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This is Greg. He is a takahē, one of the rarest birds in the world; there's only about 250 individuals left, and this guy was definitely the cheekiest. Unfortunately he died last October from old age (he was around 19), however he is fondly remembered by many people in New Zealand.

 

Takahē were thought to be extinct until 1948 when a small population was found in Fiordland in the South Island. All takahē alive today originate from that small group.

 

Greg lived on Tiritiri Matangi, where there was a bit of an ongoing drama between the different takahē. The story goes like this; Greg had a wife named Cheesecake, and together they had a daughter named Ella. The people who looked after the takahē population wanted a bird for Ella to mate with, so they brought in Te Mingi from Motutapu island. However, as it turned out, Cheesecake fell in love with Te Mingi and they ran off together, leaving Greg all alone. They tried to get them back together, however Greg had no interest in that hussy Cheesecake, and Ella and Te Mingi didn't have any interest in each other either. In the end they let Cheesecake and Te Mingi pair up, and Ella was moved to another island because she and Greg were hanging out too much, and they didn't want to risk them inbreeding. After that, Greg never had another lady takahē. He was forever alone.

 

Latin name: Porphyrio hochstetteri

 

A great 10 minute doco about the discovery in 1948:

www.nzonscreen.com/title/ornithology-notornis-expedition-...

Up close with the Takahe at Zealandia

Te Anau is a town in the Southland region of the South Island of New Zealand. It is on the eastern shore of Lake Te Anau in Fiordland. Lake Te Anau is the largest lake in the South Island and second only within New Zealand to Lake Taupo. The 2013 census recorded the town's population as 1,911. The town has a wide range of accommodation, with over 4,000 beds available in summer.

 

Tourism and farming are the predominant economic activities in the area. Lying as it does at the borders of Fiordland National Park, it is the gateway to a wilderness area famed for tramping and spectacular scenery. Many tourists come to Te Anau to visit the famous nearby fiords Milford Sound and Doubtful Sound. The town is also used as a base for those undertaking the Milford Track and the Kepler Track, the latter being a 4-day loop from Te Anau. Visitors to the area also partake in activities such as kayaking, cycling, jet boat riding, fishing and hunting, farm tours and seaplane/helicopter sightseeing. In 2014, readers of New Zealand's Wilderness magazine voted Te Anau as the best location in New Zealand for tramping (hiking) opportunities.

 

Rising on the west side of Lake Te Anau, the Kepler and Murchison mountain ranges are evident from most of Te Anau. Many species of bird life are also found locally, notably the endangered Takahe which can be found at the Fiordland Wildlife Park. The Department of Conservation office in Te Anau is active in protecting endangered native birds.

 

Te Anau hosts the Kepler Challenge in early December each year.

 

Te Anau is connected by highway with Invercargill to the southeast, Queenstown to the northeast, Gore to the east, and Manapouri to the south. It is at the beginning of the Milford Road, the section of State Highway 94 that leads to Milford Sound, which lies 120 kilometres to the north.

 

A local attraction is the Te Ana-au Caves across Lake Te Anau from the town. The caves include an underground glowworm grotto, which can be viewed from a punt during daily guided tours.

 

Te Anau has two schools; Fiordland College and Te Anau Primary school, a H & J Smith department store and a Fresh Choice supermarket.

 

source: Wikipedia

There are only 250 of these birds left in the world, all are in New Zealand.

The Takahē is a stocky bird, with reduced wings, strong legs and a massive bill.

Its overall length is up to 63 cm (24.8 in) and its average weight is about 2.75 kg (6 lbs), ranging from 1.8-4.2 kg (4-9.2 lbs)

The adult Takahē is mainly purple-blue in colour, with a greenish back and inner wings. It has a red frontal shield and red-based pink bill. The legs are pink. Sexes are similar, the females being slightly smaller, but young birds have mainly pale brown plumage. This is a noisy species with a loud clowp call.

