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Tribal Quilt Cover Set by Bianca is a scorching design inspired by African pattern featuring round bold stripes with earthy tones of black, white and stone, harmonized by identical European pillowcases and cushions.

www.izzz.com.au/tribal-quilt-cover-set-bianca-p.html

The mxing of snow, red mud, and late afternoon light forms a pleasing abstract in the heart of Monument Valley.

 

© Michael Greene’s Wild Moments 2010 | All Rights Reserved | Please do not use without my permission. Please Note: My images are posted here for viewing enjoyment only. Please contact me if you are interested in using this image or purchasing a print.

 

Website: www.wildmoments.net

 

Blog: wildmoments.wordpress.com/

"Hot Travel Tips to Avoid Crowds in the National Parks"

This artwork was inspired by the ancient tribal designs ofindigenous people around the world.

 

My Facebook Artist Page: www.facebook.com/sherriedlarch/

  

The first woman we were searching was dead, the second we found was ill and i refused to take any picture of her, the third, on the picture, was very happy to meet a foreigner, it was the first time she had such a visit. She has the face totally tattooed in black. It was a tradition in the Chin state of Myanmar. She said it was just normal to be like this at this time as any woman with white face was seen as ugly! Few hours from Mindat and after thousands of curves in the hills, Myanmar...

www.ericlafforgue.com

This artwork was inspired by the ancient tribal designs of the indigenous people around the world.

 

My Facebook Artist Page: www.facebook.com/sherriedlarch/

  

ISO Strobist Workshop - Tribal Concept Photo shoot

Workshop Speaker: JB Dacanay

Tribal Concept: Janjie Rey Niog

Tribal Warrior - Fashion, Designs: Toni Roquim & Gil Mary

Model: Mary Gil

MUA: Toni Roquim

Photographer: Ino Florencio

Special thanks to Gilmer and Mary Gil, & to all ISO Support / Advisers

 

This fire was kindled with a flame from a Cherokee Council fire that has been burning in Oklahoma since 1838. The original fire was taken to Oklahoma when the Cherokee Nation was removed west over the infamous "Trail of Tears".

In May 1951, four Eastern band of Cherokee Tribal leaders from the Qualla Boundary, North Carolina, retraced that trail of heartbreak and brought live coals from the Oklahoma fire.

The Eternal Flame here at the Mountainside Theatre was kindled from the century old Oklahoma fire on June, 23, 1951.

 

May this fire burn eternally as a symbol of the strength of the Cherokee People and may it honor those Cherokee who have gone before.

 

“Armed carjackings, assaults, robbery, shootings and serious sexual offences, including rape, are common in Papua” says the Foreign Office travel advice to travelers!

The papua tourism office has a hard work convincing more people like me to come to PNG!

Once a year takes place in Mount Hagen the biggest tribal meeting, called a singsing.

The “Men bilong pait” (the Warriors) ,the” pipels” (the women), and the “pikinini” (the children) are all here. Hundreds of papus are preparing themselves for the Singsing. It’s in open air, but you feel like being backstage in the latest fashion show in Milano or Paris as men paint their faces in red,yellow,white,black, women take grass to make skirts or kilts and cover their bodies with clay, mud, or even pigs fat!

Old wise men are building the giant headdresses made of eagle, parrot and bird of paradise feathers. Each feather is packed in newspaper, to protect them from insects. It will take hours…

Some warriors wear also marsupial jaws as necklaces! “If you do not have jaws, you can put dogs teeth, it works too” they tell me!

Bones, shells, pigs tusks, or twigs are put in the noses. I meet a Highlands warrior who has gave up the traditional shell that he used to put in his nose, and now uses an electrical meter!

Papu like to put a modern touch in their jewels or decorations, as we like to put some tribal stuff in our so called designed houses!

 

Now it’s time for parade. All the tribes are marching. It’s a mix of sounds and sights, not a love parade, rather a war parade!

The Mount Hagen festival was launched by the Australian colonial governor in 1964, to promote peace in the country.So…The warriors simulate fights! But the stone axes, the arrows, the shields, the spears, the bludgeons are real! There won’t be any violence during the festival, but everyday, tribal fights still take place, with guns instead of axes, and people die…

You can hear war songs, drums, and the tribes start to march in circle, in column, or in line .

The tribes keep on dancing until sundown, and have to listen to an endless speech from a local political while the few tourists go back to their hotels, stoned by the loudspeakers noise!

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Image Result For Cross Tattoo Tribal Designs

 

Are you thinking about getting a tattoo? Free Tattoo Designs can help you pick a design you can be happy with the rest of your life..Cross tattoos are among the most versatile tattoo symbols out there today. The most popular cross tattoo is the...

 

yourtattooideas.xyz/cross-tattoo-tribal-designs.html

I recently made a similar bear as a custom order for one of my favorite customers and I enjoyed so much making that type of embroidery that I decided to make a new one in this beautiful sea foam/mint felt color.

 

What I like the most in doing what I do is paring colors together and I really got inspired by the color combos I chose for the two sides of this little plush pillow.

 

The embroidery style itself was inspired by a research I made with my son on tribal motifs found on totem poles and other artifacts.

I did not make a sketch at all for the design, I just picked the different color thread I wanted to use and started to "free form" embroider each side.

 

This little plush bear pillow is all hand sewn and made with much love and attention to details.

It measures 11" wide by 7.5" high.

This artwork was inspired by the ancient tribal designs ofindigenous people around the world.

 

My Facebook Artist Page: www.facebook.com/sherriedlarch/

  

Photographer & Model: Hubrick Tenebrae

Tattoo: Yakuza 01 by K-tarsis Design

marketplace.secondlife.com/p/K-tarsis-Tattoo-Tribal-02/12...

