better than Lewis Black to provide his idiosyncratic (and hilarious) point of view on homeland security.

 

Video

 

Posted at 12:01 AM in Comedy | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

 

March 06, 2007

The Great Apple iTunes War: Colbert vs Obama-Daily Comedy Classic

Lord Colbert is in high form as he skewers Obama's Audacity of Hope with, well...Audacity of Colbert! Don't miss this one, it's a gem. Posted by Jason McManus.

 

Colbert Report Video

 

Posted at 12:02 PM in Apple, Comedy, Obama, Stephen Colbert, iTunes | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sounds from Outer Space -Sun & Saturn's Rings

Listen to sounds from our Solar System: you'll think you're in a Stanley Kubrick SciFi flick. This is truly an "other worldly" experience! Enjoy the show, and pass it on. Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

Song of the Sun

   

Low-frequency vibrations from the Sun recorded by the ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft.

 

Listen

     

Cassini-Huygens passing through

  

Saturn's rings

 

NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini-Huygens spacecraft is hit by millions of dust particles as it goes through a gap in Saturn's icy rings.

   

Although the ring gaps appear empty, they are not. The spacecraft ploughed through these dust particles at a speed of about 70 000 kilometres per hour! These impacts, converted into audible sounds, resemble hail hitting a tin roof.

 

This video shows how the atmospheric circulation inside the Sun causes very low frequency 'sound' to be produced.

 

Listen

 

Posted at 12:05 AM in Astronomy, Saturn, Saturn's Rings, Sounds from Space, Sun | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Darwin's God -The Legacy of HMS 'Beagle'

In case you miss this, you've got to read Robin Henig's article, "Darwin's God," in Sunday's New York Times. "Darwin's God." It covers a lot of what we've been posting about the past month about the controversy surrounding religion, science, and technology in the 21st century, especially the recent works of the radical neo-Darwinists, Richard Dawkins (The God Delusion), Daniel Dennett, and Sam Harris. The key point Henig makes is not the hullabaloo over the neo-atheists, but a quieter and potentially more illuminating debate. "It is taking place," she writes, "not between science and religion but within science itself, specifically among the scientists studying the evolution of religion. These scholars tend to agree on one point: that religious belief is an outgrowth of brain architecture that evolved during early human history. What they disagree about is why a tendency to believe evolved, whether it was because belief itself was adaptive or because it was just an evolutionary byproduct, a mere consequence of some other adaptation in the evolution of the human brain."

 

On his voyage of the HMS Beagle, Darwin discovered the origins of the species; what he didn't discover was the origin of the man's belief in a god. Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

Read More See also The Big Picture

 

Posted at 12:04 AM in Faith, Religion, Science | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 6: "Yes, Thank You HAL, Sign Me Up Today for Free Email Delivery of The Daily Galaxy"

The Daily Galaxy -News from Planet Earth & Beyond, is an eclectic text and video presentation of fascinating news and goings on from around the world.

 

Every day a new discovery...Get The Daily Galaxy sent to you free. Sign up today via Feedblitz.

 

We're the new daily source for news and insights on science, technology, and popular culture (music, film, more) -Your daily eye on the universe for unpredictable, great, and often irreverent, zany content.

  

Posted at 12:03 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

NASA: Pacific Cooling to La Nina

New data on sea-level heights from February 2007 show that the tropical Pacific Ocean has transitioned from a warm (El Nino) to a cool (La Nina) condition during the prior two months.

 

La Nina often follows an El Nino episode and the two are essentially opposites. During a La Nina, trade winds are stronger than normal, and the cold water that normally exists along the coast of South America extends to the central equatorial Pacific. La Nina changes global weather patterns and is associated with less moisture in the air, resulting in less rain along the coasts of North and South America.

 

In this image, places where the Pacific sea surface is warmer than normal are yellow and red, and places where the sea surface is cooler than normal are blue and purple. Green shows where conditions are near normal. Source NASA Science. Posted by Jason McManus.

 

Posted at 12:02 AM in Climate, Climate Change | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Gnarls Barkley "Crazy" -Today's Hot Playlist Track

This is a track you'll never forget. Ride the energy...Gnarls Barkley won Best Song for Crazy and the Future Sounds award at MTV's European Music Awards 2006 in Copenhagen. Rolling Stone named Crazy #1 in their 2006 year-end list "The 100 Best Songs of the Year." The duo won two Grammy awards in 2007 for Best Urban/Alternative Performance (Crazy) and Best Alternative Music Album (St. Elsewhere). Gnarls Barkley is a collaboration between DJ producer Danger Mouse and rapper Cee-Lo Green. (I've linked to Rhapsody; if you don't have a player, it takes seconds to download). Posted by Casey Kazan.

 

Crazy Link

 

NASA and National Geographic report that simultaneous warming on Earth and Mars suggests that our planet's recent climate changes have a natural -- and not a human-induced cause -- according to one scientist's controversial theory. Mars, too, appears to be enjoying more mild and balmy temperatures. DailyGalaxy, March 5.

 

Edited Event Horizon Telescope image of a black hole in the the galaxy M87. What you see here isn't the actual black hole but material tat has been heated to super-hot temperatures and glows as a result of being so close to the black hole and rubbing against other particles. Larger image to follow. Inverted grayscale variant.

