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View allAll Photos Tagged taxonomy:genus=Metrosideros

Sadleria cyatheoides (thanks to endemanf for the correct ID)

- growing under Metrosideros polymorpha

Sadleria cyatheoides

near the Kilauea Iki crater - which erupted in 1959.

 

For a fascinating account of the invasion, early succession and recovery of vegetation 1959 Kilauea Iki volcano, see Hawaii: The Fires of Life by Garrett A. Smathers and Dieter Mueller-Dombois.

 

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Pteridophyta

Class: Pteridopsida

Order:Athyriales

Family:Blechnaceae

Genus:Sadleria

   

Kilauea

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

 

1041308 107

Sadleria cyatheoides (thanks to endemanf for the correct ID)

- growing under Metrosideros polymorpha

Sadleria cyatheoides

near the Kilauea Iki crater - which erupted in 1959.

 

For a fascinating account of the invasion, early succession and recovery of vegetation 1959 Kilauea Iki volcano, see Hawaii: The Fires of Life by Garrett A. Smathers and Dieter Mueller-Dombois.

 

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Pteridophyta

Class: Pteridopsida

Order:Athyriales

Family:Blechnaceae

Genus:Sadleria

   

Kilauea

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

 

1041308 105

Sadleria cyatheoides (thanks to endemanf for the correct ID)

- growing under Metrosideros polymorpha

Sadleria cyatheoides

near the Kilauea Iki crater - which erupted in 1959.

 

For a fascinating account of the invasion, early succession and recovery of vegetation 1959 Kilauea Iki volcano, see Hawaii: The Fires of Life by Garrett A. Smathers and Dieter Mueller-Dombois.

 

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Pteridophyta

Class: Pteridopsida

Order:Athyriales

Family:Blechnaceae

Genus:Sadleria

   

Kilauea

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

 

1041308 106

Curtis's botanical magazine..

London ;New York [etc.] :Academic Press [etc.].

biodiversitylibrary.org/page/466835

Sadleria cyatheoides (thanks to endemanf for the correct ID)

- growing under Metrosideros polymorpha

Sadleria cyatheoides

near the Kilauea Iki crater - which erupted in 1959.

 

For a fascinating account of the invasion, early succession and recovery of vegetation 1959 Kilauea Iki volcano, see Hawaii: The Fires of Life by Garrett A. Smathers and Dieter Mueller-Dombois.

 

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Pteridophyta

Class: Pteridopsida

Order:Athyriales

Family:Blechnaceae

Genus:Sadleria

   

Kilauea

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

 

1041308 104

climbing rata vine on rewarewa tree trunk

 

liana

 

Metrosideros sp. (Plant, Myrtaceae), New Zealand: Endemic

 

Knightia excelsa, rewarewa, (Plant, Proteaceae), New Zealand, Endemic

 

Looking for kokako bird aves

 

Tawa/Rewarewa forest

 

Pongakawa Ecological Area, Lake Rotoehu, Rotorua, Bay of Plenty

 

naturewatch.org.nz/observations/342885

track to Swimmers Beach

 

Lake Mahinapua

West Coast

Westland

New Zealand

 

naturewatch.org.nz/observations/342804

 

Lots of scales on a sapling of southern rata, Metrosideros umbellata.

 

From the herbivore list on the PlantSyNZ database, this matches Anoplaspis metrosideri, described by Nicholas Martin as "White scales on leaves of tree ratas, Metrosideros species, often chlorotic areas on leaf; female scale cover white, oystershell-shaped, exuvia brown with dark median area, body and eggs purple-black; male scale cover white, fusiform, exuvia brown."

One of the variegated pohutukawa trees planted around the entrance and carpark of the New Plymouth airport. Some branches were reverted to non-variegated foliage.

Lots of scales on a sapling of southern rata, Metrosideros umbellata.

