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Vinayagar getting immersed in the beach after a blissful week.

To all hindhu religion i would like to wish Vinayagar Charthuthi

 

Vinayagar

Vinayaga Chathurthi

Hinduism is not merely a way of life. It is also a science of life. Its concepts are scientific and based on truths discovered by the Rishis and Jnanis. People are confused by the "many gods" of Hinduism. According to Hinduism, God or Paramporul or Sivam or Brahmam or the Supreme is Absolute. He is Infinite. However, He can and does appear and respond in a form. The different deities of Hinduism are different facets of God. They show His functions, powers or aspects. The forms of the Hindu deities are highly symbolic and they contain many meanings and messages.

 

Vinayagar

The first prayer of a Hindu is always to Vinayagar. Vinayagar is invoked at the beginning of all ritualistic worship. He is invoked before a family moves into a house. Recitation of holy songs begin with the recitation of a Vinayagar mantra or song.

 

Vinayagar has a place in the Buddhist temple and among the Jains. The Chinese too worship Vinayagar but with a different name. Vinayagar or Vinayagar-like deities are found in Indonesia, Japan, Afghanistan, Mexico, Brazil, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Tibet, Mongolia and Polynesia, among other places.

 

Vinayagar or Ganesha or Ganapati is otherwise called as Vigneshwara or Vighnaharta, the Lord of and destroyer of obstacles. When we do evil things or when the time is not right, He places obstacles in our path. When we take the correct path, He removes the root of our troubles.

 

Vinayagar is also one of the five Gods the worship of whom was popularized by Adi Shankaracharya; the other four being Vishnu, Shiva, Shakti and Surya. The worship of these five deities is called the panchaayatana puja. In some cases, Skanda is also worshipped.

 

It is said that Ganesha was born when the eternal couple contemplated on AUM. If you view Lord Ganesha sideways, then you will see the symbol AUM in sanskrit. That's why Ganesha is called AUMkara and worshipped first. AUM is praNava. What is meant by praNava. pra is short for prakriti and navam means excellent boat. That is, AUM is the way to cross the ocean of worldly existence.

 

Chathurthi Festival

Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated as the birth anniversary of Ganesha (Vinayaka), the God of Wisdom and Prosperity. God Vinayaka is the Son of God Shiva and Goddess Parvathi. The principal annual festival of 'Vinayaka' or 'Ganesha' falls on the fourth day of the bright fortnight of 'Bhadrapada' (August-September). Constellation with the appearance of the elephant head is brightly visible on this very night. In Tamil Nadu, 'Vinayaka Chaturthi' (as it is known) is very widely celebrated with special rituals in people's homes, as well as at Vinayaka's temples and shrines.

 

Birth of Vinayaga

According to a legend, Goddess Parvati created an image of a boy made of clay and gave him life. She made him guard the door when she was taking a bath. The boy was guarding the door without letting anyone inside. When God Siva, Parvati's husband came home, the boy didn't allow him inside, which enraged God Siva who cut off the boy's head. The boy fell dead on the ground. God Siva went inside and Goddess Parvati was terrified by this news. On Goddess Parvati's request, God Siva went looking for a replacement head, when the first living thing he came across was an elephant. He cut off the elephant's head, affixed it to the torso of the boy and gave him new life.

 

Lord Vinayaka has got an elephant face and human body. He is worshipped by many names like Vinayaka, Ganesha, Pillayar, Vigneshwara, Gajanana, Ganapathy, Mooshika Vahanaa, Modhaga priya etc. He rides on an animal called mooshika (a large kind of rat).

 

Celebration

In our houses we celebrate this pooja in a grand manner. We decorate the floor with kolams using rice flour. On that day we buy a new Vinayaka idol (made of clay). We also buy a decorated umbrella to place behind the idol. On a wooden plank, plantain leaf is placed and raw rice is spread over it. We place the idol on this and decorate with flowers and perform pooja.

 

Vinayaka likes a dish called mothagam (kozhukkattai). So different varieties of kozhukkattai are prepared and offered to the lord on this day. It is the special item on this day.

 

On the next day, punar pooja is done. This is the pooja, which acts as an ending to the festival. After this we remove the idol from its place. On the next day after punar pooja, we immerse the idol in water in the sea, well or pond.

 

For this pooja, different flowers are used. Erukkampoo (calotropis), thumbaipoo (white small flowers and arugampul (a type of grass) is very special for the lord. Different varieties of fruits are also offered.

 

Vinayaga - Master of Knowledge

Vinayaka is one who drives away all sorrows, difficulties and miseries. He is the enemy of all obstacles. He will not allow any obstacle to come in the way. He is the destroyer of obstacles. He confers happiness and peace (on his devotees). He is the master of all those powers (Buddhi and Siddhi). What is this Siddhi? When there is purity of mind, you achieve peace (which is Siddhi). Vinayaka is thus the Lord of Buddhi and Siddhi (the Intellect and Self-Realisation). Hence, every human being should acquire control over the mind.

 

Ganesha is the embodiment of intelligence (Buddhi) and achievement (Siddhi). He was approached by sage Vyasa with a prayer to write down the Mahabharatha even as he composed the hundreds of thousands of its verses! Ganesha agreed immediately, He brooked no delay, even to secure a writing too, he broke his pointed tusk and was ready to start.

 

Arukkampul Priyan (Fresh Green Grass)

There is a mythological story which reveals how the practice of offering Arukkampul (fresh green grass) to Ganapathi during the Vinayaka Chathurthi festival originated.

 

Once, the story goes, Parvathi and Parameswara were playing a game of dice with Nandiswara (Parameswara's vehicle, the bully as the umpire). Although Iswara lost the game, Nandi declared Him as the winner. Enraged at this unfair decision Parvathi cursed Nandi that he would be afflicted with an incurable disease. Nandi, seeking Parvathi's forgiveness, explained that he gave the verdict in Parameswara's favour because the latter was his master and his duty as a servant was to serve him. Parvathi relented and said that Nandi would be freed from the curse if he offered to her son Ganapathi what was most relished by Nandi. Nandi pondered for a moment and declared that what he loved most as a bull was fresh green grass. He would offer that to Ganapathi. That was how the practice of including fresh green grass among the offerings made to Ganapathi during festival occasions came into vogue.

 

Elephant Faced Mushika Vahanan

The esoteric significance of the Elephant headed Ganesha image is: Ganapati has been given the head of an elephant because He is known for His extraordinary intelligence. The elephant is symbolic of extreme intelligence. Vinayaka is the embodiment of intelligence. He is described as Buddhi Vinayak and Siddhi Vinayaka (Vinayaka - the Wise and Vinayaka - the Accomplished)."

 

The rat runs hither and tether, Man's mind too, ruled by impulses, runs hither and thither. However, he is also capable of being wise, hardworking and strong like the elephant. Man's goal then is to remove his mouse qualities and enter the elephant stage. The huge elephant sitting on a tiny mouse also indicates the truth that the Atman is the same in all, irrespective of size or birth or race.

 

Another meaning is also given to the mouse. It moves everywhere unnoticed and steals or destroys food. Like the mouse, egoism too exists unnoticed in our minds and silently wrecks havoc in our lives. When controlled by divine wisdom, however, the ego can aid progress.

 

The Trunk

The elephant trunk is very significant. The trunk is also its nose. The elephant nose is its greatest weapon and tool. Similarly, Vinayagar having the elephant form shows that man's nose is his greatest weapon and tool. How? Breath-control. Through breath control man can attain powers. It can help him expand his consciousness and move towards Sivagati.

 

Large Ears

Vinayagar has large ears. Why? It is to teach us to talk less and listen more. Many of our problems with people arise because we listen little but talk a lot. Before someone can finish saying what he wants to say, we interrupt. This truth can be verified at home and at meetings. Ears are used to gain knowledge. The large ears indicate that when God is known, all knowledge is known.

 

The Pot-Belly

Vinayagar has a huge pot-belly. Why? Vinayagar's pot-belly suggests that it can contain anything and everything. His belly is considered to be the womb of the world. We notice that His belly is something like that of a pregnant woman who holds life in her. The difference is that while the pregnant woman supports one life or perhaps two or three, Vinayagar supports and sustains all life. He is the creative energy that brings forth life. Vinayagar's protruding belly and stories about His voracious appetite show that He can digest anything. This indicates that a man of perfection, the highly evolved man, can digest anything whether it is pain or pleasure, good or bad, honor or dishonor. He has attained equilibrium.

