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About the Building

 

In 1998, The Contemporary Jewish Museum selected architect Daniel Libeskind to design its new home, which was to include an adaptive reuse of the landmark Jessie Street Power Substation, designed by Willis Polk in 1907. In his design for the Contemporary Jewish Museum, his first commissioned project in North America, Libeskind responded to the Museum's mission to be a lively center that fosters community among people of diverse backgrounds through shared experiences with the arts by focusing on the celebratory nature of the Jewish experience.

 

Unveiled in 2005, Daniel Libeskind's design for the new Museum combines the history of an early 20th-century San Francisco landmark building with the dynamism of contemporary architecture. The design for the new 63,000-square-foot facility marries many of the character-defining features of the original substation, including the brick southern façade, trusses, and skylights, with bold contemporary spaces. The building, with its integration of architectural styles, emanates a powerful connection between tradition and innovation and reflects the Museum's mission to celebrate Jewish culture, history, art, and ideas within the context of 21st-century perspectives.

 

Architect's design concept

 

The building embodies a number of symbolic references to Jewish concepts. Most notably, Libeskind was inspired by the Hebrew phrase "L'Chaim" (To Life), because of its connection to the role the substation played in restoring energy to the city after the 1906 earthquake and the Museum's mission to be a lively center for engaging audiences with Jewish culture. The architect based the extension's conceptual organizing principles on the two symbolic Hebrew letters of “chai” (life), the “chet” and the “yud.” From the outside, the extension is most remarkable for its unique shape, as well as its skin: a vibrant blue metallic steel, which changes color depending on the time of day, weather, or one's vantage point.

San Francisco, California. A stream of water runs through a narrow gulley at ground level of the plaza that links Mission St. with the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Only after studying it for a while did I realize that it is a fountain in which the carefully chosen stones fit together to form a nearly seamless display of diversity in alignment. At certain points, the depth of the gulley changes, which causes the water to cascade slightly, as in all fountains, and the stones to appear to change in size and patina. The effect is disturbing, even as the fountain is calming, which makes the design memorable.

 

For a full view of the plaza, follow this link: www.thecjm.org/

Dear Charlie at work, with his lovely and super heavy Kiev 88. Taken last week in front of the new Jewish Contemporary Museum in San Francisco.

 

Fuji Reala 100 (220 film)/Hasselblad 500 C/M

(I purchased a few rolls of Reala (120, 220 and 35mm) while in Japan last April and

I must admit I do not like this film one bit. I've yet to develop the Reala 100 roll I shot with Charlie this day on my Canonet and I'm dreading the results already.).

About the Building

 

In 1998, The Contemporary Jewish Museum selected architect Daniel Libeskind to design its new home, which was to include an adaptive reuse of the landmark Jessie Street Power Substation, designed by Willis Polk in 1907. In his design for the Contemporary Jewish Museum, his first commissioned project in North America, Libeskind responded to the Museum's mission to be a lively center that fosters community among people of diverse backgrounds through shared experiences with the arts by focusing on the celebratory nature of the Jewish experience.

 

Unveiled in 2005, Daniel Libeskind's design for the new Museum combines the history of an early 20th-century San Francisco landmark building with the dynamism of contemporary architecture. The design for the new 63,000-square-foot facility marries many of the character-defining features of the original substation, including the brick southern façade, trusses, and skylights, with bold contemporary spaces. The building, with its integration of architectural styles, emanates a powerful connection between tradition and innovation and reflects the Museum's mission to celebrate Jewish culture, history, art, and ideas within the context of 21st-century perspectives.

 

Architect's design concept

 

The building embodies a number of symbolic references to Jewish concepts. Most notably, Libeskind was inspired by the Hebrew phrase "L'Chaim" (To Life), because of its connection to the role the substation played in restoring energy to the city after the 1906 earthquake and the Museum's mission to be a lively center for engaging audiences with Jewish culture. The architect based the extension's conceptual organizing principles on the two symbolic Hebrew letters of “chai” (life), the “chet” and the “yud.” From the outside, the extension is most remarkable for its unique shape, as well as its skin: a vibrant blue metallic steel, which changes color depending on the time of day, weather, or one's vantage point.

An event my friend catered at The Contemporary Jewish Museum that he had me take pictures of. Loved the great angles and fantastic lighting in this room!

About the Building

 

In 1998, The Contemporary Jewish Museum selected architect Daniel Libeskind to design its new home, which was to include an adaptive reuse of the landmark Jessie Street Power Substation, designed by Willis Polk in 1907. In his design for the Contemporary Jewish Museum, his first commissioned project in North America, Libeskind responded to the Museum's mission to be a lively center that fosters community among people of diverse backgrounds through shared experiences with the arts by focusing on the celebratory nature of the Jewish experience.

