new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged tanahlottemple

Pura Batu Bolong at Tanah Lot on the Indonesian Island of Bali, one of the most visited locations on this stunningly beautiful island and it's quite easy to see why!

Tanah Lot is a rock formation off the Indonesian island of Bali. It is home to the pilgrimage temple Pura Tanah Lot, a popular tourist and cultural icon for photography and general exoticism. (Source-Wikipedia)

View large on black

 

Tanah Lot Temple or Pura Tanah Lot is one of Indonesia's and Bali's most important and valuable heritage sea temples. Tanah Lot Temple built at the top of a huge rock which is surrounded by the sea. Built by one of the last priests to come to Bali from Java in the 16th century, its rituals include the paying of homage to the guardian spirits of the sea, Sang Dewi Danau. It located about 20 km west of Denpasar on the main highway, one arrives at the town of Kediri. where a large sign at the main intersection announces a turn-off to the southwest to Pura Tanah Lot the famous seaside temple to the south. Part of the temple juts out into the lake and a Buddhist stupa near the outer courtyard bears witness to this temple´s Hindu Buddhist roots. Early mornings are the best time to visit, as clouds or mist soon roll in.

Tanah means earth and Lot means south or sea (usually written Lod thus something like “Temple of the Easth the Sea” is intended. It is actually construct atop a large, jagged outcropping of rock just off the coast. It is accessible only during tide. The temple itself is quite modest Consisting of two shrines with tiered roofs (7 and 3), a few small buildings and two pavilions.

Poisonous black sea snakes live the rocks and in caves along the coast. They guard the temple, but give the site a reputation of being “dangerous.” Nevertheless many Balinese love to sit on the beach or on a bluff overlooking the temple in the late afternoon, watching the tides change and enjoying the silhouettes of the temple meru against the brilliant setting sun.

Like so many other temples in Bali, Tanah Lot Temple is connected with the famous bhrahman priest, Danghyang Nirartha, who wandered from Java to Bali in the 16th century. Do one of his journeys he decided to sleep in this beautiful spot, and then afterwards advised the Balinese to erect a temple here. As mentioned above, this is one of the sad kahyangan or six most holy temples for all of Bali as well as for Tabanan district.

In 1980 the temple’s rock face was starting to crumble and the area around and inside the temple started to become dangerous. The Japanese government then provided a loan to the Indonesia government of IDR 800 billion (approximately USD 130 million) to conserve the historic temple and other significant locations around Bali. As a result, over one third of Tanah Lot's "rock" is actually cunningly disguised artificial rock created during the Japanese-funded and supervised renovation and stabilization program.

 

Tanah Lot Temple, Bali

December 19th, 2009

 

Thank you very much for viewing, and for all your wonderfull comments, awards, and any critiques. I really appreciate it a lot !

See more and follow me at my Facebook page. Thanks a lot for droppin' by. Have a nice day!

When you are in a place that many photographers have already taken images, you need to be creative to make your image unique. This was taken in Tanah Lot temple where many images can be found in the Internet. I have found this spot in the same place and hastened myself to find a better composition using my D800E. Hope you like it! >_<

  

See more at my Facebook page. Thanks a lot for droppin' by. Have a nice day!

View large on black

 

Tanah Lot Temple or Pura Tanah Lot is one of Indonesia's and Bali's most important and valuable heritage sea temples. Tanah Lot Temple built at the top of a huge rock which is surrounded by the sea. Built by one of the last priests to come to Bali from Java in the 16th century, its rituals include the paying of homage to the guardian spirits of the sea, Sang Dewi Danau. It located about 20 km west of Denpasar on the main highway, one arrives at the town of Kediri. where a large sign at the main intersection announces a turn-off to the southwest to Pura Tanah Lot the famous seaside temple to the south. Part of the temple juts out into the lake and a Buddhist stupa near the outer courtyard bears witness to this temple´s Hindu Buddhist roots. Early mornings are the best time to visit, as clouds or mist soon roll in.

Tanah means earth and Lot means south or sea (usually written Lod thus something like “Temple of the Easth the Sea” is intended. It is actually construct atop a large, jagged outcropping of rock just off the coast. It is accessible only during tide. The temple itself is quite modest Consisting of two shrines with tiered roofs (7 and 3), a few small buildings and two pavilions.

Poisonous black sea snakes live the rocks and in caves along the coast. They guard the temple, but give the site a reputation of being “dangerous.” Nevertheless many Balinese love to sit on the beach or on a bluff overlooking the temple in the late afternoon, watching the tides change and enjoying the silhouettes of the temple meru against the brilliant setting sun.

Like so many other temples in Bali, Tanah Lot Temple is connected with the famous bhrahman priest, Danghyang Nirartha, who wandered from Java to Bali in the 16th century. Do one of his journeys he decided to sleep in this beautiful spot, and then afterwards advised the Balinese to erect a temple here. As mentioned above, this is one of the sad kahyangan or six most holy temples for all of Bali as well as for Tabanan district.

