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Keyspan Park is the home of the New York Mets-affiliated Brooklyn Cyclones of the New York-Penn League. It opened in 2001 with a capacity of 6,500. Demand for Cyclones tickets was so great that the team added 1,000 seats in a right-field bleacher pavilion within three weeks after the park opened. The park's naming rights were sold to KeySpan Energy, a utility company whose primary holding is the former Brooklyn Union Gas.

 

The Parachute Jump is a no-longer-operational amusement ride, whose iconic open-frame steel structure remains a Coney Island landmark. Eighty meters (262 feet) tall and weighing 170 tons (150 tonnes), it has been called the "Eiffel Tower of Brooklyn". It was built for the 1939 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens, and moved to its current site, then part of the Steeplechase Park amusement park, in 1941. It is the only portion of Steeplechase Park still standing today. The ride ceased operations in the 1960s.

 

The ride was based on functional parachutes which were held open by metal rings throughout the ascent and decent. Twelve cantilevered steel arms sprout from the top of the tower, each of which supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of surrounding guide cables. Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat hanging below the closed chute, then hoisted to the top, where a release mechanism would drop them, the descent slowed only by the parachute. Shock absorbers at the bottom, consisting of pole-mounted springs, cushioned the landing. Each parachute required three cable operators, keeping labor expenses high.

 

The site barely escaped a condominium development by Fred Trump, but public opposition and the expense of demolition scuttled the project. The City of New York acquired the Steeplechase site in 1969, and control of the Jump passed to the city's parks department, which attempted to sell it in 1971. No buyers were found, and demolition was considered but eventually rejected, due both to the high price to the city that demolition would cost and to a nascent preservation movement.

 

Beginning in 1993, the City of New York painted and stabilized the structure, painting it in its original colors, but the structure still suffers from rust in the salt air. With Coney Island in a period of revival, including the minor league baseball stadium KeySpan Park next door, a $5 million restoration plan by the New York City Economic Development Corporation has been underway since 2002; as of 2003, the upper part of the structure was completely dismantled, and steel structural elements were being completely replaced as necessary.

 

In 2004-2005, the Parachute Jump was the focus of an architecture competition by the Coney Island Development Corporation and the Van Alen Institute which drew over 800 entries. The 7800 square foot (725 m²) Parachute Pavilion, at the base of the Jump, will be an all-season activity center including a souvenir shop, restaurant, bar, and exhibition space. In 2005, a lighting installation was completed. The winning design followed strict guidelines to harmonize with the landmark structure, including a maximum height of 30 feet (9.1 m)

 

See this picture of the Parachute Drop from before Keyspan Park was built.

 

The Parachute Drop was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 23, 1989.

 

Parachute Drop National Historic Register #80002645

Founded in 1895 in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park,

the de Young Museum

  

The design of the new de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park embraces both art and nature. The landscape is brought into the building through a deep, penetrating exterior, the landscape court, while artwork is brought outside of the building in the sculpture garden. The interweaving of visitor, art, and landscape is reinforced on the ground level through ample opportunity to enter the museum and interact with the collection, and through the tower, a reference point linking Golden Gate Park with the San Francisco community beyond.

  

Architect: Herzog & de Meuron

Architect of Record: Fong and Chan Architects

Landcape Architect: Walter Hood

Contractor: Swinerton and Walberg Builders

 

About the Architects

 

Herzog & de Meuron

In 1978 Pierre de Meuron and Jacques Herzog established their office and became Herzog & de Meuron in 1997. Harry Gugger and Christine Binswanger joined the office as Partners in 1991 and 1994 respectively, followed by Robert Hösl and Ascan Mergenthaler in 2004. Today the firm has 10 associates and 182 employees worldwide, with branch offices in London, Munich, San Francisco, Barcelona, and Beijing.

 

Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron both teach at Harvard University (1989 and since 1994, respectively), and at the ETH Studio Basel, Institute for the Contemporary City (since 1999).

 

Herzog & de Meuron received international attention very early in their career with the Blue House (completed 1980) in Oberwil, Switzerland; the Stone House in Tavole, Italy (1988); and the Apartment Building along a Party Wall in Basel (1988). The firm’s breakthrough project was the Ricola Storage Building in Laufen, Switzerland (1987). The Goetz Collection, a Gallery for a Private Collection of Modern Art in Munich (1992) stands at the beginning of a series of internationally acclaimed museum buildings such as the Küppersmühle Museum, for the Grothe Collection in Duisburg, Germany (1999), the Tate Modern in London (2000), and Schaulager® for the Laurenz Foundation in Basel (2003). Renown in the United States came with the Dominus Winery in Yountville, California (1998). On many projects, the architects have worked together with artists, including their collaborations with Rémy Zaugg (Fünf Höfe, Five Courtyards for the Munich City Centre, 2003) and with Thomas Ruff (for the Eberswalde Technical School Library in Germany, 1999).

