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tribune.com.pk/story/831276/the-mangroves-of-karachi-faci...

  

The most visible and delicate ecosystem of Karachi, a city with a profound coastal environment, is that of the mangrove forests that thrive in the mingled salt and freshwater where the Indus River meets the Arabian Sea.

 

These forests, however, are under existential threat for a number of reasons, particularly along the city coastline. There is untreated municipal waste and industrial pollution causing still-undetermined amounts of damage, there is exploitation of the trees by the area’s communities for use as firewood, building material and fodder and, most alarmingly, there is the chopping down of the forests to make way for coastal development projects.

 

The Pakistani coastline stretches for around 990 kilometres, with the Exclusive Economic Zone – the sea zone in which the state has special rights over marine resources – covering an area of about 240,000 square kilometres. Meanwhile, the 220-kilometre Sindh coastal belt, characterised by a network of tidal creeks and numerous islands with mangrove vegetation, is divided between the Indus Delta system and the Karachi coast. The former is home to the largest arid climate mangroves in the world, while mangrove forestation also dots the latter.

  

A vast ecosystem

  

According to the Sindh Coastal Community Development Project, the extensive mangrove swamps of Sindh spread over approximately 100,000 hectares. The black mangrove, with aerial roots growing up out of the mud, is the most common species. The forests also house the red mangrove, Rhizophora mucronata, Ceriops tagal and Aegiceras corniculatum, as well as several species of marine seaweed that often grow as algal mats on the surface of the mud.

 

The mangrove swamps, creeks and mudflats serve as a breeding ground for a diverse variety of marine life along the Sindh coastline, such as mussels, oysters, shrimp and fish, which move offshore as they grow. Some species of migratory birds, too, use the swamps as wintering grounds.

 

It is not just animals and vegetation that are supported by the vast ecosystem formed by Sindh’s mangroves. The 100,000 people living along the northern edge of the Indus Delta use an estimated 18,000 tons of mangrove firewood each year, while the leaves and shoots are used as fodder for livestock.

 

The mangroves, beautiful as they are, offer more than just aesthetic value: they can greatly benefit both the city and the country if they are properly harnessed. Protecting them could enhance the financial dividends for the fishing industry. Research has also proved that they can act as a barrier against tidal flooding and coastal erosion, as their roots, embedded in the coastal land, provide shoreline stability.

 

Another important yet neglected element of the viable use of the mangroves is recreation. Countries with these natural assets often develop ways to utilise coastal mangrove forestation as sites for exciting recreational activities, which not only draw tourists and have tremendous financial value but also provide educational benefits.

 

Farhan Anwar is an urban planner and runs a non-profit organisation based in Karachi focusing on urban sustainability issues

 

Published in The Express Tribune, February 2rd, 2015.

   

tribune.com.pk/story/831276/the-mangroves-of-karachi-faci...

  

The most visible and delicate ecosystem of Karachi, a city with a profound coastal environment, is that of the mangrove forests that thrive in the mingled salt and freshwater where the Indus River meets the Arabian Sea.

 

These forests, however, are under existential threat for a number of reasons, particularly along the city coastline. There is untreated municipal waste and industrial pollution causing still-undetermined amounts of damage, there is exploitation of the trees by the area’s communities for use as firewood, building material and fodder and, most alarmingly, there is the chopping down of the forests to make way for coastal development projects.

 

The Pakistani coastline stretches for around 990 kilometres, with the Exclusive Economic Zone – the sea zone in which the state has special rights over marine resources – covering an area of about 240,000 square kilometres. Meanwhile, the 220-kilometre Sindh coastal belt, characterised by a network of tidal creeks and numerous islands with mangrove vegetation, is divided between the Indus Delta system and the Karachi coast. The former is home to the largest arid climate mangroves in the world, while mangrove forestation also dots the latter.

  

A vast ecosystem

  

According to the Sindh Coastal Community Development Project, the extensive mangrove swamps of Sindh spread over approximately 100,000 hectares. The black mangrove, with aerial roots growing up out of the mud, is the most common species. The forests also house the red mangrove, Rhizophora mucronata, Ceriops tagal and Aegiceras corniculatum, as well as several species of marine seaweed that often grow as algal mats on the surface of the mud.

 

The mangrove swamps, creeks and mudflats serve as a breeding ground for a diverse variety of marine life along the Sindh coastline, such as mussels, oysters, shrimp and fish, which move offshore as they grow. Some species of migratory birds, too, use the swamps as wintering grounds.

 

It is not just animals and vegetation that are supported by the vast ecosystem formed by Sindh’s mangroves. The 100,000 people living along the northern edge of the Indus Delta use an estimated 18,000 tons of mangrove firewood each year, while the leaves and shoots are used as fodder for livestock.

 

The mangroves, beautiful as they are, offer more than just aesthetic value: they can greatly benefit both the city and the country if they are properly harnessed. Protecting them could enhance the financial dividends for the fishing industry. Research has also proved that they can act as a barrier against tidal flooding and coastal erosion, as their roots, embedded in the coastal land, provide shoreline stability.

 

Another important yet neglected element of the viable use of the mangroves is recreation. Countries with these natural assets often develop ways to utilise coastal mangrove forestation as sites for exciting recreational activities, which not only draw tourists and have tremendous financial value but also provide educational benefits.

 

Farhan Anwar is an urban planner and runs a non-profit organisation based in Karachi focusing on urban sustainability issues

 

Published in The Express Tribune, February 2rd, 2015.

   

Panorama constructed from 5 Images, stitched in Microsoft ICE. Taken on the 04/03/ 2014 at 14:20:38Hrs using a Nikon D3100 camera with an AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR Lens+ a 52mm UV filter,

The Royal Victoria Dock Panorama.

With the Thames cable car (Emirates Air Line) on the left, The O2 and the Crystal in the centre and Excel on the right

The Crystal is a building on The Royal Victoria Dock in east London that contains a permanent exhibition about sustainable development.

For more detail Click on down arrow on the right corner under image and Go to VIEW ALL SIZES & THEN choose ORIGINAL

  

our community garden plot, early July 2017

Wilkinson Eyre; 2012

  

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Explore: Feb 27, 2011 #204

 

This urban sustainable park is geolocated inside the former Monterrey Foundry Property with an area of 142 hectares (1.42 km2). The Monterrey Foundry (Monterrey Steel Foundry Company) operated from 1900 until its bankruptcy in 1986. Two (2) years later, after been legally declared financially insolvent, the Fideicomiso Fundidora (Fundidora Escrow) was installed to administer the Park. The park has several industrial buildings from the Old Foundry making it a top famous Archeological Industrial Site in Mexico.

 

Don't use this image on Websites/Blog or any other media

without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved. / Todos los derechos reservados, no usar sin permiso.

“We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.”

~ Jawaharlal Nehru

 

Just thinking back to my first visit to the Toronto Brickworks a year ago today.

The Brickworks is a former brick factory and quarry. You can read a bit more about its history here.

 

After it closed, it became a popular site for urban exploration. I've seen some amazing images of the Brickworks ~ you can see some of my favourites here :~ )

 

The Brickworks is currently undergoing a transformation to a centre for "for urban sustainability and green design" by Evergreen Brickworks.

 

P.S. View large on black, if you're so inclined. Another image in comments below.

At the invitation of President Barack Obama, President Dilma Rousseff made an official visit to the United States on April 9, 2012 to discuss their countries’ ongoing relationship on a broad range of bilateral, regional, and multilateral issues. The Leaders expressed satisfaction with the constructive and balanced partnership, based on the shared values and mutual trust that exist between their countries, the two largest democracies and economies in the Americas .

   

To form a U.S.-Brazil Partnership for the 21st Century, the Leaders reviewed the progress of major dialogues elevated to the Presidential-level in March 2011 – the Economic and Financial Dialogue, the Global Partnership Dialogue, and the Strategic Energy Dialogue. To contribute to the 21st Century Partnership, the Presidents directed a new Defense Cooperation Dialogue between their two Defense Ministers that will also report regularly to the Presidents. They praised the work and acknowledged the importance of numerous other interactions and consultations between their two governments in enhancing bilateral cooperation.

   

They coincided on the importance of the contributions from civil society and the private sector to create the basis for a US-Brazil Partnership. The Presidents participated in the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum, noting the important role that the private sector plays in the commercial relationship and welcomed the activities of the April 9, 2012 “US-Brazil Partnership for the 21st Century” conference in Washington focused on trade and investment, energy, innovation, competitiveness, and education.

   

The Leaders stressed that partnerships between state and local governments contribute to the fostering of friendship and understanding between their countries and to the advancing of shared national goals. They welcomed the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding to Support State and Local Cooperation, encouraging subnational entities to unite efforts to achieve goals in areas of mutual interest that complement the strengthening of U.S.-Brazil bilateral relations, such as trade and investment, economic opportunity, science, technology and innovation, social inclusion, environmental sustainability, and preparation for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games and other megaevents.

   

The Leaders highlighted the important discussions that have taken place under the Economic and Financial Dialogue (EFD). The Presidents noted their satisfaction with the EFD’s expanded focus on infrastructure and investment in both countries and welcomed the creation of a dialogue on investment under the Agreement on Trade and Economic Cooperation. The Leaders also noted the importance of the Commercial Dialogue and the Economic Partnership Dialogue between the two countries. President Obama announced the September 2012 trip of the President’s Export Council to Brazil and President Rousseff stressed that high-level sectoral trade missions to the US will be organized, in areas such as foodservice, information technology, health and machinery.

   

President Rousseff underscored the importance of investment in infrastructure—including in view of the upcoming 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympics Games—as well as in the energy sector, in particular the development of technology and productive capacity in Brazil .

   

They welcomed the growth of the U.S.-Brazil trade and investment relationship, illustrated by a record $74 billion in two-way trade in 2011. They further emphasized the importance of the mutual benefits of stimulating increased trade and investment. They reiterated their commitment to the multilateral trading system and to working together to ensure that the World Trade Organization contributes to global economic growth and job creation. The Presidents reaffirmed the commitment of both countries to advance trade in services and manufactured goods and to strengthen collaboration in agricultural policies, research, science-based sanitary and phytosanitary measures, as well as to strive, both in bilateral and multilateral fora, towards the removal of barriers to trade in agricultural products.

   

They highlighted education as an increasingly important strategic priority for strengthening and supporting all aspects of the U.S.-Brazil partnership, particularly science, technology, innovation, and competitiveness. Recognizing the economic advantages for both countries of increasing contact between Americans and Brazilians, the Presidents welcomed the momentum of and support for the U.S. 100,000 Strong in the Americas and the Brazilian Science Without Borders international exchange initiatives. They hailed the start of activities of the first group of students and researchers participating in Science Without Borders and look forward to welcoming thousands more students in both countries.

   

The Presidents welcomed the VII US-Brazil CEO Forum’s support for the 100,000 Strong in the Americas and Science Without Borders initiatives, and their joint recommendations and commitment to enhanced engagement aimed at strengthening the business environment, increasing bilateral trade and investment, improving infrastructure, enhancing women’s economic empowerment, encouraging energy and aviation cooperation, and tracking progress toward these ends.

   

In the context of the EFD, the Presidents discussed greater collaboration in international financial institutions and as they look toward the G-20 Summit in Mexico to reduce global imbalances, promote financial stability and inclusion; and to create the conditions for strong, sustained, and balanced growth. They stressed the need to deepen the reform of the international financial institutions, which must reflect the new economic realities and, in this regard, underscored the importance of working together on quota and governance reforms in the IMF.

   

They welcomed the consolidation of the G20 as the highest forum for coordination of international economic policies and reaffirmed the G20 role in advancing measures to promote inclusive growth, job creation and overcoming global imbalances. They recommended that the two countries’ senior representatives to the G20 continue to hold regular bilateral consultations. They noted the continued uncertainty present in the international economy while highlighting the important steps recently taken by European policymakers. They welcomed the continued signs of economic recovery in the United States . The Leaders also highlighted the opportunity for closer cooperation in the Multilateral Development Banks.

   

The Presidents noted the convergence of positions regarding the application of the "Emissions Trading System" (ETS) of the European Union, to international air transport. They further emphasized that issues related to international civil aviation emissions should be resolved multilaterally.

   

The Presidents underscored the importance of the upcoming United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in Brazil as an opportunity to promote sustainable development through innovation and broad stakeholder engagement. They emphasized the importance of broad participation in the High Level Segment of the Conference, on June 20-22, 2012. In support of this expanded collaboration, they recognized progress on mobilizing investments in smart and sustainable infrastructure in Rio de Janeiro and Philadelphia under the US-Brazil Joint Initiative on Urban Sustainability.

   

The Leaders praised the strengthening of US-Brazil dialogue on sustainable development and welcomed the adoption of an Environmental Protection Agency-Ministry of Environment Memorandum of Understanding, focused on environmental impact assessment, risk analysis, social inclusion and environmental justice. The leaders also praised the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on Sustainable Housing and Urban Development to grow cooperative efforts and deepen learning exchange in the field of sustainable housing and urban development in support of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA).

   

They welcomed the outcomes of the 17th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change held in Durban , in December 2011, which reached a comprehensive and balanced result. They further highlighted the importance of the multilateral system in dealing with climate change through effective implementation of the outcomes from Durban .

   

The Leaders praised the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding on the Aviation Partnership, as well as progress made toward facilitating greater travel and tourism between their countries while maintaining and improving border security. They noted that the US-Brazil Aviation Partnership will promote bilateral cooperation in infrastructure, air transportation, and air traffic, which will contribute to growth, competitiveness and socioeconomic development in both countries. Areas of engagement may include exchanges of best practices, research and development, innovation, new technologies, sustainability, training, logistics, supply chains and other topics.

   

The Presidents reviewed the implementation of measures that facilitate the flow of tourists and business executives between the two countries. They committed to work closely together to satisfy the requirements of the of the US Visa Waiver Program and Brazil ’s applicable legislation to enable US and Brazilian citizens visa free travel. They discussed the “Global Entry” pilot-program and praised the efforts of both governments to facilitate travel, to the benefit of their respective citizens. President Obama recalled his directive to accelerate the U.S. ability to process visas by 40 percent in Brazil this year as well as the Department of State’s recent announcement of its intent to open new consulates in Belo Horizonte and Porto Alegre .

   

They expressed their satisfaction with the advancement of a ”Green-Lane” pilot-project on air cargo transportation, aimed at adopting a broad program of mutual recognition of authorized economic operators, to facilitate trade in goods between the two countries.