In 1980 the temple’s rock face was starting to crumble and the area around and inside the temple started to become dangerous. The Japanese government then provided a loan to the Indonesia government of IDR 800 billion (approximately USD 130 million) to conserve the historic temple and other significant locations around Bali. As a result, over one third of Tanah Lot's "rock" is actually cunningly disguised artificial rock created during the Japanese-funded and supervised renovation and stabilization program.

 

Tanah Lot Temple, Bali

December 19th, 2009

 

Thank you very much for viewing, and for all your wonderfull comments, awards, and any critiques. I really appreciate it a lot !

 

This image also posted at Your Favorite Place Contest | flickr Travel Award

Tanah Lot was founded by the Javanese priest Danghyang Nirartha in the 16th century. Legend has it that he slept on the site one evening, and afterwards suggested that the Balinese build a sacred temple on that spot. The temple is one of the six cardinal temples in Bali that are strung out in a line down the west coast, and on a clear day you can see all the way to another cardinal temple, Pura Uluwatu on the southwestern coast of the Bukit Peninsula. As one of Bali’s many sea temples that are meant to honor the gods and goddesses of the ocean, this is a sacred site that is revered by many Balinese Hindus.

 

© Istvan Kadar Photography

 

See more and follow me at my Facebook page. Thanks a lot for droppin' by. Have a nice day!

Purification Ceremony at Lake Batur in anticipation of Nyepi Day (Silence Day)

Tanah Lot, according to Google is "Land in the Sea' or ‘the small island floating on the sea’. For the Balinese, Pura Tanah Lot is one of the most important and venerated sea temples. This temple is the most visited and photographed temple in Bali. It’s an obligatory stop, especially at sunset.

 

It was low tide during the time we visited and you can walk towards it and roam around. During high tide, they say that you need a boat in order to go to the temple. It was Friday and there are lots of people going to the temple to worship continuously up to 10pm they say.

 

We search for a place where we can position the camera to avoid obstruction and to have a better view of the temple. We found a small lagoon between two huge rocks and use it as the foreground. We use a 90secs exposure to blur the people going into and on the temple. The sun is about to set on the right side of this photo giving it a yellowish tint and on the right a bluish one signaling the end of another day.

Tanah Lot means "Land in the Middle of the sea" in Balinese language.

Bali is an Indonesian island located in the westernmost end of the Lesser Sunda Islands, lying between Java to the west and Lombok to the east. It is one of the country's 33 provinces with the provincial capital at Denpasar towards the south of the island (strictly speaking, the province covers a few small neighbouring islands as well as the isle of Bali).

 

With a population recorded as 3,891,000 in the 2010 census,[2] the island is home to most of Indonesia's small Hindu minority. In the 2000 census about 92.29% of Bali's population adhered to Balinese Hinduism while most of the remainder follow Islam. It is also the largest tourist destination in the country and is renowned for its highly developed arts, including traditional and modern dance, sculpture, painting, leather, metalworking, and music. Bali, a tourist haven for decades, has seen a further surge in tourist numbers in recent years.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia...

 

link to Bali...

It's time to go home, but I'm curious about the blue hour ;-)

In the evening of the 30th we went down to Tanah Lot after a day of driving around the island and seeing various temples, including the Monkey Temple near Ubud. Tanah Lot is the famous island temple just off the coast of Bali, and I was ready to take some serious pictures there! I setup the tripod and took images from various locations around the island.

 

This particular shot I took with my 17-40 lens at a high aperture of f/22. I also used my Cokin 3 stop filter to give some additional time to the exposure. Really happy with the way this one turned out, and judging by the fact it made explore I don't think I'm alone!

Last embers of the day fizzle out over the highly revered balinese hindu temple of Tanah Lot in Bali, Indonesia

Batu Bolong Temple is located in the west side of Tanah Lot Temple which is featured by beautiful panorama with the big hole under the temple. Batu Bolong Temple is also built on the rock with the reef bank and own the small temple yard.

 

Tanah Lot is said to be the work of the 15th century priest Nirartha. The story goes that during his travels along the south coast he saw the rock-island's beautiful setting and rested there. Some fishermen saw him, and bought him gifts. Nirartha then spent the night on the little island. Later he spoke to the fishermen and told them to build a shrine on the rock for he felt it to be a holy place to worship the Balinese sea gods.

 

The temple is one of seven sea temples around the Balinese coast. It was said that each of the sea temples was to be within eyesight of the next so that they formed a chain along the south-western coast.

  

© Istvan Kadar Photography

Tanah Lot is a rock formation off the Indonesian island of Bali. It is home to the pilgrimage temple Pura Tanah Lot (literally "Tanah Lot temple"), a popular tourist and cultural icon for photography and general exoticism.

 

TANAH LOT TEMPLE

Tanah Lot means "Land [sic: in the] Sea" in the Balinese language. Located in Tabanan, about 20 kilometres from Denpasar, the temple sits on a large offshore rock which has been shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide.