 

Image source: eventhorizontelescope.org/

 

First original caption: Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window onto the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity. Credit: Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration

 

Second original caption: Astronomers Capture First Image of a Black Hole

An international collaboration presents paradigm-shifting observations of the gargantuan black hole at the heart of distant galaxy Messier 87

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

 

This breakthrough was announced today in a series of six papers published in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. The image reveals the black hole at the center of Messier 87 [1], a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun [2].

 

The EHT links telescopes around the globe to form an Earth-sized virtual telescope with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution [3]. The EHT is the result of years of international collaboration, and offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the Universe predicted by Einstein’s general relativity during the centennial year of the historic experiment that first confirmed the theory [4].

 

"We have taken the first picture of a black hole," said EHT project director Sheperd S. Doeleman of the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. "This is an extraordinary scientific feat accomplished by a team of more than 200 researchers."

 

Black holes are extraordinary cosmic objects with enormous masses but extremely compact sizes. The presence of these objects affects their environment in extreme ways, warping spacetime and super-heating any surrounding material.

 

"If immersed in a bright region, like a disc of glowing gas, we expect a black hole to create a dark region similar to a shadow — something predicted by Einstein’s general relativity that we’ve never seen before, explained chair of the EHT Science Council Heino Falcke of Radboud University, the Netherlands. "This shadow, caused by the gravitational bending and capture of light by the event horizon, reveals a lot about the nature of these fascinating objects and allowed us to measure the enormous mass of M87’s black hole."

 

Multiple calibration and imaging methods have revealed a ring-like structure with a dark central region — the black hole’s shadow — that persisted over multiple independent EHT observations.

 

"Once we were sure we had imaged the shadow, we could compare our observations to extensive computer models that include the physics of warped space, superheated matter and strong magnetic fields. Many of the features of the observed image match our theoretical understanding surprisingly well," remarks Paul T.P. Ho, EHT Board member and Director of the East Asian Observatory [5]. "This makes us confident about the interpretation of our observations, including our estimation of the black hole’s mass."

 

Creating the EHT was a formidable challenge which required upgrading and connecting a worldwide network of eight pre-existing telescopes deployed at a variety of challenging high-altitude sites. These locations included volcanoes in Hawai`i and Mexico, mountains in Arizona and the Spanish Sierra Nevada, the Chilean Atacama Desert, and Antarctica.

 

The EHT observations use a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) which synchronises telescope facilities around the world and exploits the rotation of our planet to form one huge, Earth-size telescope observing at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. VLBI allows the EHT to achieve an angular resolution of 20 micro-arcseconds — enough to read a newspaper in New York from a sidewalk café in Paris [6].

 

The telescopes contributing to this result were ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter telescope, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano, the Submillimeter Array, the Submillimeter Telescope, and the South Pole Telescope [7]. Petabytes of raw data from the telescopes were combined by highly specialised supercomputers hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory.

 

The construction of the EHT and the observations announced today represent the culmination of decades of observational, technical, and theoretical work. This example of global teamwork required close collaboration by researchers from around the world. Thirteen partner institutions worked together to create the EHT, using both pre-existing infrastructure and support from a variety of agencies. Key funding was provided by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the EU's European Research Council (ERC), and funding agencies in East Asia.

 

"We have achieved something presumed to be impossible just a generation ago," concluded Doeleman. "Breakthroughs in technology, connections between the world's best radio observatories, and innovative algorithms all came together to open an entirely new window on black holes and the event horizon."

   

Notes

[1] The shadow of a black hole is the closest we can come to an image of the black hole itself, a completely dark object from which light cannot escape. The black hole’s boundary — the event horizon from which the EHT takes its name — is around 2.5 times smaller than the shadow it casts and measures just under 40 billion km across.

 

[2] Supermassive black holes are relatively tiny astronomical objects — which has made them impossible to directly observe until now. As a black hole’s size is proportional to its mass, the more massive a black hole, the larger the shadow. Thanks to its enormous mass and relative proximity, M87’s black hole was predicted to be one of the largest viewable from Earth — making it a perfect target for the EHT.

 

[3] Although the telescopes are not physically connected, they are able to synchronize their recorded data with atomic clocks — hydrogen masers — which precisely time their observations. These observations were collected at a wavelength of 1.3 mm during a 2017 global campaign. Each telescope of the EHT produced enormous amounts of data — roughly 350 terabytes per day — which was stored on high-performance helium-filled hard drives. These data were flown to highly specialised supercomputers — known as correlators — at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory to be combined. They were then painstakingly converted into an image using novel computational tools developed by the collaboration.

 

[4] 100 years ago, two expeditions set out for the island of Príncipe off the coast of Africa and Sobra in Brazil to observe the 1919 solar eclipse, with the goal of testing general relativity by seeing if starlight would be bent around the limb of the sun, as predicted by Einstein. In an echo of those observations, the EHT has sent team members to some of the world's highest and isolated radio facilities to once again test our understanding of gravity.

 

[5] The East Asian Observatory (EAO) partner on the EHT project represents the participation of many regions in Asia, including China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, India and Indonesia.

 

[6] Future EHT observations will see substantially increased sensitivity with the participation of the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the Greenland Telescope and the Kitt Peak Telescope.

 

[7] ALMA is a partnership of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; Europe, representing its member states), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) of Japan, together with the National Research Council (Canada), the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST; Taiwan), Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA; Taiwan), and Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI; Republic of Korea), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. APEX is operated by ESO, the 30-meter telescope is operated by IRAM (the IRAM Partner Organizations are MPG (Germany), CNRS (France) and IGN (Spain)), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the EAO, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano is operated by INAOE and UMass, the Submillimeter Array is operated by SAO and ASIAA and the Submillimeter Telescope is operated by the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The South Pole Telescope is operated by the University of Chicago with specialized EHT instrumentation provided by the University of Arizona.