   

The Presidents welcomed the adoption of the Brazil-US Action Plan on Science and Technology Cooperation, which reflects the outcome of the March 2012 Joint Commission Meeting (JCM) on Science and Technology and highlighted the creation of a working group on innovation to explore the role of innovation in promoting competitiveness and job creation. The JCM also addressed cooperation in ocean science, technology and observation, disaster management, basic science, measurement standards, including for advanced biofuels, and the importance of access to Earth Observation data. They also welcomed the discussions during the III JCM on health, biomedicine and life sciences, women in science and nanotechnology.

   

The Leaders highlighted the importance of strengthening the bilateral space cooperation and instructed the appropriate agencies to examine the feasibility of developing joint space projects. They took note of the recent meeting in Brasilia of the Space Security Dialogue.

   

They highlighted the increasing importance of Internet and information and communication technologies (ICT)-related issues and the need to deepen discussion and expand cooperation between the U.S. and Brazil on issues so vital to their economies and societies. They noted with satisfaction the longstanding collaboration in those areas and welcomed the establishment of a new mechanism for consultations on issues such as Internet governance, Internet/ICT policy, and cyber security.

   

The Presidents spoke at length about global developments and welcomed the continued progress of the Global Partnership Dialogue (GPD). They welcomed the advancement of educational cooperation, scientific cooperation, and trilateral cooperation under the GPD. The Leaders noted their commitment to promote democracy, respect for human rights, cultural awareness, and social and economic inclusion around the world.

   

The Presidents concurred that just as other international organizations have had to change to be more responsive to the challenges of the 21st century, the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) also needs to be reformed, and expressed their support for a modest expansion of the Security Council that improves its effectiveness and efficiency, as well as its representativeness. President Obama reaffirmed his appreciation for Brazil ’s aspiration to become a permanent member of the Security Council and acknowledged its assumption of global responsibilities. The two leaders pledged to continue consultation and cooperation between the two countries to achieve the vision outlined in the UN Charter of a more peaceful and secure world.

   

In exchanging views on recent challenges in Africa and the Middle East , the Presidents underscored the importance of cooperative efforts to bring about the sustainable settlement of disputes that contribute to peace and stability. They expressed their commitment to support, as a matter of urgency, comprehensive and lasting multilateral solutions to today’s pressing global issues and crises.

   

The Leaders reaffirmed their commitment to government transparency and accountability, as well as citizen engagement as key to strengthening democracy, human rights, and good governance, and preventing corruption. They celebrated their joint launch of the Open Government Partnership (OGP) in New York last September, praised the close collaboration between the two countries as co-chairs of the Partnership and discussed the upcoming OGP meeting in Brasilia, at which more than forty new countries will issue National Action Plans that include concrete new commitments on fighting corruption, promoting transparency, and harnessing new technologies to empower citizens.

   

President Obama congratulated President Rousseff on Brazil 's Freedom of Information Act, and its regional and global leadership role in engaging civil society and attracting a diverse set of countries to the second major high-level meeting. President Rousseff also congratulated President Obama on the U.S. implementation of its OGP plan, including the recent launch of Ethics.gov and the new Green Button initiative to ensure consumers have access to their own energy data.

   

The Leaders also reviewed and noted the progress of their countries’ trilateral development cooperation in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa on issues ranging from food security, energy, agriculture, health, decent work, and humanitarian cooperation. They recalled their collaborative work and directed further efforts on trilateral food security cooperation. They welcomed the signing of an agreement on technical cooperation activities to improve food security in third countries.

   

They encouraged greater trilateral security cooperation and welcomed the recent launching of the pilot project for integrated monitoring system for surplus coca cultivation reduction in Bolivia .

   

The Presidents praised the cooperation fostered under the Joint Action Plan To Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Discrimination and Promote Equality in the areas of health, environmental justice, access to justice, education, and entrepreneurship in sports megaevents. They noted that as their economies grow, it is important that the benefits accrue to all sectors, including children and aged people and historically marginalized sectors such as women, people of African descent, indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, and LGBT people. They welcomed additional collaboration on LGBT issues in human rights multilateral fora. They also highlighted progress in bilateral cooperation for gender equality and advancement in the status of women, including efforts aimed at increasing women´s political and economic participation in the fields of science and technology; as well as the prioritization of prevention and response to gender-based violence globally.

   

The Presidents reaffirmed the commitment of both countries to the conclusion of an effective international instrument in the World Intellectual Property Organization that ensures that copyright is not a barrier to equal access to information, culture, and education for visually impaired persons and persons with print disabilities.

   

They expressed their satisfaction with the positive effect of the dialogue regarding the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction on the implementation of this instrument in Brazil and in the United States .

   

The Leaders expressed their support for the theme of the upcoming Summit of the Americas, "Connecting the Americas: Partners for Prosperity", which focuses on the role of physical integration, regional cooperation, poverty and inequalities, citizen security, disasters, and access to technologies as a means to achieve greater levels of development and overcome challenges in the Americas.

   

The Heads of State discussed the importance of continued economic progress and political stability in Haiti , to include the formation of a new government and timely elections. They underlined the achievements of the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) and encouraged the Government of Haiti (GOH) to work toward strengthening governance and the rule of law. They further encouraged Haiti to continue to pursue the development of the Haitian National Police. To spur new public-private partnerships for Haiti’s energy sector, the Leaders committed to working with the GOH on developing and implementing its national energy plan, including its plans to modernize Haiti’s electric utility and harness renewable energy sources, like the Artibonite 4C hydroelectric plant, to power Haiti’s future development.

   

The Presidents noted the launch of the Strategic Energy Dialogue (SED) with significant interagency collaboration of both countries. They underscored increased cooperation on oil and gas, biofuels, renewable energy and energy efficiency, science, and clean energy. Underscoring the importance of developing all of these key resources for global energy security, the Leaders directed their governments to seek greater opportunities to work with industry partners to help stabilize global oil and gas markets, increase access to energy, and enhance and promote the development and deployment of renewable, clean and low-carbon energy technologies.

   

The Leaders noted the importance of broader collaboration on oil and gas exploration; in particular the safe, clean, and efficient production of their countries’ oil and gas reserves. They emphasized their commitment to provide opportunities that encourage companies to invest in production and to share their technology and their experience in ways that develop capacity in the oil and gas sector. They highlighted the importance of their governments and industries sharing information on best practices, including on unconventional gas development and through ongoing technical collaboration on deep-water oil and gas operations.

   

The Leaders committed to continue building on their countries’ collaboration on bioenergy technology development and research, as well as sustainability; including for aviation biofuels and cooperation in third countries, such as Global Bioenergy Partnership capacity building in West Africa . They hailed the joint efforts that resulted in the conclusion of the first phase of viability studies for bioenergy production in third countries under the framework of the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance Cooperation on Biofuels.

   

The Presidents highlighted the importance of their regional cooperation on renewable energy through identification of potential financial resources from multilateral organizations. With regard to energy efficiency, they committed to support regional efforts to increase cooperation in the energy sector and further collaboration under the auspices of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas .

   

As part of the Presidential Dialogues, the Leaders directed the establishment of a Defense Cooperation Dialogue (DCD) and announced its first meeting on April 24 in Brazil . They noted the importance of the enhanced dialogue in enabling closer bilateral defense cooperation between their countries based on mutual respect and trust. They also observed the DCD will provide a forum for exchanging views and identifying opportunities for collaboration on defense issues around the globe.

   

They reiterated both countries’ strong resolve to support international efforts towards nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear security, and disarmament, aiming to achieve the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons. In this regard, they expressed support for the review cycle of the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), and the goals identified in the Action Plan adopted by the VIII NPT Review Conference, which includes the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the beginning of negotiations on a treaty banning the production of fissile materials for nuclear weapons or other explosive purposes, and related initiatives. They decided to intensify bilateral and multilateral cooperation in the field of physical protection and nuclear safety, as well as the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.

  

Remarks

Reta Jo Lewis

Special Representative for Global Intergovernmental Affairs

The John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute, Northeastern University

 

Boston, MA

 

April 6, 2012

   

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  

Good afternoon and thank you Richard for that very kind introduction.

 

I am delighted to have the opportunity to visit Northeastern University, a highly acclaimed institution well-known for experiential research opportunities with a global outlook.

 

I would like to take a moment to thank the John D. O’Bryant African-American Institute. Not just for hosting this afternoon’s event, but for your commitment to intellectually, culturally, and socially inspiring students of African descent toward excellence, success, and service. Under the inspired leadership of Dr. Richard O’Bryant, the Institute fosters a positive and inspiring learning environment.

 

Today, the world faces a unique set of challenges -- economic, environmental, social, and political – that require collaborative innovation and determination of our world’s best minds.

 

It is almost hard to imagine how much has happened in the last 18 months, from revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa, to renewed fears over economic default in Europe. The world has changed very quickly under our feet and before our eyes.

 

Over the last three years, the United States has ended one war, and we have begun to wind down another. We are affirming our place as a Pacific power. We are strengthening our alliance with our European and NATO partners. We are elevating the role of economics and development within U.S. diplomacy to help create jobs here at home and to advance our strategic interests around the world. And of course, we are reaching beyond governments to engage directly with people.

 

In this fast changing world, the Obama Administration is convinced of the need to seize this moment, to meet these challenges, and to lay the foundation for sustained global leadership in a rapidly changing world increasingly linked and transformed by new technologies. Only America has the reach, resources, and relationships to anchor a more peaceful and prosperous world.

 

At the same time, urbanization is occurring at an unprecedented rate, especially in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Fifty-two percent of the earth’s population now lives in cities. Every week one million people move to cities. Continued rapid urbanization will lead to three billion new urban dwellers.

 

Global partnerships which put aside individual philosophies and focus on solutions are essential to solving these global challenges and to building a more stable and secure world.

 

As Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton has said, and as the United States has long maintained, U.S. foreign policy relationships will always be nation-to-nation. But the scope of what defines nation-to-nation conversations are shifting in the modern, more global, and more flattened economy – deeming city-to-city and state-to-state dialogues just as critical to the larger context of executing, implementing, and achieving a nation’s overarching diplomatic goals.

 

Building peer-to-peer relationships between state and local elected officials has a tremendous effect on foreign policy that often goes unrecognized. Still, building these relationships and encouraging this engagement at the subnational level has limitless potential.

 

Peer-to-peer relationships provide state and local leaders around the globe with an intimate glance into the American way of life, and more importantly, into our democratic institutions and system of governance. Even at a more basic but equally important level, these interactions develop trust – an attribute essential to developing strong bilateral ties.

 

Secretary Clinton has stated time and time again that 21st century global challenges require us to work with new partners to collaborate and innovate globally. At the Department of State, this has meant making a transition to 21st Century Statecraft, a strategy for creating partnerships for achieving modern diplomatic goals by engaging all the elements of our national power and leveraging all forms of our strength.

 

Two years ago, Secretary Clinton created the Office of Global Intergovernmental Affairs emphasizing the need to utilize local leaders as a key component in the much needed widespread and deep-rooted efforts to take on our world’s greatest challenges – a key part of that charge is empowering subnational officials to lead their states and communities to a stable and secure future.

 

My job is to realize Secretary Clinton’s vision by connecting what the Federal Government does best with what state and local governments are doing and can do, and what our successful private sector is doing and can do. We have launched partnerships with China, India, and Brazil to strengthen subnational economic and cultural networks.

 

So, just as Secretary Clinton engages in important bilateral discussions with her counterparts, such as the Minister of External Relations of Brazil, so too does our office engage in pivotal conversations on a range of issues with Brazilian mayors and governors.

 

I just returned from a 10-day visit to Brazil during which I sought opportunities for state-to-state cooperation around the 2014 World Cup matches, trade and security interests, Sister City relationships, and social inclusion programs. I have worked to expand the relationships between U.S. mayors and governors and their counterparts in Brazil. I have made several trips to Brazil to support this effort. In each of the twelve cities and states I have visited, I have been met with incredible enthusiasm.

 

Exchanges between Brazilian and U.S. subnational entities have become more numerous and robust in the past two years. We have worked with the governors of California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, and other elected officials to connect with their fellow leaders in Brazil

 

While all of the Brazilian officials with whom I have met have expressed the desire to collaborate in various ways, the issue of education is raised consistently. The United States and Brazil strongly support the internationalization of higher education. Both nations truly are honoring the commitments established in the U.S.-Brazil Partnership on Education by working together to achieve the shared goals of President Obama’s 100,000 Strong for the Americas initiative and Brazilian President Rousseff’s Science Without Borders. I am committed to engaging subnational entities in this effort, and am proud that we can count on their leadership and expertise to help make these initiatives successful.

 

For example, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick led a delegation of university leaders to Brazil last year, where they established the TOP USA-Massachusetts Program, an initiative that will promote an academic exchange of faculty and students between several Brazilian and Massachusetts universities. I had the opportunity to meet with a delegation from CAPES (the Brazilian Federal Agency for the Support and Evaluation of Graduate Education) in Washington, DC last month during their Science Without Borders exchange. They made visits to various states a top priority. During her U.S. visit next week, President Rousseff plans to visit Massachusetts where she will meet with Governor Patrick and speak at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). When the United States and Brazil initiated the Partnership on Education, this is precisely what we had in mind.

 

These relationships truly strengthen the U.S.-Brazil bilateral partnership. As the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games approach, and as efforts are made to prepare our young citizens for the workforce and future leadership, the importance of subnational engagement between our nations becomes increasingly palpable.

 

The United States and Brazil signed in 2011 a memorandum of understanding to work together in preparation for these major global sporting events. In this agreement, we recalled our prior commitments from the Joint Action Plan to promote Ethnic and Racial Equality (JAPER) and the MOU for the advancement of women. We affirmed that we view these mega events as opportunities to tackle inequality and to advance economic opportunities to ensure citizens at every level of society benefit from those opportunities.

 

So, as we interact with state and local leaders in Brazil and around the world, we employ Secretary Clinton’s Economic Statecraft initiative which place economics and market forces at the center of U.S. foreign policy. Economic Statecraft harnesses global economic forces to advance America’s foreign policy and employs the tools of foreign policy to shore up our economic strength. In furtherance of the Secretary’s vision, our office has leveraged U.S. state and local officials in our economic strategy in China and India, among other nations.

 

For instance, we supported the establishment of the U.S. China Governors Forum in 2011. It has been reported that this dialogue fostered interactions that resulted in tangible U.S. job creation.

 

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal visited several Chinese cities and corporations in October 2011, including Sany Group, which has invested $60 million in Peachtree City, Georgia. Sany Group plans to invest $25 million more in the State of Georgia, and to hire 300 engineers over the next five years.