Urthwerks' good friend, Michael, dropped these treasures by yesterday!! They appear to be made of bone and are amazing!! Will be cleaning them up and designing four different one of a kind Urthwerks pieces. If interested, give us a shout!! #industrialchic #urthwerks #tribal #bone #jewelry

  

"Shimmering Silver Ghost Wolf" This piece came to me in a dream, I just saw this wolf running in an icy landscape. He was part metal--or at least appeared metallic and shiny perhaps it was armor, also part celtic, part tribal design. He was of the earth and unearthly at the same time. I woke up and painted him exactly as I remembered him

Art by Sherrie Thai of Shaireproductions.com

 

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This NEW SENTINEL KILT from Mirja Mills of EMO tions is just RP perfection, suitable for Male or Female. Its Rigged Mesh coming in 3 sizes and has some Wonderfully detailed parts,add some of EMO tions wonderful Tribal style hair and Jewelry and you can wander the wastelands in style.

Stylecard

SENTINEL KILT NEW

ORION JEWELRY SET

SIDNEY in BLONDE with the TRIBAL Hairbase

All from EMO tions

Taxiii

slurl.com/secondlife/Hells%20End/128/116/22

Pet from Manticore

 

fashionfeed.thebestofsl.com/2014/02/emo-tions-roleplay-gi...

The Chin tattooed women live in the Chin, Rakhine and Arakan states in northwestern Myanmar. The origin of facial tattoos in the region is unknown. Some believe that the practice began during the reigns of Kings long ago. The royalty used to come to the villages to capture young women. The men from the tribe may have tattooed their women to make them ugly, thereby saving them from a life of slavery. Interestingly, I heard a similar origin for body modification among the Mursi tribe in Ethiopia. As legend has it, the tribeswomen began wearing giant lip plates to make them uglier to would-be kidnappers. Now, the bigger the lip plate the higher the bride price.

For years, access to the tribal Mindat area was restricted by the burmese government. It was opened just two years ago. Only about 700 tourists visit per year. Most of them only visit the bucolic Mount Victoria by bus, never meeting the tattooed women who remain isolated, hours away by foot. Those who do wish to meet them better pack good walking shoes and be prepared to sleep in smoke-filled local houses complete with rats.

There are a few different face tattoo patterns. The spiderweb tattoo is popular in the Mrauk U region. It takes a three hour long tail boat ride to reach this remote area. This tattoo is usually accompanied by a circle in the center of the forehead which represents the sun or lines under the nose symbolizing tiger whiskers.

Another design, known as the bee pattern, is common in the Mindat area. It is composed of dots, lines and occasionally circles. It is worn by the Muun tribe who inhabit the hills of the Arakan state.

The Magan tribeswomen wear huge earrings made of beads and calabashes. They can also play the flute with their noses.

I ventured to Kanpelet village in search of the women from the U Pu tribe who have the incredibly rare whole face tattoo. This is one of the most impressive styles: the entire face is inked up. Rumors had it that only three women in this area had the tattoo. After hours of off roading, I arrive in the village only to learn that one died recently and another was very ill. I was lucky enough to meet Pa Late. At 85, she is nearly deaf but still works hard with her family in a small house on the top of a little hill.

Pa Late said that a completely black face had become a symbol of beauty in the past. The few women who refused to do it looked ugly to the men. The tattoo took three days but the pain lasted over a month.

There are two ways to make the tattoo needle. The first consists of tying three pieces of bamboo together and the second uses thorns. The ink is a mixture of cow bile, soot, plants, and pig fat. It usually took one day to complete the standard tattoo and a few more for the totally black one. The tattoo artist was a specialist or in some cases a parent. Infection was a common problem as the girls had blood all over their face.

Everything, including the eyelids, was tattooed. Many women say that the neck was the most sensitive area.

Ma Aung Seim shared her memories of the tattoo sessions : “I was 10 years old. The day before the tattoo ceremony, I only ate sugarcane and drank tea. It was forbidden to eat meat or peanuts. During the tattoo session, I cried a lot, but I could not move at all. After the session, my face bled for 3 days. It was very painful. My mother put fresh beans leaves on my face to alleviate the pain. I had no choice if i wanted to get married. Men wanted women with tattoos at this time. My mother told me that without a tattoo on my face, i would look like... a man! The web drawn on my face attracted the men like a spiderweb catches insects!”

Not all the tattooed women live in remote areas deep in the mountains. Some have integrated into modern society. Miss Heu, 67, lives in Kanpelet. Her grandmother forced her to get tattooed. She lives in a modern house and even has TV (when electricity is not out). Chin people have maintained their modesty and shyness: when a movie showspeople kissing or making love, most of them still fast forward the scene.

As a leader in the local community, Miss Heu had the chance to meet Aung San Suu Kyi when she came in the area for a meeting. She is very aware of the tattooed women and the ethnicities that are forgotten by the central government. She says she and Aung San Suu Kyi are friends now. Heu’s daughter has graduated and works in Singapore.

The Chin culture is threatened by the government as their teachers are usually not Chin. For a long time, they fought for independence, but since the country began to democratize, things have calmed down.

“I am old. Soon I will die” says to me a Chin woman from Pan Baung village, while she does the gesture of drying tears from her eyes. In her village, only 6 tattooed woman remain alive. Those women are the last of their kind…

 

:copyright: Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Brush designs by: "Fallen_Stock" Deviantart.com. Explored #135 :)

 

*Just a note: This is actually a full color picture but the subject and background naturally create a black and white composition :)

For Limited Bazaar!

 

I am finally participating again :)

Let DesignsMag help you find unique and impressive tattoos designs that will carry your heartfelt messages for your loved ones. www.designsmag.com/impressive-memorial-tattoos-designs/ visit for more details.