 

The Hand

The right hand of the deities in almost all representations is held in the Abaya posture with palm facing us. It indicates that he who surrenders unto Him need not fear anything. Vinayagar assures us that we should be brave as He is with the good and noble.

 

The Foot

One foot of Ganesa touches the ground while the other is folded and rests on the other thigh. Why? This suggests that while we live in this world, we must tread the middle path and not go to extremes. Moderation should be our guide.

 

The Modakam

In representations of Vinayagar, He is depicted as holding the modakam, a sweet cake, in one hand. There are usually modakam placed in a tray in front of him or held by His trunk. This is to show that the spiritually wise man always finds the world and life sweet as it enables him to be of service to his fellow beings of God. It also affords him an opportunity to improve himself and progress towards Sivagati. The modakam consists of the outer flour portion and the inner sweet portion. The inner sweet portion represents the Supreme. The message is that man must dive within himself, transcend the outer, in order to find the inner treasure.

 

The Pasam

Vinayagar, just like most other deities, is always shown holding a Pasa or rein/noose in one hand. The pasa has been given several interpretations. The pasa represents desires and feelings that bind. Uncontrolled desires are the seeds of bondage. Like the noose they strangle us.

 

The pasa shows that attachment is the cause of birth. It also shows the creative aspect of divinity. It is said that with the pasa (reins), Vinayagar guides us on the right path. With the pasa too He maintains obstacles in our path when we take a wrong turning or when the time is not right for us to do something. The pasa tells us we must bind ourselves to God for material and spiritual progress. For unfoldment we must bind ourselves through love, thavam and service to God. It suggests too that we should use our discrimination to control our desires as this conserves energy and helps us move upward. The pasa shows He binds us with His love and will guide us.

 

Ankusa

The ankusa is a hook-like instrument. This too has various related interpretations. The ankusa symbolizes discrimination, which can pierce through delusions. It is said that Vinayagar removes obstacles and troubles in our path using the ankusa. He helps us be rid of delusions. The ankusa indicates that we must check our emotions and passions through strict self-control and thavam. Like a hook pulling at our flesh, self-control and thavam will cause pain but it must be done. We must use our discrimination to control our lower nature. The ankusa reminds us to break away from the grip of material entanglements. The ankusa is also said to stand for anger, which hurts us. The pasa (attachment) and ankusa (anger) will not help in spirituality. So we have to get rid of anger and attachment by surrendering to Vinayagar. As the ankusa is used for destruction, it is also said that it shows the destructive or dissolving power of God.

 

The Snake

Vinayagar is the presiding deity of the Mooladhara Chakra which is the foundation of the evolutionary, creative or primeval energy called the Kundalini Sakti. It is coiled up like a snake when dormant. When activated, this energy is said to result in an expansion of consciousness and the unfoldment of man into Godman. This results in various siddhis (powers) and therefore we have Siddhi Vinayagar. Raising this energy to the Sahasrara will bring enlightenment. A snake normally coils around Vinayagar's belly. This represents the Kundalini sakti. It reminds us that we have to awaken this energy to reach the state of expanded consciousness. The snake around the belly also shows that everything in nature (the pot-belly) is supported by energy.

 

The Broken Tusk

Vinayagar's right tusk is broken. There are a few interpretations of this. Some suggest that it means we should not be trapped between the pairs of opposites like pleasure and pain but that we should with conscious effort break its grip on us. Vinayagar uses the broken tusk as a writing instrument. This shows that a man who transcends the pair of opposities becomes creative. Our right side represents Siva (spiritual) and the left is Sakti (material). The broken right tusk indicates that one must break-off the ego for spiritual fulfillment. In worldly life however, we need the ego as otherwise we cannot live. But the ego is worldly life must be controlled by divine wisdom. The story runs that Vinayagar and Vyasa participated in a challenge whereby Vyasa would recite the Mahabharatam without a pause and Vinayagar would write it down without stopping. In those days they wrote on palm leaves with a thick stylus. However, halfway, Vinayagar's stylus broke but he quickly broke off His tusk to continue, writing without stopping. This story indicates that we should be willing to make sacrifices for any noble cause.

 

Stotras And Mantras

It is said that by reciting Vinayaga Stotras, mantras and Thevaram songs we create energy which activates divine faculties in our consciousness. This helps remove obstacles that hamper our material and spiritual progress. What is required is patience and perseverance. We must apply the Pasa and Ankusa. Also, when we concentrate on Vinayagar and sing His praises, we awaken the divine potential in us. Reciting the following mantra is said to bring auspiciousness:

 

Aum Sri Ganesaya Namah

Aum Sri Ganesaya Namah

Aum Sri Maha Ganapathiyae Namah

Aum Sri Gam Ganapathiyae Namah.

 

Vinayagar Forms

Vinayagar is usually said to have 32 different forms. Among the important forms are: Bala Ganapati, Taruna Ganapati, Bhakti Ganapati, Vigheswara, Veera Ganapati, Sakti Ganapati, Dvaja Ganapati, Siddhi Vinayagar, Uchista Ganapati, Ekatanta Ganapati, Shristi Vinayagar, Thundi Vinayagar, Yoga Vinayagar, Vighnaraja, Kshipra Ganapati, Heramba Ganapathi.

 

Vinayagar Worship

Vinayagar worship is very simple. It is the most informal too. If we do not have a statue or picture of Him, no problem. We can make a conical shape out of clay, earth, wet turmeric powder or santhanam (sandalwood) paste and it becomes Vinayagar automatically. Even a rock or a tree with some bearing to his shape can be worshipped.

  

Original source can be found here

Life is always an interesting game, Sometimes God is born from the best art.

 

Boon of Goddess Parvathi, The Rise!

Lord Ganesha's Idol!

 

Wish you a Blessed Vinayagar Chaturthi.

Kabali is an upcoming 2016 Indian Tamil-language gangster-drama film written and directed by Pa. Ranjith.[5] The film stars Rajinikanth as the title character, whilst Taiwanese actor Winston Chao, Radhika Apte, Dhansika, Dinesh Ravi, Kalaiyarasan, and John Vijay star in other pivotal roles. Principal photography for the film began on 21 August 2015 in Chennai. While filming mostly occurred in Malaysia, smaller scenes were shot in Bangkok and Hong Kong.[6][7][8][9] The film is slated for release on 22 July 2016.[10]

Development

In June 2015, director Pa. Ranjith announced his third directorial venture, which would follow his previous two films Attakathi (2012) and Madras (2014), with Rajinikanth via Twitter. Rajinikanth had been impressed with Ranjith's work in Madras (2014) and subsequently Rajinikanth's daughter, Soundarya, asked Ranjith to work on a script for her father.[17] Working with Ranjith would make Kabali Rajinikanth's first film with a novel director for the first time since his collaboration with S. Shankar in Sivaji (2007).[18] In an interview with IndiaGlitz, producer S. Thanu revealed that Rajinikanth had personally asked him to produce the Ranjith-directed film. The producer's commercially successful Bairavi (1978) was Rajinikanth's first lead role film and the two had not collaborated since.[19] It was speculated that Rajinikanth's role would be based on a real-life mob boss from Chennai.[20] Santhosh Narayanan was confirmed as the film's music composer, continuing his partnership with Ranjith after the latter's previous two films. Ranjith also retained G. Murali, the cinematographer of Madras.