 

Similarly, North Carolina Governor Beverly Perdue’s interactions with Chinese subnational leaders has reportedly led to an agreement between a Chinese and U.S. company that will create approximately 300 new jobs in North Carolina.

 

We collaborated with Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley on his historic trade mission to India in 2011. The mission resulted in opening new doors for the State of Maryland to create jobs, bolster trade and investments, and strengthen existing business relationships.

 

Two Indian companies plan investments in Maryland and eight Maryland businesses signed deals with Indian partners, with a combined total of nearly $60 million in business deals for the state and several additional deals worth millions still on the horizon.

 

While in India, Governor O’Malley met with a number of top Indian companies to promote Maryland as an ideal location for establishing U.S. operations. He signed an agreement in New Delhi with the Federation of India Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) to create an India-Maryland Center in Maryland to boost trade between the two regions.

 

In addition, Maryland signed an agreement with the U.S.-India Importers Council committing Maryland and India to boost imports and exports. During the first nine months of 2011, the Port of Baltimore saw $341 in trade to and from India compared with $229 million during the same timeframe in 2010 – a 49 percent increase.

 

Many of the agreements entered into between Maryland and India will be of direct benefit to India. For example, CyperPoint, a Maryland cyber security company signed a $10 million contract with New Delhi-based Appin Security Group to jointly develop security solutions for mobile phones. A $20-50 million deal agreed to by Amarex Clinical Research, a Maryland company, and Scalene Cybernetics Limited, an Indian company, will create jobs both in Maryland and India.

 

While we are committed to continue working with state and local officials to advance U.S. economic interests, we are at the same time collaborating with these leaders on the creation of a sustainable future.

 

Today, we face daunting global challenges and we look forward to discussing them at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20, in Rio de Janeiro in June. As we head toward an urbanized planet, we will have to build over the next 40 years, the same urban capacity as we have built over the past 4,000 years.

 

I believe we have the ability to meet all of these needs to build a sustainable future. We have the tools and the understanding, and we have the necessary commitment to global cooperation and collaboration. U.S. subnational leaders want to work with their foreign counterparts, with the private sector, investors, and clean technology to achieve global sustainability.

 

Rio+20 is about the future. The United States believes that Rio+20 should be a different kind of meeting, one that transforms the multilateral approach to sustainable development and incorporates its concepts across all sectors. It is our hope that Rio+20 will be truly inclusive of a broad collection of stakeholders, including state and local officials, civil society and the private sector.

 

States and cities do not face a choice between green and growth: they CAN and MUST pursue both. There is no “one-size-fits-all” model for implementing sustainability, and strategies will differ across regions as they do across countries. However, we firmly believe that local government leadership bears the fundamental responsibility to support urban sustainability.

 

Another fundamental message that the United States is bringing to Rio is the importance of good governance if we are to achieve a sustainable future. We need governance at all levels to be open and transparent, with robust channels for public participation, to better engage citizens and build new networks across all sectors of our societies.

 

So again, organizing subnational relationships promotes a deeper cultural exchange among nations, advances principles of openness, freedom, transparency and fairness in economic growth, and assists in the creation of a sustainable future.

 

In a 21st century world, there are no shortages of great partnerships, nor shortages of great ideas when we shore up our collective will to address the challenges we face.

 

By combining our strengths, we can more than double our impact to this subnational end. And the multiplier effect continues if we add philanthropies, businesses, NGOs, universities, and entrepreneurs. That’s the power of partnership at its best -- allowing us to achieve so much more together than we could apart.

 

As young people and the next generation who will inherit this globalized world, you possess the power to make change. You are indeed privileged to attend this fine university which affords you the opportunity to develop a global view, as well as the leadership skills to take grassroots action for peace, prosperity, and sustainability.

 

All over the world today our youth are taking up the batons of civic engagement and striving to build a world free of social ailments. They are springing up against dictatorships and occupying the excesses of corporate inequality; they are insisting upon a strong respect for our environment and challenging the status quo of bitter partisanship.

 

In order for the youth of today to truly be the leaders of tomorrow, in order for them to become effective advocates for inclusion and vanguards of social change, they would be well-advised to heed the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. All of us must continue to make those around us aware that the path to social change demands an ethic of public service, a commitment to reconciliation, and a spirit of love and mutuality.

 

Only 26 years old when he began preaching the gospel of tolerance, Dr. King’s principles of understanding – even now – are vital to encouraging young minds to build a compassionate world that stands up against inequality, illiteracy, hunger, and poverty, for many generations to come.

 

I am here today to urge you to prepare yourselves to be effective global citizens by sharpening your international perspective. I thank you for being here today to participate in this discussion of U.S. global engagement. Learning a foreign language and studying abroad are two excellent ways to expand your world view.

 

Secretary Clinton strongly supports study abroad programs. In her 2009 New York University commencement speech, Secretary Clinton said, “…study abroad is like spring training for this century: It helps you develop the fundamentals, the teamwork, and the determination to succeed. And we want more American students to have that opportunity.”

 

At the State Department, we are committed to increasing the number and the diversity of students who study in this country, as well as our American students who study abroad. We need and welcome your participation in this effort.

 

For our part, we recognize that finding new ways to communicate and engage with you and the young citizens of the world is critical. After all, nearly half of the world’s population -- almost 3 billion people -- is under the age of 25. The State Department is committed to strengthening our bonds with youth – reaching them wherever they are around the globe, by using every tool at our command including new media. In fact, last fall I took a leap into the 21st century by joining Twitter. Follow me at @SSRGIA so that we can stay connected.

 

And with that, I am happy to take your questions.

  

Mchezaji "Che" Axum, Director of the Center for Urban Agriculture and Gardening Education in the College of Agriculture Urban Sustainability and Environmental Sciences (CAUSES), speaks to visitors during a pre-93rd Annual Agriculture Outlook Forum field trip to the University of District of Columbia (UDC) Urban Farm in Beltsville, MD, Feb. 22, 2017. UDC is one of the nation's only land grant universities in an urban environment offering gardening skills to D.C. residents and business expertise to aspiring urban farmers. The farm has greenhouses/hoop houses with winter crop production, solar energy, composting, irrigation, and aquaponic systems. USDA Photo by Preston Keres.

Here's a 3 shot HDR of The Crystal, which is London’s newest landmark building and the world’s first center dedicated to improving our knowledge of urban sustainability. It is a sustainable cities initiative by Siemens that explores how we can create a better future for our cities. It is home to the world's largest exhibition focused on urban sustainability.

 

On the left is the Emirate Air Line, the new Cable Car system across Thames.

I made Masa from scratch for the very first time with two friends the other day... bought the dry corn kernels at a Latino market plus the lime. Soaked over night then removed the outer shells by rubbing them in a course basket. We used two hand grinders out doors on my marble top planter box. I pressed and grilled some tortillas for dinner last night!

 

*In this photo composition:

 

My hand with an antique turquoise Navajo ring with well worn thunder birds.

 

A vintage Bauer California Pottery mixing bowl.

 

A dry cob of corn that my daughter gave me from the urban sustainable farm that she apprenticed at. I was suppose to do some popcorn with it but end up saving it as a keep sake... will meet up with both daughters in about one hour :-)

 

*Created for the Our Daily Challenge topic:

 

TURQUOISE OR AQUA

our community garden plot, early July 2017

The Wilkinson Eyre-designed Crystal London. a landmark building for Siemens

With the Thames cable car (Emirates Air Line) on the left.

Panorama constructed from 4 Images, stitched in Microsoft ICE. Taken on the 3rd of September 2012 at 09:44:57Hrs using a Nikon D3100 camera with an AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR Lens+ a 52mm UV filter,

The Crystal is a building on Royal Victoria Dock in east London that contains a permanent exhibition about sustainable development.

 

Choose VIEW ALL SIZES & then choose ORIGINAL for more detail.

 

our community garden plot, early July 2017

our community garden plot, early July 2017

The Crystal reflects the nearby Royal Victoria Dock with Canary Wharf appearing in the background. The Crystal is a sustainable cities initiative by Siemens that explores how we can create a better future for our cities. It is home to the world's largest exhibition focused on urban sustainability.

 

See more of London here or connect on Facebook

  

Jon & Tina Reid | Portfolio | Blog

our community garden plot, early July 2017

My former wife and I were scheduled last Sunday to go on a hike together. When she arrived to pick me up I was given these tomatoes, a lemon, and some figs that came from the urban sustainable farm where my eldest daughter has been doing her apprenticeship. Michaela graduated with honors in Cultural Anthropology. On this farm she lives in a Yurt that she shares with another apprentice. She is very happy up there. It has been hard work to grow this 'unexpected delight' that I was gifted. It's hard to describe how good these taste!

 

Tomato Baby I love you!

 

******************************

 

*A vintage carnival chalk figurine prize circa 1940's

 

*A red Fiesta Ware bowl.

 

Our Daily Challenge

UNEXPECTED DELIGHTS

William Oberlin, Brian Ferrier, Andy Baker and I joined forces on a hole design for The Putting Lot, a new miniature golf course in Bushwick themed around the concept of urban sustainability.

 

Our hole is constructed out of reclaimed materials from Build It Green and is designed to recreate the rewarding (or potentially frustrating) experience of embarking on a sustainable building project, and is named the Geographically Limiting the Origin of Resources Yielded (or G.L.O.R.Y. for short) hole.

 

The Lot opened this weekend, come out and play! It's across the street from the Jefferson L stop. For address and other info, see www.theputtinglot.org

 

This urban sustainable park is geolocated inside the former Monterrey Foundry Property with an area of 142 hectares (1.42 km2). The Monterrey Foundry (Monterrey Steel Foundry Company) operated from 1900 until its bankruptcy in 1986. Two (2) years later, after been legally declared financially insolvent, the Fideicomiso Fundidora (Fundidora Escrow) was installed to administer the Park. The park has several industrial buildings from the Old Foundry making it a top famous Archeological Industrial Site in Mexico.

 

Don't use this image on Websites/Blog or any other media

without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved. / Todos los derechos reservados, no usar sin permiso.

This urban sustainable park is geolocated inside the former Monterrey Foundry Property with an area of 142 hectares (1.42 km2). The Monterrey Foundry (Monterrey Steel Foundry Company) operated from 1900 until its bankruptcy in 1986. Two (2) years later, after been legally declared financially insolvent, the Fideicomiso Fundidora (Fundidora Escrow) was installed to administer the Park. The park has several industrial buildings from the Old Foundry making it a top famous Archeological Industrial Site in Mexico.

 

Don't use this image on Websites/Blog or any other media

without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved. / Todos los derechos reservados, no usar sin permiso.

Siemens Urban Sustainability Centre, by Wilkinson Eyre

our community garden plot, early July 2017

Cluttered urban mobility of 2019 - Blue rental scooter, toppled rental bicycle, personal bicycle, orange rental scooter, blue rental scooter, green rental scooter.

 

For more cities: www.flickr.com/photos/157917259@N03/albums/72157710038373492

our community garden plot, early July 2017

This urban sustainable park is geolocated inside the former Monterrey Foundry Property with an area of 142 hectares (1.42 km2). The Monterrey Foundry (Monterrey Steel Foundry Company) operated from 1900 until its bankruptcy in 1986. Two (2) years later, after been legally declared financially insolvent, the Fideicomiso Fundidora (Fundidora Escrow) was installed to administer the Park. The park has several industrial buildings from the Old Foundry making it a top famous Archeological Industrial Site in Mexico.

 

Don't use this image on Websites/Blog or any other media

without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved. / Todos los derechos reservados, no usar sin permiso.

Sabina O’Hara, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability & Environmental Sciences, University of the District of Columbia (UDC) offered a vignette, “New Skills for Urban Agriculture” with emphasis on aquaculture, hydroponic, food waste composting and water waste management at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Science, Technology and Math (STEM) symposium, “America the Bountiful” at the USDA in Washington, D. C. Thur. Oct. 6, 2016. The symposium focused on education, career opportunities and entrepreneurship in science, technology and math disciplines associated with agriculture. USDA photo by Bob Nichols.

Sabina O’Hara, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability & Environmental Sciences, University of the District of Columbia (UDC) offered a vignette, “New Skills for Urban Agriculture” with emphasis on aquaculture, hydroponic, food waste composting and water waste management at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Science, Technology and Math (STEM) symposium, “America the Bountiful” at the USDA in Washington, D. C. Thur. Oct. 6, 2016. The symposium focused on education, career opportunities and entrepreneurship in science, technology and math disciplines associated with agriculture. USDA photo by Bob Nichols.

Sabina O’Hara, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability & Environmental Sciences, University of the District of Columbia (UDC) offered a vignette, “New Skills for Urban Agriculture” with emphasis on aquaculture, hydroponic, food waste composting and water waste management at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Science, Technology and Math (STEM) symposium, “America the Bountiful” at the USDA in Washington, D. C. Thur. Oct. 6, 2016. The symposium focused on education, career opportunities and entrepreneurship in science, technology and math disciplines associated with agriculture. USDA photo by Bob Nichols.

Sabina O’Hara, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability & Environmental Sciences, University of the District of Columbia (UDC) offered a vignette, “New Skills for Urban Agriculture” with emphasis on aquaculture, hydroponic, food waste composting and water waste management at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Science, Technology and Math (STEM) symposium, “America the Bountiful” at the USDA in Washington, D. C. Thur. Oct. 6, 2016. The symposium focused on education, career opportunities and entrepreneurship in science, technology and math disciplines associated with agriculture. USDA photo by Bob Nichols.

The university campus was a bustle of activity in downtown Toronto today as the weekly Farmer’s Market was underway, along with a convocation of graduating students. In the midst of all this bustle, I saw her sitting by the reflecting pond, dipping her spoon into a cup of ice cream. Her attractive features and hat caught my eye and I made my way over to her as she sat there barefoot eating her ice cream. I explained my interest in photographing her for my project and she said “Sure. That’s fine.” Meet Melissa.

 

The light was bright but just a few steps away I saw that her face was sufficiently shaded from the harshness and I took a couple of frames to get things underway. We then took a few more steps to use the large stone near the pond as a background. I had used boulders on the other side of the pond to photograph my previous Stranger, Aaron, just ten minutes previously.

 

Melissa was very comfortable while I photographed her and did not seem rushed. In fact, she was on her lunch hour and was happy to be meeting and helping out with my photo project. She is 20 and is from North Carolina. She came to Toronto 3 years ago to study Environmental Urban Sustainability and is also working for the university organizing orientation activities and outreach programs for new students. Her friendly, casual manner would seem to make her an ideal person for the job which involves a good deal of community contact. Her goal is to pursue graduate studies, perhaps in Germany, and to eventually work for NASA.