The Chin tattooed women live in the Chin, Rakhine and Arakan states in northwestern Myanmar. The origin of facial tattoos in the region is unknown. Some believe that the practice began during the reigns of Kings long ago. The royalty used to come to the villages to capture young women. The men from the tribe may have tattooed their women to make them ugly, thereby saving them from a life of slavery. Interestingly, I heard a similar origin for body modification among the Mursi tribe in Ethiopia. As legend has it, the tribeswomen began wearing giant lip plates to make them uglier to would-be kidnappers. Now, the bigger the lip plate the higher the bride price.

For years, access to the tribal Mindat area was restricted by the burmese government. It was opened just two years ago. Only about 700 tourists visit per year. Most of them only visit the bucolic Mount Victoria by bus, never meeting the tattooed women who remain isolated, hours away by foot. Those who do wish to meet them better pack good walking shoes and be prepared to sleep in smoke-filled local houses complete with rats.

There are a few different face tattoo patterns. The spiderweb tattoo is popular in the Mrauk U region. It takes a three hour long tail boat ride to reach this remote area. This tattoo is usually accompanied by a circle in the center of the forehead which represents the sun or lines under the nose symbolizing tiger whiskers.

Another design, known as the bee pattern, is common in the Mindat area. It is composed of dots, lines and occasionally circles. It is worn by the Muun tribe who inhabit the hills of the Arakan state.

The Magan tribeswomen wear huge earrings made of beads and calabashes. They can also play the flute with their noses.

I ventured to Kanpelet village in search of the women from the U Pu tribe who have the incredibly rare whole face tattoo. This is one of the most impressive styles: the entire face is inked up. Rumors had it that only three women in this area had the tattoo. After hours of off roading, I arrive in the village only to learn that one died recently and another was very ill. I was lucky enough to meet Pa Late. At 85, she is nearly deaf but still works hard with her family in a small house on the top of a little hill.

Pa Late said that a completely black face had become a symbol of beauty in the past. The few women who refused to do it looked ugly to the men. The tattoo took three days but the pain lasted over a month.

There are two ways to make the tattoo needle. The first consists of tying three pieces of bamboo together and the second uses thorns. The ink is a mixture of cow bile, soot, plants, and pig fat. It usually took one day to complete the standard tattoo and a few more for the totally black one. The tattoo artist was a specialist or in some cases a parent. Infection was a common problem as the girls had blood all over their face.

Everything, including the eyelids, was tattooed. Many women say that the neck was the most sensitive area.

Ma Aung Seim shared her memories of the tattoo sessions : “I was 10 years old. The day before the tattoo ceremony, I only ate sugarcane and drank tea. It was forbidden to eat meat or peanuts. During the tattoo session, I cried a lot, but I could not move at all. After the session, my face bled for 3 days. It was very painful. My mother put fresh beans leaves on my face to alleviate the pain. I had no choice if i wanted to get married. Men wanted women with tattoos at this time. My mother told me that without a tattoo on my face, i would look like... a man! The web drawn on my face attracted the men like a spiderweb catches insects!”

Not all the tattooed women live in remote areas deep in the mountains. Some have integrated into modern society. Miss Heu, 67, lives in Kanpelet. Her grandmother forced her to get tattooed. She lives in a modern house and even has TV (when electricity is not out). Chin people have maintained their modesty and shyness: when a movie showspeople kissing or making love, most of them still fast forward the scene.

As a leader in the local community, Miss Heu had the chance to meet Aung San Suu Kyi when she came in the area for a meeting. She is very aware of the tattooed women and the ethnicities that are forgotten by the central government. She says she and Aung San Suu Kyi are friends now. Heu’s daughter has graduated and works in Singapore.

The Chin culture is threatened by the government as their teachers are usually not Chin. For a long time, they fought for independence, but since the country began to democratize, things have calmed down.

“I am old. Soon I will die” says to me a Chin woman from Pan Baung village, while she does the gesture of drying tears from her eyes. In her village, only 6 tattooed woman remain alive. Those women are the last of their kind…

 

:copyright: Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Seamlessly Looping Background Animation Of High Tech 3D Shapes Rigged At A Common 120Bpm. Checkout GlobalArchive.com, contact ChrisDortch@gmail.com, and connect to www.linkedin.com/in/chrisdortch

Seamlessly Looping Background Animation Of High Tech 3D Shapes Rigged At A Common 120Bpm. Checkout GlobalArchive.com, contact ChrisDortch@gmail.com, and connect to www.linkedin.com/in/chrisdortch

Shinnecock Reservation: L.I., NY: Labour Day Powwow, September 2006.

 

Shinnecock Tribe

Rte 27-A, Montauk Hwy

Southhampton, NY 111968

631-283-6143

State recognized; (no BIA office liason - seriously ridiculous!)

 

********************************************************************************************

 

Shinnecock Indian Nation: An Ancient History and Culture.

 

Since the beginning, Shinnecock time has been measured in moons and seasons, and the daily lives of our people revolved around the land and the waters surrounding it. Our earliest history was oral, passed down by word of mouth from generation to generation, and as far back as our collective memory can reach, we are an Algonquin people who have forever lived along the shores of Eastern Long Island.

 

Scientists say we came here on caribou hunts when the land was covered with ice. But our creation story says we were born here; that we are the human children of the goddess who descended from the sky. It was she, the story goes, who caused the land to form beneath her feet from the back of Great Turtle, deer to spring forth from her fingertips; bear to roar into awakening, wolf to prowl on the first hunt. It was she who filled the sky with birds, made the land to blossom and the ponds and bays to fill with fish and mollusks. And when all was done, the Shinnecock, the People of the Shore, appeared in this lush terrain. We are still here.