 

Tanah Lot is claimed to be the work of the 16th-century Dang Hyang Nirartha. During his travels along the south coast he saw the rock-island's beautiful setting and rested there. Some fishermen saw him, and bought him gifts. Nirartha then spent the night on the little island. Later he spoke to the fishermen and told them to build a shrine on the rock, for he felt it to be a holy place to worship the Balinese sea gods. The main deity of the temple is Dewa Baruna or Bhatara Segara, who is the sea god or sea power and these days, Nirartha is also worshipped here.

 

The Tanah Lot temple was built and has been a part of Balinese mythology for centuries. The temple is one of seven sea temples around the Balinese coast. Each of the sea temples was established within eyesight of the next to form a chain along the south-western coast. In addition to Balinese mythology, the temple was significantly influenced by Hinduism.

 

At the base of the rocky island, venomous sea snakes are believed to guard the temple from evil spirits and intruders. The temple is purportedly protected by a giant snake, which was created from Nirartha's selendang (a type of sash) when he established the island.

 

RESTAURATION

In 1980, the temple's rock face was starting to crumble and the area around and inside the temple started to become dangerous. The Japanese government then provided a loan to the Indonesian government of Rp 800 billion (approximately US$130 million) to conserve the historic temple and other significant locations around Bali. As a result, over one third of Tanah Lot's "rock" is actually cleverly disguised artificial rock created during the Japanese-funded and supervised renovation and stabilization program.

 

TOURISM

The area leading to Tanah Lot is highly commercialized and people are required to pay to enter the area. To reach the temple, visitors must walk through a set of Balinese market-format souvenir shops which cover each side of the path down to the sea. On the mainland clifftops, restaurants have also been provided for tourists.

 

WIKIPEDIA

Tanah Lot is a rock formation off the Indonesian island of Bali. It is home to the pilgrimage temple Pura Tanah Lot (literally "Tanah Lot temple"), a popular tourist and cultural icon for photography and general exoticism.

 

TANAH LOT TEMPLE

Tanah Lot means "Land [sic: in the] Sea" in the Balinese language. Located in Tabanan, about 20 kilometres from Denpasar, the temple sits on a large offshore rock which has been shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide.

 

Tanah Lot is claimed to be the work of the 16th-century Dang Hyang Nirartha. During his travels along the south coast he saw the rock-island's beautiful setting and rested there. Some fishermen saw him, and bought him gifts. Nirartha then spent the night on the little island. Later he spoke to the fishermen and told them to build a shrine on the rock, for he felt it to be a holy place to worship the Balinese sea gods. The main deity of the temple is Dewa Baruna or Bhatara Segara, who is the sea god or sea power and these days, Nirartha is also worshipped here.

 

The Tanah Lot temple was built and has been a part of Balinese mythology for centuries. The temple is one of seven sea temples around the Balinese coast. Each of the sea temples was established within eyesight of the next to form a chain along the south-western coast. In addition to Balinese mythology, the temple was significantly influenced by Hinduism.

 

At the base of the rocky island, venomous sea snakes are believed to guard the temple from evil spirits and intruders. The temple is purportedly protected by a giant snake, which was created from Nirartha's selendang (a type of sash) when he established the island.

 

RESTAURATION

In 1980, the temple's rock face was starting to crumble and the area around and inside the temple started to become dangerous. The Japanese government then provided a loan to the Indonesian government of Rp 800 billion (approximately US$130 million) to conserve the historic temple and other significant locations around Bali. As a result, over one third of Tanah Lot's "rock" is actually cleverly disguised artificial rock created during the Japanese-funded and supervised renovation and stabilization program.

 

TOURISM

The area leading to Tanah Lot is highly commercialized and people are required to pay to enter the area. To reach the temple, visitors must walk through a set of Balinese market-format souvenir shops which cover each side of the path down to the sea. On the mainland clifftops, restaurants have also been provided for tourists.

 

WIKIPEDIA

It's a vast feeling to end a day seeing the sun going down the horizon as it paints the sky with hues and kissing everything with its golden light before saying goodbye.

One of Bali's most important sea temples, Pura Tanah Lot ("Temple of Land in the Middle of the Sea") is a spectacular sight, especially at sunset.

 

The tiny island was formed by the gradual erosion of the ocean tide over thousands of years. The temple of Tanah Lot is said to have been founded by the 16th-century priest Nirartha, one of the last priests to come to Bali from Java.

 

Tanah Lot means "Land in the Sea" in Balinese language.

 

Located in Tabanan, about 20 km from Denpasar, the temple sits on a large offshore rock which has been shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide.

Tanah Lot Temple, Bali Indonesia

Purification Ceremony at Lake Batur in anticipation of Nyepi Day (Silence Day)

We were treated to a cloudy sunset : and it was the clouds and the ocean that set the stage for a magical evening

After taking picture of the Tanah Lot temple, we look for a place from where we can wait and enjoy the sunset that gives color and life to the sky. This was taken near a small cliff towards the sea. Sea sprays and getting wet are common due to strong winds and waves. The platform from where we were standing is actually below sea level. Good thing its low tide and we manage to stand here. There are also ‘sea creatures’ on the ground that is still moving and just waiting for the tides to comeback.

I have taken bracketed shots on this photo to minimize overexposure.

 

Pura Tanah Lot. Bali, Indonesia

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 28 29