 

I asked Melissa how her friends would describe her and she smiled. “Probably as too involved and too friendly.” “How can a person be too friendly?” I asked. “Well, I tend to give people the benefit of the doubt and if they let me down it can really hurt.” I told her that I welcomed her friendliness which resulted in her agreeing to meet me and be part of my project.” “Yes, I’ve enjoyed it a lot too but I’m learning to dial it back just a bit for my own good.”

 

Thank you Melissa for sharing a few minutes of your lunch hour and for participating in The Human Family. You are now #819 in Round 9 of my project. I hope your dreams come true and that you remain the friendly person I met today.

 

William, Brian, Andy Baker and I joined forces on a hole design for The Putting Lot, a new miniature golf course in Bushwick themed around the concept of urban sustainability.

 

Our hole is constructed out of reclaimed materials from Build It Green and is designed to recreate the rewarding* (or potentially frustrating) experience of embarking on a sustainable building project. Putters receive the ultimate reward (an automatic hole-in-one)* for doing their research beforehand to conserve resources (i.e. putts), but are otherwise thrust* into a frustrating situation for golfing blindly* into the situation and not using their resources efficiently. Our hole is named the Geographically Limiting the Origin of Resources Yielded (or G.L.O.R.Y. for short) hole.

 

We are currently in the construction phase but the Lot opens next week. Come out and play!

 

*can't think of a way for that not to sound like a dirty pun, but really, it's not a dirty pun.

The Iris is placed on top of some vintage to antique English cigarette cards that pertain to botany. Lots of information on the back of each one! I now have them in a mailing envelope and will send them off to my daughter Michaela who teaches urban sustainable farming and will be enrolled in an herbal medicine course. She made me an herbal skin balm that was super good and I want more!

 

Photograph was created for the Our Daily Challenge topic:

 

Sharp Edges

Joint Statement by President Rousseff and President Obama

   

At the invitation of President Dilma Rousseff, the President of the United States of America , Barack Obama, paid a State Visit to Brazil on March 19, 20 and 21, 2011.

   

BRAZIL AND THE UNITED STATES AS GLOBAL PARTNERS

   

Noting the interdependence among peace, security and development, President Rousseff and President Obama reaffirmed their desire to build a just and inclusive world order, which promotes democracy, human rights and social justice.

   

Recognizing the need of reforming international institutions to reflect the current political and economic realities, the two leaders welcomed the designation of the G20 as the premier forum for coordinating economic policy, and efforts to reform the governance of international financial institutions. The Presidents agreed that just as other international organizations have had to change to be more responsive to the challenges of the 21st century, the United Nations Security Council also needs to reform, and expressed their support for a modest expansion of the Security Council that improves its effectiveness and efficiency, as well as its representation. President Obama expressed appreciation for Brazil ’s aspiration to become a permanent member of the Security Council, and acknowledged its assumption of global responsibilities. The two leaders agreed to continued consultation and cooperation between the two countries to achieve the vision outlined in the UN Charter of a more peaceful and secure world.

   

They highlighted the maturity and depth of the relationship between Brazil and the United States, which is based on shared values and principles and characterized by the ties of friendship that have brought their multicultural nations closer throughout their histories as independent States.

   

They decided to elevate to the Presidential level the major dialogues between the two countries, including the Global Partnership Dialogue, the Economic and Financial Dialogue, and the Strategic Energy Dialogue. The leaders directed the ministers involved to convene and report to them regularly.

   

Economy, Trade, Investment, G20 and Doha Round

   

The Presidents stressed the mutual benefits created by greater economic, financial and commercial cooperation. While recognizing the high quality and diversification of trade between Brazil and the United States , they emphasized the importance of building on, deepening, and broadening that relationship. They acknowledged the great potential of reciprocal investments, particularly in the areas of infrastructure, energy and high technology.

   

They underscored the relevant work of the Economic Partnership Dialogue, the Bilateral Consultative Mechanism on trade policy, and the Commercial Dialogue. They also highlighted the importance of enhanced private sector engagement, through both the VI CEO Forum meeting and the launching of the Business Summit, which were held in the context of this presidential visit and welcomed with interest their contributions and recommendations.

   

The leaders welcomed a series of important agreements reached today, including an Agreement on Trade and Economic Cooperation; and an Agreement on Air Transportation and an associated Memorandum of Consultations on Air Transportation. They also expressed their expectation about the entry into force of the Agreement on Maritime Transport and of the Tax Information Exchange Agreement in the near future.

   

The Presidents noted that good regulatory practices and improved regulatory cooperation can contribute to competitiveness and the economic well-being of both Brazil and the United States , such as the initiatives being considered by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with the Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalização e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO).

   

Considering that Brazil will host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and recalling the US experience in organizing events of this magnitude and the interest of the US Government in sharing this experience with Brazil, the leaders welcomed the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding on Major Global Sporting Events, aimed at intensifying bilateral cooperation, particularly on infrastructure, safety, and security.

   

The Presidents reiterated the importance of consolidating the G20 and its role in coordinating actions for international economic cooperation, including encouraging the adoption of policies needed to avoid large economic and financial imbalances.

   

Building on the strong cooperation achieved in coordinating the global response to the global economic crisis through the G20, the Presidents decided to formalize a Brazil-US Economic and Financial Dialogue. The dialogue will seek to coordinate positions on global economic policy and find opportunities for greater bilateral economic cooperation. They also recommended that the senior officials in charge of the G20 in both countries, including Finance Ministers and the Sherpas, continue to conduct regular consultation on the topics of the group’s agenda, as a means to enhance bilateral coordination.

   

They reaffirmed the imperative to modernize the international financial institutions in a way that reflects the changes in the world economy and moves towards global financial stability, sustainable development and poverty reduction.

   

In relation to the G20 discussions about volatility in agricultural commodities’ prices, they recognized the need for greater transparency in commodity markets, and for improved regulation of financial mechanisms that affect pricing. They recommended caution when considering measures that could distort the operation of commodity markets.

   

The Presidents reaffirmed their strong commitment to bring the WTO Doha Round to a successful, ambitious, comprehensive and balanced conclusion. Pursuant to the conclusion from the Seoul G20 Summit, they directed their negotiators to intensify and expand their direct engagement to complete the negotiations, building on the progress made to date. They agreed that a successful conclusion of the Doha Development Agenda negotiations could increase the credibility and legitimacy of the multilateral trading system and could play a useful role in spurring global economic growth, particularly in creating jobs.

   

Energy, Environment, Climate Change and Sustainable Development

   

The Heads of State agreed that the two countries have converging interests in energy-related matters, including in oil, natural gas, biofuels and other renewables. President Obama stated that the United States seeks to be a Strategic Energy Partner of Brazil. They praised the Working Group on Energy and the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance the Cooperation on Biofuels and decided that their work will be carried out under the umbrella of a bilateral Strategic Energy Dialogue.

   

They supported the progress achieved under the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance the Cooperation on Biofuels, particularly in relation to cooperation in third countries. They welcomed the participation of the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Inter-American Development Bank in such trilateral cooperation. They underscored the importance of mobilizing public and private research institutions in the two countries to intensify cooperation in developing innovative technologies to produce advanced biofuels, and committed to enhance the bilateral and multilateral dialogue on sustainable production and use of bioenergy.

   

The Presidents took note, with satisfaction, of the launching, under the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance the Cooperation on Biofuels, of the Partnership for the Development of Biofuels for Aviation, which provides for coordination in establishing common standards and specifications, and strives to facilitate bilateral cooperation by convening experts from research institutions, academia, and the private sector.

   

They welcomed the strengthening of the collaboration on environment and climate change, including under the Common Agenda on Environment and the Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation Regarding Climate Change, and agreed to include in the Common Agenda a discussion on the concept of green economy.

   

They agreed on the importance of a green economy in the context of sustainable development as a means for generating economic growth, creating decent jobs, eradicating poverty and protecting the environment. In this sense, they agreed to initiate a dialogue on a joint initiative on urban sustainability cooperation which will serve as a platform for actions addressing the challenges and opportunities of developing urban infrastructure that promotes sustainable development with concrete economic, social and environmental benefits.

   

They expressed their satisfaction with the conclusion, in September 2010, of the Tropical Forest Conservation Act, which provides for converting foreign debt into credits for the conservation of tropical forests.

   

They underscored the importance of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA) and recognized the relevance of the project “Sustainable Urban Planning and Energy Efficient Construction for Low-Income Areas of the Americas ”. Brazil conveyed its intention to host an ECPA Ministerial Meeting in the future.

   

The Heads of State reiterated their satisfaction with the Cancun agreements at the 16th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They affirmed their commitment to the implementation of outcomes of the Cancun Meeting and to enhance efforts in anticipation of a successful outcome in Durban , South Africa .

   

They reiterated the importance of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), which will be held in Rio de Janeiro, in 2012, and committed to work closely together to ensure its success.

   

Democracy, Human Rights, Racial Equality and Social Inclusion

   

The leaders stressed the shared commitment to promote and protect human rights and to support the consolidation of democracy around the world. In keeping with the Inter-American Democratic Charter, they reaffirmed that democracy is essential to political, economic, and social development. They reiterated that the values of liberty, equality, and social justice are intrinsic to democracy, and that the promotion and protection of human rights is a basic prerequisite for the existence of a democratic society.

   

They agreed that Brazil ’s experience in constructing a successful model of democratic development could be useful to countries in the process of building their own democracies and addressing historic social inequities. In this regard, President Obama applauded Brazil ’s success in fashioning policies and programs to fight poverty, inequality, and marginalization. President Rousseff welcomed the possibility of enhancing international cooperation activities by replicating Brazilian best practices in social development.

   

The Presidents decided to work closely to enhance global food security. They highlighted the importance of the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program as an innovative multilateral mechanism to finance country-led agriculture plans. President Rousseff emphasized Brazil ’s willingness to provide leadership on international food issues, including at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

   

The Presidents welcomed the achievements of the 2008 Joint Action Plan to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Discrimination and Promote Equality, encompassing issues pertaining to justice and public safety, labor relations, health, education and environmental fairness, with the engagement of the civil society and the private sector in combating discrimination.

   

They stressed that human rights violations of children and adolescents will not be tolerated by the two countries and that the recognition and empowerment of women is a priority of both governments. They noted with satisfaction the progress under the Memorandum of Understanding for the Advancement of Women, and pledged to enhance cooperation in gender issues both bilaterally and multilaterally. In this context, they highlighted the project “Women and Science.”

   

They agreed to cooperate in advancing democracy, human rights and freedom for all people bilaterally and through the United Nations and other multilateral fora, including ensuring respect for human rights in the context of the democratic movements and transitions; strengthening the UN Human Rights Council as recently demonstrated in the case of the creation of the Commission of Inquiry on Libya; promoting respect for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals through the establishment of a Special Rapporteur at the OAS; and improving the conduct of free and fair elections regionally and globally, including through the promotion of human rights in the context of elections and increasing their accessibility to disabled persons.

   

They reaffirmed their commitment to transparency and accountability in government as key elements in strengthening democracy, including good governance and corruption prevention, and promoting and protecting human rights, and committed to launch a Brazil-US Anti-Corruption Dialogue to facilitate closer cooperation in international efforts to combat corruption. They recalled their commitment to the G20 Anti-Corruption Action Plan and welcomed their role as co-chairs of a global initiative to advance open government, building on the commitments President Obama called for at the United Nations General Assembly last September.

     

Education, Health and Culture

   

The Heads of State directed the creation of a dialogue on education and research, within the appropriate Ministerial mechanism, to review the existing bilateral cooperation programs and propose an action plan aimed at improving and expanding them. They emphasized, in particular, the importance of enhanced exchanges in both directions for students engaged in the study of science, health, technology, engineering, computer science, and math and agreed on the need to increase the availability of scholarships, at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

   

They recommended enhancing the links between educational institutions from both countries, and decided to strengthen bilateral partnerships through, among others, the Fulbright Foundation, the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, the National Science Foundation, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES), and encourage additional contributions by the private sector in both countries to foster bilateral cooperation on education.

   

President Obama noted, with satisfaction, the Brazilian interest in implementing a broad program for distance learning of English, ranging from teachers’ education to projects aimed at training professionals and other service providers for the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

   

The Heads of States recognized the positive results of the III Meeting of the Working Group on Health. They praised the wide-ranging action plan being prepared on topics that are pertinent to public health in both countries.

   

They highlighted the importance of culture as a factor for bringing nations closer together. They decided to enhance bilateral cooperation on culture and to review the existing initiatives, under the appropriate Ministerial mechanism, to encourage the exchange of collections, exhibits and educational programs between cultural institutions.

   

Science, Technology, Innovation and Space Cooperation

   

The Presidents affirmed that innovation and investment in science and technology, and associated human capital are keys to sustained economic growth and competitiveness. They expressed their support for the work of the Joint Commission for Scientific and Technological Cooperation, and praised the results of the Innovation Summits. They encouraged further communication between these initiatives.

   

President Rousseff welcomed the emphasis the US National Space Policy has placed on international cooperation and expressed her wish to expand the dialogue with the United States bearing in mind the guidelines of the Brazilian space policies, aimed at technological capacity building and the commercial use of infrastructure and technology.

   

In this context, they welcomed the signing of a new bilateral Framework Agreement on Cooperation in the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and expressed their desire to commence negotiations of a new agreement to protect launching operation technologies.

   

Furthermore, they affirmed the commitment of their countries to security in space and decided to initiate a dialogue in that area. They also instructed the appropriate agencies in the two countries to discuss the establishment of a Brazil–US Working Group on satellite-based earth observations, environmental monitoring, precipitation measurement, and natural disaster mitigation and response that would facilitate future dialogue and cooperation in these fields.

     

Defense, Disarmament, Nonproliferation and Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy

   

The Presidents recalled the progress achieved on defense issues in 2010, with the signing of the Defense Cooperation Framework Agreement and, more recently, the General Security of Military Information Agreement. They committed to undertake efforts to follow up on the established dialogue in this area, primarily on new opportunities for cooperation.

   

They recognized the importance of enhanced regional disaster relief and crisis management coordination efforts and took note of the proposal presented to the IX Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas for coordinated military support for civilian disaster response in the Americas .

   

They reaffirmed both countries’ commitments on disarmament, nuclear non-proliferation, and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, with a view to achieving the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons. In this regard, the Presidents welcomed the opportunity to build on the successes of the recent Nuclear Security Summit, the VII Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference and the ratification of the New START Treaty between the United States and Russia . They also decided on the need to bring into force the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, start negotiations on a Fissile Material Treaty, and to achieve a successful Biological Weapons Convention Review Conference in December 2011 and underscored the importance of compliance with and full implementation of all disarmament and non-proliferation related international obligations, including relevant UN Security Council and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) resolutions calling for countries to demonstrate the exclusively peaceful nature of their nuclear programs.