The near-extinction of the Takahē is due to a number of factors: over-hunting, loss of habitat and introduced predators have all played a part.

The Takahē is found in alpine grasslands habitats. It eats grass, shoots and insects.

 

The birds breed very slowly. Most pairs can only rear one chick at a time so the Dept of Conservation staff have been taking away the ‘spare eggs’, that’s the second eggs in the nests and the chicks are reared in a special ‘takahe nursery’. The chicks need to grow up like wild takahe so DOC staff use a takahe puppet to feed them and therefore the chicks don’t get used to people. When they are grown up the captive-reared birds are released back into the Murchison Mountains or onto predator-free islands.

So the future is looking much brighter for our beautiful Takahe.

 

Photographed at Maungatautari.

BattleMech Technical Readout

  

Type/Model: Takahe E

Tech: Clan / 3067

Config: Biped OmniMech

Rules: Level 3, Custom design

 

Mass: 40 tons

Chassis: Endo Steel

Power Plant: 280 XL Fusion

Walking Speed: 64.8 km/h(6 Hexes)

Maximum Speed: 97.2 km/h(9 Hexes)

Jump Jets: None

Jump Capacity: 0 meters

Armor Type: Ferro-Fibrous

Armor Factor: 134 pts (97% of Maximum)

Heat Sinks: 14 Double [28]

Max Heat Buuildup: 26

Armament:

1 ER PPC

1 ER Med Pulse Laser

2 Machine Guns

1 Streak SRM 4

Targeting Computer

 

Ammunition:

Streak SRM4 25 reloads

Machine Gun 100 rounds

  

Calculated Factors:

Total Cost: 8,537,375 C-Bills

Battle Value: 1,606

leicht zu verwechseln mit einem Takahe

A bird once thought to be extinct from 1898 to 1948 and very rare in the wild. This one is at a bird sanctuary in Te Anau. (Taken through wire netting)

Some info en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takah%c4%93

All thirteen Takahe mechs assembled in one place. Back row left to right are the following variants:

Primary, A, B, C, D, E, F

Front row Left to right:

G, H, I, J, K, and Prototype (roadrunner Variant)

Most Excellent Zealandia Night Tour, Takahe

BattleMech Technical Readout

 

Type/Model: Takahe L

Tech: Clan / 3067

Config: Biped OmniMech

Rules: Level 3, Custom design

 

Mass: 40 tons

Chassis: Endo Steel

Power Plant: 160 XL Fusion

Walking Speed: 43.2 km/h (4 Hexes)

Maximum Speed: 64.8 km/h (6 Hexes)

Jump Jets: None

Jump Capacity: 0 meters

Armor Type: Ferro-Fibrous

Armor Factor: 137 pts (100%)

Heat Sinks: 13 Double [26]

Max Heat Buildup: 26

Armament:

4 ER Medium Lasers

2 Ultra AC/5s

Ammunition:

Ultra AC/5 40 rounds

CASE II Equipment

 

Manufacturer: (Unknown)

Location: (Unknown)

Communications System: (Unknown)

Targeting & Tracking System: (Unknown)

  

Calculated Factors:

Total Cost: 6,882,168 C-Bills

Battle Value: 1,197

 

Takahe Valley, Murchison Mountains

A rare flightless bird endemic to New Zealand. Seen on Kapiti Island.

 

(Please feel free to share this image on Facebook, but no other usage without written permission. Thanks.)

Feb 03

1.Pip in charge

2. takahe wanted PIp for lunch, on Tiritirirmatangi Island

Technical Details

Nikon D7000

AF-S NIkkor 18-105mm f/3.5 - 5.6

f/8 1/60sec 35mm ISO 100

Software: Adobe Lightroom v3.6

 

Shot taken from Paekakariki

 

Kapiti Island is a small but conspicuous island about 5 km (3 mi) off the west coast of the lower North Island of New Zealand. It is 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) long, running southwest/northeast, and roughly 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) wide. The island is separated from the mainland by the Rauoterangi channel. The island is the site of Kapiti Island Nature Reserve and adjoins the Kapiti Marine Reserve.