 

On 17 August 2015, Ranjith announced the title of the film to be Kabali and that Rajinikanth would play the role of Kabaliswaran.[21] The makers of the film had earlier considered using title Kaali, which was the title of Rajinikanth's 1980 film. As that film did not do well in the Tamil Nadu box office at the time, the makers passed on using it for the new film. Another title, Kannabhiran, was also considered but it was later found that the title's rights were already held by director Ameer Sultan for a future film.[22]

 

Casting

In the film, Rajinikanth plays the role of an aged crime boss.[23] Dinesh Ravi, who played the lead in Ranjith's Attakathi (2012), and Kalaiyarasan, who played pivotal roles in both of the director's previous films, were also confirmed to be part of the film. An important role was offered to Prakash Raj initially,[24] but later it was said that the role was declined due to scheduling issues and John Vijay was cast for the role instead.[25] It was later confirmed that the role of the lead character's wife would be given to Radhika Apte, who was introduced to Tamil films through Dhoni (2012).[26] Dhansika was signed to play a supporting character in the film.[27]

 

Filming

On 18 August 2015, director Pa Ranjith announced on his Twitter page that principal photography would begin the following week,[28] which was confirmed on 22 August when Behindwoods covered a photo shoot which took place on 21 August at AVM Studios in Chennai. First schedule of the filming started on Vinayagar Chaturthi on 17 September 2015 at the Russian Centre of Science and Cultural in Chennai.[29]

 

Release

Kabali is expected to be released in Tamil worldwide, along with dubbed versions in Hindi, Telugu, and Malayalam.[30] The film will be simultaneously released in Singapore and Indonesia.[31] Malik Streams Productions and Distribution, a Malaysian media company, will simultaneously release the film in Malay for exclusive screening in Malaysia alongside the original Tamil version.[32] The film will also be dubbed in Thai and Chinese, where talks are under way to simultaneously release the film in Hong Kong and China.[33][34] Kabali will also premiere at the Le Grand Rex in Paris, France.[35] The satellite rights of the film were sold to Jaya TV.[36]

 

Marketing

The Malaysian airline, AirAsia became an official partner for Kabali and certain AirAsia planes will be painted with a Kabali theme.[37][34] The Indian financial company Muthoot FinCorp who is also an official partner of the film produced silver coins embossed with the image of actor as cast in the film.[38][39] Its teaser trailer was released in April 2016 and went viral in Asia and gained 5 million views in less than 24 hours becoming the most viewed teaser in Asia.[40][41] By 28 May, the Kabali teaser garnered 20 million views, making it one of the most watched Indian film teasers.[42]

 

Online piracy issue

On July 19, 2016, three days prior to the film's worldwide release, it was reported that pirated copies of the film were leaked online in various file-sharing sites.[43] The Indian Express reported that although the leaked copies were available only in the darknet, lots of fake links were being circulated in the web. The makers of the film had approached Madras High Court in anticipation of piracy and had requested the authority to ensure that it does not happen.[44] The Times of India reported that the producers of the film were urging the fans of the film not to watch the film online.[45]

 

CBFC chief Pahlaj Nihalani commented on the issue by saying that the leak had nothing to do with his office in Mumbai and reiterated the fact that Kabali, a Tamil film, was certified by CBFC's Chennai office. He also added that the leak would not have much effect on the film's box office collection.[45]

 

Music

Think Music has acquired the audio rights for the Tamil version, as well as the dubbed Telugu and Hindi versions.[46] The original Tamil soundtrack album featuring five songs was released on 12 June 2016.[47] According to Thanu, S. P. Balasubrahmanyam, who usually sings the introduction songs of films starring Rajinikanth, was not hired for this album because he was not in the city at the time of recording.[48]

Kabali is an upcoming 2016 Indian Tamil-language gangster-drama film written and directed by Pa. Ranjith.[5] The film stars Rajinikanth as the title character, whilst Taiwanese actor Winston Chao, Radhika Apte, Dhansika, Dinesh Ravi, Kalaiyarasan, and John Vijay star in other pivotal roles. Principal photography for the film began on 21 August 2015 in Chennai. While filming mostly occurred in Malaysia, smaller scenes were shot in Bangkok and Hong Kong.[6][7][8][9] The film is slated for release on 22 July 2016.[10]

Development

In June 2015, director Pa. Ranjith announced his third directorial venture, which would follow his previous two films Attakathi (2012) and Madras (2014), with Rajinikanth via Twitter. Rajinikanth had been impressed with Ranjith's work in Madras (2014) and subsequently Rajinikanth's daughter, Soundarya, asked Ranjith to work on a script for her father.[17] Working with Ranjith would make Kabali Rajinikanth's first film with a novel director for the first time since his collaboration with S. Shankar in Sivaji (2007).[18] In an interview with IndiaGlitz, producer S. Thanu revealed that Rajinikanth had personally asked him to produce the Ranjith-directed film. The producer's commercially successful Bairavi (1978) was Rajinikanth's first lead role film and the two had not collaborated since.[19] It was speculated that Rajinikanth's role would be based on a real-life mob boss from Chennai.[20] Santhosh Narayanan was confirmed as the film's music composer, continuing his partnership with Ranjith after the latter's previous two films. Ranjith also retained G. Murali, the cinematographer of Madras.

 

On 17 August 2015, Ranjith announced the title of the film to be Kabali and that Rajinikanth would play the role of Kabaliswaran.[21] The makers of the film had earlier considered using title Kaali, which was the title of Rajinikanth's 1980 film. As that film did not do well in the Tamil Nadu box office at the time, the makers passed on using it for the new film. Another title, Kannabhiran, was also considered but it was later found that the title's rights were already held by director Ameer Sultan for a future film.[22]

 

Casting

In the film, Rajinikanth plays the role of an aged crime boss.[23] Dinesh Ravi, who played the lead in Ranjith's Attakathi (2012), and Kalaiyarasan, who played pivotal roles in both of the director's previous films, were also confirmed to be part of the film. An important role was offered to Prakash Raj initially,[24] but later it was said that the role was declined due to scheduling issues and John Vijay was cast for the role instead.[25] It was later confirmed that the role of the lead character's wife would be given to Radhika Apte, who was introduced to Tamil films through Dhoni (2012).[26] Dhansika was signed to play a supporting character in the film.[27]

 

Filming

On 18 August 2015, director Pa Ranjith announced on his Twitter page that principal photography would begin the following week,[28] which was confirmed on 22 August when Behindwoods covered a photo shoot which took place on 21 August at AVM Studios in Chennai. First schedule of the filming started on Vinayagar Chaturthi on 17 September 2015 at the Russian Centre of Science and Cultural in Chennai.[29]

 

Release

Kabali is expected to be released in Tamil worldwide, along with dubbed versions in Hindi, Telugu, and Malayalam.[30] The film will be simultaneously released in Singapore and Indonesia.[31] Malik Streams Productions and Distribution, a Malaysian media company, will simultaneously release the film in Malay for exclusive screening in Malaysia alongside the original Tamil version.[32] The film will also be dubbed in Thai and Chinese, where talks are under way to simultaneously release the film in Hong Kong and China.[33][34] Kabali will also premiere at the Le Grand Rex in Paris, France.[35] The satellite rights of the film were sold to Jaya TV.[36]

 

Marketing

The Malaysian airline, AirAsia became an official partner for Kabali and certain AirAsia planes will be painted with a Kabali theme.[37][34] The Indian financial company Muthoot FinCorp who is also an official partner of the film produced silver coins embossed with the image of actor as cast in the film.[38][39] Its teaser trailer was released in April 2016 and went viral in Asia and gained 5 million views in less than 24 hours becoming the most viewed teaser in Asia.[40][41] By 28 May, the Kabali teaser garnered 20 million views, making it one of the most watched Indian film teasers.[42]

 

Online piracy issue

On July 19, 2016, three days prior to the film's worldwide release, it was reported that pirated copies of the film were leaked online in various file-sharing sites.[43] The Indian Express reported that although the leaked copies were available only in the darknet, lots of fake links were being circulated in the web. The makers of the film had approached Madras High Court in anticipation of piracy and had requested the authority to ensure that it does not happen.[44] The Times of India reported that the producers of the film were urging the fans of the film not to watch the film online.[45]

 

CBFC chief Pahlaj Nihalani commented on the issue by saying that the leak had nothing to do with his office in Mumbai and reiterated the fact that Kabali, a Tamil film, was certified by CBFC's Chennai office. He also added that the leak would not have much effect on the film's box office collection.[45]

 

Music

Think Music has acquired the audio rights for the Tamil version, as well as the dubbed Telugu and Hindi versions.[46] The original Tamil soundtrack album featuring five songs was released on 12 June 2016.[47] According to Thanu, S. P. Balasubrahmanyam, who usually sings the introduction songs of films starring Rajinikanth, was not hired for this album because he was not in the city at the time of recording.[48]

விநாயகப் பெருமான் துணை

Shot @ Ecr

 

Friends can't able to access flickr for past few days !

Some problem n my opera !

 

Happy Vinayagar chaturthi & !

Happy Weekend !!!

Seen at Chennai Foreshore Estate for immersion of Idols, after 'Vinayagar Chaturthi' Festival

Mersal - The Movie

vinayagar chaturthi Poster

Unofficial poster design

This is in some ways a surprising shot for me.This was clicked during our CWC walk in Kosapet, Chennai. Kosapet is famous for making Ganesh idols for the Vinayagar Chaturthi which falls in the third week of September.