   

They noted, with satisfaction, that the Plan of Action on Energy Cooperation includes nuclear energy, focusing on the following aspects: probabilistic risk assessment, reactor life sustainability, development of human resources, licensing, management of serious accidents, emergency response, prevention, and combustion efficiency.

   

The leaders agreed to strengthen the dialogue and bilateral and multilateral cooperation on nuclear security and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. In this context, they decided to commence talks on Brazilian participation in the “Partnership for Nuclear Security”, which could provide support for experts from both countries in activities related to research and development and to training and education in the areas of physical protection of installations and nuclear security and took note of Brazil’s interest in joining the United States to support the IAEA“Peaceful Uses Initiative” (PUI), a campaign launched last year to foster nuclear applications in the developing world for human health, food security, water management, and infrastructure. The Leaders also proposed to explore cooperation on a regional Center for Excellence that would serve as a forum for sharing information, best practices and training in partnership with relevant multilateral organizations, and noted the intention of the two governments to pursue a Memorandum of Understanding on the Megaports Initiative to prevent illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials.

   

Communities Abroad

   

The Presidents noted with satisfaction the growing ties between the peoples of both countries and directed the Bilateral Consular Dialogue to consider measures to facilitate travel for business, educational and tourist purposes.

   

They agreed to enhance the dialogue on the implementation, both in Brazil and in the United States , of the 1980 Hague Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction.

   

Cooperation in Third Countries

   

The Presidents highlighted the significant role of trilateral cooperation with Least Developed Countries on the priority and cross-cutting aspects of the global partnership between the two largest democracies in the Americas .

   

They expressed their satisfaction with the projects that have been carried out within the scope of the Memorandum of Understanding on the Implementation of Technical Cooperation Activities in Third Countries, particularly in Haiti , in other countries of Latin America and the Caribbean, and in Africa .

   

They also welcomed an expanded Brazil – US partnership to build research development and regulatory capacity in East and West Africa to encourage innovation, support science-based transparent regulation, and facilitate clear pathways to agricultural biotechnology, while protecting the public and the environment.

   

They expressed the interest of both countries in strengthening their dialogue to promote the Decent Work Agenda, with a view to developing projects in cooperation with the International Labor Organization (ILO) and share Brazilian best practices in combating child labor, especially in Africa . They welcomed the progress in the negotiations of a joint project for technical cooperation between Brazil , the United States , Haiti and the ILO, to prevent child labor and generate income for vulnerable workers in that Caribbean country.

   

Haiti

   

The Heads of State highlighted the importance of having a second round of voting in Haiti , in accordance with popular demand expressed at the voting polls and the election calendar released by the Provisional Electoral Board. In this context, they recognized the important support of the OAS and the OAS-Caribbean Community Mission of Election Observers in organizing the elections. They reiterated their commitment to maintain the stability, to strengthen democratic institutions, and to the long-term development of Haiti . They underscored the importance of the timely delivery on the pledges made by the international community in supporting the reconstruction of Haiti , and the role played by the Interim Haiti Reconstruction Committee and the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH).

   

They reaffirmed the commitment of both countries to an approach that could link the stabilization work carried out by MINUSTAH to the support for Haiti ’s political and institutional strengthening and social and economic development.

   

OAS, Summit of the Americas , MERCOSUL and UNASUL

   

The Presidents reiterated the commitment of both countries to the OAS and welcomed the efforts that have been made towards making it more transparent and efficient, capable of addressing the challenges of the 21st century, and thus being able to meet the expectation of its member states. They underscored the importance of the Summit of the Americas as a regional coordination body at the highest level. They stressed the need to promote better coordination among the Summit of the Americas , the OAS and the other bodies of the inter-American system, with the aim of providing greater cohesion to regional efforts and of strengthening the synergies among the institutions of the Americas .

   

The leaders affirmed the valuable contributions towards democracy, peace, cooperation, security and development made by regional and sub-regional integration efforts and agreements, including the Union of South American Nations (UNASUL) and the Southern Cone Market (MERCOSUL), and valued the dialogue between UNASUL and the United States .

   

A SHARED VISION OF THE FUTURE

   

President Rousseff and President Obama expressed their satisfaction with the status of the relationship between Brazil and the United States as global partners, fully committed to establishing an international world order that is more democratic, fair and sustainable. In this context, the Brazilian President accepted an invitation to visit the United States in the second half of 2011.

  

Joint Statement by President Rousseff and President Obama

 

At the invitation of President Dilma Rousseff, the President of the United States of America , Barack Obama, paid a State Visit to Brazil on March 19, 20 and 21, 2011.

   

BRAZIL AND THE UNITED STATES AS GLOBAL PARTNERS

   

Noting the interdependence among peace, security and development, President Rousseff and President Obama reaffirmed their desire to build a just and inclusive world order, which promotes democracy, human rights and social justice.

   

Recognizing the need of reforming international institutions to reflect the current political and economic realities, the two leaders welcomed the designation of the G20 as the premier forum for coordinating economic policy, and efforts to reform the governance of international financial institutions. The Presidents agreed that just as other international organizations have had to change to be more responsive to the challenges of the 21st century, the United Nations Security Council also needs to reform, and expressed their support for a modest expansion of the Security Council that improves its effectiveness and efficiency, as well as its representation. President Obama expressed appreciation for Brazil ’s aspiration to become a permanent member of the Security Council, and acknowledged its assumption of global responsibilities. The two leaders agreed to continued consultation and cooperation between the two countries to achieve the vision outlined in the UN Charter of a more peaceful and secure world.

   

They highlighted the maturity and depth of the relationship between Brazil and the United States, which is based on shared values and principles and characterized by the ties of friendship that have brought their multicultural nations closer throughout their histories as independent States.

   

They decided to elevate to the Presidential level the major dialogues between the two countries, including the Global Partnership Dialogue, the Economic and Financial Dialogue, and the Strategic Energy Dialogue. The leaders directed the ministers involved to convene and report to them regularly.

   

Economy, Trade, Investment, G20 and Doha Round

   

The Presidents stressed the mutual benefits created by greater economic, financial and commercial cooperation. While recognizing the high quality and diversification of trade between Brazil and the United States , they emphasized the importance of building on, deepening, and broadening that relationship. They acknowledged the great potential of reciprocal investments, particularly in the areas of infrastructure, energy and high technology.

   

They underscored the relevant work of the Economic Partnership Dialogue, the Bilateral Consultative Mechanism on trade policy, and the Commercial Dialogue. They also highlighted the importance of enhanced private sector engagement, through both the VI CEO Forum meeting and the launching of the Business Summit, which were held in the context of this presidential visit and welcomed with interest their contributions and recommendations.

   

The leaders welcomed a series of important agreements reached today, including an Agreement on Trade and Economic Cooperation; and an Agreement on Air Transportation and an associated Memorandum of Consultations on Air Transportation. They also expressed their expectation about the entry into force of the Agreement on Maritime Transport and of the Tax Information Exchange Agreement in the near future.

   

The Presidents noted that good regulatory practices and improved regulatory cooperation can contribute to competitiveness and the economic well-being of both Brazil and the United States , such as the initiatives being considered by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with the Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalização e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO).

   

Considering that Brazil will host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and recalling the US experience in organizing events of this magnitude and the interest of the US Government in sharing this experience with Brazil, the leaders welcomed the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding on Major Global Sporting Events, aimed at intensifying bilateral cooperation, particularly on infrastructure, safety, and security.

   

The Presidents reiterated the importance of consolidating the G20 and its role in coordinating actions for international economic cooperation, including encouraging the adoption of policies needed to avoid large economic and financial imbalances.

   

Building on the strong cooperation achieved in coordinating the global response to the global economic crisis through the G20, the Presidents decided to formalize a Brazil-US Economic and Financial Dialogue. The dialogue will seek to coordinate positions on global economic policy and find opportunities for greater bilateral economic cooperation. They also recommended that the senior officials in charge of the G20 in both countries, including Finance Ministers and the Sherpas, continue to conduct regular consultation on the topics of the group’s agenda, as a means to enhance bilateral coordination.

   

They reaffirmed the imperative to modernize the international financial institutions in a way that reflects the changes in the world economy and moves towards global financial stability, sustainable development and poverty reduction.

   

In relation to the G20 discussions about volatility in agricultural commodities’ prices, they recognized the need for greater transparency in commodity markets, and for improved regulation of financial mechanisms that affect pricing. They recommended caution when considering measures that could distort the operation of commodity markets.

   

The Presidents reaffirmed their strong commitment to bring the WTO Doha Round to a successful, ambitious, comprehensive and balanced conclusion. Pursuant to the conclusion from the Seoul G20 Summit, they directed their negotiators to intensify and expand their direct engagement to complete the negotiations, building on the progress made to date. They agreed that a successful conclusion of the Doha Development Agenda negotiations could increase the credibility and legitimacy of the multilateral trading system and could play a useful role in spurring global economic growth, particularly in creating jobs.

   

Energy, Environment, Climate Change and Sustainable Development

   

The Heads of State agreed that the two countries have converging interests in energy-related matters, including in oil, natural gas, biofuels and other renewables. President Obama stated that the United States seeks to be a Strategic Energy Partner of Brazil. They praised the Working Group on Energy and the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance the Cooperation on Biofuels and decided that their work will be carried out under the umbrella of a bilateral Strategic Energy Dialogue.

   

They supported the progress achieved under the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance the Cooperation on Biofuels, particularly in relation to cooperation in third countries. They welcomed the participation of the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Inter-American Development Bank in such trilateral cooperation. They underscored the importance of mobilizing public and private research institutions in the two countries to intensify cooperation in developing innovative technologies to produce advanced biofuels, and committed to enhance the bilateral and multilateral dialogue on sustainable production and use of bioenergy.

   

The Presidents took note, with satisfaction, of the launching, under the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance the Cooperation on Biofuels, of the Partnership for the Development of Biofuels for Aviation, which provides for coordination in establishing common standards and specifications, and strives to facilitate bilateral cooperation by convening experts from research institutions, academia, and the private sector.

   

They welcomed the strengthening of the collaboration on environment and climate change, including under the Common Agenda on Environment and the Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation Regarding Climate Change, and agreed to include in the Common Agenda a discussion on the concept of green economy.

   

They agreed on the importance of a green economy in the context of sustainable development as a means for generating economic growth, creating decent jobs, eradicating poverty and protecting the environment. In this sense, they agreed to initiate a dialogue on a joint initiative on urban sustainability cooperation which will serve as a platform for actions addressing the challenges and opportunities of developing urban infrastructure that promotes sustainable development with concrete economic, social and environmental benefits.

   

They expressed their satisfaction with the conclusion, in September 2010, of the Tropical Forest Conservation Act, which provides for converting foreign debt into credits for the conservation of tropical forests.

   

They underscored the importance of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA) and recognized the relevance of the project “Sustainable Urban Planning and Energy Efficient Construction for Low-Income Areas of the Americas ”. Brazil conveyed its intention to host an ECPA Ministerial Meeting in the future.

   

The Heads of State reiterated their satisfaction with the Cancun agreements at the 16th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. They affirmed their commitment to the implementation of outcomes of the Cancun Meeting and to enhance efforts in anticipation of a successful outcome in Durban , South Africa .

   

They reiterated the importance of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), which will be held in Rio de Janeiro, in 2012, and committed to work closely together to ensure its success.

   

Democracy, Human Rights, Racial Equality and Social Inclusion

   

The leaders stressed the shared commitment to promote and protect human rights and to support the consolidation of democracy around the world. In keeping with the Inter-American Democratic Charter, they reaffirmed that democracy is essential to political, economic, and social development. They reiterated that the values of liberty, equality, and social justice are intrinsic to democracy, and that the promotion and protection of human rights is a basic prerequisite for the existence of a democratic society.

   

They agreed that Brazil ’s experience in constructing a successful model of democratic development could be useful to countries in the process of building their own democracies and addressing historic social inequities. In this regard, President Obama applauded Brazil ’s success in fashioning policies and programs to fight poverty, inequality, and marginalization. President Rousseff welcomed the possibility of enhancing international cooperation activities by replicating Brazilian best practices in social development.

   

The Presidents decided to work closely to enhance global food security. They highlighted the importance of the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program as an innovative multilateral mechanism to finance country-led agriculture plans. President Rousseff emphasized Brazil ’s willingness to provide leadership on international food issues, including at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

   

The Presidents welcomed the achievements of the 2008 Joint Action Plan to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Discrimination and Promote Equality, encompassing issues pertaining to justice and public safety, labor relations, health, education and environmental fairness, with the engagement of the civil society and the private sector in combating discrimination.

   

They stressed that human rights violations of children and adolescents will not be tolerated by the two countries and that the recognition and empowerment of women is a priority of both governments. They noted with satisfaction the progress under the Memorandum of Understanding for the Advancement of Women, and pledged to enhance cooperation in gender issues both bilaterally and multilaterally. In this context, they highlighted the project “Women and Science.”

   

They agreed to cooperate in advancing democracy, human rights and freedom for all people bilaterally and through the United Nations and other multilateral fora, including ensuring respect for human rights in the context of the democratic movements and transitions; strengthening the UN Human Rights Council as recently demonstrated in the case of the creation of the Commission of Inquiry on Libya; promoting respect for the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals through the establishment of a Special Rapporteur at the OAS; and improving the conduct of free and fair elections regionally and globally, including through the promotion of human rights in the context of elections and increasing their accessibility to disabled persons.

   

They reaffirmed their commitment to transparency and accountability in government as key elements in strengthening democracy, including good governance and corruption prevention, and promoting and protecting human rights, and committed to launch a Brazil-US Anti-Corruption Dialogue to facilitate closer cooperation in international efforts to combat corruption. They recalled their commitment to the G20 Anti-Corruption Action Plan and welcomed their role as co-chairs of a global initiative to advance open government, building on the commitments President Obama called for at the United Nations General Assembly last September.

     

Education, Health and Culture

   

The Heads of State directed the creation of a dialogue on education and research, within the appropriate Ministerial mechanism, to review the existing bilateral cooperation programs and propose an action plan aimed at improving and expanding them. They emphasized, in particular, the importance of enhanced exchanges in both directions for students engaged in the study of science, health, technology, engineering, computer science, and math and agreed on the need to increase the availability of scholarships, at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

   

They recommended enhancing the links between educational institutions from both countries, and decided to strengthen bilateral partnerships through, among others, the Fulbright Foundation, the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, the National Science Foundation, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES), and encourage additional contributions by the private sector in both countries to foster bilateral cooperation on education.