   

More Information

This research was presented in a series of six papers published today in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters, along with a Focus Issue:

 

Paper I: The Shadow of the Supermassive Black Hole

Paper II: Array and Instrumentation

Paper III: Data processing and Calibration

Paper IV: Imaging the Central Supermassive Black Hole

Paper V: Physical Origin of the Asymmetric Ring

Paper VI: The Shadow and Mass of the Central Black Hole

Press release images in higher resolution (4000x2330 pixels) can be found here in PNG (16-bit), and JPG (8-bit) format. The highest-quality image (7416x4320 pixels, TIF, 16-bit, 180 Mb) can be obtained from repositories of our partners, NSF and ESO. A summary of latest press and media resources can be found on this page.

 

The EHT collaboration involves more than 200 researchers from Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America. The international collaboration is working to capture the most detailed black hole images ever by creating a virtual Earth-sized telescope. Supported by considerable international investment, the EHT links existing telescopes using novel systems — creating a fundamentally new instrument with the highest angular resolving power that has yet been achieved.

 

The individual telescopes involved are; ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter Telescope, the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT), the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT), the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the Kitt Peak Telescope, and the Greenland Telescope (GLT).

 

The EHT collaboration consists of 13 stakeholder institutes; the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the University of Arizona, the University of Chicago, the East Asian Observatory, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, Large Millimeter Telescope, Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, MIT Haystack Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Radboud University and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

   

Contact Information

Sheperd S. Doeleman

EHT Collaboration Director

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: sdoeleman@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-496-7762

 

Peter D. Edmonds

Public Information Officer

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: pedmonds@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-571-7279

 

EHT Outreach Working Group

E-mail: ehtelescope@gmail.com

Talembote se trouve à peu prês 20 km au nord de Chefchaouen

Voyez la flêche bleue.

 

From Microsoft Virtual Earth via Windows Live Maps

I have passed by this house over the past couple years, though I'd stop and take a closer look - this has got to be the coolest house inside - similar in shape to a house I found in Chicago:

www.flickr.com/photos/28718267@N06/2765438247/in/set-7215...

It looks rather unloved at this point.

Edited Event Horizon Telescope image of a black hole in the the galaxy M87. What you see here isn't the actual black hole but material tat has been heated to super-hot temperatures and glows as a result of being so close to the black hole and rubbing against other particles. Larger image to follow. Color/processing variant.

 

Image source: eventhorizontelescope.org/

 

First original caption: Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window onto the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity. Credit: Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration

 

Second original caption: Astronomers Capture First Image of a Black Hole

An international collaboration presents paradigm-shifting observations of the gargantuan black hole at the heart of distant galaxy Messier 87

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

 

This breakthrough was announced today in a series of six papers published in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. The image reveals the black hole at the center of Messier 87 [1], a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun [2].

 

The EHT links telescopes around the globe to form an Earth-sized virtual telescope with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution [3]. The EHT is the result of years of international collaboration, and offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the Universe predicted by Einstein’s general relativity during the centennial year of the historic experiment that first confirmed the theory [4].

 

"We have taken the first picture of a black hole," said EHT project director Sheperd S. Doeleman of the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. "This is an extraordinary scientific feat accomplished by a team of more than 200 researchers."

 

Black holes are extraordinary cosmic objects with enormous masses but extremely compact sizes. The presence of these objects affects their environment in extreme ways, warping spacetime and super-heating any surrounding material.

 

"If immersed in a bright region, like a disc of glowing gas, we expect a black hole to create a dark region similar to a shadow — something predicted by Einstein’s general relativity that we’ve never seen before, explained chair of the EHT Science Council Heino Falcke of Radboud University, the Netherlands. "This shadow, caused by the gravitational bending and capture of light by the event horizon, reveals a lot about the nature of these fascinating objects and allowed us to measure the enormous mass of M87’s black hole."

 

Multiple calibration and imaging methods have revealed a ring-like structure with a dark central region — the black hole’s shadow — that persisted over multiple independent EHT observations.

 

"Once we were sure we had imaged the shadow, we could compare our observations to extensive computer models that include the physics of warped space, superheated matter and strong magnetic fields. Many of the features of the observed image match our theoretical understanding surprisingly well," remarks Paul T.P. Ho, EHT Board member and Director of the East Asian Observatory [5]. "This makes us confident about the interpretation of our observations, including our estimation of the black hole’s mass."

 

Creating the EHT was a formidable challenge which required upgrading and connecting a worldwide network of eight pre-existing telescopes deployed at a variety of challenging high-altitude sites. These locations included volcanoes in Hawai`i and Mexico, mountains in Arizona and the Spanish Sierra Nevada, the Chilean Atacama Desert, and Antarctica.

 

The EHT observations use a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) which synchronises telescope facilities around the world and exploits the rotation of our planet to form one huge, Earth-size telescope observing at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. VLBI allows the EHT to achieve an angular resolution of 20 micro-arcseconds — enough to read a newspaper in New York from a sidewalk café in Paris [6].

 

The telescopes contributing to this result were ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter telescope, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano, the Submillimeter Array, the Submillimeter Telescope, and the South Pole Telescope [7]. Petabytes of raw data from the telescopes were combined by highly specialised supercomputers hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory.

