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A new Flickr friend taught me a great lesson on how to shoot manually using my macro lens...On Day 2 of this new info, I dedicate this shot to him - I am so grateful for his

patience and teachings!!

 

For me there is only the traveling on the paths that have a heart, on any path that may have a heart. There I travel, and the only worthwhile challenge for me is to traverse its full length. And there I travel--looking, looking, breathlessly.

 

From Carlos Casteneda's Teachings of Don Juan

I will leave the familiar world for a while........

HUGS AND STAY WELL MY FRIENDS!

************************************************************************

The teachings of Zarathustra (Zoroaster) appeared in Persia at some point during the period 1700-1800 BCE.[6][7]

His wisdom became the basis of the religion Zoroastrianism, and generally influenced the development of the Iranian branch of Indo-Iranian philosophy. Zarathustra was the first who treated the problem of evil in philosophical terms.[7]

He is also believed to be one of the oldest monotheists in the history of religion.

He espoused an ethical philosophy based on the primacy of good thoughts (pendar-e-nik), good words (goftar-e-nik), and good deeds (kerdar-e-nik).

 

The works of Zoroaster and Zoroastrianism had a significant influence on Greek philosophy and Roman philosophy. Plato learnt of Zoroastrian philosophy through Eudoxus and incorporated much of it into his own Platonic realism.[8]

Zarathustra was known as a sage, magician and miracle-worker in post-Classical Western culture, though almost nothing was known of his ideas until the late eighteenth century. By this time his name was associated with lost ancient wisdom and was appropriated by Freemasons and other groups who claimed access to such knowledge.

 

In 2005, the Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy ranked Zarathustra number two in the chronology of philosophical events. Zarathustra's impact lingers today due in part to the system of rational ethics he founded called Mazda-Yasna. The word Mazda-Yasna is avestan and is translated as "Worship of Wisdom" in English.

My understanding with Buddhist teachings is that all the pleasures, happiness, well-beings, fortune, good health etc are all illusionary and temporal in life. They are just like bokeh and you would not be grabbing it tightly.

 

So Buddha is teaching us to understand the fact and to get rid of the desire or greed in getting more of those well-beings. The greed is just the source of your pain in life.

 

However I did see a lot of people saying prayers and burning the incense in Buddhist Temple. They plead for good health, fortune or all kinds of well-beings in the prayers. I over-heard it when I took this shot.

 

Is this a very strange thing and it contradicts the Buddhist teaching?

 

Have a great Thursday free of all desires!

 

In the 70s everyone read the Teachings of Don Juan by Carlos Castenada.....a spiritual journey fueled by peyote and other natural psychedelics. Some amazing trips and visions! Many frightening enough to deter similar experimentation. But I enjoyed many hours of reading thanks to Carlos.

BETTER ON BLACK: View On Black

 

Copyright warning: All the pictures in my stream are my exclusive property and not to be used by any other person , business or entity without written terms and permissions. Please contact me if you are interested in this photo.

teaching that personal hygene can be fun ( that's NOT gasoline in the plastic tank).

insegnando che l'igene personale può essere divertente ( quella nel bidoncino NON è benzina).

Teaching, ii.

"When you linger in the desert, don't expect to find rain"

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- William C. Bryant.

 

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The first day sunset from our trip to Lake Tahoe, this shot was taken on the Nevada side near the sand harbor beach. This one was quite difficult to make as the light was changing quite fast and I was using three filters in front of my lens including a polarizing filter, an nd grad and the lee big stopper. Since I was using the big stopper creating a panorama the traditional way by looking through the view finder was not an option. So I had to focus and meter manually, meter and remember to close the viewfinder. Usually when I had to check so many things my ADHD kicks in and I forget or eff up something.

 

So when I got hope and finally edited the images I was so happy this one came out good. Thanks for visiting enjoy!!

2017 03 08

 

- Outfit -

 

Make: violetta. - CATWA applier sakura make02 (5colors)

Nails: sakura.maiA  ' 朔pose+yuzuya '

( Sakura Matsuri 2017 )

 

Hair: Tableau Vivant \\ Tempest hair - Naturals I

( Gacha )

 

Dress: ::C'est la vie !:: Zelie dress (cream)

 

Ears: UNISEX[MANDALA]STEKING_EARS_Season 5

 

Eyes: *N*Kingyo lives in my eyes LootBox #1 ' NAMINOKE '

( Gacha )

  

- Furniture -

 

++Twilight++ Sakura Mankai 5-1

++Twilight++ Sakura Mankai 6-1

++Twilight++ Sakura Mankai 7-1

++Twilight++ Sakura Mankai decor 1-1

( Sakura Matsuri 2017 )

 

+Half-Deer+ Sakura Petals - Windblown Trail - White

+Half-Deer+ Sakura Petals - Windblown Swirl - White

 

Garden by anc fantasy grass "Breathing" bloom

{anc} ripple. oil

 

Blog: ~ le soleil ~

 

For more information have to blog <33

Thanks so much for your time♡♡(*•̀ᴗ•́)♡

Many thanks to you!

"Go forth under the open sky, and list

To Nature's teachings."

William C. Bryant

 

View On White

 

Have a great day!

Buddhism in Thailand is largely of the Theravada school. Nearly 95% of Thailand's population is Buddhist of the Theravada school, though Buddhism in this country has become integrated with folk beliefs such as ancestor worship. Thai Buddhism was based on the religious movement founded in the sixth century B.C. by Siddhartha , later known as the Buddha, who urged the world to relinquish the extremes of sensuality and self-mortification and follow the enlightened Middle Way...... The focus of this religion is on man, not gods; the assumption is that life is pain or suffering, which is a consequence of craving, and that suffering can end only if desire ceases. The end of suffering is the achievement of nirvana often defined as the absence of craving and therefore of suffering, sometimes as enlightenment.

Like in most other Theravada nations, Buddhism in Thailand is represented primarily by the presence of Buddhist monks, who serve as officiants on ceremonial occasions, as well as being responsible for preserving and conveying the teachings of the Buddha.

 

Actually not a portrait but just a fast zoom captured from taxi of a Buddhist Monk sitting at the bus stop of Trat. A little PS processing did the other job ;-).

 

Het overgrote deel van de Thaise bevolking, zo’n 90% à 95% is boeddhist. Men hangt het zogenaamde Teravada-boeddhisme. In het Theravada wordt meditatie benadrukt als een essentieel onderdeel van het pad naar verlichting, samen met moreel gedrag en wijsheid. Het brengen van een einde aan het lijden is het hoofddoel van het Theravada boeddhisme. De Boeddha legde verder een zeer gedetailleerde gedragscode voor de Monniken neer: de Vinaya. Over het algemeen worden monniken door de Boeddha aangemoedigd om wereldse aangelegenheden en passies achter zich te laten, zodat zij gemakkelijker in staat zijn een staat van vrede en wijsheid te bereiken, en sterke ongezonde emoties zoals haat, verlangen en lust te overwinnen. Een Monnik zoals hierboven in z'n oranje gewaad, kaalgeschoren en met sandalen aan de voeten is niet meer weg te denken uit het straatbeeld van Thailand.

Er wordt van iedere jongeman verwacht, dat zij een poosje (van een week tot enkele maanden) als monnik leven. Zo tussen hun schooltijd en hun werkende leven in. Het wordt beschouwd als een overgangsrite en zij verwerven op die wijze aanzien voor zichzelf en hun familie.

Teaching, iii.

"You will never see the light if you refuse to leave shade."

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People in the class I'm teaching make me feel so good.

It's because of them that I love what I do. I'm very lucky.

~

La gente de mi clase online de fotografía me ha hecho sentir cómoda desde el primer minuto. Gracias a su calidez y simpatía puedo decir que amo lo que hago y que tengo mucha suerte. El ambiente que se ha dado en mi taller es tan bonito!