   

President Obama noted, with satisfaction, the Brazilian interest in implementing a broad program for distance learning of English, ranging from teachers’ education to projects aimed at training professionals and other service providers for the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

   

The Heads of States recognized the positive results of the III Meeting of the Working Group on Health. They praised the wide-ranging action plan being prepared on topics that are pertinent to public health in both countries.

   

They highlighted the importance of culture as a factor for bringing nations closer together. They decided to enhance bilateral cooperation on culture and to review the existing initiatives, under the appropriate Ministerial mechanism, to encourage the exchange of collections, exhibits and educational programs between cultural institutions.

   

Science, Technology, Innovation and Space Cooperation

   

The Presidents affirmed that innovation and investment in science and technology, and associated human capital are keys to sustained economic growth and competitiveness. They expressed their support for the work of the Joint Commission for Scientific and Technological Cooperation, and praised the results of the Innovation Summits. They encouraged further communication between these initiatives.

   

President Rousseff welcomed the emphasis the US National Space Policy has placed on international cooperation and expressed her wish to expand the dialogue with the United States bearing in mind the guidelines of the Brazilian space policies, aimed at technological capacity building and the commercial use of infrastructure and technology.

   

In this context, they welcomed the signing of a new bilateral Framework Agreement on Cooperation in the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and expressed their desire to commence negotiations of a new agreement to protect launching operation technologies.

   

Furthermore, they affirmed the commitment of their countries to security in space and decided to initiate a dialogue in that area. They also instructed the appropriate agencies in the two countries to discuss the establishment of a Brazil–US Working Group on satellite-based earth observations, environmental monitoring, precipitation measurement, and natural disaster mitigation and response that would facilitate future dialogue and cooperation in these fields.

     

Defense, Disarmament, Nonproliferation and Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy

   

The Presidents recalled the progress achieved on defense issues in 2010, with the signing of the Defense Cooperation Framework Agreement and, more recently, the General Security of Military Information Agreement. They committed to undertake efforts to follow up on the established dialogue in this area, primarily on new opportunities for cooperation.

   

They recognized the importance of enhanced regional disaster relief and crisis management coordination efforts and took note of the proposal presented to the IX Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas for coordinated military support for civilian disaster response in the Americas .

   

They reaffirmed both countries’ commitments on disarmament, nuclear non-proliferation, and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, with a view to achieving the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons. In this regard, the Presidents welcomed the opportunity to build on the successes of the recent Nuclear Security Summit, the VII Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference and the ratification of the New START Treaty between the United States and Russia . They also decided on the need to bring into force the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, start negotiations on a Fissile Material Treaty, and to achieve a successful Biological Weapons Convention Review Conference in December 2011 and underscored the importance of compliance with and full implementation of all disarmament and non-proliferation related international obligations, including relevant UN Security Council and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) resolutions calling for countries to demonstrate the exclusively peaceful nature of their nuclear programs.

   

They noted, with satisfaction, that the Plan of Action on Energy Cooperation includes nuclear energy, focusing on the following aspects: probabilistic risk assessment, reactor life sustainability, development of human resources, licensing, management of serious accidents, emergency response, prevention, and combustion efficiency.

   

The leaders agreed to strengthen the dialogue and bilateral and multilateral cooperation on nuclear security and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. In this context, they decided to commence talks on Brazilian participation in the “Partnership for Nuclear Security”, which could provide support for experts from both countries in activities related to research and development and to training and education in the areas of physical protection of installations and nuclear security and took note of Brazil’s interest in joining the United States to support the IAEA“Peaceful Uses Initiative” (PUI), a campaign launched last year to foster nuclear applications in the developing world for human health, food security, water management, and infrastructure. The Leaders also proposed to explore cooperation on a regional Center for Excellence that would serve as a forum for sharing information, best practices and training in partnership with relevant multilateral organizations, and noted the intention of the two governments to pursue a Memorandum of Understanding on the Megaports Initiative to prevent illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials.

   

Communities Abroad

   

The Presidents noted with satisfaction the growing ties between the peoples of both countries and directed the Bilateral Consular Dialogue to consider measures to facilitate travel for business, educational and tourist purposes.

   

They agreed to enhance the dialogue on the implementation, both in Brazil and in the United States , of the 1980 Hague Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction.

   

Cooperation in Third Countries

   

The Presidents highlighted the significant role of trilateral cooperation with Least Developed Countries on the priority and cross-cutting aspects of the global partnership between the two largest democracies in the Americas .

   

They expressed their satisfaction with the projects that have been carried out within the scope of the Memorandum of Understanding on the Implementation of Technical Cooperation Activities in Third Countries, particularly in Haiti , in other countries of Latin America and the Caribbean, and in Africa .

   

They also welcomed an expanded Brazil – US partnership to build research development and regulatory capacity in East and West Africa to encourage innovation, support science-based transparent regulation, and facilitate clear pathways to agricultural biotechnology, while protecting the public and the environment.

   

They expressed the interest of both countries in strengthening their dialogue to promote the Decent Work Agenda, with a view to developing projects in cooperation with the International Labor Organization (ILO) and share Brazilian best practices in combating child labor, especially in Africa . They welcomed the progress in the negotiations of a joint project for technical cooperation between Brazil , the United States , Haiti and the ILO, to prevent child labor and generate income for vulnerable workers in that Caribbean country.

   

Haiti

   

The Heads of State highlighted the importance of having a second round of voting in Haiti , in accordance with popular demand expressed at the voting polls and the election calendar released by the Provisional Electoral Board. In this context, they recognized the important support of the OAS and the OAS-Caribbean Community Mission of Election Observers in organizing the elections. They reiterated their commitment to maintain the stability, to strengthen democratic institutions, and to the long-term development of Haiti . They underscored the importance of the timely delivery on the pledges made by the international community in supporting the reconstruction of Haiti , and the role played by the Interim Haiti Reconstruction Committee and the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH).

   

They reaffirmed the commitment of both countries to an approach that could link the stabilization work carried out by MINUSTAH to the support for Haiti ’s political and institutional strengthening and social and economic development.

   

OAS, Summit of the Americas , MERCOSUL and UNASUL

   

The Presidents reiterated the commitment of both countries to the OAS and welcomed the efforts that have been made towards making it more transparent and efficient, capable of addressing the challenges of the 21st century, and thus being able to meet the expectation of its member states. They underscored the importance of the Summit of the Americas as a regional coordination body at the highest level. They stressed the need to promote better coordination among the Summit of the Americas , the OAS and the other bodies of the inter-American system, with the aim of providing greater cohesion to regional efforts and of strengthening the synergies among the institutions of the Americas .

   

The leaders affirmed the valuable contributions towards democracy, peace, cooperation, security and development made by regional and sub-regional integration efforts and agreements, including the Union of South American Nations (UNASUL) and the Southern Cone Market (MERCOSUL), and valued the dialogue between UNASUL and the United States .

   

A SHARED VISION OF THE FUTURE

   

President Rousseff and President Obama expressed their satisfaction with the status of the relationship between Brazil and the United States as global partners, fully committed to establishing an international world order that is more democratic, fair and sustainable. In this context, the Brazilian President accepted an invitation to visit the United States in the second half of 2011.

  

I met her in downtown Toronto after leaving class and heading toward the subway to return home. Her attractive face and energetic stride appealed to my photographer’s eye and I stopped her to ask if I could photograph her for my project. She was surprised and warned me “I’m not very photogenic.” I can’t get over how many attractive people think that. I told her I would like the chance to prove her wrong. She agreed to a couple of quick photos. Meet Mel.

 

Mel is a student in the Environmental and Urban Sustainability program at the university – a four year degree program. She’s in her second year. When I asked her if she had a message she would like to share with those who would see her photo she thought for a moment and replied “Make an impression.” When I asked her to expand on that to clarify she said she thinks everyone should use their life to try and make a positive impression on the world. Now there’s a message you can’t argue with. I pointed out that the program she is studying would seem directly related to her statement and she agreed. When I asked if she was on her way to class she said “Not exactly. I’m going to a tutoring session. I volunteer to help other students with math - I’m a bit of a math nerd” (confessed with a smile).

 

I guided Mel to the spot where I first saw her, near an overhang with indirect natural light and fired off a few photos until I was confident that I had a good one to share with the group. Information was exchanged so I can send Mel her photo and we were both on our way.

 

Thanks you Mel for participating in 100 Strangers. You are now Stranger #362 in Round 4 of my project. Thanks for your time; I enjoyed meeting you.

 

Additional note: I received the following note from Mel by email: "Thank you for stopping me and asking me to be a part of your incredible project. It was amazing to meet you. The picture is great and your photography skills are fantastic also. I hope everything works out well for you." It gives me the nicest feeling when people like Mel tell me how much they enjoyed the 100 Strangers experience. It was my pleasure, Mel.

 

Find out more about the project and see pictures taken by other photographers at the 100 Strangers Flickr Group page

 

To browse Round 1 of my 100 Strangers project click here: www.flickr.com/photos/jeffcbowen/sets/72157633145986224/

 

To browse Round 2 of my 100 Strangers project click here:www.flickr.com/photos/jeffcbowen/sets/72157634422850489/

 

To browse Round 3 of my 100 Strangers project click here: www.flickr.com/photos/jeffcbowen/sets/72157635541434065/

China commits to building eco-civilization

 

China will commit to its international obligations and work with countries around the world to build an eco-civilization for a better Earth, President Xi Jinping said in a congratulatory

letter to an environmental forum on Saturday.

 

In the letter, Xi extended his congratulations on the opening of the Eco Forum Global

Annual Conference 2013, which was held in Guiyang, capital city of southwest China's Guizhou Province.

 

He said the forum concentrates on the international community's common concerns about

building an eco-civilization. He expressed his belief that the results of the forum will make

positive contributions to protecting the global environment.

 

The president said building a beautiful China is an important part of the Chinese dream of

national rejuvenation.

China will work in line with the idea of respecting, complying with and protecting nature,

and implement the national policy of saving resources and protecting the environment, so as to promote green, recycling and low-carbon development, he said.

 

He said that to leave a good environment for future generations, China will incorporate building an ecological civilization into its economic, political, cultural and social development,

and shape the industrial structure, production mode and people's lifestyles in the spirit of

saving resources and protecting the environment. (Source: Xinhua)

(from www.cciced.net/encciced/newscenter/update/2013/201308/P02... )

= = =

 

caption: A volunteer writes her environmental statements onto an artificial tree during the first China Ecological Products (Technologies) Expo in Guiyang, capital of southwest China's Guizhou Province, July 19, 2013. The five-day expo, a key part of the 2013 Eco-Forum Global Annual Conference, kicked off here Friday. More than 260 exhibitors will attend the expo to introduce their advanced concepts and techniques in the field of ecology. (Xinhua/Ou Dongqu)

(from english.cntv.cn/20130719/105718.shtml )

= = =

 

Ecological civilization Guiyang International Forum 2013

 

Annual Meeting schedule

Published: July 2,2013

 

Theme

 

Construction of ecological civilization: Green change and transformation

 

- The green industry, green urban sustainability and green consumption-led

 

Time, place, scale

 

Scale: about 2,000 people (including foreign guests)

 

Location: Guiyang International Eco-Conference Centre

 

Time: 2013 Player 年 19 to 21 July

 

Form

 

Forum by the opening and closing ceremonies, forums, sub-forums (peak dialogue, roundtables, creative laboratories, workshops, discussion forums, etc.), exhibitions and trade negotiations and other activities components.

 

Sub-forum and a series of activities (tentative)

 

Sub-themes 1 green development and industrial transformation

 

1.1 'north latitude and 26 degrees Dream IT industry ecosystem to build' the world top 500 senior Roundtable

 

1.2 Food Safety and Ecological Agriculture Forum

 

1.3 Green Financial Innovation and Economic Development Forum entity

 

1.4 Efficient Sustainable Energy Forum

 

1.5 Ecological Civilization · ICT Industry Innovation Forum

 

1.6 green ecological city - building a model of energy efficiency and green building forum

 

1.7 Beautiful China and Eco Tourism Forum

 

1.8 Carbon Market Forum

 

1.9 Green Wave: Challenges and Opportunities for Private Enterprise Forum

 

1.10 Chinese enterprises overseas survival forum

 

Sub-themes 2. Harmonious social and inclusive development

 

2.1 Smart Cities and Green Economy Forum

 

2.2 Third Environmental Justice Forum

 

2.3 four places: ecological education cooperation and Outlook Forum Symposium (on)

 

Four places: ecological education cooperation and Outlook Forum Seminar (next)

 

Four places: ecological education cooperation and Outlook Forum Workshop

 

2.4 Youth Herald Tribune

 

2.5 recycling economy and ecological industrial town

 

Three sub-themes. Ecological restoration and environmental governance

 

3.1 Ecological Civilization and Technology Innovation Forum

 

3.2 Urban Construction and drinking water source protection forum

 

3.3 and utilization of renewable resources forum

 

3.4 China Low Carbon Development Strategy Seminar macro

 

3.5 Respect and comply with the laws of nature Solutions Forum

 

3.6 mine ecological restoration forum

 

3.7 Green Growth and beautiful Chinese Dream - Western Dialogue Forum forestry ecological construction of the road

 

3.8 Protection and Green Transformation Forum

 

Four sub-themes of ecological culture and values

 

4.1 Sustainable consumption and expand domestic demand balance forum

 

4.2 Forestry and Ecological Civilization Forum

 

4.3 Confucianism Eco Forum (venue: Huaxi Kong Xuetang)

 

4.4 China Fanjingshan ecological civilization and Buddhist Culture Forum

 

Summit - Speech Dialogue

 

1 Television Summit - a new starting point of human civilization (Green Economy: Opportunity or myth?)

 

2 Television Summit - ecological civilization, what role we play (mainly business)

 

3 TV Summit: Imitation of Nature or Technology Universal

 

4 TV Summit: Eastern wisdom and ecological civilization

 

5 of ecological civilization construction - 2015 Outlook

 

National and international conferences (Roundtable)

 

1 green low-carbon development in developing countries Side Event (SSC course)

 

(2) China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development Roundtable 2013

 

3. Sustainable Urbanization - German cities face symposium

 

4 BRICS Ministerial

 

5 of the National Workshop of affordable housing projects

 

6 Yangtze River Wetland Network 2013 Annual Meeting

 

Theme series of activities in Guizhou

 

1 China, Guizhou ecological products (technology) Expo

 

2 Guizhou ecological investment projects and signing event

 

3 index system of ecological civilization city seminar

 

4 of ecological civilization demonstration sites (small towns, communities, villages, enterprises, urban complexes - green ecological city, ecological wetland park) visits and promotion activities

 

5 latecomer catch-up: a comparison of Guizhou and Switzerland

 

6 cultivate ecological forest activities

 

7 Forum fifth anniversary thank buffet cum outstanding contribution figures issued will

 

8. 'Guiyang · 'green' life - ecological life every day' micro-series (micro-video, micro stories, pictures) Solicitation Activities

 

9 ecological civilization Guiyang Conference five Anniversary Exhibition

 

10 A number of farm breakfast, lunch and dinner

 

11 Ecological Civilization Research Report Series conference

Washington, DC. June 2,2011.