 

The construction of the EHT and the observations announced today represent the culmination of decades of observational, technical, and theoretical work. This example of global teamwork required close collaboration by researchers from around the world. Thirteen partner institutions worked together to create the EHT, using both pre-existing infrastructure and support from a variety of agencies. Key funding was provided by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the EU's European Research Council (ERC), and funding agencies in East Asia.

 

"We have achieved something presumed to be impossible just a generation ago," concluded Doeleman. "Breakthroughs in technology, connections between the world's best radio observatories, and innovative algorithms all came together to open an entirely new window on black holes and the event horizon."

   

Notes

[1] The shadow of a black hole is the closest we can come to an image of the black hole itself, a completely dark object from which light cannot escape. The black hole’s boundary — the event horizon from which the EHT takes its name — is around 2.5 times smaller than the shadow it casts and measures just under 40 billion km across.

 

[2] Supermassive black holes are relatively tiny astronomical objects — which has made them impossible to directly observe until now. As a black hole’s size is proportional to its mass, the more massive a black hole, the larger the shadow. Thanks to its enormous mass and relative proximity, M87’s black hole was predicted to be one of the largest viewable from Earth — making it a perfect target for the EHT.

 

[3] Although the telescopes are not physically connected, they are able to synchronize their recorded data with atomic clocks — hydrogen masers — which precisely time their observations. These observations were collected at a wavelength of 1.3 mm during a 2017 global campaign. Each telescope of the EHT produced enormous amounts of data — roughly 350 terabytes per day — which was stored on high-performance helium-filled hard drives. These data were flown to highly specialised supercomputers — known as correlators — at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory to be combined. They were then painstakingly converted into an image using novel computational tools developed by the collaboration.

 

[4] 100 years ago, two expeditions set out for the island of Príncipe off the coast of Africa and Sobra in Brazil to observe the 1919 solar eclipse, with the goal of testing general relativity by seeing if starlight would be bent around the limb of the sun, as predicted by Einstein. In an echo of those observations, the EHT has sent team members to some of the world's highest and isolated radio facilities to once again test our understanding of gravity.

 

[5] The East Asian Observatory (EAO) partner on the EHT project represents the participation of many regions in Asia, including China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, India and Indonesia.

 

[6] Future EHT observations will see substantially increased sensitivity with the participation of the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the Greenland Telescope and the Kitt Peak Telescope.

 

[7] ALMA is a partnership of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; Europe, representing its member states), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) of Japan, together with the National Research Council (Canada), the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST; Taiwan), Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA; Taiwan), and Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI; Republic of Korea), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. APEX is operated by ESO, the 30-meter telescope is operated by IRAM (the IRAM Partner Organizations are MPG (Germany), CNRS (France) and IGN (Spain)), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the EAO, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano is operated by INAOE and UMass, the Submillimeter Array is operated by SAO and ASIAA and the Submillimeter Telescope is operated by the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The South Pole Telescope is operated by the University of Chicago with specialized EHT instrumentation provided by the University of Arizona.

   

More Information

This research was presented in a series of six papers published today in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters, along with a Focus Issue:

 

Paper I: The Shadow of the Supermassive Black Hole

Paper II: Array and Instrumentation

Paper III: Data processing and Calibration

Paper IV: Imaging the Central Supermassive Black Hole

Paper V: Physical Origin of the Asymmetric Ring

Paper VI: The Shadow and Mass of the Central Black Hole

Press release images in higher resolution (4000x2330 pixels) can be found here in PNG (16-bit), and JPG (8-bit) format. The highest-quality image (7416x4320 pixels, TIF, 16-bit, 180 Mb) can be obtained from repositories of our partners, NSF and ESO. A summary of latest press and media resources can be found on this page.

 

The EHT collaboration involves more than 200 researchers from Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America. The international collaboration is working to capture the most detailed black hole images ever by creating a virtual Earth-sized telescope. Supported by considerable international investment, the EHT links existing telescopes using novel systems — creating a fundamentally new instrument with the highest angular resolving power that has yet been achieved.

 

The individual telescopes involved are; ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter Telescope, the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT), the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT), the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the Kitt Peak Telescope, and the Greenland Telescope (GLT).

 

The EHT collaboration consists of 13 stakeholder institutes; the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the University of Arizona, the University of Chicago, the East Asian Observatory, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, Large Millimeter Telescope, Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, MIT Haystack Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Radboud University and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

   

Contact Information

Sheperd S. Doeleman

EHT Collaboration Director

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: sdoeleman@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-496-7762

 

Peter D. Edmonds

Public Information Officer

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: pedmonds@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-571-7279

 

EHT Outreach Working Group

E-mail: ehtelescope@gmail.com

microsoft virtual earth

 

Edited Event Horizon Telescope image of a black hole in the the galaxy M87. What you see here isn't the actual black hole but material tat has been heated to super-hot temperatures and glows as a result of being so close to the black hole and rubbing against other particles. Larger image to follow. Color/processing variant.

 

Image source: eventhorizontelescope.org/

 

First original caption: Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window onto the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity. Credit: Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration

 

Second original caption: Astronomers Capture First Image of a Black Hole

An international collaboration presents paradigm-shifting observations of the gargantuan black hole at the heart of distant galaxy Messier 87

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

 

This breakthrough was announced today in a series of six papers published in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. The image reveals the black hole at the center of Messier 87 [1], a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun [2].