 

From the herbivore list on the PlantSyNZ database, this matches Anoplaspis metrosideri, described by Nicholas Martin as "White scales on leaves of tree ratas, Metrosideros species, often chlorotic areas on leaf; female scale cover white, oystershell-shaped, exuvia brown with dark median area, body and eggs purple-black; male scale cover white, fusiform, exuvia brown."

A panorama stitched together from several photos showing one emergent northern rata tree taken from the canopy of an adjacent tree. It's hard to capture the impressive scale here.

 

Like all rain forest trees, it is festooned with a large biomass and rich diversity of epiphytes and vines. These are structural parasites on the tree, since they use it to get to the light but don't contribute to the considerable resources needed to build a tree trunk. Not that northern rata can claim any moral high ground. It started out as an epiphyte itself and strangled and replaced its host tree. (Nature's spectacular, but watch your back!)

Metrosideros polymorpha HEAR

 

Metrosideros polymorpha wikipedia

Metrosideros polymorpha ‘ōhi‘a lehua or lehua tree

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Magnoliophyta

Class: Magnoliopsida

Order: Myrtales

Family: Myrtaceae

Genus: Metrosideros

  

Kilauea

 

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

 

1041308 076

climbing rata vine on rewarewa tree trunk

 

liana

 

Metrosideros sp. (Plant, Myrtaceae), New Zealand: Endemic

 

Knightia excelsa, rewarewa, (Plant, Proteaceae), New Zealand, Endemic

 

Looking for kokako bird aves

 

Tawa/Rewarewa forest

 

Pongakawa Ecological Area, Lake Rotoehu, Rotorua, Bay of Plenty

 

naturewatch.org.nz/observations/342885

Kalalau valley, Na Pali coast, Kauai

 

Metrosideros polymorpha wikipedia

Metrosideros polymorpha ‘ōhi‘a lehua or lehua tree

 

Order: Myrtales

Family: Myrtaceae

Genus: Metrosideros

 

In the foreground

 

Machaerina angustifolia (uki) in the Cyperaceae (Sedge) family

 

www.hear.org/starr/images/species/?q=machaerina+angustifo...

  

1041708 107

climbing rata vine on rewarewa tree trunk

 

liana

 

Metrosideros sp. (Plant, Myrtaceae), New Zealand: Endemic

 

Knightia excelsa, rewarewa, (Plant, Proteaceae), New Zealand, Endemic

 

Looking for kokako bird aves

 

Tawa/Rewarewa forest

 

Pongakawa Ecological Area, Lake Rotoehu, Rotorua, Bay of Plenty

 

panorama

 

naturewatch.org.nz/observations/342885

Metrosideros polymorpha HEAR

 

Metrosideros polymorpha wikipedia

Metrosideros polymorpha ‘ōhi‘a lehua or lehua tree

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Magnoliophyta

Class: Magnoliopsida

Order: Myrtales

Family: Myrtaceae

Genus: Metrosideros

  

Kilauea

 

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

 

1041308 069

A view up into the crown of a large matai tree being slowing enveloped by a northern rata tree. Northern rata, like strangler figs, can start their lives as canopy epiphytes. Once their roots make ground-fall, they thicken up and envelop their host tree.

climbing rata vine on rewarewa tree trunk

 

liana

 

Metrosideros sp. (Plant, Myrtaceae), New Zealand: Endemic

 

Knightia excelsa, rewarewa, (Plant, Proteaceae), New Zealand, Endemic

 

Looking for kokako bird aves

 

Tawa/Rewarewa forest

 

Pongakawa Ecological Area, Lake Rotoehu, Rotorua, Bay of Plenty

 

naturewatch.org.nz/observations/342885

One of the variegated pohutukawa trees planted around the entrance and carpark of the New Plymouth airport. Some branches were reverted to non-variegated foliage.