Following is a joint statement of the Governments of the United States and Brazil on the U.S.-Brazil Global Partnership Dialogue:

 

In their Joint Statement of March 19, 2011, Presidents Barack Obama and Dilma Rousseff called for regular meetings of the major U.S.-Brazil bilateral dialogues. In this context, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Minister of External Relations Antonio de Aguiar Patriota convened on June 1, 2011 the second U.S.-Brazil Global Partnership Dialogue (GPD), which was preceded by senior-level meetings on science, technology and the environment; education and culture; trilateral development cooperation and food security; and regional issues.

 

The second meeting of the GPD advanced the results of President Obama’s State visit to Brazil last March. Secretary Clinton and Minister Patriota recognize the GPD as a venue to strengthen cooperation between the two largest democracies and economies of the Americas on bilateral, regional, and global issues. They highlighted the interdependence of peace, security and development, and reaffirmed that the United States and Brazil share the common objectives of enhancing their bilateral partnership and promoting democracy, human rights, sustainable development, and social inclusion.

 

The GPD Participants reviewed progress made since the February meeting of the Economic Partnership Dialogue, highlighting the implementation of the Memorandum of Consultation on Air Transport, the entry into force of the Maritime Transport Agreement, and the importance of the recently-signed Memorandum of Understanding on Major Global Sporting Events as tools to promote business and investment. The Participants discussed the possibility of a joint aviation program between the United States and Brazil in order to enhance private sector engagement and to better enable our economies to rise to the challenges of globalization.

 

The Participants noted the significance of the Partnership for the Development of Biofuels for Aviation, under the Memorandum of Understanding to Advance the Cooperation on Biofuels, the Steering Committee of which also met on June 1, 2011 in Washington, and underscored the importance of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA). Brazil reaffirmed its intention to host an ECPA ministerial meeting in the future.

 

The Participants renewed their decision to enhance cooperation on food security and on development assistance to third countries. They discussed strategies to enhance their existing efforts on trilateral cooperation, including outreach on agricultural biotechnology. They welcomed progress in concluding programs in Haiti and Africa, and expressed their intent to develop a program in Egypt in the area of decent work in cooperation with the International Labor Organization. They acknowledged the successful implementation of joint initiatives in Mozambique in the areas of food security and agriculture.

 

The Participants looked forward to planning the next meeting of the U.S.-Brazil Joint Commission on Science and Technology, which features innovation as a key agenda item, at the earliest possible date. They underscored the role of innovation in promoting sustained economic growth, competitiveness, and job creation, and expressed their interest in exploring synergies among existing bilateral initiatives, and enhancing collaboration among government, the academic community, the private sector, and civil society in this area.

 

The Participants discussed the creation of a working group to foster bilateral cooperation on satellite-based earth observations, environmental monitoring, precipitation measurement, and natural disaster prevention, mitigation and response.

 

Pursuant to the decision of Presidents Obama and Rousseff to expand educational exchanges and promote cooperation on research and development, the Participants conceived an Action Plan with concrete steps to enhance substantially the exchange of students at the undergraduate and graduate levels in science, technology, and other relevant disciplines, and to engage civil society and the private sector in the training of a skilled workforce.

 

The Participants reaffirmed their intention to promote bilateral cultural cooperation and exchanged views on specific projects in the areas of music, museums and libraries.

 

The Participants reiterated their intention to work closely in preparation for the United Nations (UN) Conference on Sustainable Development, which will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2012 (Rio+20). The participants exchanged ideas on the green economy and reaffirmed their intent to work together on the Green Economy Partnership and Joint Initiative on Urban Sustainability in the run up to Rio+20. They also discussed the upcoming 17th Conference of Parties under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Durban, South Africa, and reaffirmed their intention to work together toward implementing the agreement reached in Cancun, Mexico. Bearing in mind their common interest in addressing a concrete environmental and health issue, the Participants explored the possibility of joining efforts under the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, an initiative in which the United States is a leading partner, and the Brazil-led Ethanol for Domestic Use Initiative.

 

The Participants welcomed the progress achieved under the Joint Action Plan to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Discrimination and Promote Equality and the Memorandum of Understanding on the Advancement of Women. They encouraged relevant agencies of both nations to devise work plans in advance of the Joint Action Plan’s high-level steering committee meeting in Brasilia in July 2011. The Participants commended the work underway in both countries to implement the MOU for the Advancement of Women, and in particular efforts aimed to advance women and girls in science and technology, achieve economic empowerment, and combat gender-based violence domestically and in third countries.

 

In seeking to advance the shared objective of both countries to combat all forms of discrimination, the Participants also underscored the importance of safeguarding individuals who experience discrimination due to their sexual orientation. The participants expressed intent to continue collaborating to advance the human rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender (LGBT) persons within the international community and within international organizations.

 

The Participants welcomed the creation of a working group to discuss the implementation, both in Brazil and in the United States, of the 1980 Hague Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, and took note of the results of the bilateral meetings held in Brasilia on May 18- 19, 2011.

 

They noted the increasing flow of travelers between the United States and Brazil, and decided to work together to facilitate this flow.

 

They took note of the upcoming Political-Military Talks, to be held in Brasilia on June, 3, 2011, during which Brazil and United States will strengthen their dialogue on bilateral and regional issues regarding defense and security.

 

The Participants reaffirmed their shared objective to promote and protect democracy in the Americas. They acknowledged the success of presidential elections held in Haiti last March and noted with satisfaction the inauguration of President Michel Joseph Martelly in May 2011. They reaffirmed the intention of both countries to work to facilitate market access for products originated in Haiti. Minister Patriota reiterated that Brazil intends to extend a preferential trade program to that country similar to the U.S. Haiti Economic Lift Program (HELP) act.

 

The Participants welcomed the return of Honduras to the Organization of American States (OAS). They stressed the need to make the Inter-American System more transparent and efficient, and to strengthen and streamline the relationship among the Summit of the Americas, the OAS, and other institutions of the system.

 

The Participants affirmed the valuable contributions towards democracy, peace, cooperation, security and development made by regional and sub-regional integration efforts and agreements, including the Union of South American Nations (UNASUL) and noted the value of dialogue between UNASUL and the United States.

 

The Participants decided to continue discussions on democracy, development, peace, security, and other shared priorities in Africa and the Middle East.

 

The participants stressed the need to further cooperate on counternarcotics efforts and combating transnational crime.

 

The Participants exchanged views on disarmament, nonproliferation and peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Both sides look forward to discussing these issues more in the coming months.

 

Both countries discussed important issues and cooperation in the UN Security Council, including conflict-affected areas around the world and the UN peacekeeping mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH).

   

PRN: 2011/887

   

SAC to raze 1908 house

 

A 105-year-old house near San Antonio College will likely be demolished to make room for a campus facility that will promote environmental sustainability.

 

The Historic and Design Review Commission denied a landmark designation Wednesday for a 1908 house at 811 Ogden St., less than a block east of the SAC campus and just west of the Tobin Hill Historic District. Representatives of Alamo Colleges said the structure will be carefully disassembled, with doors, windows and other materials saved for repairs to other historic structures. The demolition will make room for a community garden and B-cycle station, as part of the city's bicycle sharing program.

 

The house is near EcoCentro, a 3,000-square-foot urban sustainability center under development at SAC at 1802 N. Main Ave. It will accommodate courses and community workshops on renewable energy and other environmental topics, including gardening, composting, recycling and water conservation.

 

The city's Office of Historic Preservation determined the house still has much of its structural integrity, despite being used as apartments at least since the early 1950s, and request the designation.

 

But Molly Cundari, an architect on the project, told commissioners the house lost much of its integrity when it was converted to apartments.

 

“We think that the house has been altered beyond the point which it would be considered” for landmark designation, Cundari said.

 

Frederica Kushner, a Tobin Hill resident, appealed to the board to support the designation, which would ultimately be ruled on by the City Council, to save the house. Use of the house as a “rooming home” did not lessen its historic value, she said.

 

But Commissioner Harry Shafer, who made a Feb. 27 site visit, said the house is worse off than it appears, with a foundation in “terrible shape,” a leaky roof and rotting wood. Commissioner Victor Salas said it would cost “more than it would be worth” to restore it.

 

City staff research revealed that Henry C. Feldman, a prominent real estate agent, was among the first occupants of the house. A 1908 testimonial in the San Antonio Light said Feldman “put through some of the largest and most important real estate transfers” in the city in the early 1900s.

 

College district officials said they tried to find a buyer to move the house, but were unsuccessful. Despite a 6-foot perimeter fence, the district also has reported problems with vandals tearing apart walls of the vacant house in search of copper wiring.

Photographer: Caesandra Seawell

Picking a Winner: How to Make the U.S. a Leader in the Clean Energy Economy

 

To watch the video, click here: www.americanprogress.org/events/2010/03/apollo.html

 

Thursday, March 4, 2010

 

In his State of the Union speech, President Obama said, "I do not accept second place for the United States of America." But the truth is that when it comes to the clean energy economy, the United States isn’t even coming in second. Amidst growing concerns about clean-energy jobs going overseas, this conference will discuss what it will take for the U.S. to regain its competitiveness in the global clean energy economy.

 

The Apollo Alliance and Center for American Progress will bring together policymakers, academics, business and labor leaders, and other experts to discuss what policies will support the United States in becoming not only a consumer of clean-energy technologies but also a leading producer of them.

 

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.: Opening Remarks:

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

John Podesta, President and Chief Executive Officer, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

10:00 - 11:15 a.m.: The American Clean Energy Economy in 2020: What Should It Look Like and How Can We Get There?

Rob Atkinson, President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Bob Borosage, President, Institute for America's Future

Peter Brehm, Vice President of Business Development and Government Relations, Infinia Corporation

Kathleen McGinty, Former Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

 

Moderated by:

Susan McGinnis, Managing Editor and Anchor, Clean Skies News

 

For a transcript click here.

 

11:30 - 12:15 p.m.: Keynote Speeches: Perspectives from House and Senate Champions on How to Grow a Thriving and Globally Competitive Clean Energy Economy

Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Congressman Jay Inslee (D-WA)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Introduced by:

 

Cathy Calfo, Executive Director, Apollo Alliance

 

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.: The U.S. and the World: What Are Other Countries Doing and What Could the U.S. Do?

Thea Lee, Deputy Chief of Staff, AFL-CIO

Leo Hindery, Chair of the U.S. Economy/Smart Globalization Initiative, New America Foundation

Julian Wong, Senior Policy Analyst, Center for American Progress

Joan Fitzgerald, author of Emerald Cities: Urban Sustainability and Economic Development

 

Moderated by:

Bracken Hendricks, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

2:45 - 4:15 p.m.: Educating the Clean Energy Workforce of the Future

 

Keynote speach:

William Spriggs, Assistent Secretary for Policy, US Department of Labor

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Andy Levin, Chief Workforce Officer, State of Michigan

Louis Soares, Director of the Postsecondary Education Program, Center for American Progress

Van Jones, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Founder, Green For All

Joel Rogers, Director, Center on Wisconsin Strategy

 

Moderated by:

Kate Gordon, Vice President for Energy Policy, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

4:15 - 5:00 p.m.: Making America A Winner in the Clean Energy Economy

Jared Bernstein, Chief Economist and Economic Policy Advisor to Vice President Joseph Biden

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. June 22, 2012.

Good morning. To President Rousseff, the Brazilian Government, the Brazilian people for hosting us, to Secretary General Ban, Secretary General Sha: Thank you for convening this conference. And thanks to all of you representing governments, civil society, the private sector, young people, men, women, and children everywhere.

 

Brazil has done the world a great service by hosting us all here. This can be a fractious time. But thanks to Brazil’s deft and effective leadership, we have coalesced around an outcome document that marks a real advance for sustainable development. We know this is one of the most pressing matters of our time, because how we grow together over the long term isn’t a question for only some countries. It is a question for all countries. And here in Rio, thanks to Brazil, we are at the center of our shared efforts to find answers.

 

I want to thank the President of Samoa for his remarks and the reminder that we meet at a critical moment. For some countries and some people around the world, this is not just a matter for long-term planning, but for immediate, pressing action. And we know that voices are being raised demanding expanded opportunities and a greater role in the decisions that affect the lives of us all. We have the potential to answer that call. Hundreds of millions of people have been lifted out of extreme poverty in just the past generation, laying the groundwork for even more progress. We are working together to end chronic hunger, an area where Brazil has shown particularly strong leadership. I believe we can end preventable child deaths and chart a path towards an AIDS-free generation.ãã

 

In short, this is a time for us to be pragmatic, but also optimistic. A more prosperous future is within our reach, a future where all people benefit from sustainable development no matter who they are or where they live. But let’s be honest. We know what is possible.ã We know what we could do. But we also know that future is not guaranteed, because the resources that we all depend upon – fresh water, thriving oceans, arable land, a stable climate – are under increasing pressure. And that is why, in the 21st century, the only viable development is sustainable development. The only way to deliver lasting progress for everyone is by preserving our resources and protecting our common environment.ã

 

So we have come together, here in Rio, to identify practical ways we can all promote sustainable development. And while our views may differ sometimes, I believe we agree on some fundamental principles. We cannot be boxed in by the orthodoxies of the past.ã We should and must make decisions based on research and scientific evidence about what works. And above all, we need fresh, agile, action-oriented partnerships that can produce results year after year after year.

 

So while the outcome document adopted here contains many important principles and proposals, the most compelling products of this conference are the examples of new thinking that can lead to models for future action. It should be said of Rio that people left here thinking, as the late Steve Jobs put it, not just big, but different.

 

We should be thinking different about harnessing the power of the market. Remember in the 1960s, official development assistance accounted for 70 percent of the capital flows to developing nations, but today it amounts to only 13 percent, while at the same time, development budgets have actually increased. Why is that? Well, you know very well. Because while continuing to provide assistance, the private sector investments, using targeted resources and smart policies, have catalyzed more balanced, inclusive, sustainable growth.ã

 

The United States has taken this idea to heart. And earlier today, I helped launch a partnership between the United States and African nations that will use $20 million in U.S. Government funding to unlock hundreds of millions of dollars in private financing for clean energy projects in Africa and beyond. It’s part of our contribution to the United Nations Sustainable Energy for All initiative, which has secured significant private sector investments for sustainable energy. And we hope to see even more coming out of Rio.