 

The EHT links telescopes around the globe to form an Earth-sized virtual telescope with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution [3]. The EHT is the result of years of international collaboration, and offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the Universe predicted by Einstein’s general relativity during the centennial year of the historic experiment that first confirmed the theory [4].

 

"We have taken the first picture of a black hole," said EHT project director Sheperd S. Doeleman of the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. "This is an extraordinary scientific feat accomplished by a team of more than 200 researchers."

 

Black holes are extraordinary cosmic objects with enormous masses but extremely compact sizes. The presence of these objects affects their environment in extreme ways, warping spacetime and super-heating any surrounding material.

 

"If immersed in a bright region, like a disc of glowing gas, we expect a black hole to create a dark region similar to a shadow — something predicted by Einstein’s general relativity that we’ve never seen before, explained chair of the EHT Science Council Heino Falcke of Radboud University, the Netherlands. "This shadow, caused by the gravitational bending and capture of light by the event horizon, reveals a lot about the nature of these fascinating objects and allowed us to measure the enormous mass of M87’s black hole."

 

Multiple calibration and imaging methods have revealed a ring-like structure with a dark central region — the black hole’s shadow — that persisted over multiple independent EHT observations.

 

"Once we were sure we had imaged the shadow, we could compare our observations to extensive computer models that include the physics of warped space, superheated matter and strong magnetic fields. Many of the features of the observed image match our theoretical understanding surprisingly well," remarks Paul T.P. Ho, EHT Board member and Director of the East Asian Observatory [5]. "This makes us confident about the interpretation of our observations, including our estimation of the black hole’s mass."

 

Creating the EHT was a formidable challenge which required upgrading and connecting a worldwide network of eight pre-existing telescopes deployed at a variety of challenging high-altitude sites. These locations included volcanoes in Hawai`i and Mexico, mountains in Arizona and the Spanish Sierra Nevada, the Chilean Atacama Desert, and Antarctica.

 

The EHT observations use a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) which synchronises telescope facilities around the world and exploits the rotation of our planet to form one huge, Earth-size telescope observing at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. VLBI allows the EHT to achieve an angular resolution of 20 micro-arcseconds — enough to read a newspaper in New York from a sidewalk café in Paris [6].

 

The telescopes contributing to this result were ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter telescope, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano, the Submillimeter Array, the Submillimeter Telescope, and the South Pole Telescope [7]. Petabytes of raw data from the telescopes were combined by highly specialised supercomputers hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory.

 

The construction of the EHT and the observations announced today represent the culmination of decades of observational, technical, and theoretical work. This example of global teamwork required close collaboration by researchers from around the world. Thirteen partner institutions worked together to create the EHT, using both pre-existing infrastructure and support from a variety of agencies. Key funding was provided by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the EU's European Research Council (ERC), and funding agencies in East Asia.

 

"We have achieved something presumed to be impossible just a generation ago," concluded Doeleman. "Breakthroughs in technology, connections between the world's best radio observatories, and innovative algorithms all came together to open an entirely new window on black holes and the event horizon."

   

Notes

[1] The shadow of a black hole is the closest we can come to an image of the black hole itself, a completely dark object from which light cannot escape. The black hole’s boundary — the event horizon from which the EHT takes its name — is around 2.5 times smaller than the shadow it casts and measures just under 40 billion km across.

 

[2] Supermassive black holes are relatively tiny astronomical objects — which has made them impossible to directly observe until now. As a black hole’s size is proportional to its mass, the more massive a black hole, the larger the shadow. Thanks to its enormous mass and relative proximity, M87’s black hole was predicted to be one of the largest viewable from Earth — making it a perfect target for the EHT.

 

[3] Although the telescopes are not physically connected, they are able to synchronize their recorded data with atomic clocks — hydrogen masers — which precisely time their observations. These observations were collected at a wavelength of 1.3 mm during a 2017 global campaign. Each telescope of the EHT produced enormous amounts of data — roughly 350 terabytes per day — which was stored on high-performance helium-filled hard drives. These data were flown to highly specialised supercomputers — known as correlators — at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory to be combined. They were then painstakingly converted into an image using novel computational tools developed by the collaboration.

 

[4] 100 years ago, two expeditions set out for the island of Príncipe off the coast of Africa and Sobra in Brazil to observe the 1919 solar eclipse, with the goal of testing general relativity by seeing if starlight would be bent around the limb of the sun, as predicted by Einstein. In an echo of those observations, the EHT has sent team members to some of the world's highest and isolated radio facilities to once again test our understanding of gravity.

 

[5] The East Asian Observatory (EAO) partner on the EHT project represents the participation of many regions in Asia, including China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, India and Indonesia.

 

[6] Future EHT observations will see substantially increased sensitivity with the participation of the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the Greenland Telescope and the Kitt Peak Telescope.

 

[7] ALMA is a partnership of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; Europe, representing its member states), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) of Japan, together with the National Research Council (Canada), the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST; Taiwan), Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA; Taiwan), and Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI; Republic of Korea), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. APEX is operated by ESO, the 30-meter telescope is operated by IRAM (the IRAM Partner Organizations are MPG (Germany), CNRS (France) and IGN (Spain)), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the EAO, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano is operated by INAOE and UMass, the Submillimeter Array is operated by SAO and ASIAA and the Submillimeter Telescope is operated by the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The South Pole Telescope is operated by the University of Chicago with specialized EHT instrumentation provided by the University of Arizona.