 

Unveiled in 2005, Daniel Libeskind's design for the new Museum combines the history of an early 20th-century San Francisco landmark building with the dynamism of contemporary architecture. The design for the new 63,000-square-foot facility marries many of the character-defining features of the original substation, including the brick southern façade, trusses, and skylights, with bold contemporary spaces. The building, with its integration of architectural styles, emanates a powerful connection between tradition and innovation and reflects the Museum's mission to celebrate Jewish culture, history, art, and ideas within the context of 21st-century perspectives.

 

Architect's design concept

 

The building embodies a number of symbolic references to Jewish concepts. Most notably, Libeskind was inspired by the Hebrew phrase "L'Chaim" (To Life), because of its connection to the role the substation played in restoring energy to the city after the 1906 earthquake and the Museum's mission to be a lively center for engaging audiences with Jewish culture. The architect based the extension's conceptual organizing principles on the two symbolic Hebrew letters of “chai” (life), the “chet” and the “yud.” From the outside, the extension is most remarkable for its unique shape, as well as its skin: a vibrant blue metallic steel, which changes color depending on the time of day, weather, or one's vantage point.

San Francisco, California, Contemporary Jewish Museum, shop entrance and wall detail. The structure, opened in 1998, is designed by Daniel Libeskind to incorporate the landmark Jessie Street Power Substation, designed by Willis Polk in 1907. The new, framing structure is most remarkable for its unique shape, as well as its skin: a vibrant blue metallic steel that changes color depending on the time of day, weather, or one's vantage point.

 

www.thecjm.org/index.php

Two views of San Francisco's Contemporary Jewish Museum.

www.thecjm.org/

EXPLORE - August 13, 2009 #196

Thanks everyone!

 

Around San Francisco (Series #2)

 

About the Building

 

In 1998, the Contemporary Jewish Museum selected architect Daniel Libeskind to design its new home, which was to include an adaptive reuse of the landmark Jessie Street Power Substation, designed by Willis Polk in 1907. In his design for the Contemporary Jewish Museum, his first commissioned project in North America, Libeskind responded to the Museum's mission to be a lively center that fosters community among people of diverse backgrounds through shared experiences with the arts by focusing on the celebratory nature of the Jewish experience.

 

Unveiled in 2005, Daniel Libeskind's design for the new Museum combines the history of an early 20th-century San Francisco landmark building with the dynamism of contemporary architecture. The design for the new 63,000-square-foot facility marries many of the character-defining features of the original substation, including the brick southern façade, trusses, and skylights, with bold contemporary spaces. The building, with its integration of architectural styles, emanates a powerful connection between tradition and innovation and reflects the Museum's mission to celebrate Jewish culture, history, art, and ideas within the context of 21st-century perspectives.

 

Architect's Design Concept

 

The building embodies a number of symbolic references to Jewish concepts. Most notably, Libeskind was inspired by the Hebrew phrase "L'Chaim" (To Life), because of its connection to the role the substation played in restoring energy to the city after the 1906 earthquake and the Museum's mission to be a lively center for engaging audiences with Jewish culture. The architect based the extension's conceptual organizing principles on the two symbolic Hebrew letters of “chai” (life), the “chet” and the “yud.” From the outside, the extension is most remarkable for its unique shape, as well as its skin: a vibrant blue metallic steel, which changes color depending on the time of day, weather, or one's vantage point.

 

Featuring over 10,000-square-feet of exhibition space as well as a multipurpose room, the new facility greatly increases the Museum's space for exhibitions and innovative programs in visual, performing, and media arts. At the heart of the new facility is a large education center, which allows the Museum to provide ongoing education programs in conjunction with its exhibitions for children, youth, adults, and seniors. The new facility also includes the Museum Store and Cafe on the Square with seating on Jessie Square when the weather permits. (source: CJM website)

San Francisco, California. A stream of water runs through a narrow gulley at ground level of the plaza that links Mission St. with the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Only after studying it for a while did I realize that it is a fountain in which the carefully chosen stones fit together to form a nearly seamless display of diversity in alignment. At certain points, the depth of the gulley changes, which causes the water to cascade slightly, as in all fountains, and the stones to appear to change in size and patina. The effect is disturbing, even as the fountain is calming, which makes the fountain memorable.

 

For a full view of the plaza, follow this link: www.thecjm.org/

A sharp corner of Daniel Liebskind's distinctive stainless steel clad Contemporary Jewish Museum catches the morning sun.