 

The surprising part of this click happened when my fellow clicker Ashok Saravanan posted a picture from the walk. We both had almost similar POV shots of this idol.Now why this is surprising is that we were not near each other when we made the click. Talk about two minds thinking alike haan :D.

 

Looks best in black, Press L

Ganesh Chaturthi Recipes 2017 | Vinayagar Chaturthi Recipes

 

Recipe Link: asmallbite.com/ganesh-chaturthi-recipes-2017-vinayagar-ch...

Wish you all a Happy Ganesh Chaturthi 2017.

 

Checkout my Collection of Ganesh Chaturthi Recipes 2017 | Vinayagar Chaturthi Recipes 2017

 

May Lord Ganesha Remove the Obstacles of your life, Provide you with auspicious Beginnings, Inspire you with creativity, And bless you with intellect and wisdom!

Happy Vinayagar Chaturthi!! @Caveman Art & Craft Studios

 

Lord Ganesha's Birthday is celebrated throughout India as Ganesh Chaturthi or Vinayaka chaturthi, during the month of August or September. The festivity is a visual treat which goes on for 10 days. Every year new idols of Lord Ganesh are made and worshipped. At the end of the festivity, the idols are dissolved in water bodies. This practice of dissolving the idols is to symbolically represent that every living being will ultimately be a piece and part of the five forces of the nature.

 

Click here for Photo Documentary

 

Sparkcrews Studios| www.sparkcrews.com -©All Rights Reserved

Departure of lord #ganesha for the immersion in #pattinapakkam #seashore of #chennai, #tamilnadu, #india after the #vinayagar #chaturthi #festival. This is the biggest and last idol on the march from #Thiruvateeswarar #shiva temple, #triplicane. Pic taken near #parthasarathy temple.

Kabali is an upcoming 2016 Indian Tamil-language gangster-drama film written and directed by Pa. Ranjith.[5] The film stars Rajinikanth as the title character, whilst Taiwanese actor Winston Chao, Radhika Apte, Dhansika, Dinesh Ravi, Kalaiyarasan, and John Vijay star in other pivotal roles. Principal photography for the film began on 21 August 2015 in Chennai. While filming mostly occurred in Malaysia, smaller scenes were shot in Bangkok and Hong Kong.[6][7][8][9] The film is slated for release on 22 July 2016.[10]

Development

In June 2015, director Pa. Ranjith announced his third directorial venture, which would follow his previous two films Attakathi (2012) and Madras (2014), with Rajinikanth via Twitter. Rajinikanth had been impressed with Ranjith's work in Madras (2014) and subsequently Rajinikanth's daughter, Soundarya, asked Ranjith to work on a script for her father.[17] Working with Ranjith would make Kabali Rajinikanth's first film with a novel director for the first time since his collaboration with S. Shankar in Sivaji (2007).[18] In an interview with IndiaGlitz, producer S. Thanu revealed that Rajinikanth had personally asked him to produce the Ranjith-directed film. The producer's commercially successful Bairavi (1978) was Rajinikanth's first lead role film and the two had not collaborated since.[19] It was speculated that Rajinikanth's role would be based on a real-life mob boss from Chennai.[20] Santhosh Narayanan was confirmed as the film's music composer, continuing his partnership with Ranjith after the latter's previous two films. Ranjith also retained G. Murali, the cinematographer of Madras.

 

On 17 August 2015, Ranjith announced the title of the film to be Kabali and that Rajinikanth would play the role of Kabaliswaran.[21] The makers of the film had earlier considered using title Kaali, which was the title of Rajinikanth's 1980 film. As that film did not do well in the Tamil Nadu box office at the time, the makers passed on using it for the new film. Another title, Kannabhiran, was also considered but it was later found that the title's rights were already held by director Ameer Sultan for a future film.[22]

 

Casting

In the film, Rajinikanth plays the role of an aged crime boss.[23] Dinesh Ravi, who played the lead in Ranjith's Attakathi (2012), and Kalaiyarasan, who played pivotal roles in both of the director's previous films, were also confirmed to be part of the film. An important role was offered to Prakash Raj initially,[24] but later it was said that the role was declined due to scheduling issues and John Vijay was cast for the role instead.[25] It was later confirmed that the role of the lead character's wife would be given to Radhika Apte, who was introduced to Tamil films through Dhoni (2012).[26] Dhansika was signed to play a supporting character in the film.[27]

 

Filming

On 18 August 2015, director Pa Ranjith announced on his Twitter page that principal photography would begin the following week,[28] which was confirmed on 22 August when Behindwoods covered a photo shoot which took place on 21 August at AVM Studios in Chennai. First schedule of the filming started on Vinayagar Chaturthi on 17 September 2015 at the Russian Centre of Science and Cultural in Chennai.[29]

 

Release

Kabali is expected to be released in Tamil worldwide, along with dubbed versions in Hindi, Telugu, and Malayalam.[30] The film will be simultaneously released in Singapore and Indonesia.[31] Malik Streams Productions and Distribution, a Malaysian media company, will simultaneously release the film in Malay for exclusive screening in Malaysia alongside the original Tamil version.[32] The film will also be dubbed in Thai and Chinese, where talks are under way to simultaneously release the film in Hong Kong and China.[33][34] Kabali will also premiere at the Le Grand Rex in Paris, France.[35] The satellite rights of the film were sold to Jaya TV.[36]

 

Marketing

The Malaysian airline, AirAsia became an official partner for Kabali and certain AirAsia planes will be painted with a Kabali theme.[37][34] The Indian financial company Muthoot FinCorp who is also an official partner of the film produced silver coins embossed with the image of actor as cast in the film.[38][39] Its teaser trailer was released in April 2016 and went viral in Asia and gained 5 million views in less than 24 hours becoming the most viewed teaser in Asia.[40][41] By 28 May, the Kabali teaser garnered 20 million views, making it one of the most watched Indian film teasers.[42]

 

Online piracy issue

On July 19, 2016, three days prior to the film's worldwide release, it was reported that pirated copies of the film were leaked online in various file-sharing sites.[43] The Indian Express reported that although the leaked copies were available only in the darknet, lots of fake links were being circulated in the web. The makers of the film had approached Madras High Court in anticipation of piracy and had requested the authority to ensure that it does not happen.[44] The Times of India reported that the producers of the film were urging the fans of the film not to watch the film online.[45]

 

CBFC chief Pahlaj Nihalani commented on the issue by saying that the leak had nothing to do with his office in Mumbai and reiterated the fact that Kabali, a Tamil film, was certified by CBFC's Chennai office. He also added that the leak would not have much effect on the film's box office collection.[45]

 

Music

Think Music has acquired the audio rights for the Tamil version, as well as the dubbed Telugu and Hindi versions.[46] The original Tamil soundtrack album featuring five songs was released on 12 June 2016.[47] According to Thanu, S. P. Balasubrahmanyam, who usually sings the introduction songs of films starring Rajinikanth, was not hired for this album because he was not in the city at the time of recording.[48]

Kabali is an upcoming 2016 Indian Tamil-language gangster-drama film written and directed by Pa. Ranjith.[5] The film stars Rajinikanth as the title character, whilst Taiwanese actor Winston Chao, Radhika Apte, Dhansika, Dinesh Ravi, Kalaiyarasan, and John Vijay star in other pivotal roles. Principal photography for the film began on 21 August 2015 in Chennai. While filming mostly occurred in Malaysia, smaller scenes were shot in Bangkok and Hong Kong.[6][7][8][9] The film is slated for release on 22 July 2016.[10]

Development

In June 2015, director Pa. Ranjith announced his third directorial venture, which would follow his previous two films Attakathi (2012) and Madras (2014), with Rajinikanth via Twitter. Rajinikanth had been impressed with Ranjith's work in Madras (2014) and subsequently Rajinikanth's daughter, Soundarya, asked Ranjith to work on a script for her father.[17] Working with Ranjith would make Kabali Rajinikanth's first film with a novel director for the first time since his collaboration with S. Shankar in Sivaji (2007).[18] In an interview with IndiaGlitz, producer S. Thanu revealed that Rajinikanth had personally asked him to produce the Ranjith-directed film. The producer's commercially successful Bairavi (1978) was Rajinikanth's first lead role film and the two had not collaborated since.[19] It was speculated that Rajinikanth's role would be based on a real-life mob boss from Chennai.[20] Santhosh Narayanan was confirmed as the film's music composer, continuing his partnership with Ranjith after the latter's previous two films. Ranjith also retained G. Murali, the cinematographer of Madras.