 

Recently completed projects include the Laban Dance Center in London (2003, awarded with the RIBA Stirling Prize in 2003); the new flagship store Prada Aoyama Tokyo (2003); the Cottbus Technical University Library in Germany (February 2005); the expansion of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis (opening April 2005); Allianz Arena, the new soccer stadium for Munich (opening May 2005, FIFA World Cup 2006); and finally the National Stadium for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing (groundbreaking December 2003, projected completion 2007).

 

Work by Herzog & de Meuron has appeared in numerous exhibitions, including Architektur Denkform at the Architekturmuseum Basel (1988); Herzog & de Meuron: une exposition, curated and designed by Rémy Zaugg at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris (1995); The Un-Private House at the Museum of Modern Art (1999); Works in Progress, at the Fondazione Prada in Milano (2001), and Herzog & de Meuron: Archéologie de l’imaginaire at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montréal (2002). In 2004 the Schaulager® Basel presented Herzog & de Meuron. No. 250. An Exhibition (8 May-26 September 2004). The exhibition is currently on display at the Netherlands Architecture Institute in Rotterdam (22 January-08 May 2005) and will then travel to Tate Modern London (01 June-28 August 2005).

 

The numerous prizes awarded the firm since 1987 include the Deutscher Kritikerpreis (1993), the Max Beckmann Award (1996), the Rolf Schock Prize for the Visual Arts (1999), and the Prix Equerre d’Argent (2001). In 2001 Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron were awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize for their complete works.

   

Fong & Chan Architects

Fong & Chan Architects (FCA) was established in August 1982 when Chiu Lin Tse-Chan and David G. Fong, colleagues, decided to interview as partners for the position of Associate Master Architect of San Francisco International Airport’s (SFIA) Master Plan. Although they had no portfolio or experience as a firm, they were awarded the position because of their well-rounded architectural skills and experience in airport design. Since then, FCA has grown into a respected firm with an extensive portfolio of award-winning work. FCA projects represent a wide range of building types, including international and domestic airport terminals, museums, hospitals and clinics, senior care facilities, and research laboratories for both the private and public sectors. Significant arts projects include the San Francisco Airport Commission Aviation Library / Louis A. Turpen Aviation Museum at the San Francisco International Airport and the American Center for Wine, Food, and the Arts in Napa, California. Other recent commissions include the Joint Mixed-Use Development Project between UC-Hastings College of the Law and the Central YMCA of San Francisco, in San Francisco’s historic Civic Center, and the Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, California.

 

Fong & Chan Architects received the 2002 “Architecture Firm / Ten-Year Award” from the California Chapter of the Society of American Registered Architects and is a winner of multiple National Design Awards from the Society of American Registered Architects.

 

FCA works to benefit the profession by sponsoring an annual scholarship at the College of Environmental Design at UC Berkeley and participating in student internship programs. Principals serve as members, lecturers, and volunteers of many local, regional, and national architectural affiliations. FCA is a corporate member of the U.S. Green Building Council and employs LEED Certified Design Professionals.

   

Walter Hood

Walter Hood is a Professor and former Chair of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning at the University of California, Berkeley, and principal of Hood Design in Oakland, California. Hood has worked in a variety of settings including community design, urban landscape design, art, and research and has exhibited and lectured on his professional projects and theoretical works nationally and abroad. He was a fellow at the American Academy in Rome in Landscape Architecture, 1997.

 

Hood’s work was recently featured in Open, New Designs for Public Space, The Van Alen Institute (2003–04), the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s “Revelatory Landscapes” Exhibition (2000–2001) and the Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial (2000). He was awarded the American Society of Landscape Architecture National Award of Honor in 2003.

 

Recent commissions by Hood Design include the garden of the new Jackson Hole Center for the Arts in Jackson Hole, Wyoming; the Poplar Street improvement project in Macon, Georgia; and the renovation and streetscape improvement of Splash Pad Park, the new Lafayette Square Park, and the Oakland Waterfront, including designs for 10 new parks and a 6.6-mile trail, all in Oakland, California.

 

Hood’s published monographs Urban Diaries and Blues & Jazz Landscape Improvisations were awarded an ASLA Research award in 1996. His essay “Macon Memories” is featured in Sites of Memory, Princeton Press, 2001. He is currently researching and writing a book entitled ,i>Urban Landscapes; American Landscape Typologies, to be published soon.