Completed in 2008 the new building is an extension to a 1907 Electric Sub Station on Mission Street (not shown) restored/converted for use as a museum.

See:

www.thecjm.org

www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contemporary_Jewish_Museum

Scribe Julie Seltzer is writing a Torah at the Contemporary Jewish Museum over the course of a year, but she still has time to get into the San Francisco spirit. Her Purim costume this year was "The Whole Megilla" for which she wrote the entirety of the Purim story on her clothing.

 

On her headband: Chapter 10

Shoulders: Chapters 7-9

Skirt: Chapters 1-6

Tights: The names of Haman's sons, which are written very large and bold in the scroll as they are on the costume.

 

To read about it in her words, check out her blog on the subject.

Olivia by Chanelle

 

Olivia has a humorous personality. She likes bagels a lot. If she could go anywhere in the world she would go to India. She is also a great listener (except when her younger brother asks her to get him a bagel). Olivia also has an older sister named Isobel. Her next door neighbors were also named Olivia and Isabel, which was a coincidence, so they came up with calling themselves big and medium Olivia, and big and little Isobel. Olivia feels she is on an emotional roller coaster – sometimes with too much emotion, and sometimes left with none. I asked Olivia if she could control one of earth's elements which one would she choose and she responded, water.

 

Selection from #SFphotohunt, a street photography contest inspired by the exhibition The Radical Camera: New York's Photo League: 1936–1951. Learn more about #SFphotohunt at www.thecjm.org/sfphotohunt

Since its founding in 1984, the Contemporary Jewish Museum has engaged audiences of all ages and backgrounds through dynamic exhibitions and programs that explore contemporary perspectives on Jewish culture, history, art, and ideas. The Museum has distinguished itself as a welcoming place where visitors can connect with one another through dialogue and shared experiences with the arts.

 

Embracing a range of artistic disciplines and media, the Museum’s exhibition program includes contemporary art and historical objects, film and music, conversations, lectures, literary readings, and other live performance. Ever changing, the Contemporary Jewish Museum is a non-collecting institution that partners with national and international cultural institutions to present exhibitions that are both timely and relevant and represent the highest level of artistic achievement and scholarship. The focus of the CJM's programming is on education and outreach to the broader community with the goal of fostering interfaith and intercultural dialogues.

 

www.thecjm.org/index.php

 

“At Sinai Moses received the Torah and handed it over to Joshua who handed it over to the elders who handed it over to the prophets who in turn handed it over to the men of the Great Assembly. The latter said three things: Be deliberate in judgment, raise up many disciples, and make a fence around the Torah.”

- Pirkei Avot

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Daniel Libeskind's extremely satisfying cube design, which houses the San Francisco's Contemporary Jewish Museum.

 

Best viewed large at: visuals.twoeyes.org/460-san-franciscos-contemporary-jewis...

Selection from #SFphotohunt, a street photography contest inspired by the exhibition The Radical Camera: New York's Photo League: 1936–1951. Learn more about #SFphotohunt at www.thecjm.org/sfphotohunt

www.thecjm.org/

 

I went to see "Curious George Saves the Day" exhibit.

I love the Curious George children's books. Wow, he started out as Fifi!!!!

 

Curious George, the impish monkey protagonist of many adventures, may never have seen the light of day if it were not for the determination and courage of his creators, the illustrator H. A. Rey (1898–1977) and his wife, author and artist Margret Rey (1906–1996).

 

Born in Hamburg to Jewish families, they lived together in Paris from 1936 to 1940. Hours before the Nazis marched into Paris in June 1940, the Reys fled on bicycles, carrying drawings for their children’s stories including one about a mischievous monkey, then named Fifi. Not only were they able to save the characters, but the Reys themselves were saved by their illustrations when authorities found them in their belongings, which may explain why saving the day after a narrow escape became the premise of most Curious George stories.

 

After their fateful escape from Paris and a four-month journey across France, Spain, Portugal, and Brazil, the couple reached New York in the fall of 1940. In all, the Reys authored and illustrated over 30 books, most of them for children, seven starring Curious George.

 

The exhibition features nearly 80 original drawings of the beloved monkey and other characters, preparatory dummy books, vintage photographs, and documentation related to the Reys’ escape from Nazi Europe, as well as a specially designed reading room for visitors of all ages.

 

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Amazing decorations designed by Paxton gate, and realized by the tireless interns of 826 Valencia.

 

The CJM was the host of the Where the Wild Things Are Premiere after-party, a benefit for 826 Valencia.

 

Photo: Trish Tunney © 2009

A reluctant photographer gets photographed! www.flickr.com/photos/thecjm

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