 

On 17 August 2015, Ranjith announced the title of the film to be Kabali and that Rajinikanth would play the role of Kabaliswaran.[21] The makers of the film had earlier considered using title Kaali, which was the title of Rajinikanth's 1980 film. As that film did not do well in the Tamil Nadu box office at the time, the makers passed on using it for the new film. Another title, Kannabhiran, was also considered but it was later found that the title's rights were already held by director Ameer Sultan for a future film.[22]

 

Casting

In the film, Rajinikanth plays the role of an aged crime boss.[23] Dinesh Ravi, who played the lead in Ranjith's Attakathi (2012), and Kalaiyarasan, who played pivotal roles in both of the director's previous films, were also confirmed to be part of the film. An important role was offered to Prakash Raj initially,[24] but later it was said that the role was declined due to scheduling issues and John Vijay was cast for the role instead.[25] It was later confirmed that the role of the lead character's wife would be given to Radhika Apte, who was introduced to Tamil films through Dhoni (2012).[26] Dhansika was signed to play a supporting character in the film.[27]

 

Filming

On 18 August 2015, director Pa Ranjith announced on his Twitter page that principal photography would begin the following week,[28] which was confirmed on 22 August when Behindwoods covered a photo shoot which took place on 21 August at AVM Studios in Chennai. First schedule of the filming started on Vinayagar Chaturthi on 17 September 2015 at the Russian Centre of Science and Cultural in Chennai.[29]

 

Release

Kabali is expected to be released in Tamil worldwide, along with dubbed versions in Hindi, Telugu, and Malayalam.[30] The film will be simultaneously released in Singapore and Indonesia.[31] Malik Streams Productions and Distribution, a Malaysian media company, will simultaneously release the film in Malay for exclusive screening in Malaysia alongside the original Tamil version.[32] The film will also be dubbed in Thai and Chinese, where talks are under way to simultaneously release the film in Hong Kong and China.[33][34] Kabali will also premiere at the Le Grand Rex in Paris, France.[35] The satellite rights of the film were sold to Jaya TV.[36]

 

Marketing

The Malaysian airline, AirAsia became an official partner for Kabali and certain AirAsia planes will be painted with a Kabali theme.[37][34] The Indian financial company Muthoot FinCorp who is also an official partner of the film produced silver coins embossed with the image of actor as cast in the film.[38][39] Its teaser trailer was released in April 2016 and went viral in Asia and gained 5 million views in less than 24 hours becoming the most viewed teaser in Asia.[40][41] By 28 May, the Kabali teaser garnered 20 million views, making it one of the most watched Indian film teasers.[42]

 

Online piracy issue

On July 19, 2016, three days prior to the film's worldwide release, it was reported that pirated copies of the film were leaked online in various file-sharing sites.[43] The Indian Express reported that although the leaked copies were available only in the darknet, lots of fake links were being circulated in the web. The makers of the film had approached Madras High Court in anticipation of piracy and had requested the authority to ensure that it does not happen.[44] The Times of India reported that the producers of the film were urging the fans of the film not to watch the film online.[45]

 

CBFC chief Pahlaj Nihalani commented on the issue by saying that the leak had nothing to do with his office in Mumbai and reiterated the fact that Kabali, a Tamil film, was certified by CBFC's Chennai office. He also added that the leak would not have much effect on the film's box office collection.[45]

 

Music

Think Music has acquired the audio rights for the Tamil version, as well as the dubbed Telugu and Hindi versions.[46] The original Tamil soundtrack album featuring five songs was released on 12 June 2016.[47] According to Thanu, S. P. Balasubrahmanyam, who usually sings the introduction songs of films starring Rajinikanth, was not hired for this album because he was not in the city at the time of recording.[48]

Ganesha Chaturthi (गणेश चतुर्थी) is the Hindu festival celebrated in honour of the god Ganesha, the elephant-headed remover of obstacles and the god of beginnings and wisdom. The festival, also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi, is observed in the Hindu calendar month of Bhaadrapada, starting on the shukla chaturthi (fourth day of the waxing moon period). The date usually falls between 19 August and 20 September. The festival lasts for 10 days, ending on Anant Chaturdashi (fourteenth day of the waxing moon period).

Legend[edit]

Main article: Ganesha

Traditional Ganesha Hindu stories tell that Lord Ganesha,son of goddess Parvati consort of Shiva. Parvati created Ganesha out of sandalwood paste that she used for her bath and breathed life into the figure. She then set him to stand guard at her door while she bathed. Lord Shiva, who had gone out, returned and as Ganesha didn't know him, didn't allow him to enter. Lord Shiva became enraged by this and asked his follower Ganas to teach the child some manners. Ganesha who was very powerful, being born of Parvati, the embodiment of Shakti, defeated Shiva's followers and declared that nobody was allowed to enter while his mother was bathing. The sage of heavens, Narada along with the Saptarishis sensed the growing turmoil and went to appease the boy with no results. Angered, the king of Gods, Indra attacked the boy with his entire heavenly army but even they didn't stand a chance. By then, this issue had become a matter of pride for Parvati and Shiva. Angry Shiva severed the head of the child. Parvati seeing this became enraged. Seeing Parvati in anger Shiva promised that her son will be alive again. The devas searched for the head of dead person facing North, but they found only the head of a dead elephant. They brought the head of the elephant and Shiva fixed it on the child's body and brought him back to life. Lord Shiva also declared that from this day the boy would be called Ganesha (Gana Isha : Lord of Ganas).[4]

 

According to the Linga Purana, Ganesha was created by Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati at the request of the Devas for being a Vighnakartaa (obstacle-creator) in the path of Rakshasas, and a Vighnahartaa (obstacle-averter) to help the Devas achieve fruits of their hard work.[5]

The festival involves installing clay Idols of lord Ganesh in public pandals (temporary shrines), which are worshipped for ten days with different variety of herbal leaves, plants and immersed at the end of the festival in a water(lake) along with the Idol. After adding herbal and medicated plants and leaves(patri) in lakes, the water in the lake become Hygienic. This was in practice because, in early days people used to drink lake water, and to protect people with infections and viral diseases especially in this season, this tradition was introduced. Some Hindus also install the clay images of Ganesha in their homes. It is believed that Ganesha bestows his presence on earth for all his devotees during this festival. The festival is celebrated as a public event since the days of Shivaji (1630-1680).

 

While celebrated all over India, it is most elaborate in Maharashtra and other parts of Western[1] and Southern India[2]. Outside India, it is celebrated widely in Nepal and by Hindus in the United States, Canada, Mauritius,[3] Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma, Fiji, Trinidad & Tobago, and Guyana.

The festival is observed in the Hindu calendar month of Bhaadrapada, starting on the shukla chaturthi, the fourth lunar day of the waxing moon fortnight.[6] The date usually falls between 20 August and 20 September. The festival lasts for 10 to 12 days, ending on Anant Chaturdashi.

Domestic celebration in Maharashtra[edit]

In Maharashtra, most Hindu families also install their own small clay statues for worship on Ganesh Chaturthi. As per the tradition of their respective families, the domestic celebrations come to end an end after 1,3,5,7 or 11 days when the statue is taken in a procession to a large body of water such as rivers or sea for immersion. Due to environmental concerns, a number of families now avoid the large water bodies and instead immerse the statue in a bucket or tub at home. After a few days the clay is used in the home garden. In some cities, a public eco-friendly process is used for immersion.[7]

The main sweet dish during the festival is the modak (modak in Marathi, modakam/kudumu in Telugu, modaka/kadubu in Kannadakozhakatta or modakkam in in Malayalam and modagam in Tamil). A modak is a dumpling made from rice flour/wheat flour with a stuffing of fresh or dry-grated coconut, jaggery, dry fruits and some other condiments. It is either steam-cooked or fried. Another popular sweet dish is the karanji (karjikai in Kannada) which is similar to the modak in composition and taste but has a semicircular shape.

 

In Andhra Pradesh and Kerala, modakkam (rice flour dumplings stuffed with coconut and jaggery mixture),Laddu, Vundrallu (steamed coarsely grounded rice flour balls), Panakam (jaggery, black pepper and cardamom flavored drink), Vadapappu (soaked and moong lentils), Chalividi (cooked rice flour and jaggery mixture), etc., are offered to Ganesha along with Modakams. These offerings to god are called Naivedyam in Telugu. Traditionally plate containing the Modak is filled with twenty-one pieces of the sweet.