    

L1170583

 

The Parachute Jump is a no-longer-operational amusement ride, whose iconic open-frame steel structure remains a Coney Island landmark. Eighty meters (262 feet) tall and weighing 170 tons (150 tonnes), it has been called the "Eiffel Tower of Brooklyn". It was built for the 1939 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens, and moved to its current site, then part of the Steeplechase Park amusement park, in 1941. It is the only portion of Steeplechase Park still standing today. The ride ceased operations in the 1960s.

 

The ride was based on functional parachutes which were held open by metal rings throughout the ascent and decent. Twelve cantilevered steel arms sprout from the top of the tower, each of which supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of surrounding guide cables. Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat hanging below the closed chute, then hoisted to the top, where a release mechanism would drop them, the descent slowed only by the parachute. Shock absorbers at the bottom, consisting of pole-mounted springs, cushioned the landing. Each parachute required three cable operators, keeping labor expenses high.

 

The site barely escaped a condominium development by Fred Trump, but public opposition and the expense of demolition scuttled the project. The City of New York acquired the Steeplechase site in 1969, and control of the Jump passed to the city's parks department, which attempted to sell it in 1971. No buyers were found, and demolition was considered but eventually rejected, due both to the high price to the city that demolition would cost and to a nascent preservation movement.

 

Beginning in 1993, the City of New York painted and stabilized the structure, painting it in its original colors, but the structure still suffers from rust in the salt air. With Coney Island in a period of revival, including the minor league baseball stadium KeySpan Park next door, a $5 million restoration plan by the New York City Economic Development Corporation has been underway since 2002; as of 2003, the upper part of the structure was completely dismantled, and steel structural elements were being completely replaced as necessary.

 

In 2004-2005, the Parachute Jump was the focus of an architecture competition by the Coney Island Development Corporation and the Van Alen Institute which drew over 800 entries. The 7800 square foot (725 m²) Parachute Pavilion, at the base of the Jump, will be an all-season activity center including a souvenir shop, restaurant, bar, and exhibition space. In 2005, a lighting installation was completed. The winning design followed strict guidelines to harmonize with the landmark structure, including a maximum height of 30 feet (9.1 m)

 

See this picture of the Parachute Drop in its current setting as part of Keyspan Park.

 

The Parachute Drop was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 23, 1989.

 

National Historic Register #80002645

SOFTlab’s design, “Nova,” was selected as the winner of the second annual design competition hosted by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute in collaboration with DOT Art, to choose a work for the season’s Holiday Installation. Located within the Flatiron North Public Plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, the structure will be on display from November 18th through January 6th, 2016 in conjunction with free festive community programming presented by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership. The installation is comprised of seven viewing cones, fabricated out of aluminum, 3M Scotchlife Reflective Material, 3M Dichroic film and LED lights, that spectators can use to admire the surrounding landmarks and sky through a distorted, unexpected way. Shaped in the form of a star, the design pays homage to the stars importance throughout history when it was used to navigate the land and sea and as a special symbol of the holidays, guiding pilgrimages to holy sites. “Nova” will serve as the areas very own North Star as it remains a fixed, recognizable landmark while the bustle of holiday traffic steadily circulates around it.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

“Nova” by SOFTlab

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.softlabnyc.com

 

The Parachute Jump is a no-longer-operational amusement ride, whose iconic open-frame steel structure remains a Coney Island landmark. Eighty meters (262 feet) tall and weighing 170 tons (150 tonnes), it has been called the "Eiffel Tower of Brooklyn". It was built for the 1939 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens, and moved to its current site, then part of the Steeplechase Park amusement park, in 1941. It is the only portion of Steeplechase Park still standing today. The ride ceased operations in the 1960s.

 

The ride was based on functional parachutes which were held open by metal rings throughout the ascent and decent. Twelve cantilevered steel arms sprout from the top of the tower, each of which supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of surrounding guide cables. Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat hanging below the closed chute, then hoisted to the top, where a release mechanism would drop them, the descent slowed only by the parachute. Shock absorbers at the bottom, consisting of pole-mounted springs, cushioned the landing. Each parachute required three cable operators, keeping labor expenses high.

 

The site barely escaped a condominium development by Fred Trump, but public opposition and the expense of demolition scuttled the project. The City of New York acquired the Steeplechase site in 1969, and control of the Jump passed to the city's parks department, which attempted to sell it in 1971. No buyers were found, and demolition was considered but eventually rejected, due both to the high price to the city that demolition would cost and to a nascent preservation movement.