 

As coastal dwellers, we continue to prize the bounty of the sea, the shellfish, the scaly fish, which for thousands of years provided the bulk of our diet. We were whalers, challenging the mighty Atlantic from our dugout canoes long before the arrival of the big ships, long before the whaling industry flourished in the 19th century.

 

In the 1700's, we became noted among the northeastern coastal tribes for our fine beads made from the Northern quahog clam and whelk shells. The Dutch, who arrived on our shores before the English, turned our beads (wampum) into the money system for the colonies.

 

The Shinnecock Nation is among the oldest self-governing tribes of Indians in the United States and has been a state-recognized tribe for over 200 years. In 1978, we applied for Federal Recognition, and in 2003, we were placed on the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Ready for Active" list.

 

Traditionally, decisions concerning the welfare of the tribe were made by consensus of adult male members. Seeking to shortcut the consensus process in order to more easily facilitate the acquisition of Indian lands, the Town of Southampton devised a three member trustee system for the Shinnecock people. This system of tribal government was approved by the New York State legislature in February of 1792. Since April 3, 1792, Shinnecock Indians have gone to the Southampton Town Hall the first Tuesday after the first Monday in April to elect three tribal members to serve a one- year term as Trustees. In April of 2007, the Shinnecock Indian Nation exercised its sovereign right as an ancient Indian Nation and returned to one of its basic Traditions: it bypassed the Southampton Town Hall and for the first time since 1792 held its leadership elections at home, where they will remain.

 

The Trustee system, however, did not then and does not now circumvent the consensus process, which still remains the governing process of the Shinnecock Indian Nation. Major decisions concerning the tribe are voted yea or nay by all eligible adult members, including women, who gained the right to vote in the mid-1990s. Also in that period, the Shinnecock Nation installed a Tribal Council, a 13 member body elected for two years terms. The Council is an advisory body to the Board of Trustees.

 

Today, we number over 1300 people, more than 600 of whom reside on the reservation adjacent to the Town of Southampton on the East End of Long Island. While our ancestral lands have dwindled over the centuries from a territory stretching at least from what is known today as the Town of Easthampton and westward to the eastern border of the Town of Brookhaven, we still hold on to approximately 1200 acres.

 

With modest resources, we have managed to build a community to help us better meet the demands of an ever expanding and intrusive world. In addition to the Shinnecock Presbyterian church building and its Manse, our infrastructure includes a tribal community center, a shellfish hatchery, a health and dental center, a family preservation and Indian education center, a museum, and playgrounds for our children. Also on our list of recent achievements is the design and development of an official Shinnecock Indian Nation flag and an official seal.

 

Our skilled craftspeople and fine artists find employment within the Tribe as well as the surrounding area. The number of tribal members holding advanced degrees in law, business, medicine, social sciences and liberal arts continues to grow, and tribal members hold positions of responsibility in all areas, including teaching, banking and counseling, both within and outside the Shinnecock community.

 

One of the earliest forms of economic development that the Shinnecock Nation undertook was to lease Reservation acreage to local area farmers for their crops, mainly potatoes and corn. While the project did bring in a small income for the Tribe, the resulting damages from pesticides leaking into the ground water and polluting our drinking water supply were enormous. We had great expectations for our shellfish hatchery (Oyster Project) but brown tide and general pollution forced it to close before it had the chance to develop into the business enterprise it was planned to be. In the summer of 2005, the Tribe began reseeding parts of its waterways with oysters, and celebrated a renewal harvest of Shinnecock chunkoo oysters at the Tribal Thanksgiving Dinner, November 2006.

 

At the present moment, the Shinnecock annual Powwow is the economic development project of record for the Shinnecock Nation. Revived in 1946 as a benefit for our church, the Powwow has evolved into an event that hosts thousands of visitors. But we are at the mercy of the weather. For the past two years, rainstorms have forced us to drastically revise our budgeting plans. We are now exploring Indian Gaming as a means of attaining the much needed self-sufficiency that will enable us to perform the sacred duties laid out for us by the Ancestors — to protect, manage and maintain the Shinnecock Indian Nation.

 

By Bevy Deer Jensen

Shinnecock Nation Communications Officer

 

*********************************************************************************************

 

For more information on the Shinnecock Nation, please visit: www.shinnecocknation.com/

 

*********************************************************************************************

 

photography: a. golden, eyewash design, c. 2006.

Surma or Suri are sedentary pastoral people living in south west of Ethiopia, on the western bank of the Omo river.

 

These breeders tribal groups have a cattle centred culture. They grow cabbage, beans, yams, tobacco and coffee and breed their cattle, mostly cows, on their traditional lands, located in the Omo Valley. Cows are tremendously important in Suri culture. They do not see cattle simply as a material asset but as a life sustaining and meaningful companion. Suri even sing songs for them and make fires to warm them. These cows are not bred for their meat and are usually not killed unless they are needed for ceremonial purposes. They use their milk and their blood, which they both drink. Cows also have a social and symbolic meaning in Suri’s society. Suri men are judged on how much cattle they own. In desperate times, Suri men can risk their lives to steal cattle from other tribes.The average male in the Suri tribe owns 40 cows. Every young male is named after their cattle, which they have to look after since the age of 8. Men are not allowed to marry until they own 60 cows. Cows are given to the bride’s family after the wedding ceremony.

 

This central role of the cow in their way of life accounts for the fierce independance they want to preserve and explains their warlike culture. Indeed, it’s quite common to see men and even women carrying Kalashnikovs which are part of the daily life. Their remote homeland has always been a place of traditional rivalries with the neighbouring tribes such as the Bume (Nyangatom) or the Toposa who regurlarly team up to raid the Suri’s cattle. These fights, and even sometimes battles, have become quite bloody since automatic firearms have become available from the parties in the Sudanese Civil War. This conflict has pushed neighboring tribes into Suri’s land and is a constant competition to keep and protect their territory and owns. A battleended up with the death of hundreds of Suri, including women and children.