 

*

Hoy termina otro ciclo, espero que no sea una despedida.

Espero que sea un comienzo.

Gracias por todo, chicos ♥

 

In Buddhist teachings, life is full of suffering and pain.

 

In our world, so many people became casualties in the wars between political or religious powers. These people have nothing to do with the powers.

 

We need to find and see the beauty around us in order to balance off and make sense of this cruel reality of life.

 

My macro prayer shot on the eve of 9-11 anniversary taken at the front yard of my home.

Candid portrait captured in Cardiff Bay, Wales.

India, "Anient Site Sarnath",Varanasi, Buhdda, "Buddha bones", "Buddha stupa", "Buddha first Teachings", Birthplace of Buddhism

Panta rhei is a simplified version of the famous Greek philosopher Heraclitus' teachings. It basically means, everything flows. And everything in the Universe is indeed continually on the move, spiraling and shifting through space.

 

Some cosmic objects move a little further than others — take the subject of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, a globular cluster of stars known as Palomar 12.

Although it currently lies on the outskirts of the Milky Way’s halo, Palomar 12 was not born here. When astronomers first studied this cluster, they were puzzled by its strangely young age when compared to the other clusters in the galaxy. It appeared to be around 30 percent younger than other Milky Way globulars. Surely if it had been born within our galaxy, it would have sprung to life at a similar time to its cluster companions?

 

A bit more digging revealed that Palomar 12 was actually ripped from its initial home, the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical galaxy, around 1.7 billion years ago via tidal interactions between its former home and our galaxy. The dwarf galaxy that Palomar 12 once called home is a satellite galaxy to ours, and closely orbits around us — even occasionally passing through the plane of our galaxy. In fact, it is being slowly torn apart and consumed by the Milky Way.

 

The sparkling stars in this picture were imaged by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.

 

Credit: ESA/NASA

 

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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The Sandamuni pagoda in Mandalay is known for its large golden chedi, its hundreds of shrines containing inscribed marble slabs and the largest iron Buddha image in Burma. The Sandamuni is located on the foot of Mandalay Hill with good views of the hill and its monasteries. The pagoda was built as a memorial to crown Prince Kanaung, who was murdered in 1866 by two of King Mindon Min’s sons, who were unhappy not to be the first in line to become the next King. The bodies of the crown Prince and three of his sons who were also killed were entombed on the Sandamuni pagoda grounds. In the early 1990’s the tombs were moved to a mausoleum in Mandalay. The oldest structure on the grounds is the golden chedi. The chedi was built in 1874 by King Mindon Min on the site of his temporary Palace while the nearby Royal Palace was being built. Covered walkways through hundreds of shrines lead towards the chedi in the center of the complex. 1774 Shrines housing inscribed marble slabs.

 

In total 1774 shrines surrounding the central Sandamuni pagoda in Mandalay, each housing a single marble slab. The slabs are inscribed with the teachings of the Buddha. Each slab measuring 1.68 meters tall and 1.07 meters wide is enshrined in a small white shrine named Dhamma ceti, Dhamma being the teachings of the Buddha and ceti the Burmese word for chedi or stupa. The white shrines are topped with an ornamental spire shaped like an umbrella

 

Myanmar opent zich langzaam voor de wereld na een turbulente geschiedenis te hebben gehad. Het is lange tijd gesloten geweest voor de buitenwereld en nog steeds heeft het militaire regime deels de macht. Het vroegere Birma heet nu officieel Myanmar en een reis door dit land is een bijzondere en unieke ervaring. Bewonder de talrijke tempels en pagodes in dit boeddhistische land met zijn gevarieerde landschap. Geniet van de talrijke cultuurschatten en de vriendelijke bevolking van dit schitterende nog onontdekte land. De Nanmyaeboshar Sandamuni Pagoda in Mandalay wordt omringd door vele witte miniaturen. Op de foto´s zie je een deel van de 1774 die bij elkaar staan! In elke pagode staat een wijsheid die de monniken moeten leren! Het is werkelijk een unieke pagode die je nergens anders ter wereld vindt.

I met him on Bandra Hill Road liked his look , his turban , his peaceful attitude and shot a few frames.

 

He belongs to the Sikh religion.

 

about Sikhism

 

Sikhism,[1] founded in fifteenth century Punjab on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and ten successive Sikh Gurus (the last one being the sacred text Guru Granth Sahib), is the fifth-largest organized religion in the world.[2] This system of religious philosophy and expression has been traditionally known as the Gurmat (literally the counsel of the gurus) or the Sikh Dharma. Sikhism originated from the word Sikh, which in turn comes from the Sanskrit root śiṣya meaning "disciple" or "learner", or śikṣa meaning "instruction".[3][4]

 

The principal belief of Sikhism is faith in waheguru—represented using the sacred symbol of ik ōaṅkār, the Universal God. Sikhism advocates the pursuit of salvation through disciplined, personal meditation on the name and message of God. A key distinctive feature of Sikhism is a non-anthropomorphic concept of God, to the extent that one can interpret God as the Universe itself. The followers of Sikhism are ordained to follow the teachings of the ten Sikh gurus, or enlightened leaders, as well as the holy scripture entitled the Gurū Granth Sāhib, which, along with the writings of six of the ten Sikh Gurus, includes selected works of many devotees from diverse socio-economic and religious backgrounds. The text was decreed by Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth guru, as the final guru of the Khalsa Panth. Sikhism's traditions and teachings are distinctively associated with the history, society and culture of the Punjab. Adherents of Sikhism are known as Sikhs (students or disciples) and number over 23 million across the world. Most Sikhs live in Punjab in India and, until India's partition, millions of Sikhs lived in what is now Pakistani Punjab.[5]

 

The origins of Sikhism lie in the teachings of Guru Nanak and his successors. The essence of Sikh teaching is summed up by Nanak in these words: "Realisation of Truth is higher than all else. Higher still is truthful living".[6] Sikhism believes in equality of all humans and rejects discrimination on the basis of caste, creed, and gender. Sikhism also does not attach any importance to asceticism as a means to attain salvation, but stresses on the need of leading life as a householder.

 

Sikhism is a monotheistic religion.[7][8] In Sikhism, God—termed Vāhigurū—is shapeless, timeless, and sightless: niraṅkār, akāl, and alakh. The beginning of the first composition of Sikh scripture is the figure "1"—signifying the universality of God. It states that God is omnipresent and infinite, and is signified by the term ēk ōaṅkār.[9] Sikhs believe that before creation, all that existed was God and Its hukam (will or order).[10] When God willed, the entire cosmos was created. From these beginnings, God nurtured "enticement and attachment" to māyā, or the human perception of reality.[11]

 

While a full understanding of God is beyond human beings,[9] Nanak described God as not wholly unknowable. God is omnipresent (sarav viāpak) in all creation and visible everywhere to the spiritually awakened. Nanak stressed that God must be seen from "the inward eye", or the "heart", of a human being: devotees must meditate to progress towards enlightenment. Guru Nanak Dev emphasized the revelation through meditation, as its rigorous application permits the existence of communication between God and human beings.[9] God has no gender in Sikhism, (though translations may incorrectly present a male God); indeed Sikhism teaches that God is "Nirankar" [Niran meaning "without" and kar meaning "form", hence "without form"]. In addition, Nanak wrote that there are many worlds on which God has created life.[12]

[edit] Pursuing salvation and khalsa

A Sikh man at the Harimandir Sahib

 

Nanak's teachings are founded not on a final destination of heaven or hell, but on a spiritual union with God which results in salvation.[13] The chief obstacles to the attainment of salvation are social conflicts and an attachment to worldly pursuits, which commit men and women to an endless cycle of birth—a concept known as reincarnation.