 

Celebrations in Tamil Nadu[edit]

Ganesh Chaturthi is also celebrated in Tamil Nadu. Here it is known as vinayakachaturthi or pillayar chaturthi and the festival falls on the fourth day after new moon in the month of aavani. On this day ganesh idols made of clay are worshipped in all homes. It is known as kaliman pillayar. ganesh is decorated with garlands and Bermuda grass known asarukampul(அருகம்புல் ) in tamil.Modak,ladoo and other dishes are offered to ganesha.People throng ganesh temples all day .Famous ganesh temples in state will be decked up with devotees all day. Large ganesh idols are installed in public places in the state particularly in Chennai and the idols are not usually more than 13 feet high. Idols are usually made of clay and paper machete as plaster of paris idols are banned by the state government .In many places idols are made of coconuts and other organic products. The idols are worshipped for some days in pandals.and are immersed in the bay of Bengal the following sunday. The Tamil Nadu police department makes elaborate arrangements for the festival. Ganesh chaturthi has become one of the major festivals in tamil nadu especially Chennai

Kerala is a state where ganesh chathurthi is celebrated in a great pomp.It is also known as vinyakha chathurthi or lamboodhara piranalu. It falls in the month of chingam . People worship idols of ganesha and do milk abhishekam. Temples are very crowded and people give for nivedeyam . In each locality their would be fairs,concerts,dance and skit. In the city of thiruvanathapuram a grand procession is held from the pazhavangadi ganapathi temple to the Shankumugham beach with tall statues of ganesh made of organic items and milk which immerced into the sea. Elephant worship is done all over Kerala. In the temples peoples break thousands of coconuts for removing sins.Grand feasts are given to people after nivedyam. Streets are fully decorated with flowers and rangolis.

Ganesh Chaturthi is the most popular and extravagant festival celebrated by the Hindu Goans.Locally known as Chavath in Konkani(Devanagari:चवथ,Romi lipi:Chovoth)and is also known as Parab(Parva,or an auspicious celebration).[8]Preparations begin a month before,and the actual festivities begin on the third day of lunar month of Bhadrapada,on this day Haritalika or Gauri with Shiva is worshiped by women,which also includes fasting.[9]On the day of festival,elaborate Pujas and feasts are organised,Arati is one of the major attraction of the festivities.Many instruments which are unique to Goa like Ghumot,Shamel, and other classical instruments such as cymbals,Pakhawaj etc are played.[10]Decorations,fireworks,gifts,and sweets play a major role during the festivities.Harvest festival known as Navyachi Pancham is celebrated on the next day,newly harvested paddy is ceremoniously brought home from the fields or temples(where Puja is held on a community level) and a Puja is conducted. Most of the idols are immersed either in the sea,rivers or tanks and wells on the second day,whereas some places festivities may run for five,seven,nine or eleven days.[11]

Ganesh Chaturthi has a long history in Goa,it predates the Kadamba era.Goa Inquisition had banned all the Hindu festivals,and heavy restrictions where imposed on the Hindus who did not convert to Christianity.But Goans did not stop practicing their culture. Many families worship Ganesha in the form of Patri(leaves used for worshiping Ganesha or any other deity),a picture drawn on paper,small silver idols,or in some households Ganesha idols are even hidden,this is a remarkable thing about Ganesh festival in Goa.The reason for this was,ban on clay Ganesha idols,or festivities as a part of Inquisition of the Jesuits,many familes have still kept the tradition alive.[12]Another striking feature about Chavath of Goa is,unlike Maharashtra, its more a family affair,and a very sentimental for the Goans. It's generally a celebration of the joint family,some families of 1000 or more members,still celebrate the festival together with great fanfare in their ancestral homes.Many such families are found in Goa.[13]Goan Catholics also take part in the festivities in many places.

Public celebrations of the festival are hugely popular, with local communities (mandalas) vying with each other to put up the biggest statue and the best pandal. The festival is also the time for cultural activities like singing and theater performances, orchestra and community activities like free medical checkup, blood donation camps, charity for the poor, etc.

 

Today, the Ganesh Festival is not only a popular festival, it has become a very critical and important economic activity for Mumbai, Pune, Visakhapatnam, Hyderabad, Bangalore and Chennai. Many artists, industries, and businesses survive on this mega-event. Ganesh Festival also provides a stage for budding artists to present their art to the public. In Maharashtra, not only Hindus but many other religions also participate in the celebration like Muslims, Jains, Christian and others.

Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated in the UK by the migrant Hindu population as well as the large number of Indians residing there. The Hindu culture and Heritage Society, UK - a Southall based organisation celebrated Ganesh Chaturthi for the first time in London in 2005 at The Vishwa Hindu Temple. The Idol was immersed in the river Thames at Putney Pier. Another celebration organised by an Gujarati group has been celebrated in the Southend-on-Sea which attracts over 18000 devotees.[14] Annual celebrations also take place on the River Mersey at Liverpool.[15][16]

 

The festival is similarly celebrated in many locations across the world. The Hindu Swayamsevak Sangh USA, an organisation of Hindus based in the US organises many such events to mark the Hindu festivals.

In USA, Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated by various associations of people from India. (Various Indian Associations of North America and in Temples across USA.)

 

The Philadelphia Ganesh popularly known as PGF is the largest Sarvajanik (fully contributed by public funds) Hindu festival in North America. Since 2005 the festival is conducted every year in Bharatiya Temple, Chalfont, Pennsylvania. The 10 days are marked by processions, devotional programs, cultural events, India filmi-orchestra and a weekend carnival. While the Marathi community plays a big role in organising the festival, participation from all communities such as Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, North Indian, Bengali etc. is seen as the reason for its success and uniqueness.

 

In Canada, Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated by associations of Marathi-speaking people. (MBM in Toronto, MSBC in Vancouver, etc.)

 

Celebration of Ganesh Chaturthi in Mauritius dates back to 1896. The first Ganesh Chaturthi Puja was held in the 7 Cascades Valley next to Henrietta village by the Bhiwajee family who is still celebrating this pious festival after more than a century. Over the years the festival gained such popularity on the island that Mauritian government has attributed a public holiday for that day.

 

In Malaysia and Singapore, the festival is more commonly known as Vinayagar Chakurthi because of the relatively larger Tamil-speaking Hindu minority among the other South Asian ethnic groups. It is very common to see pictures or statues of Lord Ganesha at the entrance of homes, business premises and schools. These idols are usually decorated with flower garlands alongside offerings of fruits and sweets. Most Ganesha temples mark Vinayagar Chaturthi with morning prayers, abhishegam (ritual bathing of the deity) and free vegetarian lunch for devotees and the poor. Chariot processions organised by Ganesha temples in the evenings often attract huge crowds of devotees and tourists.

 

History[edit]

It is not known when and how Ganesh Chaturthi was first celebrated.[17] Ganesh Chaturthi was being celebrated as a public event in Pune since the times of Shivaji (1630-1680), the founder of the Maratha Empire.[17] The Peshwas, the de facto hereditary administrators of the Empire from 1749 till its end in 1818, encouraged the celebrations in their administrative seat Pune as Ganesha was their family deity (Kuladevata).[17] With the fall of the Peshwas, Ganesh Chaturthi lost state patronage and became a private family celebration again till its revival by Indian freedom fighter and social reformer Lokmanya Tilak.[17]

 

In 1893, Lokmanya Tilak transformed the annual domestic festival into a large, well-organized public event.[18] Tilak recognized the wide appeal of the deity Ganesha as "the god for everybody",[19][20] and popularized Ganesh Chaturthi as a national festival in order "to bridge the gap between Brahmins and 'non-Brahmins' and find a context in which to build a new grassroots unity between them", and generate nationalistic fervour among people in Maharashtra against the British colonial rule.[21][22] Tilak was the first to install large public images of Ganesh in pavilions, and also established the practice of submerging in rivers, sea, or other pools of water all public images of the deity on the tenth day after Ganesh Chaturthi.[23]

 

Under Tilak's encouragement, the festival facilitated community participation and involvement in the form of intellectual discourses, poetry recitals, performances of plays, musical concerts, and folk dances. It served as a meeting ground for people of all castes and communities in times when, in order to exercise control over the population, the British discouraged social and political gatherings.[24]

The most serious impact of the festival on the environment is due to the immersion of idols made of Plaster of Paris into lakes, rivers and the sea. Traditionally, the idol was sculpted out of mud taken from nearby one’s home. After the festival, it was returned to the Earth by immersing it in a nearby water body. This cycle was meant to represent the cycle of creation and dissolution in Nature.