 

Beginning in 1993, the City of New York painted and stabilized the structure, painting it in its original colors, but the structure still suffers from rust in the salt air. With Coney Island in a period of revival, including the minor league baseball stadium KeySpan Park next door, a $5 million restoration plan by the New York City Economic Development Corporation has been underway since 2002; as of 2003, the upper part of the structure was completely dismantled, and steel structural elements were being completely replaced as necessary.

 

In 2004-2005, the Parachute Jump was the focus of an architecture competition by the Coney Island Development Corporation and the Van Alen Institute which drew over 800 entries. The 7800 square foot (725 m²) Parachute Pavilion, at the base of the Jump, will be an all-season activity center including a souvenir shop, restaurant, bar, and exhibition space. In 2005, a lighting installation was completed. The winning design followed strict guidelines to harmonize with the landmark structure, including a maximum height of 30 feet (9.1 m)

 

See this picture of the Parachute Drop in its current setting as part of Keyspan Park.

 

The Parachute Drop was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 23, 1989.

 

National Historic Register #80002645

Exhibition at Van Alen Institute (April 9 - June 1, 2013) in a space behind Van Alen Books.

An elegant LED light installation called Flatiron Sky-Line by LOT Architecture will light up the Flatiron District this holiday season.

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

An elegant LED light installation called Flatiron Sky-Line by LOT Architecture will light up the Flatiron District this holiday season.

The installation called Flatiron Sky-line was the winning entry in a competition organized by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership, and the Van Alen Institute

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza.

 

Design and architecture firm Studio Cadena’s proposal, “Happy,” was selected for implementation through the 2018 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Happy,” features a series of softly shaped, colored plastic screens that drape down from an open frame to create an intimate collective space while encouraging visitors to view the city in a different light through the yellow screens. “Happy” intends to offer a warm embrace during the cold winter months while inspiring passersby to slow down in the midst of a busy intersection.

  

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Happy” by Studio Cadena

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

www.studiocadena.com

 

The Parachute Jump is a no-longer-operational amusement ride, whose iconic open-frame steel structure remains a Coney Island landmark. Eighty meters (262 feet) tall and weighing 170 tons (150 tonnes), it has been called the "Eiffel Tower of Brooklyn". It was built for the 1939 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens, and moved to its current site, then part of the Steeplechase Park amusement park, in 1941. It is the only portion of Steeplechase Park still standing today. The ride ceased operations in the 1960s.

 

The ride was based on functional parachutes which were held open by metal rings throughout the ascent and decent. Twelve cantilevered steel arms sprout from the top of the tower, each of which supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of surrounding guide cables. Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat hanging below the closed chute, then hoisted to the top, where a release mechanism would drop them, the descent slowed only by the parachute. Shock absorbers at the bottom, consisting of pole-mounted springs, cushioned the landing. Each parachute required three cable operators, keeping labor expenses high.

 

The site barely escaped a condominium development by Fred Trump, but public opposition and the expense of demolition scuttled the project. The City of New York acquired the Steeplechase site in 1969, and control of the Jump passed to the city's parks department, which attempted to sell it in 1971. No buyers were found, and demolition was considered but eventually rejected, due both to the high price to the city that demolition would cost and to a nascent preservation movement.

 

Beginning in 1993, the City of New York painted and stabilized the structure, painting it in its original colors, but the structure still suffers from rust in the salt air. With Coney Island in a period of revival, including the minor league baseball stadium KeySpan Park next door, a $5 million restoration plan by the New York City Economic Development Corporation has been underway since 2002; as of 2003, the upper part of the structure was completely dismantled, and steel structural elements were being completely replaced as necessary.

 

In 2004-2005, the Parachute Jump was the focus of an architecture competition by the Coney Island Development Corporation and the Van Alen Institute which drew over 800 entries. The 7800 square foot (725 m²) Parachute Pavilion, at the base of the Jump, will be an all-season activity center including a souvenir shop, restaurant, bar, and exhibition space. In 2005, a lighting installation was completed. The winning design followed strict guidelines to harmonize with the landmark structure, including a maximum height of 30 feet (9.1 m).

 

See this picture of the Parachute Drop in its current setting as part of Keyspan Park.

 

The Parachute Drop was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 23, 1989.

 

National Historic Register #80002645

  

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza.

 

Design and architecture firm Studio Cadena’s proposal, “Happy,” was selected for implementation through the 2018 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Happy,” features a series of softly shaped, colored plastic screens that drape down from an open frame to create an intimate collective space while encouraging visitors to view the city in a different light through the yellow screens. “Happy” intends to offer a warm embrace during the cold winter months while inspiring passersby to slow down in the midst of a busy intersection.