 

Māyā—defined as illusion or "unreality"—is one of the core deviations from the pursuit of God and salvation: people are distracted from devotion by worldly attractions which give only illusive satisfaction. However, Nanak emphasised māyā as not a reference to the unreality of the world, but of its values. In Sikhism, the influences of ego, anger, greed, attachment, and lust—known as the Five Evils—are believed to be particularly pernicious. The fate of people vulnerable to the Five Evils is separation from God, and the situation may be remedied only after intensive and relentless devotion.[14]

 

Nanak described God's revelation—the path to salvation—with terms such as nām (the divine Name) and śabad (the divine Word) to emphasise the totality of the revelation. Nanak designated the word guru (meaning teacher) as the voice of God and the source and guide for knowledge and salvation.[15] Salvation can be reached only through rigorous and disciplined devotion to God. Nanak distinctly emphasised the irrelevance of outward observations such as rites, pilgrimages, or asceticism. He stressed that devotion must take place through the heart, with the spirit and the soul.

 

A key practice to be pursued is nām: remembrance of the divine Name. The verbal repetition of the name of God or a sacred syllable is an established practice in religious traditions in India, but Nanak's interpretation emphasized inward, personal observance. Nanak's ideal is the total exposure of one's being to the divine Name and a total conforming to Dharma or the "Divine Order". Nanak described the result of the disciplined application of nām simraṇ as a "growing towards and into God" through a gradual process of five stages. The last of these is sac khaṇḍ (The Realm of Truth)—the final union of the spirit with God.[15]

 

Nanak stressed now kirat karō: that a Sikh should balance work, worship, and charity, and should defend the rights of all creatures, and in particular, fellow human beings. They are encouraged to have a chaṛdī kalā, or optimistic, view of life. Sikh teachings also stress the concept of sharing—vaṇḍ chakkō—through the distribution of free food at Sikh gurdwaras (laṅgar), giving charitable donations, and working for the good of the community and others (sēvā).

[edit] The ten gurus and religious authority

Main article: Sikh Gurus

A rare Tanjore-style painting from the late 19th century depicting the ten Sikh Gurus with Bhai Bala and Bhai Mardana.

 

The term guru comes from the Sanskrit gurū, meaning teacher, guide, or mentor. The traditions and philosophy of Sikhism were established by ten specific gurus from 1499 to 1708. Each guru added to and reinforced the message taught by the previous, resulting in the creation of the Sikh religion. Nanak was the first guru and appointed a disciple as successor. Gobind Singh was the final guru in human form. Before his death, Gobind Singh decreed that the Gurū Granth Sāhib would be the final and perpetual guru of the Sikhs.[16] The Sikhs believe that the spirit of Nanak was passed from one guru to the next, " just as the light of one lamp, which lights another and does not diminish ",[17] and is also mentioned in their holy book.

  

After Nanak's passing, the most important phase in the development of Sikhism came with the third successor, Amar Das. Nanak's teachings emphasised the pursuit of salvation; Amar Das began building a cohesive community of followers with initiatives such as sanctioning distinctive ceremonies for birth, marriage, and death. Amar Das also established the manji (comparable to a diocese) system of clerical supervision.[15]

The interior of the Akal Takht

 

Amar Das's successor and son-in-law Ram Das founded the city of Amritsar, which is home of the Harimandir Sahib and regarded widely as the holiest city for all Sikhs. When Ram Das's youngest son Arjan succeeded him, the line of male gurus from the Sodhi Khatri family was established: all succeeding gurus were direct descendants of this line. Arjun Mathur was responsible for compiling the Sikh scriptures. Guru Arjan Sahib was captured by Mughal authorities who were suspicious and hostile to the religious order he was developing.[18] His persecution and death inspired his successors to promote a military and political organization of Sikh communities to defend themselves against the attacks of Mughal forces.

 

The Sikh gurus established a mechanism which allowed the Sikh religion to react as a community to changing circumstances. The sixth guru, Har Gobind, was responsible for the creation of the concept of Akal Takht (throne of the timeless one), which serves as the supreme decision-making centre of Sikhdom and sits opposite the Darbar Sahib. The Sarbat Ḵẖālsā (a representative portion of the Khalsa Panth) historically gathers at the Akal Takht on special festivals such as Vaisakhi or Diwali and when there is a need to discuss matters that affect the entire Sikh nation. A gurmatā (literally, guru's intention) is an order passed by the Sarbat Ḵẖālsā in the presence of the Gurū Granth Sāhib. A gurmatā may only be passed on a subject that affects the fundamental principles of Sikh religion; it is binding upon all Sikhs.[19] The term hukamnāmā (literally, edict or royal order) is often used interchangeably with the term gurmatā. However, a hukamnāmā formally refers to a hymn from the Gurū Granth Sāhib which is given as an order to Sikhs.

[edit] History

Main article: History of Sikhism

 

Nanak (1469–1538), the founder of Sikhism, was born in the village of Rāi Bhōi dī Talwandī, now called Nankana Sahib (in present-day Pakistan).[20] His father, Mehta Kalu was a Patwari, an accountant of land revenue in the employment of Rai Bular Bhatti, the area landlord. Nanak's mother was Tripta Devi and he had one older sister, Nanaki. His parents were Khatri Hindus of the Bedi clan. As a boy, Nanak was fascinated by religion, and his desire to explore the mysteries of life eventually led him to leave home and take missionary journeys.

 

In his early teens, Nanak caught the attention of the local landlord Rai Bular Bhatti, who was moved by his intellect and divine qualities. Rai Bular was witness to many incidents in which Nanak enchanted him and as a result Rai Bular and Nanak's sister Bibi Nanki, became the first persons to recognise the divine qualities in Nanak. Both of them then encouraged and supported Nanak to study and travel. Sikh tradition states that at the age of thirty, Nanak went missing and was presumed to have drowned after going for one of his morning baths to a local stream called the Kali Bein. One day, he declared: "There is no Hindu, there is no Muslim" (in Punjabi, "nā kōi hindū nā kōi musalmān"). It was from this moment that Nanak would begin to spread the teachings of what was then the beginning of Sikhism.[21] Although the exact account of his itinerary is disputed, he is widely acknowledged to have made four major journeys, spanning thousands of kilometres, the first tour being east towards Bengal and Assam, the second south towards Tamil Nadu, the third north towards Kashmir, Ladakh, and Tibet, and the final tour west towards Baghdad and Mecca.[22]

 

Nanak was married to Sulakhni, the daughter of Moolchand Chona, a rice trader from the town of Bakala. They had two sons. The elder son, Sri Chand, was an ascetic, and he came to have a considerable following of his own, known as the Udasis. The younger son, Lakshmi Das, on the other hand, was totally immersed in worldly life. To Nanak, who believed in the ideal of rāj maiṁ jōg (detachment in civic life), both his sons were unfit to carry on the Guruship.

[edit] Growth of the Sikh community

 

In 1538, Nanak chose his disciple Lahiṇā, a Khatri of the Trehan clan, as a successor to the guruship rather than either of his sons. Lahiṇā was named Angad Dev and became the second guru of the Sikhs.[23] Nanak conferred his choice at the town of Kartarpur on the banks of the river Ravi, where Nanak had finally settled down after his travels. Though Sri Chand was not an ambitious man, the Udasis believed that the Guruship should have gone to him, since he was a man of pious habits in addition to being Nanak's son. They refused to accept Angad's succession. On Nanak's advice, Angad shifted from Kartarpur to Khadur, where his wife Khivi and children were living, until he was able to bridge the divide between his followers and the Udasis. Angad continued the work started by Nanak and is widely credited for standardising the Gurmukhī script as used in the sacred scripture of the Sikhs.

 

Amar Das, a Khatri of the Bhalla clan, became the third Sikh guru in 1552 at the age of 73. Goindval became an important centre for Sikhism during the guruship of Amar Das. He preached the principle of equality for women by prohibiting purdah and sati. Amar Das also encouraged the practice of langar and made all those who visited him attend laṅgar before they could speak to him.[24] In 1567, Emperor Akbar sat with the ordinary and poor people of Punjab to have laṅgar. Amar Das also trained 146 apostles of which 52 were women, to manage the rapid expansion of the religion.[25] Before he died in 1574 aged 95, he appointed his son-in-law Jēṭhā, a Khatri of the Sodhi clan, as the fourth Sikh guru.