Metrosideros polymorpha HEAR

 

Metrosideros polymorpha wikipedia

Metrosideros polymorpha ‘ōhi‘a lehua or lehua tree

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Magnoliophyta

Class: Magnoliopsida

Order: Myrtales

Family: Myrtaceae

Genus: Metrosideros

   

1041708 108

A matai tree in the embrace of a strangling parasite, northern rata.

This looks like Metrosideros perforata. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Kathrin Affeld's rata canopy field work with Chippy Wood

 

Punakaiki

Westland

New Zealand

 

naturewatch.org.nz/observations/342890

A matai tree in the embrace of a strangling parasitic northern rata. Northern rata can start out life as epiphytes high in the canopy of another tree. The northern rata roots eventually reach the ground and they eventually wrap around the unlucky host tree and replace it as it dies and rots away.

  

Wenderholm Regional Park, Auckland, New Zealand

  

Wenderholm Regional Park, Auckland, New Zealand

These two pohutukawa trees on the corner of Hackthorne Road and Macmillan Ave are just starting to flower.

Kingdom: Plantae

(unranked): Angiosperms

(unranked): Eudicots

(unranked): Rosids

Order: Myrtales (Myrtenartige)

Family: Myrtaceae (myrtle family, Myrtengewächse)

Subfamily: Myrtoideae

Tribus: Metrosidereae

Genus: Metrosideros (Eisenhölzer)

 

Metrosideros polymorpha GAUDICH. (ohia, lehua, ohia lehua)

[det. "J.B. Friday", 2013, based on this photo]

 

more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrosideros_polymorpha

  

USA, Hawaii, Big Island: vic. Volcanoes National Park, June 2009

 

RIMG0428

Most commonly a bright to deep crimson red earning this tree the title New Zealand Christmas tree, this yellow form is much less common but is nevertheless naturally occuring. There is quite a variation between individual trees in the timing of flowering, and in the shade and brightness of the flowers. In isolated populations genetic drift has resulted in local variation: many of the trees growing around the Rotorua lakes produce pink-shaded flowers, and the yellow-flowered cultivar Aurea (pictured here) descends from a pair discovered in 1940 on Mōtiti Island in the Bay of Plenty.

 

This tree grows across the steep entranceway to a house a few doors down from my own in Mt Victoria, Wellington.

Metrosideros polymorpha HEAR

 

Metrosideros polymorpha wikipedia

Metrosideros polymorpha ‘ōhi‘a lehua or lehua tree

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Magnoliophyta

Class: Magnoliopsida

Order: Myrtales

Family: Myrtaceae

Genus: Metrosideros

  

Kilauea

 

Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

 

1041308 068

An old Metrosideros tree in the garden of the Sign of the Takahe, coming into bloom. Perhaps it's an out of season pohutukawa, or perhaps a cultivar of foreign Metrosideros.

 

Note the silvereye.

Kathrin Affeld, then a Lincoln University PhD student, now Dr. Affeld, climbing one of her emergent northern rata trees in the Paparoa National Park. She spend her PhD studying all the invertebrate species that live up in the crowns of these trees. Several species (including one genus) were unknown before Kathrin's work.

Lots of scales on a sapling of southern rata, Metrosideros umbellata.

 

From the herbivore list on the PlantSyNZ database, this matches Anoplaspis metrosideri, described by Nicholas Martin as "White scales on leaves of tree ratas, Metrosideros species, often chlorotic areas on leaf; female scale cover white, oystershell-shaped, exuvia brown with dark median area, body and eggs purple-black; male scale cover white, fusiform, exuvia brown."

pohutukawa, Metrosideros excelsa (Myrtaceae), Army Bay

 

Shakespear Regional Park, Auckland, New Zealand

Kathrin Affeld's rata canopy field work with Chippy Wood

 

Punakaiki

Westland

New Zealand

 

naturewatch.org.nz/observations/342890

Kathrin Affeld's rata canopy field work with Chippy Wood

 

Punakaiki

Westland

New Zealnad

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