 

You also see the power of the market in the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, which aims to help 100 million families adopt clean cookstoves and fuels by 2020. By supporting consumer research and creating incentives for manufacturers, we’re helping to create a market for stoves that people will pay for and use, while at the same time preventing health problems in women and children, and cleaning the air of black soot.

 

Now in addition to tapping into the private sector, we should be thinking different about new types of partnerships to solve problems that might otherwise seem insurmountable. Here in Rio, the United States launched joint efforts on everything from deforestation and water to solid waste. We’re also leading Feed the Future, a global effort to improve food security that is helping food producers adapt to climate change even as they reduce their own greenhouse gas emissions.ãã

 

And earlier this year, I was privileged to host six countries in the United Nations Environment Program as we launched the Climate and Clean Air Coalition. The goal is to reduce short-lived climate pollutants that cause more than 30 percent of current global warming, as well as millions of premature deaths and extensive crop losses. We know we have to keep working together on CO2, but we think that our Climate and Clean Air Coalition, to which many more countries are joining, and we welcome you, can take targeted action and produce results with respect to methane and black soot and HFCs.

 

We also have to be thinking different about development in our cities. That is, after all, where most of the world’s population lives today, where most of the growth is and will take place, and where innovative ideas are being put into action. Under the Joint Initiative on Urban Sustainability that President Rousseff and President Obama kicked off last year, we are bringing political officials from every level – from state, county, local, municipalities – together along with industry leaders and developers to find creative ways to generate sustainable economic growth. If, as I heard earlier today, that 70 percent of the structures that will be needed in 30 years to house, to provide economic opportunities for the world’s population have yet to be built, then we have a tremendous opportunity we cannot waste.

 

And finally, the only prosperous, sustainable economy is an inclusive economy. That means we should think different about how we recognize the needs of workers in the informal economy, how we unleash the talent and energy of young people, and how we act on the compelling evidence most recently published by the World Bank that women are essential drivers of sustainable development.ã I applaud the bold call to action issued here in Rio by UN Women, and likewise the Rio+20 outcome document devotes a strong section to expanding opportunities for women.

 

And while I am very pleased that this year’s outcome document endorses sexual and reproductive health and universal access to family planning, to reach our goals in sustainable development we also have to ensure women’s reproductive rights. Women must be empowered to make decisions about whether and when to have children. And the United States will continue – (applause) – the United States will continue to work to ensure that those rights are respected in international agreements.

 

Now none of this is an abstract discussion. There is just too much at stake, too much still to be done. And many of you visited the U.S. Center here in Rio and saw practical solutions related to some of the work I’ve discussed and other goals we hold in common. We believe solutions require action by all of us. Governments, yes; let’s do our part. Let’s do more than our part. Let’s pave the way for more clean energy investments, take on the entrenched political and economic interests that stand in the way of clean energy, technology, and sources being used in nations around the world. Let’s use the private sector, particularly the consumer goods companies, as they have agreed to do, to make sure they have sustainable supply chains, the right kind of packaging and marketing that puts the least amount of burden on the earth we share.ã

 

Let’s bring in the nonprofits, the civil society organizations, faith groups, individuals, all of us, committed to realizing the sustainable development goals that we have embraced. We know that we will be judged not by what we say nor even by what we intend to do, but by whether we deliver results for people alive today, and whether we keep faith with future generations. I’m very honored to be here with all of you, and I pledge my country’s, the Obama Administration’s, and my own personal efforts to continue our work together. We simply cannot afford to fail.

 

Thank you all very much.

 

Picking a Winner: How to Make the U.S. a Leader in the Clean Energy Economy

 

To watch the video, click here: www.americanprogress.org/events/2010/03/apollo.html

 

Thursday, March 4, 2010

 

In his State of the Union speech, President Obama said, "I do not accept second place for the United States of America." But the truth is that when it comes to the clean energy economy, the United States isn’t even coming in second. Amidst growing concerns about clean-energy jobs going overseas, this conference will discuss what it will take for the U.S. to regain its competitiveness in the global clean energy economy.

 

The Apollo Alliance and Center for American Progress will bring together policymakers, academics, business and labor leaders, and other experts to discuss what policies will support the United States in becoming not only a consumer of clean-energy technologies but also a leading producer of them.

 

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.: Opening Remarks:

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

John Podesta, President and Chief Executive Officer, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

10:00 - 11:15 a.m.: The American Clean Energy Economy in 2020: What Should It Look Like and How Can We Get There?

Rob Atkinson, President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Bob Borosage, President, Institute for America's Future

Peter Brehm, Vice President of Business Development and Government Relations, Infinia Corporation

Kathleen McGinty, Former Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

 

Moderated by:

Susan McGinnis, Managing Editor and Anchor, Clean Skies News

 

For a transcript click here.

 

11:30 - 12:15 p.m.: Keynote Speeches: Perspectives from House and Senate Champions on How to Grow a Thriving and Globally Competitive Clean Energy Economy

Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Congressman Jay Inslee (D-WA)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Introduced by:

 

Cathy Calfo, Executive Director, Apollo Alliance

 

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.: The U.S. and the World: What Are Other Countries Doing and What Could the U.S. Do?

Thea Lee, Deputy Chief of Staff, AFL-CIO

Leo Hindery, Chair of the U.S. Economy/Smart Globalization Initiative, New America Foundation

Julian Wong, Senior Policy Analyst, Center for American Progress

Joan Fitzgerald, author of Emerald Cities: Urban Sustainability and Economic Development

 

Moderated by:

Bracken Hendricks, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

2:45 - 4:15 p.m.: Educating the Clean Energy Workforce of the Future

 

Keynote speach:

William Spriggs, Assistent Secretary for Policy, US Department of Labor

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Andy Levin, Chief Workforce Officer, State of Michigan

Louis Soares, Director of the Postsecondary Education Program, Center for American Progress

Van Jones, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Founder, Green For All

Joel Rogers, Director, Center on Wisconsin Strategy

 

Moderated by:

Kate Gordon, Vice President for Energy Policy, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

4:15 - 5:00 p.m.: Making America A Winner in the Clean Energy Economy

Jared Bernstein, Chief Economist and Economic Policy Advisor to Vice President Joseph Biden

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Picking a Winner: How to Make the U.S. a Leader in the Clean Energy Economy

 

To watch the video, click here: www.americanprogress.org/events/2010/03/apollo.html

 

Thursday, March 4, 2010

 

In his State of the Union speech, President Obama said, "I do not accept second place for the United States of America." But the truth is that when it comes to the clean energy economy, the United States isn’t even coming in second. Amidst growing concerns about clean-energy jobs going overseas, this conference will discuss what it will take for the U.S. to regain its competitiveness in the global clean energy economy.

 

The Apollo Alliance and Center for American Progress will bring together policymakers, academics, business and labor leaders, and other experts to discuss what policies will support the United States in becoming not only a consumer of clean-energy technologies but also a leading producer of them.

 

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.: Opening Remarks:

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

John Podesta, President and Chief Executive Officer, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

10:00 - 11:15 a.m.: The American Clean Energy Economy in 2020: What Should It Look Like and How Can We Get There?

Rob Atkinson, President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Bob Borosage, President, Institute for America's Future

Peter Brehm, Vice President of Business Development and Government Relations, Infinia Corporation

Kathleen McGinty, Former Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

 

Moderated by:

Susan McGinnis, Managing Editor and Anchor, Clean Skies News

 

For a transcript click here.

 

11:30 - 12:15 p.m.: Keynote Speeches: Perspectives from House and Senate Champions on How to Grow a Thriving and Globally Competitive Clean Energy Economy

Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Congressman Jay Inslee (D-WA)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Introduced by:

 

Cathy Calfo, Executive Director, Apollo Alliance

 

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.: The U.S. and the World: What Are Other Countries Doing and What Could the U.S. Do?

Thea Lee, Deputy Chief of Staff, AFL-CIO

Leo Hindery, Chair of the U.S. Economy/Smart Globalization Initiative, New America Foundation

Julian Wong, Senior Policy Analyst, Center for American Progress

Joan Fitzgerald, author of Emerald Cities: Urban Sustainability and Economic Development

 

Moderated by:

Bracken Hendricks, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

2:45 - 4:15 p.m.: Educating the Clean Energy Workforce of the Future

 

Keynote speach:

William Spriggs, Assistent Secretary for Policy, US Department of Labor

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Andy Levin, Chief Workforce Officer, State of Michigan

Louis Soares, Director of the Postsecondary Education Program, Center for American Progress

Van Jones, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Founder, Green For All

Joel Rogers, Director, Center on Wisconsin Strategy

 

Moderated by:

Kate Gordon, Vice President for Energy Policy, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

4:15 - 5:00 p.m.: Making America A Winner in the Clean Energy Economy

Jared Bernstein, Chief Economist and Economic Policy Advisor to Vice President Joseph Biden

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

 

For a transcript click here.

 

The Crystal - Urban Sustainability Centre, by Wilkinson Eyre

Picking a Winner: How to Make the U.S. a Leader in the Clean Energy Economy

 

To watch the video, click here: www.americanprogress.org/events/2010/03/apollo.html

 

Thursday, March 4, 2010

 

In his State of the Union speech, President Obama said, "I do not accept second place for the United States of America." But the truth is that when it comes to the clean energy economy, the United States isn’t even coming in second. Amidst growing concerns about clean-energy jobs going overseas, this conference will discuss what it will take for the U.S. to regain its competitiveness in the global clean energy economy.

 

The Apollo Alliance and Center for American Progress will bring together policymakers, academics, business and labor leaders, and other experts to discuss what policies will support the United States in becoming not only a consumer of clean-energy technologies but also a leading producer of them.

 

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.: Opening Remarks:

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

John Podesta, President and Chief Executive Officer, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

10:00 - 11:15 a.m.: The American Clean Energy Economy in 2020: What Should It Look Like and How Can We Get There?

Rob Atkinson, President, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Bob Borosage, President, Institute for America's Future

Peter Brehm, Vice President of Business Development and Government Relations, Infinia Corporation

Kathleen McGinty, Former Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

 

Moderated by:

Susan McGinnis, Managing Editor and Anchor, Clean Skies News

 

For a transcript click here.

 

11:30 - 12:15 p.m.: Keynote Speeches: Perspectives from House and Senate Champions on How to Grow a Thriving and Globally Competitive Clean Energy Economy

Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Congressman Jay Inslee (D-WA)

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Introduced by:

 

Cathy Calfo, Executive Director, Apollo Alliance

 

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.: The U.S. and the World: What Are Other Countries Doing and What Could the U.S. Do?

Thea Lee, Deputy Chief of Staff, AFL-CIO

Leo Hindery, Chair of the U.S. Economy/Smart Globalization Initiative, New America Foundation

Julian Wong, Senior Policy Analyst, Center for American Progress

Joan Fitzgerald, author of Emerald Cities: Urban Sustainability and Economic Development

 

Moderated by:

Bracken Hendricks, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

2:45 - 4:15 p.m.: Educating the Clean Energy Workforce of the Future

 

Keynote speach:

William Spriggs, Assistent Secretary for Policy, US Department of Labor

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Andy Levin, Chief Workforce Officer, State of Michigan

Louis Soares, Director of the Postsecondary Education Program, Center for American Progress

Van Jones, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Founder, Green For All

Joel Rogers, Director, Center on Wisconsin Strategy

 

Moderated by:

Kate Gordon, Vice President for Energy Policy, Center for American Progress

 

For a transcript click here.

 

4:15 - 5:00 p.m.: Making America A Winner in the Clean Energy Economy

Jared Bernstein, Chief Economist and Economic Policy Advisor to Vice President Joseph Biden

Phil Angelides, Chairman, Apollo Alliance

 

For a transcript click here.

 

Photo by Echo Xie.

 

Sunday June 24, 2012 1:00pm - 6:00pm @ The Fridge (516 8th Street SE Rear alley, Washington, DC 20003)

 

Join us on a group bicycle ride to different community gardens in D.C., with everyone convening at a community film screening and discussion of a feature-length documentary, "A Community of Gardeners," which promotes urban sustainability and green spaces, with a chance for film-goers to drink, eat and socialize afterwards.

 

GROUP CYCLE RIDE (1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.) - FREE

 

Meet up at City Bikes' Adams Morgan location (2501 Champlain St. NW) at 1:00 p.m. Soon aftewards, we will head out for a chance to see Wangari Gardens, a great new city garden in the shadow of the Children's Medical Center. From there we will meander across town to visit the new terraced garden at Brainfood and then to the Fridge Gallery. Following the screening and social hour, head over to City Bikes' Capitol Hill location (709 8th St. SE) for snacks and swag. If you have any questions please email ben@citybikes.com. The group ride is free and open to the public.

 

To guarantee your seat at the screening, be sure to also purchase tickets for $5.

 

Scoutmob presents: FILM SCREENING + DISCUSSION (3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.) + SOCIAL HOUR (4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.) - $5

 

Buy your tix online: secure.scoutmob.com/washington-dc/hand-picked/cycle-in

 

The feature-length documentary, "A Community of Gardeners," explores the vital role of seven community gardens in Washington, D.C. as sources of fresh, nutritious food, outdoor classrooms, places of healing, links to immigrants' homelands, centers of social interaction and oases of beauty and calm in inner-city neighborhoods. The film also traces the history of community gardens in the United States, from the potato patch farms of the late 19th century, to the victory gardens of World War II, to community gardening's current renaissance.

 

Before the screening, we will premiere, "Planting Community: The Story of Wangari Gardens," a five-minute documentary produced by Still Life Projects that tells the story of Josh Singer and his determination to reclaim an abandoned piece of land in DC's Park View neighborhood. The hurdles he faces along the way cause months of setbacks, but his vision of a community garden grows into something beyond what he even imagined.

 

The screenings will be followed by a discussion and Q&A with filmmaker Cintia Cabib, Josh Singer of Wangari Gardens, Kate Lee of the Brainfood Youth Garden, and Ryan Hill of Still Life Projects.

 

Stick around for a social hour, with complimentary drinks and treats.

 

Tickets for the film screening + discussion + social hour are $5 - on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited, so purchase your tix now!

 

Buy your tix online: secure.scoutmob.com/washington-dc/hand-picked/cycle-in

 

Learn more: benevolentmedia.org/festival

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