 

Jēṭhā became Ram Das and vigorously undertook his duties as the new guru. He is responsible for the establishment of the city of Ramdaspur later to be named Amritsar. Before Ramdaspur, Amritsar was known as Guru Da Chakk. In 1581, Arjan Dev—youngest son of the fourth guru—became the fifth guru of the Sikhs. In addition to being responsible for building the Darbar/Harimandir Sahib (called the Golden Temple), he prepared the Sikh sacred text known as the Ādi Granth (literally the first book) and included the writings of the first five gurus. In 1606, for refusing to make changes to the Granth and for supporting an unsuccessful contender to the throne, he was tortured and killed by the Mughal Emperor, Jahangir.[26]

[edit] Political advancement

 

Hargobind, became the sixth guru of the Sikhs. He carried two swords—one for spiritual and the other for temporal reasons (known as mīrī and pīrī in Sikhism).[27] Sikhs grew as an organized community and under the 10th Guru the Sikhs developed a trained fighting force to defend their independence. In 1644, Har Rai became guru followed by Harkrishan, the boy guru, in 1661. No hymns composed by these three gurus are included in the Sikh holy book.[28]

 

Tegh Bahadur became guru in 1665 and led the Sikhs until 1675. Teg Bahadur was executed by Aurangzeb for helping to protect Hindus, after a delegation of Kashmiri Pandits came to him for help when the Emperor condemned them to death for failing to convert to Islam.[29] He was succeeded by his son, Gobind Rai who was just nine years old at the time of his father's death. Gobind Rai further militarised his followers, and was baptised by the Pañj Piārē when he formed the Khalsa on 13 April 1699. From here on in he was known as Gobind Singh.

 

From the time of Nanak, when it was a loose collection of followers who focused entirely on the attainment of salvation and God, the Sikh community had significantly transformed. Even though the core Sikh religious philosophy was never affected, the followers now began to develop a political identity. Conflict with Mughal authorities escalated during the lifetime of Teg Bahadur and Gobind Singh. The latter founded the Khalsa in 1699. The Khalsa is a disciplined community that combines its religious purpose and goals with political and military duties.[30] After Aurangzeb killed four of his sons, Gobind Singh sent Aurangzeb the Zafarnamah (Notification/Epistle of Victory).

 

Shortly before his death, Gobind Singh ordered that the Gurū Granth Sāhib (the Sikh Holy Scripture), would be the ultimate spiritual authority for the Sikhs and temporal authority would be vested in the Khalsa Panth—the Sikh Nation/Community.[16] The first scripture was compiled and edited by the fifth guru, Arjan Dev, in 1604.

 

A former ascetic was charged by Gobind Singh with the duty of punishing those who had persecuted the Sikhs. After the guru's death, Baba Banda Singh Bahadur became the leader of the Sikh army and was responsible for several attacks on the Mughal empire. He was executed by the emperor Jahandar Shah after refusing the offer of a pardon if he converted to Islam.[31]

 

The Sikh community's embrace of military and political organisation made it a considerable regional force in medieval India and it continued to evolve after the demise of the gurus. After the death of Baba Banda Singh Bahadur, a Sikh Confederacy of Sikh warrior bands known as misls formed. With the decline of the Mughal empire, a Sikh Empire arose in the Punjab under Maharaja Ranjit Singh, with its capital in Lahore and limits reaching the Khyber Pass and the borders of China. The order, traditions and discipline developed over centuries culminated at the time of Ranjit Singh to give rise to the common religious and social identity that the term "Sikhism" describes.[32]

 

After the death of Ranjit Singh, the Sikh Empire fell into disorder and was eventually annexed by the United Kingdom after the hard-fought Anglo-Sikh Wars. This brought the Punjab under the British Raj. Sikhs formed the Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee and the Shiromani Akali Dal to preserve Sikhs' religious and political organization a quarter of a century later. With the partition of India in 1947, thousands of Sikhs were killed in violence and millions were forced to leave their ancestral homes in West Punjab.[33] Sikhs faced initial opposition from the Government in forming a linguistic state that other states in India were afforded. The Akali Dal started a non-violence movement for Sikh and Punjabi rights. Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale emerged as a leader of the Bhindran-Mehta Jatha—which assumed the name of Damdami Taksal in 1977 to promote a peaceful solution of the problem. In June 1984, Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi ordered the Indian army to launch Operation Blue Star to remove Bhindranwale and his followers from the Darbar Sahib. Bhindranwale, and a large number of innocent pilgrims were killed during the army's operations. In October, Indira Gandhi was assassinated by two of her Sikh bodyguards. The assassination was followed by the 1984 Anti-Sikh riots massacre[34] and Hindu-Sikh conflicts in Punjab, as a reaction to the assassination and Operation Blue Star.

[edit] Scripture

 

There are two primary sources of scripture for the Sikhs: the Gurū Granth Sāhib and the Dasam Granth. The Gurū Granth Sāhib may be referred to as the Ādi Granth—literally, The First Volume—and the two terms are often used synonymously. Here, however, the Ādi Granth refers to the version of the scripture created by Arjan Dev in 1604. The Gurū Granth Sāhib refers to the final version of the scripture created by Gobind Singh.

[edit] Adi Granth

Main article: Ādi Granth

 

The Ādi Granth was compiled primarily by Bhai Gurdas under the supervision of Arjan Dev between the years 1603 and 1604.[35] It is written in the Gurmukhī script, which is a descendant of the Laṇḍā script used in the Punjab at that time.[36] The Gurmukhī script was standardised by Angad Dev, the second guru of the Sikhs, for use in the Sikh scriptures and is thought to have been influenced by the Śāradā and Devanāgarī scripts. An authoritative scripture was created to protect the integrity of hymns and teachings of the Sikh gurus and selected bhagats. At the time, Arjan Sahib tried to prevent undue influence from the followers of Prithi Chand, the guru's older brother and rival.[37]

 

The original version of the Ādi Granth is known as the kartārpur bīṛ and is claimed to be held by the Sodhi family of Kartarpur.[citation needed] (In fact the original volume was burned by Ahmad Shah Durrani's army in 1757 when they burned the whole town of Kartarpur.)[citation needed]

[edit] Guru Granth Sahib

Gurū Granth Sāhib folio with Mūl Mantra

Main article: Gurū Granth Sāhib

 

The final version of the Gurū Granth Sāhib was compiled by Gobind Singh in 1678. It consists of the original Ādi Granth with the addition of Teg Bahadur's hymns. It was decreed by Gobind Singh that the Granth was to be considered the eternal guru of all Sikhs; however, this tradition is not mentioned either in 'Guru Granth Sahib' or in 'Dasam Granth'.

 

Punjabi: ਸੱਬ ਸਿੱਖਣ ਕੋ ਹੁਕਮ ਹੈ ਗੁਰੂ ਮਾਨਯੋ ਗ੍ਰੰਥ ।

Transliteration: Sabb sikkhaṇ kō hukam hai gurū mānyō granth.

English: All Sikhs are commanded to take the Granth as Guru.

 

It contains compositions by the first five gurus, Teg Bahadur and just one śalōk (couplet) from Gobind Singh.[38] It also contains the traditions and teachings of sants (saints) such as Kabir, Namdev, Ravidas, and Sheikh Farid along with several others.[32]

 

The bulk of the scripture is classified into rāgs, with each rāg subdivided according to length and author. There are 31 main rāgs within the Gurū Granth Sāhib. In addition to the rāgs, there are clear references to the folk music of Punjab. The main language used in the scripture is known as Sant Bhāṣā, a language related to both Punjabi and Hindi and used extensively across medieval northern India by proponents of popular devotional religion.[30] The text further comprises over 5000 śabads, or hymns, which are poetically constructed and set to classical form of music rendition, can be set to predetermined musical tāl, or rhythmic beats.