   

More Information

This research was presented in a series of six papers published today in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters, along with a Focus Issue:

 

Paper I: The Shadow of the Supermassive Black Hole

Paper II: Array and Instrumentation

Paper III: Data processing and Calibration

Paper IV: Imaging the Central Supermassive Black Hole

Paper V: Physical Origin of the Asymmetric Ring

Paper VI: The Shadow and Mass of the Central Black Hole

Press release images in higher resolution (4000x2330 pixels) can be found here in PNG (16-bit), and JPG (8-bit) format. The highest-quality image (7416x4320 pixels, TIF, 16-bit, 180 Mb) can be obtained from repositories of our partners, NSF and ESO. A summary of latest press and media resources can be found on this page.

 

The EHT collaboration involves more than 200 researchers from Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America. The international collaboration is working to capture the most detailed black hole images ever by creating a virtual Earth-sized telescope. Supported by considerable international investment, the EHT links existing telescopes using novel systems — creating a fundamentally new instrument with the highest angular resolving power that has yet been achieved.

 

The individual telescopes involved are; ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter Telescope, the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT), the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT), the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the Kitt Peak Telescope, and the Greenland Telescope (GLT).

 

The EHT collaboration consists of 13 stakeholder institutes; the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the University of Arizona, the University of Chicago, the East Asian Observatory, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, Large Millimeter Telescope, Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, MIT Haystack Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Radboud University and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

   

Contact Information

Sheperd S. Doeleman

EHT Collaboration Director

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: sdoeleman@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-496-7762

 

Peter D. Edmonds

Public Information Officer

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: pedmonds@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-571-7279

 

EHT Outreach Working Group

E-mail: ehtelescope@gmail.com

My entry to round three of the the 2014 Bio Cup.

 

We have learned that the worm virus that we have labeled 18Z5 has gotten into our systems and corrupted a project that we have been working on to pass time.

This self-replicating virus has gained the ability to tear apart programs and stitch them back together into working executable functions. We have never seen anything like it before.

It has infiltrated our virtual Earth that we have been making for the past five years. It has created several other 'Chimeras' which were harmless, but this new one, with chameleon eyes, a beak, wings, claws, and several implanted weapons is very worrying.

We are sending in one of our avatars that contains a disassembling program to kill this program.

I have kind of fallen off the face of the (virtual) earth of late... things have been hectic, I bought an old apartment that needed renovating in the spring thinking I would have all the time in the world to fix it up, then I got offered a fantastic job starting beginning of October, and then I landed a bunch of consultancy work over the summer... I am super happy about everything, but it means these past months have been a whirlwind of builders as I no longer had the time to do the work myself and deadlines... I move next week, then I am sleeping for a week!

Here's the (main) Yahoo Campus, seen from space, courtesy of MSN Virtual Earth. They musta taken this on a weekend....

 

MSN Virtual Earth - Yahoo

 

See the 'notes' popups for a tour.

Edited Event Horizon Telescope image of a black hole in the the galaxy M87. What you see here isn't the actual black hole but material tat has been heated to super-hot temperatures and glows as a result of being so close to the black hole and rubbing against other particles. Larger image to follow. Color/processing variant.

 

Image source: eventhorizontelescope.org/

 

First original caption: Scientists have obtained the first image of a black hole, using Event Horizon Telescope observations of the center of the galaxy M87. The image shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the Sun. This long-sought image provides the strongest evidence to date for the existence of supermassive black holes and opens a new window onto the study of black holes, their event horizons, and gravity. Credit: Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration

 

Second original caption: Astronomers Capture First Image of a Black Hole

An international collaboration presents paradigm-shifting observations of the gargantuan black hole at the heart of distant galaxy Messier 87

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

 

This breakthrough was announced today in a series of six papers published in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. The image reveals the black hole at the center of Messier 87 [1], a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun [2].

 

The EHT links telescopes around the globe to form an Earth-sized virtual telescope with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution [3]. The EHT is the result of years of international collaboration, and offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the Universe predicted by Einstein’s general relativity during the centennial year of the historic experiment that first confirmed the theory [4].

 

"We have taken the first picture of a black hole," said EHT project director Sheperd S. Doeleman of the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. "This is an extraordinary scientific feat accomplished by a team of more than 200 researchers."

 

Black holes are extraordinary cosmic objects with enormous masses but extremely compact sizes. The presence of these objects affects their environment in extreme ways, warping spacetime and super-heating any surrounding material.

 

"If immersed in a bright region, like a disc of glowing gas, we expect a black hole to create a dark region similar to a shadow — something predicted by Einstein’s general relativity that we’ve never seen before, explained chair of the EHT Science Council Heino Falcke of Radboud University, the Netherlands. "This shadow, caused by the gravitational bending and capture of light by the event horizon, reveals a lot about the nature of these fascinating objects and allowed us to measure the enormous mass of M87’s black hole."

 

Multiple calibration and imaging methods have revealed a ring-like structure with a dark central region — the black hole’s shadow — that persisted over multiple independent EHT observations.

 

"Once we were sure we had imaged the shadow, we could compare our observations to extensive computer models that include the physics of warped space, superheated matter and strong magnetic fields. Many of the features of the observed image match our theoretical understanding surprisingly well," remarks Paul T.P. Ho, EHT Board member and Director of the East Asian Observatory [5]. "This makes us confident about the interpretation of our observations, including our estimation of the black hole’s mass."