 

Like their neighbors, the Surma also paint their bodies. They create a variety of designs on their necked bodies using their finger tips which helps them to expose their dark skins.The painting could have both a beautifying and opponent frightening purpose. As one studies these body paintings whirls, stripes ,flower and star designs are noticeable. The girls also get painted by Surma men who are generally believed to be expert artists.

 

The Suri are led by a ritual chief in the villages known as the Komoru, dressed in colourful robes and wearing a crown of baboon fur. Village life is largely communal, sharing the produce of the cattle (milk and blood). Decisions of the village are taken by the men in an assembly. These debates are led by the Komoru, who are merely the most respected elder in a village even if they can be removed.

Although their traditional remoteness and autarky is threathened, only few Surma are familiar with Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia, and their literacy level is very low. Lip plate and Donga stick fight are the two typical distinctive features of these people which they share with the neighboring Mursi people.

 

The Sagenai , called aslo donga ritual is a combat that brings both wounds and honor to both the winner and loser. The men bodies are decorated with ritual drawings and their heads are protected by a sort of helmet. For the boys participating to the donga, this challenge is a true moment of glory. The combat is taking place in a middle of a circle made by the crowd. The rules are simple and can be summed up as follows: the person who manage to stay on his feet is the winner, and one must absolutely not kill his opponent. The winner will be honored by the entire tribe and can choose girls to date.

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

The Chin tattooed women live in the Chin, Rakhine and Arakan states in northwestern Myanmar. The origin of facial tattoos in the region is unknown. Some believe that the practice began during the reigns of Kings long ago. The royalty used to come to the villages to capture young women. The men from the tribe may have tattooed their women to make them ugly, thereby saving them from a life of slavery. Interestingly, I heard a similar origin for body modification among the Mursi tribe in Ethiopia. As legend has it, the tribeswomen began wearing giant lip plates to make them uglier to would-be kidnappers. Now, the bigger the lip plate the higher the bride price.

For years, access to the tribal Mindat area was restricted by the burmese government. It was opened just two years ago. Only about 700 tourists visit per year. Most of them only visit the bucolic Mount Victoria by bus, never meeting the tattooed women who remain isolated, hours away by foot. Those who do wish to meet them better pack good walking shoes and be prepared to sleep in smoke-filled local houses complete with rats.

There are a few different face tattoo patterns. The spiderweb tattoo is popular in the Mrauk U region. It takes a three hour long tail boat ride to reach this remote area. This tattoo is usually accompanied by a circle in the center of the forehead which represents the sun or lines under the nose symbolizing tiger whiskers.

Another design, known as the bee pattern, is common in the Mindat area. It is composed of dots, lines and occasionally circles. It is worn by the Muun tribe who inhabit the hills of the Arakan state.

The Magan tribeswomen wear huge earrings made of beads and calabashes. They can also play the flute with their noses.

I ventured to Kanpelet village in search of the women from the U Pu tribe who have the incredibly rare whole face tattoo. This is one of the most impressive styles: the entire face is inked up. Rumors had it that only three women in this area had the tattoo. After hours of off roading, I arrive in the village only to learn that one died recently and another was very ill. I was lucky enough to meet Pa Late. At 85, she is nearly deaf but still works hard with her family in a small house on the top of a little hill.

Pa Late said that a completely black face had become a symbol of beauty in the past. The few women who refused to do it looked ugly to the men. The tattoo took three days but the pain lasted over a month.

There are two ways to make the tattoo needle. The first consists of tying three pieces of bamboo together and the second uses thorns. The ink is a mixture of cow bile, soot, plants, and pig fat. It usually took one day to complete the standard tattoo and a few more for the totally black one. The tattoo artist was a specialist or in some cases a parent. Infection was a common problem as the girls had blood all over their face.

Everything, including the eyelids, was tattooed. Many women say that the neck was the most sensitive area.

Ma Aung Seim shared her memories of the tattoo sessions : “I was 10 years old. The day before the tattoo ceremony, I only ate sugarcane and drank tea. It was forbidden to eat meat or peanuts. During the tattoo session, I cried a lot, but I could not move at all. After the session, my face bled for 3 days. It was very painful. My mother put fresh beans leaves on my face to alleviate the pain. I had no choice if i wanted to get married. Men wanted women with tattoos at this time. My mother told me that without a tattoo on my face, i would look like... a man! The web drawn on my face attracted the men like a spiderweb catches insects!”

Not all the tattooed women live in remote areas deep in the mountains. Some have integrated into modern society. Miss Heu, 67, lives in Kanpelet. Her grandmother forced her to get tattooed. She lives in a modern house and even has TV (when electricity is not out). Chin people have maintained their modesty and shyness: when a movie showspeople kissing or making love, most of them still fast forward the scene.

As a leader in the local community, Miss Heu had the chance to meet Aung San Suu Kyi when she came in the area for a meeting. She is very aware of the tattooed women and the ethnicities that are forgotten by the central government. She says she and Aung San Suu Kyi are friends now. Heu’s daughter has graduated and works in Singapore.

The Chin culture is threatened by the government as their teachers are usually not Chin. For a long time, they fought for independence, but since the country began to democratize, things have calmed down.