  

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Happy” by Studio Cadena

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

www.studiocadena.com

 

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

For the past three years, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have hosted an open call for artists and designers to create a dynamic and festive holiday inspired installation. This year, the architecture and design firm LOT’s design, “Flatiron Sky-Line,” was selected as the winner of the Holiday Design Competition. Located within the Flatiron North Public Plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, the structure will be on display from November 21st through January 2, 2017. For the duration of the “Flatiron Sky-Line” installation, free festive community programming, known as the “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer,” presented by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership, will occur within or surrounding the sculpture. The installation is comprised of ten large arches with a hammock hung within each arch. Constructed of white power-coated steel tubes, the arches are affixed with LED lights that bring the plaza to life at night. The playful hammocks are intended to be a relaxation destination in one of the busiest intersections in the district. As passersby lay horizontally, they are able to admire the architectural sites above them in a new perspective.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

“Flatiron Sky-Line” by LOT

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.lot-arch.com

 

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza.

 

Design and architecture firm Studio Cadena’s proposal, “Happy,” was selected for implementation through the 2018 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Happy,” features a series of softly shaped, colored plastic screens that drape down from an open frame to create an intimate collective space while encouraging visitors to view the city in a different light through the yellow screens. “Happy” intends to offer a warm embrace during the cold winter months while inspiring passersby to slow down in the midst of a busy intersection.

  

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Happy” by Studio Cadena

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

www.studiocadena.com

 

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza. Architecture firm Future Expansion’s proposal, “Flatiron Reflection,” was selected for implementation through the 2017 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Flatiron Reflection” is comprised of a bundle of glistening tubes, arranged in a choir-like sculptural formation. The striking scale of the structure is designed to invite passersby to engage with the artwork both from a distance and in an intimate manner.

 

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Flatiron Reflection” by Future Expansion

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

ww.future-expansion.com

 

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

Keyspan Park is the home of the New York Mets-affiliated Brooklyn Cyclones of the New York-Penn League. It opened in 2001 with a capacity of 6,500. Demand for Cyclones tickets was so great that the team added 1,000 seats in a right-field bleacher pavilion within three weeks after the park opened. The park's naming rights were sold to KeySpan Energy, a utility company whose primary holding is the former Brooklyn Union Gas.

 

The Parachute Jump is a no-longer-operational amusement ride, whose iconic open-frame steel structure remains a Coney Island landmark. Eighty meters (262 feet) tall and weighing 170 tons (150 tonnes), it has been called the "Eiffel Tower of Brooklyn". It was built for the 1939 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens, and moved to its current site, then part of the Steeplechase Park amusement park, in 1941. It is the only portion of Steeplechase Park still standing today. The ride ceased operations in the 1960s.

 

The ride was based on functional parachutes which were held open by metal rings throughout the ascent and decent. Twelve cantilevered steel arms sprout from the top of the tower, each of which supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of surrounding guide cables. Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat hanging below the closed chute, then hoisted to the top, where a release mechanism would drop them, the descent slowed only by the parachute. Shock absorbers at the bottom, consisting of pole-mounted springs, cushioned the landing. Each parachute required three cable operators, keeping labor expenses high.

 

The site barely escaped a condominium development by Fred Trump, but public opposition and the expense of demolition scuttled the project. The City of New York acquired the Steeplechase site in 1969, and control of the Jump passed to the city's parks department, which attempted to sell it in 1971. No buyers were found, and demolition was considered but eventually rejected, due both to the high price to the city that demolition would cost and to a nascent preservation movement.

 

Beginning in 1993, the City of New York painted and stabilized the structure, painting it in its original colors, but the structure still suffers from rust in the salt air. With Coney Island in a period of revival, including the minor league baseball stadium KeySpan Park next door, a $5 million restoration plan by the New York City Economic Development Corporation has been underway since 2002; as of 2003, the upper part of the structure was completely dismantled, and steel structural elements were being completely replaced as necessary.

 

In 2004-2005, the Parachute Jump was the focus of an architecture competition by the Coney Island Development Corporation and the Van Alen Institute which drew over 800 entries. The 7800 square foot (725 m²) Parachute Pavilion, at the base of the Jump, will be an all-season activity center including a souvenir shop, restaurant, bar, and exhibition space. In 2005, a lighting installation was completed. The winning design followed strict guidelines to harmonize with the landmark structure, including a maximum height of 30 feet (9.1 m)

 

See this picture of the Parachute Drop from before Keyspan Park was built.