 

Creating the EHT was a formidable challenge which required upgrading and connecting a worldwide network of eight pre-existing telescopes deployed at a variety of challenging high-altitude sites. These locations included volcanoes in Hawai`i and Mexico, mountains in Arizona and the Spanish Sierra Nevada, the Chilean Atacama Desert, and Antarctica.

 

The EHT observations use a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) which synchronises telescope facilities around the world and exploits the rotation of our planet to form one huge, Earth-size telescope observing at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. VLBI allows the EHT to achieve an angular resolution of 20 micro-arcseconds — enough to read a newspaper in New York from a sidewalk café in Paris [6].

 

The telescopes contributing to this result were ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter telescope, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano, the Submillimeter Array, the Submillimeter Telescope, and the South Pole Telescope [7]. Petabytes of raw data from the telescopes were combined by highly specialised supercomputers hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory.

 

The construction of the EHT and the observations announced today represent the culmination of decades of observational, technical, and theoretical work. This example of global teamwork required close collaboration by researchers from around the world. Thirteen partner institutions worked together to create the EHT, using both pre-existing infrastructure and support from a variety of agencies. Key funding was provided by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the EU's European Research Council (ERC), and funding agencies in East Asia.

 

"We have achieved something presumed to be impossible just a generation ago," concluded Doeleman. "Breakthroughs in technology, connections between the world's best radio observatories, and innovative algorithms all came together to open an entirely new window on black holes and the event horizon."

   

Notes

[1] The shadow of a black hole is the closest we can come to an image of the black hole itself, a completely dark object from which light cannot escape. The black hole’s boundary — the event horizon from which the EHT takes its name — is around 2.5 times smaller than the shadow it casts and measures just under 40 billion km across.

 

[2] Supermassive black holes are relatively tiny astronomical objects — which has made them impossible to directly observe until now. As a black hole’s size is proportional to its mass, the more massive a black hole, the larger the shadow. Thanks to its enormous mass and relative proximity, M87’s black hole was predicted to be one of the largest viewable from Earth — making it a perfect target for the EHT.

 

[3] Although the telescopes are not physically connected, they are able to synchronize their recorded data with atomic clocks — hydrogen masers — which precisely time their observations. These observations were collected at a wavelength of 1.3 mm during a 2017 global campaign. Each telescope of the EHT produced enormous amounts of data — roughly 350 terabytes per day — which was stored on high-performance helium-filled hard drives. These data were flown to highly specialised supercomputers — known as correlators — at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and MIT Haystack Observatory to be combined. They were then painstakingly converted into an image using novel computational tools developed by the collaboration.

 

[4] 100 years ago, two expeditions set out for the island of Príncipe off the coast of Africa and Sobra in Brazil to observe the 1919 solar eclipse, with the goal of testing general relativity by seeing if starlight would be bent around the limb of the sun, as predicted by Einstein. In an echo of those observations, the EHT has sent team members to some of the world's highest and isolated radio facilities to once again test our understanding of gravity.

 

[5] The East Asian Observatory (EAO) partner on the EHT project represents the participation of many regions in Asia, including China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, India and Indonesia.

 

[6] Future EHT observations will see substantially increased sensitivity with the participation of the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the Greenland Telescope and the Kitt Peak Telescope.

 

[7] ALMA is a partnership of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; Europe, representing its member states), the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) of Japan, together with the National Research Council (Canada), the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST; Taiwan), Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA; Taiwan), and Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI; Republic of Korea), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. APEX is operated by ESO, the 30-meter telescope is operated by IRAM (the IRAM Partner Organizations are MPG (Germany), CNRS (France) and IGN (Spain)), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the EAO, the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano is operated by INAOE and UMass, the Submillimeter Array is operated by SAO and ASIAA and the Submillimeter Telescope is operated by the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The South Pole Telescope is operated by the University of Chicago with specialized EHT instrumentation provided by the University of Arizona.

   

More Information

This research was presented in a series of six papers published today in a special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters, along with a Focus Issue:

 

Paper I: The Shadow of the Supermassive Black Hole

Paper II: Array and Instrumentation

Paper III: Data processing and Calibration

Paper IV: Imaging the Central Supermassive Black Hole

Paper V: Physical Origin of the Asymmetric Ring

Paper VI: The Shadow and Mass of the Central Black Hole

Press release images in higher resolution (4000x2330 pixels) can be found here in PNG (16-bit), and JPG (8-bit) format. The highest-quality image (7416x4320 pixels, TIF, 16-bit, 180 Mb) can be obtained from repositories of our partners, NSF and ESO. A summary of latest press and media resources can be found on this page.

 

The EHT collaboration involves more than 200 researchers from Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America. The international collaboration is working to capture the most detailed black hole images ever by creating a virtual Earth-sized telescope. Supported by considerable international investment, the EHT links existing telescopes using novel systems — creating a fundamentally new instrument with the highest angular resolving power that has yet been achieved.

 

The individual telescopes involved are; ALMA, APEX, the IRAM 30-meter Telescope, the IRAM NOEMA Observatory, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT), the Submillimeter Array (SMA), the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT), the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the Kitt Peak Telescope, and the Greenland Telescope (GLT).

 

The EHT collaboration consists of 13 stakeholder institutes; the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the University of Arizona, the University of Chicago, the East Asian Observatory, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, Large Millimeter Telescope, Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, MIT Haystack Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Radboud University and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

   

Contact Information

Sheperd S. Doeleman

EHT Collaboration Director

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: sdoeleman@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-496-7762

 

Peter D. Edmonds

Public Information Officer

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

E-mail: pedmonds@cfa.harvard.edu

Phone: +1-617-571-7279

 

EHT Outreach Working Group

E-mail: ehtelescope@gmail.com

Panorama of San Francisco - captured from virtual earth to view the increasing reality of virtual cities.