“I am old. Soon I will die” says to me a Chin woman from Pan Baung village, while she does the gesture of drying tears from her eyes. In her village, only 6 tattooed woman remain alive. Those women are the last of their kind…

 

:copyright: Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Free selection of tattoo flash designs such as our Celtic tattoos, original butterfly ... All new tattoo flash, Victor Modafferi tattoo designs, tribal tattoo, cross tattoo, star tattoo, angel tattoo, butterfly tattoo, dragon tattoo, chinese tattoo

Tribal Ceylan 2012

 

Huile sur toile 80x80cm

Oil on canevas 32x32 Inches

www.tattoos-malu-art.com/

 

Here comes the hub of tattoo designs, TATTOOS MALU ART! We present before you the finest designs and ideas of various tattoo arts. You would also come across our gallery of celebrity Tattoos.

 

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They performed three forms of Santali dance - Baha, Sohorai and Dong.

 

SNTALS

The Santhal (also spelled as Santal) are one of the Tribal peoples who live mainly in the states of Jharkhand, West Bengal, Bihar, Odisha, and Assam. They are one of the largest tribal community and one of the most studied tribal religions in India.The insurrection of the Santhals was mainly against the British and their supporters. On 30 June 1855 the Santhal rebel leaders Sidhu Murmu and Kanu Murmu mobilized 30 thousand Santhals and declared a rebellion against the British Raj.

The Santhals are an agricultural tribe, from time immemorial they have cleared forests, toiled the land, and produced food for subsistence. Beside agriculture they also domesticate animals. Apart from these the Santhals also are well versed in the art of hunting, where their exceptional skills with bow and arrows is noticeable.

 

SANTALI CULTURE

The Santhali culture has attracted many scholars and anthropologists for decades. Unlike many other tribal groups of the Indian subcontinent, the Santhals have preserved their native language despite waves of migrations and invasions such as Aryan, Hun, Mughals, Europeans, and others.

Santhali culture is depicted in the paintings and artworks in the walls of their houses. The Santhals mainly prefer group performance than solo, which is an important feature of tribal art form in India. Group dancing and singing is the most important medium to express their joy and happiness. The Santhali dance and music is tuned with the nature of occasion whether it is social or ceremonial. The three most quintessential instruments in Santhali music are two kinds of drums one Tumdak and the other Tamak, and Tiriao or flute. The Tumdak is a double headed drum having the shape of a frustum, the drum skins at left and right are made of animal skins. The one at the left has bigger circumference than the right. The Tamak has a hemispherical shape, with a wider circumference and played by two drum sticks. Tiriao or basically a bansuri is a bamboo made musical instrument with five holes.

The most well known dance form of the Santhals is a group of women with interlocked hands forming a semicircle, encircling a relatively smaller group of male percussionists at the centre. The dance steps and movements are in accordance with the beats which is relatively simple. The dance forms, countenance, and beats differ from region to region. The Santhali Dance have a wide variety and types and is tuned with ceremony and social celebrations. The Dasai dance is performed only by males of the community on festive occasions. Langre, Guluri, and Humti is danced all round the year, whereas Baha and Sohorai are only for festive seasons. In social ceremonies like marriage Dong is danced. Along with these popular dances some other rare forms like Rinjha and Jhika also exist and performed only in few regions.

The Santhal songs also have a variety similar to their dance, the Santali word for song is "Sereng". Generally singing is accompanied with dancing but there are some songs which do not include dancing. There is also a kind of song sung during the sowing of paddy. The "Gam Sereng" is another type of song which is sung in hot summer evening. Courtesy : (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santhal_people)

 

Spring watch at Baroghutu

Spring all over the World is a season of colors, and celebration of lives. Holi, a festival of colours, is a festival of Spring celebrated by the Hindus allover India. On the eve of Holi, in the last week of February this year, I couldn’t miss the opportunity to join the celebration of lives at Baroghutu with all its elements including the tribal dance performed by the Santals.

Mukutmanipur's undulating forested landscape marked by the vibrant colors of Palash (Butea monosperma) is refreshing and invigorating for the body and mind. It is marked by the prominent hillock about 200 metres high, locally named "Baroghutu" (Baro- twelve, ghutu-/stones/hill). The tribal (mostly santals) hamlets of Baroghutu, Jambeda, Kumorbahal, Dhagora and Mukutmanipur encircle this hillock. With a landscape that seems naturally designed for adventure, Mukutmanipur offers opportunities in rock climbing, trekking and a variety of water sports.

 

The local tribal festivals, Tusu, Bhadu, Sahrai and Badna are symbolized by fascinating music and dance, and strengthen the Mukutmanipur experience, laden with the relaxed air of nature in the heartland. The Bankura district has a tribal population famous for its music, art and culture. Mukutmanipur is one such quaint village. The community will provide the tourist with a life that is stress free.

 

Tribal Ornament design used for new era...

They performed three forms of Santali dance - Baha, Sohorai and Dong.

 

SNTALS

The Santhal (also spelled as Santal) are one of the Tribal peoples who live mainly in the states of Jharkhand, West Bengal, Bihar, Odisha, and Assam. They are one of the largest tribal community and one of the most studied tribal religions in India.The insurrection of the Santhals was mainly against the British and their supporters. On 30 June 1855 the Santhal rebel leaders Sidhu Murmu and Kanu Murmu mobilized 30 thousand Santhals and declared a rebellion against the British Raj.

The Santhals are an agricultural tribe, from time immemorial they have cleared forests, toiled the land, and produced food for subsistence. Beside agriculture they also domesticate animals. Apart from these the Santhals also are well versed in the art of hunting, where their exceptional skills with bow and arrows is noticeable.

 

SANTALI CULTURE

The Santhali culture has attracted many scholars and anthropologists for decades. Unlike many other tribal groups of the Indian subcontinent, the Santhals have preserved their native language despite waves of migrations and invasions such as Aryan, Hun, Mughals, Europeans, and others.