A group of Sikh musicians at the Golden Temple complex

 

The Granth begins with the Mūl Mantra, an iconic verse created by Nanak:

 

Punjabi: ੴ ਸਤਿ ਨਾਮੁ ਕਰਤਾ ਪੁਰਖੁ ਨਿਰਭਉ ਨਿਰਵੈਰੁ ਅਕਾਲ ਮੂਰਤਿ ਅਜੂਨੀ ਸੈਭੰ ਗੁਰ ਪ੍ਰਸਾਦਿ ॥

ISO 15919 transliteration: Ika ōaṅkāra sati nāmu karatā purakhu nirabha'u niravairu akāla mūrati ajūnī saibhaṅ gura prasādi.

Simplified transliteration: Ik ōaṅkār sat nām kartā purkh nirbha'u nirvair akāl mūrat ajūnī saibhaṅ gur prasād.

English: One Universal Creator God, The Name Is Truth, Creative Being Personified, No Fear, No Hatred, Image Of The Timeless One, Beyond Birth, Self Existent, By Guru's Grace.

 

All text within the Granth is known as gurbānī. Gurbānī, according to Nanak, was revealed by God directly, and the authors wrote it down for the followers. The status accorded to the scripture is defined by the evolving interpretation of the concept of gurū. In the Sant tradition of Nanak, the guru was literally the word of God. The Sikh community soon transferred the role to a line of men who gave authoritative and practical expression to religious teachings and traditions, in addition to taking socio-political leadership of Sikh adherents. Gobind Singh declared an end of the line of human gurus, and now the Gurū Granth Sāhib serves as the eternal guru, with its interpretation vested with the community.[30]

[edit] Dasam Granth

Main article: Dasam Granth

A frontispiece to the Dasam Granth

 

The Dasam Granth (formally dasvēṁ pātśāh kī granth or The Book of the Tenth Master) is an eighteenth-century collection of poems by Gobind Singh. It was compiled in the shape of a book (granth) by Bhai Mani Singh some 13 to 26 years after Guru Gobind Singh Ji left this world for his heavenly abode.

 

From 1895 to 1897, different scholars and theologians assembled at the Akal Takht, Amritsar, to study the 32 printed Dasam Granths and prepare the authoritative version. They met at the Akal Takhat at Amritsar, and held formal discussions in a series of meetings between 13 June 1895 and 16 February 1896. A preliminary report entitled Report Sodhak (revision) Committee Dasam Patshah de Granth Sahib Di was sent to Sikh scholars and institutions, inviting their opinion. A second document, Report Dasam Granth di Sudhai Di was brought out on 11 February 1898. Basing its conclusions on a study of the old handwritten copies of the Dasam Granth preserved at Sri Takht Sahib at Patna and in other Sikh gurudwaras, this report affirmed that the Holy Volume was compiled at Anandpur Sahib in 1698[3] . Further re-examinations and reviews took place in 1931, under the aegis of the Darbar Sahib Committee of the Shiromani Gurdwara Prabhandak Committee. They, too, vindicated the earlier conclusion (agreeing that it was indeed the work of the Guru) and its findings have since been published.

[edit] Janamsakhis

Main article: Janamsākhīs

 

The Janamsākhīs (literally birth stories), are writings which profess to be biographies of Nanak. Although not scripture in the strictest sense, they provide an interesting look at Nanak's life and the early start of Sikhism. There are several—often contradictory and sometimes unreliable—Janamsākhīs and they are not held in the same regard as other sources of scriptural knowledge.

[edit] Observances

 

Observant Sikhs adhere to long-standing practices and traditions to strengthen and express their faith. The daily recitation from memory of specific passages from the Gurū Granth Sāhib, especially the Japu (or Japjī, literally chant) hymns is recommended immediately after rising and bathing. Family customs include both reading passages from the scripture and attending the gurdwara (also gurduārā, meaning the doorway to God; sometimes transliterated as gurudwara). There are many gurdwaras prominently constructed and maintained across India, as well as in almost every nation where Sikhs reside. Gurdwaras are open to all, regardless of religion, background, caste, or race.

 

Worship in a gurdwara consists chiefly of singing of passages from the scripture. Sikhs will commonly enter the temple, touch the ground before the holy scripture with their foreheads, and make an offering. The recitation of the eighteenth century ardās is also customary for attending Sikhs. The ardās recalls past sufferings and glories of the community, invoking divine grace for all humanity.[39]

 

The most sacred shrine is the Harimandir Sahib in Amritsar, famously known as the Golden Temple. Groups of Sikhs regularly visit and congregate at the Harimandir Sahib. On specific occasions, groups of Sikhs are permitted to undertake a pilgrimage to Sikh shrines in the province of Punjab in Pakistan, especially at Nankana Sahib and other Gurdwaras. Other places of interest to Sikhism in Pakistan includes the samādhī (place of cremation) of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in Lahore.

[edit] Sikh festivals

 

Festivals in Sikhism mostly centre around the lives of the Gurus and Sikh martyrs. The SGPC, the Sikh organisation in charge of upkeep of the gurdwaras, organises celebrations based on the new Nanakshahi calendar. This calendar is highly controversial among Sikhs and is not universally accepted. Several festivals (Hola Mohalla, Diwali, and Nanak's birthday) continue to be celebrated using the Hindu calendar. Sikh festivals include the following:

 

* Gurpurabs are celebrations or commemorations based on the lives of the Sikh gurus. They tend to be either birthdays or celebrations of Sikh martyrdom. All ten Gurus have Gurpurabs on the Nanakshahi calendar, but it is Guru Nanak Dev and Guru Gobind Singh who have a gurpurab that is widely celebrated in Gurdwaras and Sikh homes. The martyrdoms are also known as a shaheedi Gurpurab, which mark the martyrdom anniversary of Guru Arjan Dev and Guru Tegh Bahadur.

* Vaisakhi or Baisakhi normally occurs on 13 April and marks the beginning of the new spring year and the end of the harvest. Sikhs celebrate it because on Vaisakhi in 1699, the tenth guru, Gobind Singh, laid down the Foundation of the Khalsa an Independent Sikh Identity.

* Bandi Chhor Divas or Diwali celebrates Hargobind's release from the Gwalior Fort, with several innocent Hindu kings who were also imprisoned by Jahangir, on 26 October, 1619.

* Hola Mohalla occurs the day after Holi and is when the Khalsa Panth gather at Anandpur and display their warrior skills, including fighting and riding.

 

[edit] Ceremonies and customs

The anand kāraj (Sikh marriage) ceremony

 

Nanak taught that rituals, religious ceremonies, or idol worship is of little use and Sikhs are discouraged from fasting or going on pilgrimages.[40] However, during the period of the later gurus, and owing to increased institutionalisation of the religion, some ceremonies and rites did arise. Sikhism is not a proselytizing religion and most Sikhs do not make active attempts to gain converts. However, converts to Sikhism are welcomed, although there is no formal conversion ceremony. The morning and evening prayers take about two hours a day, starting in the very early morning hours. The first morning prayer is Guru Nanak's Jap Ji. Jap, meaning "recitation", refers to the use of sound, as the best way of approaching the divine. Like combing hair, hearing and reciting the sacred word is used as a way to comb all negative thoughts out of the mind. The second morning prayer is Guru Gobind Singh's universal Jaap Sahib. The Guru addresses God as having no form, no country, and no religion but as the seed of seeds, sun of suns, and the song of songs. The Jaap Sahib asserts that God is the cause of conflict as well as peace, and of destruction as well as creation. Devotees learn that there is nothing outside of God's presence, nothing outside of God's control. Devout Sikhs are encouraged to begin the day with private meditations on the name of God.