 

The Parachute Drop was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on May 23, 1989 (Designation List 215).

 

Parachute Drop National Historic Register #80002645

For the past three years, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have hosted an open call for artists and designers to create a dynamic and festive holiday inspired installation. This year, the architecture and design firm LOT’s design, “Flatiron Sky-Line,” was selected as the winner of the Holiday Design Competition. Located within the Flatiron North Public Plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, the structure will be on display from November 21st through January 2, 2017. For the duration of the “Flatiron Sky-Line” installation, free festive community programming, known as the “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer,” presented by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership, will occur within or surrounding the sculpture. The installation is comprised of ten large arches with a hammock hung within each arch. Constructed of white power-coated steel tubes, the arches are affixed with LED lights that bring the plaza to life at night. The playful hammocks are intended to be a relaxation destination in one of the busiest intersections in the district. As passersby lay horizontally, they are able to admire the architectural sites above them in a new perspective.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

“Flatiron Sky-Line” by LOT

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.lot-arch.com

 

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza.

 

Design and architecture firm Studio Cadena’s proposal, “Happy,” was selected for implementation through the 2018 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Happy,” features a series of softly shaped, colored plastic screens that drape down from an open frame to create an intimate collective space while encouraging visitors to view the city in a different light through the yellow screens. “Happy” intends to offer a warm embrace during the cold winter months while inspiring passersby to slow down in the midst of a busy intersection.

  

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Happy” by Studio Cadena

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

www.studiocadena.com

 

Coney Island

 

Foreground: Childs' Restaurant Building, designed by Dennison & Hirons, terra cotta details by Atlantic Terra Cotta Company (Former home of Lola Star's Dreamland Roller Rink)

 

Coney Island institutions have a way of disappearing without leaving anything on the boardwalk to remember them by. That is not the case with Childs' Restaurant, the seaside outpost of a popular early 20th Century lunchroom chain, that was built in 1923 and whose frame still stands today. If you've ever taken a stroll on the boardwalk, west of the parachute jump and Keyspan Park, you've probably noticed its massive facade, adorned with flamboyant nautical details. It has stuck around for so long partly because it’s kept a steady number of tenants over the years, including a chocolate factory and most recently a glitzy roller rink. The building is now completely vacant and boarded up. Here’s the story of the great restaurant that once stood there, and how the building has survived to this day.

  

Background: Coney Island Parachute Jump

 

The Parachute Jump is a defunct amusement ride in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York, whose iconic open-frame steel structure remains a Brooklyn landmark. 262 feet (80 m) tall and weighing 170 tons (150 tonnes), it has been called the "Eiffel Tower of Brooklyn". It was built for the 1939 New York World's Fair in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens, and moved to its current site, then part of the Steeplechase Park amusement park, in 1941. It is the only portion of Steeplechase Park still standing today. The ride ceased operations in 1968. The ride was based on functional parachutes which were held open by metal rings throughout the ascent and descent. Twelve cantilevered steel arms sprout from the top of the tower, each of which supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of surrounding guide cables. Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat hanging below the closed chute, then hoisted to the top, where a release mechanism would drop them, the descent slowed only by the parachute.

 

The ride was built in 1939 for the World's fair, and towered over the fair's "Amusement Zone". The Life Savers company sponsored the ride, investing $15,000 and decorating the new tower with brightly lit candy-shaped rings. Eleven parachutes were used, leaving the tower with one empty arm. Adult riders paid 40 cents, children a quarter. The trip up took about a minute and the drop down was over in 10 or 20 seconds.

 

After the fair, the Tilyou family, owners of Coney Island's Steeplechase Park, purchased the Parachute Jump for $150,000. It was disassembled and moved to its current location adjacent to the Riegelmann boardwalk, between West 16th and West 19th Streets. The ride required some modifications in its new windier shore-side location. Steeplechase Park closed in 1964, the victim of rising crime, neighborhood decline, and competing entertainment.

 

In 2005, the Parachute Jump was the focus of an architecture competition by the Coney Island Development Corporation and the Van Alen Institute which drew over 800 entries. The 7,800-square-foot (720 m2) Parachute Pavilion, at the base of the Jump, will be an all-season activity center including a souvenir shop, restaurant, bar, and exhibition space. The winning design team was Kevin Carmody,Andrew Groarke, Chris Hardie and Lewis Kinneir, of London. Their design follows strict guidelines to harmonize with the landmark structure, including a maximum height of 30 feet (9.1 m).

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza.