Santhali culture is depicted in the paintings and artworks in the walls of their houses. The Santhals mainly prefer group performance than solo, which is an important feature of tribal art form in India. Group dancing and singing is the most important medium to express their joy and happiness. The Santhali dance and music is tuned with the nature of occasion whether it is social or ceremonial. The three most quintessential instruments in Santhali music are two kinds of drums one Tumdak and the other Tamak, and Tiriao or flute. The Tumdak is a double headed drum having the shape of a frustum, the drum skins at left and right are made of animal skins. The one at the left has bigger circumference than the right. The Tamak has a hemispherical shape, with a wider circumference and played by two drum sticks. Tiriao or basically a bansuri is a bamboo made musical instrument with five holes.

The most well known dance form of the Santhals is a group of women with interlocked hands forming a semicircle, encircling a relatively smaller group of male percussionists at the centre. The dance steps and movements are in accordance with the beats which is relatively simple. The dance forms, countenance, and beats differ from region to region. The Santhali Dance have a wide variety and types and is tuned with ceremony and social celebrations. The Dasai dance is performed only by males of the community on festive occasions. Langre, Guluri, and Humti is danced all round the year, whereas Baha and Sohorai are only for festive seasons. In social ceremonies like marriage Dong is danced. Along with these popular dances some other rare forms like Rinjha and Jhika also exist and performed only in few regions.

The Santhal songs also have a variety similar to their dance, the Santali word for song is "Sereng". Generally singing is accompanied with dancing but there are some songs which do not include dancing. There is also a kind of song sung during the sowing of paddy. The "Gam Sereng" is another type of song which is sung in hot summer evening. Courtesy : (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santhal_people)

 

Spring watch at Baroghutu

Spring all over the World is a season of colors, and celebration of lives. Holi, a festival of colours, is a festival of Spring celebrated by the Hindus allover India. On the eve of Holi, in the last week of February this year, I couldn’t miss the opportunity to join the celebration of lives at Baroghutu with all its elements including the tribal dance performed by the Santals.

Mukutmanipur's undulating forested landscape marked by the vibrant colors of Palash (Butea monosperma) is refreshing and invigorating for the body and mind. It is marked by the prominent hillock about 200 metres high, locally named "Baroghutu" (Baro- twelve, ghutu-/stones/hill). The tribal (mostly santals) hamlets of Baroghutu, Jambeda, Kumorbahal, Dhagora and Mukutmanipur encircle this hillock. With a landscape that seems naturally designed for adventure, Mukutmanipur offers opportunities in rock climbing, trekking and a variety of water sports.

 

The local tribal festivals, Tusu, Bhadu, Sahrai and Badna are symbolized by fascinating music and dance, and strengthen the Mukutmanipur experience, laden with the relaxed air of nature in the heartland. The Bankura district has a tribal population famous for its music, art and culture. Mukutmanipur is one such quaint village. The community will provide the tourist with a life that is stress free.

 

The malong is a traditional "tube skirt" made of handwoven or machine-made multi-colored cotton cloth, bearing a variety of geometric or okir designs. The malong is akin to the sarong worn by peoples in Malaysia, Brunei and Indonesia. The malong is traditionally used as a garment by numerous tribes in the Southern Philippines and the Sulu Archipelago.~Wiki

Model: Kseniya Sovenko, Heffner Management

Makeup Artist: Lis Krebs

Hair Stylist: Lauren Hall

Costume and Set Design: Lisa S. Town

 

When I came across these antlers in my grandfathers basement, I noticed how the biggest one looked as if it could perfectly mimic the shoulders of a human when turned upside down. Then I realized that the other ones were slightly smaller than than each other and began stacking them on my own shoulders with the thought of affixing them in the back to create a neck piece. They felt like bones to me as they wrapped around. I painted them in a matte white to enhance this look.

 

While the neckpiece felt tribal, I wanted to give it a modern twist by placing the model in an environment of blowing plastic that was brightly lit with big soft light in the studio for a futuristic feel. This was then enhanced through makeup artistry and hair styling to bring our futuristic tribal queen to life. I especially loved the intensity and darkness that the model brought in her expression.

 

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This Tribal Fan is handmade of mother of pearl with a golden brass and SS clasp.

 

A sophisticated and graceful design for those special occations, they measure 1.7 inches in length.

 

Please see my profile for info.

Primal Originals Profile

 

ISO Strobist Workshop - Tribal Concept Photo shoot

Workshop Speaker: JB Dacanay

Tribal Concept: Janjie Rey Niog

Tribal Warrior - Fashion, Designs: Toni Roquim & Gil Mary

Model: Mary Gil

MUA: Toni Roquim

Photographer: Ino Florencio

Special thanks to Gilmer and Mary Gil, & to all ISO Support / Advisers

  

They performed three forms of Santali dance - Baha, Sohorai and Dong.

 

SNTALS

The Santhal (also spelled as Santal) are one of the Tribal peoples who live mainly in the states of Jharkhand, West Bengal, Bihar, Odisha, and Assam. They are one of the largest tribal community and one of the most studied tribal religions in India.The insurrection of the Santhals was mainly against the British and their supporters. On 30 June 1855 the Santhal rebel leaders Sidhu Murmu and Kanu Murmu mobilized 30 thousand Santhals and declared a rebellion against the British Raj.

The Santhals are an agricultural tribe, from time immemorial they have cleared forests, toiled the land, and produced food for subsistence. Beside agriculture they also domesticate animals. Apart from these the Santhals also are well versed in the art of hunting, where their exceptional skills with bow and arrows is noticeable.