 

However, as the production of Ganesh idols on a commercial basis grew, the earthen or natural clay (shaadu maati in Marathi and banka matti in Telugu) was replaced by Plaster of Paris. Plaster is a man-made material, easier to mould, lighter and less expensive than clay. However, plaster is non-biodegradable, and insoluble in water. Moreover, the chemical paints used to adorn these plaster idols themselves contain heavy metals like mercury and cadmium, causing water pollution. Also, on immersion, non-biodegradable accessories that originally adorned the idol accumulate in the layers of sand on the beach.

 

In the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Radio Jaagriti, the leading Hindu radio station in the country, has actively educated the public of the environmental implications of the use of plaster of Paris murtis. Clay Lord Ganeshas have been encouraged to be used for immersion into the water courses to prevent any harmful environmental impacts. Ganesh Chaturthi is a widely celebrated Hindu Festival in Trinidad and Tobago.

On the final day of the Ganesh festival thousands of plaster idols are immersed into water bodies by devotees. These increase the level of acidity in the water and the content of heavy metals.[27] Several non-governmental and governmental bodies have been addressing this issue. Amongst the solutions proposed are as follows:

 

Return to the traditional use of natural clay idols and immerse the icon in a bucket of water at home.

Use of a permanent icon made of stone and brass, used every year and a symbolic immersion only.

Recycling of plaster idols to repaint them and use them again the following year.

Ban on the immersion of plaster idols into lakes, rivers and the sea.[28]

Creative use of other biodegradable materials such as papier-mâché to create Ganesh idols.

Encouraging people to immerse the idols in tanks of water rather than in natural water bodies.

To handle religious sentiments sensitively, some temples and spiritual groups have taken up the cause.[29]

Ganesha Chaturthi (गणेश चतुर्थी) is the Hindu festival celebrated in honour of the god Ganesha, the elephant-headed remover of obstacles and the god of beginnings and wisdom. The festival, also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi, is observed in the Hindu calendar month of Bhaadrapada, starting on the shukla chaturthi (fourth day of the waxing moon period). The date usually falls between 19 August and 20 September. The festival lasts for 10 days, ending on Anant Chaturdashi (fourteenth day of the waxing moon period).

Legend[edit]

Main article: Ganesha

Traditional Ganesha Hindu stories tell that Lord Ganesha,son of goddess Parvati consort of Shiva. Parvati created Ganesha out of sandalwood paste that she used for her bath and breathed life into the figure. She then set him to stand guard at her door while she bathed. Lord Shiva, who had gone out, returned and as Ganesha didn't know him, didn't allow him to enter. Lord Shiva became enraged by this and asked his follower Ganas to teach the child some manners. Ganesha who was very powerful, being born of Parvati, the embodiment of Shakti, defeated Shiva's followers and declared that nobody was allowed to enter while his mother was bathing. The sage of heavens, Narada along with the Saptarishis sensed the growing turmoil and went to appease the boy with no results. Angered, the king of Gods, Indra attacked the boy with his entire heavenly army but even they didn't stand a chance. By then, this issue had become a matter of pride for Parvati and Shiva. Angry Shiva severed the head of the child. Parvati seeing this became enraged. Seeing Parvati in anger Shiva promised that her son will be alive again. The devas searched for the head of dead person facing North, but they found only the head of a dead elephant. They brought the head of the elephant and Shiva fixed it on the child's body and brought him back to life. Lord Shiva also declared that from this day the boy would be called Ganesha (Gana Isha : Lord of Ganas).[4]

 

According to the Linga Purana, Ganesha was created by Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati at the request of the Devas for being a Vighnakartaa (obstacle-creator) in the path of Rakshasas, and a Vighnahartaa (obstacle-averter) to help the Devas achieve fruits of their hard work.[5]

The festival involves installing clay Idols of lord Ganesh in public pandals (temporary shrines), which are worshipped for ten days with different variety of herbal leaves, plants and immersed at the end of the festival in a water(lake) along with the Idol. After adding herbal and medicated plants and leaves(patri) in lakes, the water in the lake become Hygienic. This was in practice because, in early days people used to drink lake water, and to protect people with infections and viral diseases especially in this season, this tradition was introduced. Some Hindus also install the clay images of Ganesha in their homes. It is believed that Ganesha bestows his presence on earth for all his devotees during this festival. The festival is celebrated as a public event since the days of Shivaji (1630-1680).

 

While celebrated all over India, it is most elaborate in Maharashtra and other parts of Western[1] and Southern India[2]. Outside India, it is celebrated widely in Nepal and by Hindus in the United States, Canada, Mauritius,[3] Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma, Fiji, Trinidad & Tobago, and Guyana.

The festival is observed in the Hindu calendar month of Bhaadrapada, starting on the shukla chaturthi, the fourth lunar day of the waxing moon fortnight.[6] The date usually falls between 20 August and 20 September. The festival lasts for 10 to 12 days, ending on Anant Chaturdashi.

Domestic celebration in Maharashtra[edit]

In Maharashtra, most Hindu families also install their own small clay statues for worship on Ganesh Chaturthi. As per the tradition of their respective families, the domestic celebrations come to end an end after 1,3,5,7 or 11 days when the statue is taken in a procession to a large body of water such as rivers or sea for immersion. Due to environmental concerns, a number of families now avoid the large water bodies and instead immerse the statue in a bucket or tub at home. After a few days the clay is used in the home garden. In some cities, a public eco-friendly process is used for immersion.[7]

The main sweet dish during the festival is the modak (modak in Marathi, modakam/kudumu in Telugu, modaka/kadubu in Kannadakozhakatta or modakkam in in Malayalam and modagam in Tamil). A modak is a dumpling made from rice flour/wheat flour with a stuffing of fresh or dry-grated coconut, jaggery, dry fruits and some other condiments. It is either steam-cooked or fried. Another popular sweet dish is the karanji (karjikai in Kannada) which is similar to the modak in composition and taste but has a semicircular shape.

 

In Andhra Pradesh and Kerala, modakkam (rice flour dumplings stuffed with coconut and jaggery mixture),Laddu, Vundrallu (steamed coarsely grounded rice flour balls), Panakam (jaggery, black pepper and cardamom flavored drink), Vadapappu (soaked and moong lentils), Chalividi (cooked rice flour and jaggery mixture), etc., are offered to Ganesha along with Modakams. These offerings to god are called Naivedyam in Telugu. Traditionally plate containing the Modak is filled with twenty-one pieces of the sweet.

 

Celebrations in Tamil Nadu[edit]

Ganesh Chaturthi is also celebrated in Tamil Nadu. Here it is known as vinayakachaturthi or pillayar chaturthi and the festival falls on the fourth day after new moon in the month of aavani. On this day ganesh idols made of clay are worshipped in all homes. It is known as kaliman pillayar. ganesh is decorated with garlands and Bermuda grass known asarukampul(அருகம்புல் ) in tamil.Modak,ladoo and other dishes are offered to ganesha.People throng ganesh temples all day .Famous ganesh temples in state will be decked up with devotees all day. Large ganesh idols are installed in public places in the state particularly in Chennai and the idols are not usually more than 13 feet high. Idols are usually made of clay and paper machete as plaster of paris idols are banned by the state government .In many places idols are made of coconuts and other organic products. The idols are worshipped for some days in pandals.and are immersed in the bay of Bengal the following sunday. The Tamil Nadu police department makes elaborate arrangements for the festival. Ganesh chaturthi has become one of the major festivals in tamil nadu especially Chennai

Kerala is a state where ganesh chathurthi is celebrated in a great pomp.It is also known as vinyakha chathurthi or lamboodhara piranalu. It falls in the month of chingam . People worship idols of ganesha and do milk abhishekam. Temples are very crowded and people give for nivedeyam . In each locality their would be fairs,concerts,dance and skit. In the city of thiruvanathapuram a grand procession is held from the pazhavangadi ganapathi temple to the Shankumugham beach with tall statues of ganesh made of organic items and milk which immerced into the sea. Elephant worship is done all over Kerala. In the temples peoples break thousands of coconuts for removing sins.Grand feasts are given to people after nivedyam. Streets are fully decorated with flowers and rangolis.