 

Design and architecture firm Studio Cadena’s proposal, “Happy,” was selected for implementation through the 2018 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Happy,” features a series of softly shaped, colored plastic screens that drape down from an open frame to create an intimate collective space while encouraging visitors to view the city in a different light through the yellow screens. “Happy” intends to offer a warm embrace during the cold winter months while inspiring passersby to slow down in the midst of a busy intersection.

  

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Happy” by Studio Cadena

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

www.studiocadena.com

 

Inaba's winning design in the Van Alen Institute's Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition.

this IMAGE is NOT mine!

this IMAGE is NOT mine!

this IMAGE is NOT mine!

this IMAGE is NOT mine!

 

Dr Mohsen Mostafavi is an Iranian architect, and Chairman of the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London, a position he has held since 1995. Mr. Mostafavi received a Diploma in Architecture from the Architectural Association in London, and undertook research on counter-reformation urban history at the University of Essex and at Cambridge University. Prior to his current appointment, he was Director of the Master of Architecture I Program at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University. Mr. Mostafavi has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Cambridge University, and the Frankfurt Academy of Fine Arts. His research has been published in many journals, including The Architectural Review, AAFiles, Arquitectura, Bauwelt, Casabella, Centre, and Daidalos, and he is co-author of Architecture and Continuity (1983); Delayed Space (with Homa Fardjadi, 1994) and of On Weathering: The Life of Buildings in Time (with David Leatherbarrow, MIT, 1993), which received the American Institute of Architects commendation prize for writing on architectural theory.

Mohsen Mostafavi, an architect and educator, is the Dean and Alexander and Victoria Wiley Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He was formerly the Gale and Ira Drukier Dean of the College of Architecture, Art and Planning at Cornell University. Previously, he was the Chairman of the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London.

Dean Mostafavi serves on the steering committee of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, the board of the Van Alen Institute, and on numerous university committees including the Harvard University Committee on the Arts as well as the Committee on Common Spaces. He has served on the design committee of the London Development Agency (LDA), the RIBA Gold Medal, and is currently involved as a consultant on a number of international architectural and urban projects.

Dr Mostafavi received a diploma in architecture from the AA in 1976 and undertook research on Counter-Reformation urban history at the Universities of Essex and Cambridge. Previously, he was Director of the Master of Architecture I Program at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Mostafavi has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Cambridge University, and the Frankfurt Academy of Fine Arts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohsen_Mostafavi

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

NYC DOT Art in collaboration with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute present a special holiday installation within the Flatiron plaza on Broadway and 23rd Street in Manhattan. For “New York Light,” INABA, the designer, Ben Gal Fiero, the fabricator, and Buro Happold, the structural engineer, devised a steel tube installation that celebrates the upcoming winter holidays as well as the City itself. The installation illuminates the night with LED lighting. It is comprised of mirrored panels that hang from the structure and reflect the surrounding architecture and environment. With the Flatiron building at one end and the Empire State Building at the other, the plaza provides a space for unique interaction with the skyline and creates a new, enlivened environment during the holiday season. Public events will be presented within the installation by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership.

 

Special thanks to Robert Silman Associates and Walsh Electrical Contracting with support from presenting sponsors Tiffany & Co. and Merginoff Properties and contributing sponsors Grey Group and Macmillan.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute

New York Light by INABA

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rdStreet, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.inaba.us

 

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza.

 

Design and architecture firm Studio Cadena’s proposal, “Happy,” was selected for implementation through the 2018 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Happy,” features a series of softly shaped, colored plastic screens that drape down from an open frame to create an intimate collective space while encouraging visitors to view the city in a different light through the yellow screens. “Happy” intends to offer a warm embrace during the cold winter months while inspiring passersby to slow down in the midst of a busy intersection.

  

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Happy” by Studio Cadena

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

www.studiocadena.com

 

For the past three years, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have hosted an open call for artists and designers to create a dynamic and festive holiday inspired installation. This year, the architecture and design firm LOT’s design, “Flatiron Sky-Line,” was selected as the winner of the Holiday Design Competition. Located within the Flatiron North Public Plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, the structure will be on display from November 21st through January 2, 2017. For the duration of the “Flatiron Sky-Line” installation, free festive community programming, known as the “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer,” presented by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership, will occur within or surrounding the sculpture. The installation is comprised of ten large arches with a hammock hung within each arch. Constructed of white power-coated steel tubes, the arches are affixed with LED lights that bring the plaza to life at night. The playful hammocks are intended to be a relaxation destination in one of the busiest intersections in the district. As passersby lay horizontally, they are able to admire the architectural sites above them in a new perspective.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