 

Upon a child's birth, the Guru Granth Sāhib is opened at a random point and the child is named using the first letter on the top left-hand corner of the left page. All boys are given the middle name or surname Singh, and all girls are given the middle name or surname Kaur.[41] Sikhs are joined in wedlock through the anand kāraj ceremony. Sikhs are required to marry when they are of a sufficient age (child marriage is taboo), and without regard for the future spouse's caste or descent. The marriage ceremony is performed in the company of the Guru Granth Sāhib; around which the couple circles four times. After the ceremony is complete, the husband and wife are considered "a single soul in two bodies."[42]

 

According to Sikh religious rites, neither husband nor wife is permitted to divorce. A Sikh couple that wishes to divorce may be able to do so in a civil court—but this is not condoned.[43] Upon death, the body of a Sikh is usually cremated. If this is not possible, any means of disposing the body may be employed. The kīrtan sōhilā and ardās prayers are performed during the funeral ceremony (known as antim sanskār).[44]

[edit] Baptism and the Khalsa

A kaṛā, kaṅghā and kirpān.

 

Khalsa (meaning pure) is the name given by Gobind Singh to all Sikhs who have been baptised or initiated by taking ammrit in a ceremony called ammrit sañcār. The first time that this ceremony took place was on Vaisakhi, which fell on 29 March 1698/1699 at Anandpur Sahib in Punjab. It was on that occasion that Gobind Singh baptised the Pañj Piārē who in turn baptised Gobind Singh himself.

 

Baptised Sikhs are bound to wear the Five Ks (in Punjabi known as pañj kakkē or pañj kakār), or articles of faith, at all times. The tenth guru, Gobind Singh, ordered these Five Ks to be worn so that a Sikh could actively use them to make a difference to their own and to others' spirituality. The 5 items are: kēs (uncut hair), kaṅghā (small comb), kaṛā (circular iron bracelet), kirpān (dagger), and kacchā (special undergarment). The Five Ks have both practical and symbolic purposes.[45]

[edit] Sikh people

Main article: Sikh

Further information: Sikhism by country

Punjabi Sikh family from Punjab, India

 

Worldwide, there are 25.8 million Sikhs and approximately 75% of Sikhs live in the Indian state of Punjab, where they constitute about 60% of the state's population. Even though there are a large number of Sikhs in the world, certain countries have not recognised Sikhism as a major religion and Sikhism has no relation to Hinduism. Large communities of Sikhs live in the neighboring states, and large communities of Sikhs can be found across India. However, Sikhs only make up about 2% of the Indian population.

 

In addition to social divisions, there is a misperception that there are a number of Sikh sectarian groups[clarification needed], such as Namdharis and Nirankaris. Nihangs tend to have little difference in practice and are considered the army of Sikhism. There is also a sect known as Udasi, founded by Sri Chand who were initially part of Sikhism but later developed into a monastic order.

 

Sikh Migration beginning from the 19th century led to the creation of significant communities in Canada (predominantly in Brampton, along with Malton in Ontario and Surrey in British Columbia), East Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, the United Kingdom and more recently, Australia, New Zealand, the United States and Western Europe. Smaller populations of Sikhs are found in Mauritius, Malaysia, Fiji, Nepal, China, Pakistan, Afganistan, Iraq and many other countries

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikhism.

   

Life is fragile. I have heard the story of a person diagnosed with cancer and passed away in a month’s time.

 

Yet life is strong and tough. Many living beings survive in tough conditions.

 

It looks contradicting. The lesson is like what is being said in Buddhist teachings.

 

There is no constancy in life. There is no norm or constant rule in the world.

 

Don’t ever think these norms are always happening.

 

When you work hard, you will be rewarded.

When you study hard, you will get high grades.

When you make great arts, you will be recognized as a great artist.

When you love, you will be loved.

 

Some people say we should live like life ends tomorrow.

 

Do what you want to do before it is too late. May be this is a hug to yourself?

 

Happy Thursday!

 

This is the close up in Van Dusen taken a few weeks ago.

 

© all rights reserved

 

Please take your time... and enjoy it large on black

 

Our Tad Lo Resort has a spectacular setting perched above the Sexet River with an incredible ambiance and great views of the Tad Lo and Tad Suong waterfall. We enjoy the natural surroundings exploring by foot and soak up the peaceful atmosphere. There are many beautiful natural attractions to see here but perhaps the attractions that sticks in most people's mind the longest though, are those charming monks in the saffron robes. Usually with an umbrella in hand to ward off either sunrays or raindrops. In the early morning hours, when they make their daily alms rounds through town.

 

The little village Kieng Than Lei is located on the Bolaven Plateau and is a great spot to see the rural life of Laos. The area surrounding it is very peaceful, scenic and no other tourists to be found. We met this monk at a little temple complex near the Sexet river. Their lifestyle is shaped so as to support their spiritual practice, to live a simple and meditative life. Lao monks are very friendly and approachable. We had a friendly chat with the local people and monks. The young monks can speak a little bit of English. We donated some money to this Buddhist community. Most people donate food to the monks to gain merit and improve their karma. The temples of Laos were once seen as "Universities" for monks. Lao monks are highly respected and revered in Lao communities. Many of the novice monks come from poor villages throughout Laos and live and study. Many of them are teenagers and not yet full-fledged men of the cloth like this eldery monk.

 

Lao monks are very friendly and approachable. Pay a visit to any temple in town and it's highly likely that a polite young monk - or group of them - will initiate a conversation with you. Most of these curious, conservational monks are of the novice variety, that is, they are usually teenagers still in school and not yet full-fledged men of the cloth. Many of the novice monks come from poor villages throughout Laos to live and study at one of the twenty-odd temples scattered around Luang Prabang. Obviously, being Buddhist monks, they are focused on learning about the teachings of the Lord Buddha, but novices also study a variety of academic subjects and languages such as Pali, French and English. Many of them can also speak Thai, a language that is quite similar to their native Lao. Those monks that want to pursue their education at a university must relocate to the capital of Vientiane and do so at one of the larger temples located there.

Islam (Arabic: الإسلام‎ is a monotheistic, Abrahamic religion based on the teachings of the Qur’an, a religious book considered by its adherents to be the verbatim word of God (Arabic: الله‎, Allāh), and the Islamic prophet Muhammad's personally demonstrated examples (collected through narration of his companions in the volumes of Hadith) for implementing them. The word Islam is a homograph, having multiple meanings, and a triliteral of the word salam, which directly translates as peace. Other meanings include submission, or the total surrender of oneself to God. An adherent of Islam is a Muslim, meaning "one who submits (to God)". The word Muslim is the participle of the same verb of which Islām is the infinitive. Muslims regard Islam as the completed and universal version of an original monotheistic faith revealed to peoples before, including to Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.

 

Religious practices include the Five Pillars of Islam, which are five duties that unite Muslims into a community. Islamic law (Arabic: '‎شريعة Šarīʿah) touches on virtually every aspect of life and society, encompassing everything from dietary laws and banking to warfare and welfare. Almost all Muslims belong to one of two major denominations, the Sunni (85%) and Shi'a (15%). Islam is the predominant religion in much of Africa, the Middle East, as well as in major parts of Asia Large communities are also found in China, Russia and the Balkans. Converts and immigrant communities are found in almost every part of the world. About 20% of Muslims live in Arab countries, 30% in the Indian Subcontinent, and 15.6% in Indonesia alone, the largest Muslim country in absolute numbers With 1.3 billion to 1.8 billion Muslims, Islam is the second-largest religion in the world and the fastest growing religion in the world.

  

MANHATTAN, NY

USA

"As a bee seeks nectar from all kinds of flowers seek teachings everywhere.

Like a deer that finds a quiet place to graze seek seclusion to digest all that you have gathered.