Ganesh Chaturthi is the most popular and extravagant festival celebrated by the Hindu Goans.Locally known as Chavath in Konkani(Devanagari:चवथ,Romi lipi:Chovoth)and is also known as Parab(Parva,or an auspicious celebration).[8]Preparations begin a month before,and the actual festivities begin on the third day of lunar month of Bhadrapada,on this day Haritalika or Gauri with Shiva is worshiped by women,which also includes fasting.[9]On the day of festival,elaborate Pujas and feasts are organised,Arati is one of the major attraction of the festivities.Many instruments which are unique to Goa like Ghumot,Shamel, and other classical instruments such as cymbals,Pakhawaj etc are played.[10]Decorations,fireworks,gifts,and sweets play a major role during the festivities.Harvest festival known as Navyachi Pancham is celebrated on the next day,newly harvested paddy is ceremoniously brought home from the fields or temples(where Puja is held on a community level) and a Puja is conducted. Most of the idols are immersed either in the sea,rivers or tanks and wells on the second day,whereas some places festivities may run for five,seven,nine or eleven days.[11]

Ganesh Chaturthi has a long history in Goa,it predates the Kadamba era.Goa Inquisition had banned all the Hindu festivals,and heavy restrictions where imposed on the Hindus who did not convert to Christianity.But Goans did not stop practicing their culture. Many families worship Ganesha in the form of Patri(leaves used for worshiping Ganesha or any other deity),a picture drawn on paper,small silver idols,or in some households Ganesha idols are even hidden,this is a remarkable thing about Ganesh festival in Goa.The reason for this was,ban on clay Ganesha idols,or festivities as a part of Inquisition of the Jesuits,many familes have still kept the tradition alive.[12]Another striking feature about Chavath of Goa is,unlike Maharashtra, its more a family affair,and a very sentimental for the Goans. It's generally a celebration of the joint family,some families of 1000 or more members,still celebrate the festival together with great fanfare in their ancestral homes.Many such families are found in Goa.[13]Goan Catholics also take part in the festivities in many places.

Public celebrations of the festival are hugely popular, with local communities (mandalas) vying with each other to put up the biggest statue and the best pandal. The festival is also the time for cultural activities like singing and theater performances, orchestra and community activities like free medical checkup, blood donation camps, charity for the poor, etc.

 

Today, the Ganesh Festival is not only a popular festival, it has become a very critical and important economic activity for Mumbai, Pune, Visakhapatnam, Hyderabad, Bangalore and Chennai. Many artists, industries, and businesses survive on this mega-event. Ganesh Festival also provides a stage for budding artists to present their art to the public. In Maharashtra, not only Hindus but many other religions also participate in the celebration like Muslims, Jains, Christian and others.

Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated in the UK by the migrant Hindu population as well as the large number of Indians residing there. The Hindu culture and Heritage Society, UK - a Southall based organisation celebrated Ganesh Chaturthi for the first time in London in 2005 at The Vishwa Hindu Temple. The Idol was immersed in the river Thames at Putney Pier. Another celebration organised by an Gujarati group has been celebrated in the Southend-on-Sea which attracts over 18000 devotees.[14] Annual celebrations also take place on the River Mersey at Liverpool.[15][16]

 

The festival is similarly celebrated in many locations across the world. The Hindu Swayamsevak Sangh USA, an organisation of Hindus based in the US organises many such events to mark the Hindu festivals.

In USA, Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated by various associations of people from India. (Various Indian Associations of North America and in Temples across USA.)

 

The Philadelphia Ganesh popularly known as PGF is the largest Sarvajanik (fully contributed by public funds) Hindu festival in North America. Since 2005 the festival is conducted every year in Bharatiya Temple, Chalfont, Pennsylvania. The 10 days are marked by processions, devotional programs, cultural events, India filmi-orchestra and a weekend carnival. While the Marathi community plays a big role in organising the festival, participation from all communities such as Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, North Indian, Bengali etc. is seen as the reason for its success and uniqueness.

 

In Canada, Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated by associations of Marathi-speaking people. (MBM in Toronto, MSBC in Vancouver, etc.)

 

Celebration of Ganesh Chaturthi in Mauritius dates back to 1896. The first Ganesh Chaturthi Puja was held in the 7 Cascades Valley next to Henrietta village by the Bhiwajee family who is still celebrating this pious festival after more than a century. Over the years the festival gained such popularity on the island that Mauritian government has attributed a public holiday for that day.

 

In Malaysia and Singapore, the festival is more commonly known as Vinayagar Chakurthi because of the relatively larger Tamil-speaking Hindu minority among the other South Asian ethnic groups. It is very common to see pictures or statues of Lord Ganesha at the entrance of homes, business premises and schools. These idols are usually decorated with flower garlands alongside offerings of fruits and sweets. Most Ganesha temples mark Vinayagar Chaturthi with morning prayers, abhishegam (ritual bathing of the deity) and free vegetarian lunch for devotees and the poor. Chariot processions organised by Ganesha temples in the evenings often attract huge crowds of devotees and tourists.

 

History[edit]

It is not known when and how Ganesh Chaturthi was first celebrated.[17] Ganesh Chaturthi was being celebrated as a public event in Pune since the times of Shivaji (1630-1680), the founder of the Maratha Empire.[17] The Peshwas, the de facto hereditary administrators of the Empire from 1749 till its end in 1818, encouraged the celebrations in their administrative seat Pune as Ganesha was their family deity (Kuladevata).[17] With the fall of the Peshwas, Ganesh Chaturthi lost state patronage and became a private family celebration again till its revival by Indian freedom fighter and social reformer Lokmanya Tilak.[17]

 

In 1893, Lokmanya Tilak transformed the annual domestic festival into a large, well-organized public event.[18] Tilak recognized the wide appeal of the deity Ganesha as "the god for everybody",[19][20] and popularized Ganesh Chaturthi as a national festival in order "to bridge the gap between Brahmins and 'non-Brahmins' and find a context in which to build a new grassroots unity between them", and generate nationalistic fervour among people in Maharashtra against the British colonial rule.[21][22] Tilak was the first to install large public images of Ganesh in pavilions, and also established the practice of submerging in rivers, sea, or other pools of water all public images of the deity on the tenth day after Ganesh Chaturthi.[23]

 

Under Tilak's encouragement, the festival facilitated community participation and involvement in the form of intellectual discourses, poetry recitals, performances of plays, musical concerts, and folk dances. It served as a meeting ground for people of all castes and communities in times when, in order to exercise control over the population, the British discouraged social and political gatherings.[24]

The most serious impact of the festival on the environment is due to the immersion of idols made of Plaster of Paris into lakes, rivers and the sea. Traditionally, the idol was sculpted out of mud taken from nearby one’s home. After the festival, it was returned to the Earth by immersing it in a nearby water body. This cycle was meant to represent the cycle of creation and dissolution in Nature.

 

However, as the production of Ganesh idols on a commercial basis grew, the earthen or natural clay (shaadu maati in Marathi and banka matti in Telugu) was replaced by Plaster of Paris. Plaster is a man-made material, easier to mould, lighter and less expensive than clay. However, plaster is non-biodegradable, and insoluble in water. Moreover, the chemical paints used to adorn these plaster idols themselves contain heavy metals like mercury and cadmium, causing water pollution. Also, on immersion, non-biodegradable accessories that originally adorned the idol accumulate in the layers of sand on the beach.

 

In the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Radio Jaagriti, the leading Hindu radio station in the country, has actively educated the public of the environmental implications of the use of plaster of Paris murtis. Clay Lord Ganeshas have been encouraged to be used for immersion into the water courses to prevent any harmful environmental impacts. Ganesh Chaturthi is a widely celebrated Hindu Festival in Trinidad and Tobago.

On the final day of the Ganesh festival thousands of plaster idols are immersed into water bodies by devotees. These increase the level of acidity in the water and the content of heavy metals.[27] Several non-governmental and governmental bodies have been addressing this issue. Amongst the solutions proposed are as follows:

 

Return to the traditional use of natural clay idols and immerse the icon in a bucket of water at home.

Use of a permanent icon made of stone and brass, used every year and a symbolic immersion only.

Recycling of plaster idols to repaint them and use them again the following year.

Ban on the immersion of plaster idols into lakes, rivers and the sea.[28]

Creative use of other biodegradable materials such as papier-mâché to create Ganesh idols.

Encouraging people to immerse the idols in tanks of water rather than in natural water bodies.

To handle religious sentiments sensitively, some temples and spiritual groups have taken up the cause.[29]

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