“Flatiron Sky-Line” by LOT

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.lot-arch.com

 

For the past three years, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have hosted an open call for artists and designers to create a dynamic and festive holiday inspired installation. This year, the architecture and design firm LOT’s design, “Flatiron Sky-Line,” was selected as the winner of the Holiday Design Competition. Located within the Flatiron North Public Plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, the structure will be on display from November 21st through January 2, 2017. For the duration of the “Flatiron Sky-Line” installation, free festive community programming, known as the “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer,” presented by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership, will occur within or surrounding the sculpture. The installation is comprised of ten large arches with a hammock hung within each arch. Constructed of white power-coated steel tubes, the arches are affixed with LED lights that bring the plaza to life at night. The playful hammocks are intended to be a relaxation destination in one of the busiest intersections in the district. As passersby lay horizontally, they are able to admire the architectural sites above them in a new perspective.

 

NYCDOT Art Program, Arterventions

“Flatiron Sky-Line” by LOT

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.lot-arch.com

 

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

Inaba's winning design in the Van Alen Institute's Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition.

Brooklyn-based design studio Young Projects was selected to design the 2014 Valentine Heart, Match-Maker, and to oversee its construction in collaboration with Kammetal. Over the last six years the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. For the 2014 competition, Times Square Arts, in collaboration with Van Alen Institute, selected Young Projects' Match-Maker out of six design proposals.

 

Match-Maker cosmically connects people this Valentine's Day. Guided by their zodiac signs, visitors arrange themselves at twelve viewing points around the heart-shaped sculpture. Peering through colorful, interwoven periscopes provides glimpses of each viewer's four most ideal astrological mates, offering potentially novel connections between lonely souls or settled lovers. The form of the sculpture is elusive, complex and symmetrical, and changes as viewers experience it from different vantage points throughout Times Square. From many points of view it forms a perfect and iconic heart; from other perspectives the sculpture is tangled and perplexing.

 

Photographs by Ka-Man Tse for @TsqArts.

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza. Architecture firm Future Expansion’s proposal, “Flatiron Reflection,” was selected for implementation through the 2017 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Flatiron Reflection” is comprised of a bundle of glistening tubes, arranged in a choir-like sculptural formation. The striking scale of the structure is designed to invite passersby to engage with the artwork both from a distance and in an intimate manner.

 

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Flatiron Reflection” by Future Expansion

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

ww.future-expansion.com

 

Inaba's winning design in the Van Alen Institute's Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition.

Photo by Rocco S. Cetera

Young Projects' "Match Maker"

Times Square Arts /Van Alen Institute

2014 Times Square Valentine Heart Winner

 

Times Square, Midtown West

New York City

 

February 11, 2014

Inaba's winning design in the Van Alen Institute's Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition.

Photo by Rocco S. Cetera

 

"NOVA" by SOFTLab

Van Alen Institute and the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

Second Annual Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition

 

Flatiron District/Madison Square

New York City

 

November 14, 2015

Photo by Rocco S. Cetera

Young Projects' "Match Maker"

Times Square Arts /Van Alen Institute

2014 Times Square Valentine Heart Winner

 

Times Square, Midtown West

New York City

 

February 11, 2014

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza. Architecture firm Future Expansion’s proposal, “Flatiron Reflection,” was selected for implementation through the 2017 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Flatiron Reflection” is comprised of a bundle of glistening tubes, arranged in a choir-like sculptural formation. The striking scale of the structure is designed to invite passersby to engage with the artwork both from a distance and in an intimate manner.

 

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Flatiron Reflection” by Future Expansion

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

ww.future-expansion.com

 

Since 2014, DOT Art, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute have partnered to select interactive, festive artwork for display in the Flatiron North public plaza at 23rd Street and Broadway, during the holiday season from mid-November to January. The yearly installation has become a neighborhood tradition and coincides with the Partnership’s 23 Days of Flatiron Cheer, a series of free community programming events held in the plaza. Architecture firm Future Expansion’s proposal, “Flatiron Reflection,” was selected for implementation through the 2017 Holiday Design Competition open call. “Flatiron Reflection” is comprised of a bundle of glistening tubes, arranged in a choir-like sculptural formation. The striking scale of the structure is designed to invite passersby to engage with the artwork both from a distance and in an intimate manner.

 

NYC DOT Art Program, Arterventions

In partnership with the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership

“Flatiron Reflection” by Future Expansion

Flatiron Plaza, Broadway and 23rd Street, Manhattan

www.nyc.gov/dotart

www.flatirondistrict.nyc

www.vanalen.org

ww.future-expansion.com

 

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