Like a mad one beyond all limits go where you please and live like a lion completely free of all fear."

(Dzogchen tantra)

 

Gurudham temple is located near Durgakund in Varanasi (Benaras), it is not an ordinary building but a masterpiece of unique architecture with philosophical symbolism in bricks.

It was constructed in 1814 by Raja Jai Narain Ghoshal of Khidderpur, Bengal.

Each brick of the temple is laid on auspicious muhurt and each and every detail of the construction like measurement of cubicles, verandah and dome, number of stairs and their heights and pictures inscribed on its eight gates, defines one or more symbolic explanations.

 

Join the photographer at www.facebook.com/laurent.goldstein.photography

 

© All photographs are copyrighted and all rights reserved.

Please do not use any photographs without permission (even for private use).

The use of any work without consent of the artist is PROHIBITED and will lead automatically to consequences.

Buddhism in Laos is largely of the Theravada school. Nearly 60% of the Lao population is Buddhist of the Theravada school, though Buddhism in this country has become integrated with folk beliefs such as ancestor worship. Buddhism was based on the religious movement founded in the sixth century B.C. by Siddhartha , later known as the Buddha, who urged the world to relinquish the extremes of sensuality and self-mortification and follow the enlightened Middle Way...... The focus of this religion is on man, not gods; the assumption is that life is pain or suffering, which is a consequence of craving, and that suffering can end only if desire ceases. The end of suffering is the achievement of nirvana often defined as the absence of craving and therefore of suffering, sometimes as enlightenment. Like in most other Theravada nations, Buddhism in Laos is represented primarily by the presence of Buddhist monks, who serve as officiants on ceremonial occasions, as well as being responsible for preserving and conveying the teachings of the Buddha.

Every family expect for every young man to live as a monk for awhile (a week till single months) between school time and their working life.

 

Their lifestyle is shaped so as to support their spiritual practice, to live a simple and meditative life. Photo taken at a temple at Ban Thieng. We had to run during our bike ride for a heavy tropical rainshower. Lucky we were passing a local temple where we could shelter. We had a friendly chat with the local people and monks. Lao monks are very friendly and approachable. We donated some money to this Buddhist community. Most people donate food to the monks to gain merit and improve their karma. The temples of Laos were once seen as "Universities" for monks. Lao monks are highly respected and revered in Lao communities. Many of the novice monks come from poor villages throughout Laos and live and study. Many of them are teenagers and not yet full-fledged men of the cloth like this eldery monk.

 

Een groot deel van de Laostiaase bevolking, zo’n 60% is boeddhist. Men hangt het zogenaamde Teravada-boeddhisme. In het Theravada wordt meditatie benadrukt als een essentieel onderdeel van het pad naar verlichting, samen met moreel gedrag en wijsheid. Het brengen van een einde aan het lijden is het hoofddoel van het Theravada boeddhisme. De Boeddha legde verder een zeer gedetailleerde gedragscode voor de Monniken neer: de Vinaya. Over het algemeen worden monniken door de Boeddha aangemoedigd om wereldse aangelegenheden en passies achter zich te laten, zodat zij gemakkelijker in staat zijn een staat van vrede en wijsheid te bereiken, en sterke ongezonde emoties zoals haat, verlangen en lust te overwinnen. Een Monnik zoals hierboven in z'n oranje gewaad, kaalgeschoren en met sandalen aan de voeten is niet meer weg te denken uit het straatbeeld van Laos.

Er wordt van iedere jongeman verwacht, dat zij een poosje (van een week tot enkele maanden) als monnik leven. Zo tussen hun schooltijd en hun werkende leven in. Het wordt beschouwd als een overgangsrite en zij verwerven op die wijze aanzien voor zichzelf en hun familie.

It´s a beautiful day: White bird

 

Pétrola lagoon. Albacete. Spain. Laguna de Pétrola en Albacete, España.

Surely it's not a pleasant destination :/

 

This is only my illustration of hell but not to scare . There are significant number of people with documented out of the body experiences /near death experiences and visions which carried them through to hellish and heavenly abode. Strange as it may seem to you ,I'm fascinated on these out of ordinary experiences of people . I do believe majority of these accounts could be real , as it fits in with my belief based on Biblical teachings that God give people dreams / visions and revelations ( Joel chapter 2 ) . That hell is a literal place of torment , originally destined for Satan , the demons and for the unrepentant sinners. Once in hell ,there's no coming back with reference to the Biblical teaching in the book of Hebrews .There's great skepticism and various views of the out of the body experiences especially from medical and scientific community rejecting the belief of the possible existence of another dimension,this belief is debunked by the scientific camp .But this doesn't mean they are right.There are just things science can't measure up in a lab ,science neither has the answers .

 

It's surely hard reconciling beliefs into agreement from largely contrasting diciplines . Having been spiritually awakened in Christ , it's no good to gamble eternity only because of our stubborn pride to admit we are on the wrong side .The ultimate rejection of the eternal God ,the creator and His divine purpose for good has it's damning consequences of eternal torture. It's not hidden in cryptic clues ,neither a secret ,it's being told . The Bible is open if people care to read .People seeing uniformity of visions and experiences after the body is pronounced dead regardless of the cultural variables , is an evidence there is something

beyond . It's not just simply effects of chemical reaction of a brain deprived of oxygen ,as hardline proponents push their theories into people's minds that we are simply like rats , and nothing awaits after our hearts stop beating.

 

I don't like being misunderstood as so negative , going nuts but whateva , you are free I can't stopped you thinking , but please be gentle :)

My unusual experiences through the years do teach me there are things to see and expect from beyond our physical awareness . I do believe we are spiritual beings . I'd rather stay for the old long revelations of God than hop to new corrupting beliefs against the teachings of God . There's forces of good and evil . There should be awareness of corrupting forces of darkness bewitching lives for centuries through magic ,with shortlive effects of success bear no good promises ,but simply reproduction of human misery and confusion .

 

If magic did also work ,practiced by people through centuries then there's reason to believe there is spiritual side of things ,an existince of different dimensions .From this I see God ,the creator who judges righteously .The Bible speaks of the great angelic rebellion before mankind existed. God created hell as originally intented punishment for the angelic fallen ones ,it's not orginally made for man .The angelic wars still going on to this day . But since mankind was caught in between , beguiled ,deceived to rebel against Him ,sadly those who are stubbornly with pride not turning back to Him have the same destiny as those rebelious heavenly entities.

 

God put rules, guidelines expressed in one book , inspired by the Spirit of God .It's wonderfully written by a number of writters through thousands of years and put together in harmony telling the nature of God ,His purpose , His love for mankind , when put into one basket ,in itself is a great miracle to have happened if people see it that way .The prophecies fulfilled through centuries is a signature of truth about God and His existence .The Bible is the true word of God .He gave his begotten son to be born in the flesh ,to die in cruxifiction and resurrected for the remissions of sins ,so man could have salvation .It's a major Bible prophecy fulfilled.But man still continued to rebel . 600 years after Jesus ,came Muhammed bringing a new doctrine revealed to him from an apparation in a cave of what Muhammed thought was an angelic being .The Bible said ,the devil can appear as angel of light too.Apparently the doctrine Muhammed introduced was complete twist of God's purpose .The great twist of disbelief of Jesus death ,His resurrection and the purpose of salvation for mankind , is misleading billions away from God's goal to save humanity.Whether looking in nutshell of Islam and Christian Roman Catholicism full of abominations and twisting of the true Biblical teachings ,introducing the old Babylonian worship of idols which God hates , the pornography ,fornication and adultery ,self indulgences ,hedonism,Hollywood is offering to its massive audience , gave us the true scale of massive rebellion to God in global scale ,if only we opened our eyes to see .The devil wants people to go to hell,as many as he can bring with him as his time is getting so short .

When Lucifer and his menions will be bound for a thousand years ( Book of Revelations speak of it) they will be thrown to HELL !