 

SANTALI CULTURE

The Santhali culture has attracted many scholars and anthropologists for decades. Unlike many other tribal groups of the Indian subcontinent, the Santhals have preserved their native language despite waves of migrations and invasions such as Aryan, Hun, Mughals, Europeans, and others.

Santhali culture is depicted in the paintings and artworks in the walls of their houses. The Santhals mainly prefer group performance than solo, which is an important feature of tribal art form in India. Group dancing and singing is the most important medium to express their joy and happiness. The Santhali dance and music is tuned with the nature of occasion whether it is social or ceremonial. The three most quintessential instruments in Santhali music are two kinds of drums one Tumdak and the other Tamak, and Tiriao or flute. The Tumdak is a double headed drum having the shape of a frustum, the drum skins at left and right are made of animal skins. The one at the left has bigger circumference than the right. The Tamak has a hemispherical shape, with a wider circumference and played by two drum sticks. Tiriao or basically a bansuri is a bamboo made musical instrument with five holes.

The most well known dance form of the Santhals is a group of women with interlocked hands forming a semicircle, encircling a relatively smaller group of male percussionists at the centre. The dance steps and movements are in accordance with the beats which is relatively simple. The dance forms, countenance, and beats differ from region to region. The Santhali Dance have a wide variety and types and is tuned with ceremony and social celebrations. The Dasai dance is performed only by males of the community on festive occasions. Langre, Guluri, and Humti is danced all round the year, whereas Baha and Sohorai are only for festive seasons. In social ceremonies like marriage Dong is danced. Along with these popular dances some other rare forms like Rinjha and Jhika also exist and performed only in few regions.

The Santhal songs also have a variety similar to their dance, the Santali word for song is "Sereng". Generally singing is accompanied with dancing but there are some songs which do not include dancing. There is also a kind of song sung during the sowing of paddy. The "Gam Sereng" is another type of song which is sung in hot summer evening. Courtesy : (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santhal_people)

 

Spring watch at Baroghutu

Spring all over the World is a season of colors, and celebration of lives. Holi, a festival of colours, is a festival of Spring celebrated by the Hindus allover India. On the eve of Holi, in the last week of February this year, I couldn’t miss the opportunity to join the celebration of lives at Baroghutu with all its elements including the tribal dance performed by the Santals.

Mukutmanipur's undulating forested landscape marked by the vibrant colors of Palash (Butea monosperma) is refreshing and invigorating for the body and mind. It is marked by the prominent hillock about 200 metres high, locally named "Baroghutu" (Baro- twelve, ghutu-/stones/hill). The tribal (mostly santals) hamlets of Baroghutu, Jambeda, Kumorbahal, Dhagora and Mukutmanipur encircle this hillock. With a landscape that seems naturally designed for adventure, Mukutmanipur offers opportunities in rock climbing, trekking and a variety of water sports.

 

The local tribal festivals, Tusu, Bhadu, Sahrai and Badna are symbolized by fascinating music and dance, and strengthen the Mukutmanipur experience, laden with the relaxed air of nature in the heartland. The Bankura district has a tribal population famous for its music, art and culture. Mukutmanipur is one such quaint village. The community will provide the tourist with a life that is stress free.

  

I recently made a similar bear as a custom order for one of my favorite customers and I enjoyed so much making that type of embroidery that I decided to make a new one in this beautiful sea foam/mint felt color.

 

What I like the most in doing what I do is paring colors together and I really got inspired by the color combos I chose for the two sides of this little plush pillow.

 

The embroidery style itself was inspired by a research I made with my son on tribal motifs found on totem poles and other artifacts.

I did not make a sketch at all for the design, I just picked the different color thread I wanted to use and started to "free form" embroider each side.

 

This little plush bear pillow is all hand sewn and made with much love and attention to details.

It measures 11" wide by 7.5" high.

Meghwal tribal woman (Gujarat).

 

The people of Meghwal tribe are originally from Marwar in Rajasthan. These days they are also found living in western Gujarat near the Pakistan border. In Pakistan, Meghwals mostly live in Tharparker, Badin, Mirpurkhas, and Umerkot districts while in Southern Punjab. Marwar is the region of Rajasthan in India that lies in Thar Desert.

 

See also:

 

www.flickriver.com/photos/waltercallens/random/

 

www.flickr.com/photos/waltercallens/favorites/

 

english.cohga.net/flickr/user/74089637@N00_1.html

 

www.fluidr.com/photos/waltercallens/sets

 

www.lurvely.com/index.php?owner=74089637@N00

   

They live in small hamlets of round, mud-brick huts painted on the outside with colourful geometric designs and decorated with detailed mirror inlays. The women are famous for their embroidery work and are master wool and cotton weavers. The men are woodcarvers and leather workers. Meghwals are considered as most peacefull among all the tribes living in Gujarat, Sindh, Rajasthan, Punjab.

The Meghwal women are renowned for their exuberantly detailed costumes and jewellery. Married Meghwal women are often spotted wearing gold nose ring, earrings and neckpieces. They were given to the bride as a "bride wealth" dowry by her soon-to-be husband's mother.

The Meghwal women's embroidery is avidly sought after. Their work is distinguished by their primary use of red, which comes from a local pigment produced from crushed insects. The Meghwal women artisans of Thar desert in Sindh and Balochistan, and in Gujarat are considered master of the traditional embroidery and Ralli making. Exotic hand embroidered items form part of dowry of Meghwal woman.

The Meghwal tribe are known to be both Hindu and Muslim.

Feminine tattoos are usually more delicate designs compared to tattoos for men. Have a look at the most popular female tattoos such as butterfly, flower and star .Cross Tattoos Crosses are extremely popular tattoos because of their deep and personal meanings, historical and cultural...

 

yourtattooideas.xyz/tribal-cross-tattoos-and-meanings.html

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