 

www.digitalurban.blogspot.com for a tutorial on making your own :)

Abandoned and privately owned. Has the only (I think) frescos of all the plantations.

 

Any way to (legally) see the place up close?

My house as seen by Microsoft Virtual Earth, before the map update of 20-12-2007. Detail should be better after this afternoon when they upgrade the mapimages.

Very popular photo since it ranks on the first page of Google for the query "satellite view of my house".

Welcome to the Dr. Nax Institute of Virtual Wellness!

 

Do you have a tendency to take life seriously? Do the events around you have an all too great impact upon your well being? Do you feel that you have a mission in life? Do you think that you have been put upon this virtual earth for a deep a reason? Are you looking for “meaning”?

 

Do you take yourself too seriously? Can you no longer laugh at yourself?

 

We have good news and bad news!

 

If your answers are "yes" to the questions above, then the bad news is that you are suffering from the virtual epidemic “seriousness”. The good news is that you are now at the right place! In the right hands!

 

Dr. Nax’s treatment program has been developed through 4 years of devoted observation of metaverse behavior. His findings and research have led him to develop his unique regimen which involves personal as well as group therapy sessions, during which you will be able to bare your heart freely – and get whacked on the head for doing so!

 

The doctor is available 7/24 through a carefully programmed chat robot based upon the famous ELIZA Rogerian psychotherapy system (http://nlp-addiction.com/eliza/)! Please lie down on the couch and start to talk. Dr. Nax will lead you with probing questions which will very quickly bring you back to your (non)senses!

 

However, the therapy sessions are not the only aid at our disposal: Throughout his time in the metaverse the good doctor has also collected a vast repository of therapeutic instruments which are now being put at your disposal at this very location. This is by no means a random collection of so-called “freebies” but an immensely valuable resource, hand picked precisely for its effectiveness in curing delusions of “seriousness” of all descriptions. If used in the prescribed manner (further instructions in the purchase boxes. Please read very carefully!) much benefit will be attained quickly – and painfully!

 

May you have many wonderful, frivolous, silly, off-the-wall, haphazard, serendipitous days in the metaverse!

 

Naxos Loon

Alpha Auer

 

alphatribeisland.blogspot.com/

 

Working on a library of sky texture files (for use in Virtual Earth scenes)

These are ocean clouds taken from the West side of Oahu (Kailua)

Another find on Windows Live Local. I do not know much at all about this plantation, except it is now gone, except for some ruins you see here of the sugar plant.

 

I had looked at this before but just today noticed the faded "HELVETIA" on the smokestack.

01 9-30 Heartbreak

02 Female Rape

03 London Sound

04 Lou Reed Dive(Dance)

05 Punk In The Supermarket

06 Il Duce

07 Young Parisians

08 Killer

09 Secret Art

10 Picasso Visits The Planet Of The Apes

  

Tracks 01 + 03 from the Putney tapes - Recorded 19th September 1977

Track 02 from the Chelsea tapes - Recorded 20th November 1977

Track 04 from the Muswell Hill tapes - Recorded May/June 77

Tracks 05-07 virtual earth studios, Winchester Mews (aka 'Adam and Dave demos') - Recorded 6th april 1978

Tracks 08-10 SGS Studios - Recorded 30 October 1979

  

An aerial view of the shallow waters along the north bank of the Mohawk River near Robinson Road reveals the outline of the Old Lock 20, a double-chamber lock with the northern chamber extended. You can even see the recesses for the lock gates!

 

This photo is from Microsoft Virtual Earth, see for yourself; HERE

 

Here is the link for the same location on Google Maps, thought you can not see the locks in Google Maps, HERE

 

42.813694,-73.852179

 

Solved! Thanks to Jacques Levet Jr. for the correct ID.

 

"Kismet, circa 1840, is a Creole cottage, originally two stories, but the lower level was removed when the house was set back. The addition of a screened porch is the only known alteration since then."

 

- ALONG THE RIVER ROAD, Mary Ann Sternberg

Arial view of my house using Microsoft Virtual Earth.

 

Visit my websites www.truckerphoto.com/, www.truckertompodcast.com and www.tomshealthproducts.com. Check out my Apple TV HD videos at www.truckertomhd.com.

Mystery (one of them) solved. This is Haydel-Jones, the interior of which was featured in that classic book, VESTIGES OF GRANDEUR.

 

Special thanks to Richard Sexton for helping me solve this!

As seen from Windows Live Local

It really did seem bigger than that when I was a kid. Check it out for yourself.

Check out a bird's eye view of the seminary I attend here.

 

As you can see in the image above, that's not even the highest resolution possible! Click the magnifier to get even closer!

Installation 2 is an interactive narrative installation developed with artificial intelligence technology. The webcam in the installation will recognize the appearance, facial expression and clothing color of each on-site audience based on image recognition technology and label each person with a classification label.

Based on this comprehensive recognition of "judging people by appearance", artificial intelligence software uses algorithms with semantic relevance to generate a unique virtual earth-based narrative roaming for each interactive audience, connecting the audience to any person, object or scene in the world that logically has "relevance" from the algorithm.

 

Credit: FEI Jun

 

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