The island is home to a number of native birds (mostly reintroduced), including takahe, kokako, brown teal, stitchbirds, and tieke (saddleback), miromiro, piwakawaka, ruru, weka (hybrid of North and South Island subspecies), hihi, and toutouwai. The brown kiwi and little spotted kiwi were released on the island between 1890 and 1910, and the island is now the stronghold for the latter species.

Takahe juvenile.

With wings like these you are never going to fly!

Lake Te Anau just as we were leaving to head back up north, day six of our fast trip around the South Island with my friends from the UK. November 7, 2013 New Zealand.

 

Te Anau is a town in the South Island of New Zealand. It is on the eastern shore of Lake Te Anau in Fiordland. Lake Te Anau is the largest lake in the South Island and second only within New Zealand to Lake Taupo. The 2006 census recorded the town's population as 1,899. The town has a wide range of accommodation, with over 4,000 beds available in summer.

 

Tourism and farming are the predominant economic activities in the area. Lying as it does at the borders of Fiordland National Park, it is the gateway to a wilderness area famed for tramping and spectacular scenery. Many tourists come to Te Anau to visit the famous nearby fiords Milford Sound and Doubtful Sound. Many tourists also partake in activities such as kayaking, cycling, jet boat riding, fishing and hunting, and farm tours. Many species of bird life are also found locally, notably the endangered Takahe which can be found at the Fiordland Wildlife Park. The Department of Conservation office in Te Anau is active in protecting endangered native birds.

 

Te Anau is connected by highway with Invercargill to the southeast, Queenstown to the northeast, Gore to the east, and Manapouri to the south. Te Anau is the Start of the Milford Road the Highway to Milford Sound, which lies 120 kilometres to the north.

 

A local attraction are the Te Ana-au Caves across Lake Te Anau from the town. The caves include an underground glowworm grotto, which can be viewed from a punt during daily guided tours.

  

Any one interested in following our trip around the South Island.. here is a map: www.wises.co.nz/l/south+island/#c/-45.149671/169.902439/14/

The Takahē (Porphyrio mantelli hochstetteri) is a flightless New Zealand bird from the rail family that was thought to be extinct in 1898. It was rediscovered in 1948 by Geoffrey Orbell near Lake Te Anau. Today, only 225 survive on predator free island reserves. This photo was taken on Tiritiri Matangi Island.

 

There are only 250 of these birds left in the world, all are in New Zealand.

The Takahē is a stocky bird, with reduced wings, strong legs and a massive bill.

Its overall length is up to 63 cm (24.8 in) and its average weight is about 2.75 kg (6 lbs), ranging from 1.8-4.2 kg (4-9.2 lbs)

The adult Takahē is mainly purple-blue in colour, with a greenish back and inner wings. It has a red frontal shield and red-based pink bill. The legs are pink. Sexes are similar, the females being slightly smaller, but young birds have mainly pale brown plumage. This is a noisy species with a loud clowp call.

The near-extinction of the Takahē is due to a number of factors: over-hunting, loss of habitat and introduced predators have all played a part.

The Takahē is found in alpine grasslands habitats. It eats grass, shoots and insects.

 

The birds breed very slowly. Most pairs can only rear one chick at a time so the Dept of Conservation staff have been taking away the ‘spare eggs’, that’s the second eggs in the nests and the chicks are reared in a special ‘takahe nursery’. The chicks need to grow up like wild takahe so DOC staff use a takahe puppet to feed them and therefore the chicks don’t get used to people. When they are grown up the captive-reared birds are released back into the Murchison Mountains or onto predator-free islands.So the future is looking much brighter for our beautiful Takahe.

 

Photographed at Tiritiri Matangi Island.

  

The sky burns over Christchurch: 25 April 2013.

This view is from the lookout at the Sign Of The Takahe, Hackthorne Rd., in the Cashmere Hills.

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