Don't go with them .

      

I'm not here having the taste of dark images .But look around you with opened spiritual eyes ,there is great darkness abound .But if you can handle to watch stomach twisting horror movies or thrillers , then I presume you can also handle looking at this simple digital art impressions of hellish eternity of the unsaved spoken in the Bible .I added bits of wormy characters ,as depicting my personal dread of worms and maggots ,it must be steaming childhood bad experiences with worms . This impression is far less scary than the descriptions from people who have seen hell .

 

The Bible talks about Hell .

 

1) Hell was designed originally for Satan and his demons (Matthew 25:41; Revelation 20:10).

 

2 ) Hell will also punish the sin of those who reject Christ (Matthew 13:41,50;

Revelation 20:11-15; Rev 21 :8)

3) Hell is conscious torment.

  

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Few verses of the Bible describing Hell :

 

" and throw them into the blazing furnace, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth."

Matthew 13 :50

 

“where their worm does not die, and the fire is not quenched” Mark 9 :48

 

“he will be tormented with fire and brimstone” Revelation 14 : 10

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Hell is eternal and irriversible

  

“the smoke of their torment goes up forever and ever and they have no rest day and night”

Rev 14 :11; “This is the second death, the lake of fire” Rev 20;14 ;

“If anyone’s name was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire” Rev 20 :15

 

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Erroneous Views of Hell

 

(1) The second chance view – After death there is still a way to escape hell.

 

Answer: “It is appointed unto men once to die and after that the judgment” (Hebrews 9:27).

 

(2) Universalism – All are eternally saved.

 

Answer: It denies the truth of salvation through Christ which means that a person decides to either trust in Christ or else he/she rejects Christ and goes to hell (John 3:16;3:36).

 

(3) Annihilationism – Hell means a person dies like an animal – ceases to exist.

 

Answer: It denies the resurrection of the unsaved (John 5:28, etc. – see above). It denies conscious torment

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PEOPLE WHO HAD OUT OF BODY /DEATH EXPERIENCES SEEING HEAVEN AND HELL

   

* Incredible Death Testimony by Ian McCormack :Heaven and Hell - Ian McCormack died for 4 hours ,sent to the morgue ,came back to life to tell what he saw.

  

* Mary K Baxter :A Divine Revelation of Heaven and Hell - Another great testimony and revelation of what hell is .

   

* Bill Wiese - 23 minutes in Hell (Hell Testimony)

  

* To Hell and Back (Died by Suicide) NDE & Hell Testimony - Angie Fenimore

 

* Near Death Experience - Blind woman SEES while OUT OF BODY

  

* Out of the body experience seeing Hell

   

* NDE. Plane crush. Meets God. Skydiver Mickey Robinson. Heaven & Hell.

    

* Man Dies And Meets Jesus Christ In Heaven! ( Near Death Experience )

  

* Ronald Reagan - An atheist man saw the Hell

   

* Man visits Heaven and meets God ! - (Part 1)

  

* Man visits Heaven and meets God ! - (Part 2)

  

"For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." John 3 : 16

 

JESUS SAVES !

      

"During Paul's stay in Corinth, he was brought for judgment before the proconsul Lucius Junius Gallio Annaeanus, also known as Gallio, on the accusation of conducting illegal teachings. Gallio, however, refused to judge what he considered to be a mere religious dispute among the Jews. According to tradition, the site of Paul's trial was the Bema, a large elevated rostrum standing prominently in the centre of the Roman Forum of ancient Corinth and from where the city's officials addressed the public. Probably because of the monument's connection to Saint Paul, the Bema was transformed into a Christian church during the Byzantine period."

 

Source: Ministry of Culture an Sports

 

"Corinth (/ˈkɔːrɪnθ/; Greek: Κόρινθος Kórinthos; Doric Greek: Ϙόρινθος Qórinthos) was a city-state (polis) on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnese to the mainland of Greece, roughly halfway between Athens and Sparta. The modern city of Corinth is located approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) northeast of the ancient ruins. Since 1896, systematic archaeological investigations of the Corinth Excavations by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens have revealed large parts of the ancient city, and recent excavations conducted by the Greek Ministry of Culture have brought to light important new facets of antiquity.

 

For Christians, Corinth is well-known from the two letters of Saint Paul in the New Testament, First Corinthians and Second Corinthians. Corinth is also mentioned in the Book of Acts as part of the Apostle Paul's missionary travels. In addition, the second book of Pausanias' Description of Greece is devoted to Corinth.

 

"Ancient Corinth was one of the largest and most important cities of Greece, with a population of 90,000 in 400 BC. The Romans demolished Corinth in 146 BC, built a new city in its place in 44 BC, and later made it the provincial capital of Greece."

 

Source: Wikipedia

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Please take your time... and enjoy it large on black

 

Buddhism in Laos is largely of the Theravada school. Nearly 60% of the Lao population is Buddhist of the Theravada school, though Buddhism in this country has become integrated with folk beliefs such as ancestor worship. Buddhism was based on the religious movement founded in the sixth century B.C. by Siddhartha , later known as the Buddha, who urged the world to relinquish the extremes of sensuality and self-mortification and follow the enlightened Middle Way...... The focus of this religion is on man, not gods; the assumption is that life is pain or suffering, which is a consequence of craving, and that suffering can end only if desire ceases. The end of suffering is the achievement of nirvana often defined as the absence of craving and therefore of suffering, sometimes as enlightenment. Like in most other Theravada nations, Buddhism in Laos is represented primarily by the presence of Buddhist monks, who serve as officiants on ceremonial occasions, as well as being responsible for preserving and conveying the teachings of the Buddha.

 

A recent monk workshop was held by Mlup Baitong to increase awareness of the local provincial authorities and people regarding dolphin and fish conservation because most Laotians and Cambodians have unlimitedly belief on Buddhist religion. There are only 64 or 65 irrawaddy dolphins left in the Mekong river in Southeast Asia and is classified as a critically endangered species. A number of monks here at the border of Laos and Cambodia are already available for raising awareness as well as teaching materials. The monks encourage a dialogue here in Kratie and Stung Treng Provinces to elicit their support for the dolphin conservation and to extend the general public support. Above photo shows Saffron-cloaked monks on a slow boat at the Mekong River near the border of Laos - Cambodia. There are only 12 dolphins left in this area and a few more further down stream in Kratie - Cambodia. Many temples are build next to the river since transport in Laos via the river is faster than by road. Laos is truly a Mekong country, the river runs its full length. We had a friendly chat with the local people and monks. Lao monks are very friendly and approachable. We donated some money to this Buddhist community. We hope the monk workshop will help the Irrawaddy dophins to survive. Most people donate food to the monks to gain merit and improve their karma. The temples of Laos were once seen as "Universities" for monks. Lao monks are highly respected and revered in Lao communities. Many of the novice monks come from poor villages throughout Laos and live and study.

 

Een groot deel van de Laostiaase bevolking, zo’n 60% is boeddhist. Men hangt het zogenaamde Teravada-boeddhisme. In het Theravada wordt meditatie benadrukt als een essentieel onderdeel van het pad naar verlichting, samen met moreel gedrag en wijsheid. Het brengen van een einde aan het lijden is het hoofddoel van het Theravada boeddhisme. De Boeddha legde verder een zeer gedetailleerde gedragscode voor de Monniken neer: de Vinaya. Over het algemeen worden monniken door de Boeddha aangemoedigd om wereldse aangelegenheden en passies achter zich te laten, zodat zij gemakkelijker in staat zijn een staat van vrede en wijsheid te bereiken, en sterke ongezonde emoties zoals haat, verlangen en lust te overwinnen. Een Monnik zoals hierboven in z'n oranje gewaad, kaalgeschoren en met sandalen aan de voeten is niet meer weg te denken uit het straatbeeld van Laos.

 

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