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replacement of earlier, smaller scan. The section relevant to bras , in bottom right hand corner, reads:

"Buste de 30 a 38

16-741, Bandeau d'etoffe "Swaml," [sic] garni de galon fantaisie.

Prix de la vente.......50c."

It's really just a bust flattener - goodness knows what swaml was..

 

Identifier: timbertreesfores01pinc

Title: Timber trees and forests of North Carolina

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors: Pinchot, Gifford, 1865-1946 Ashe, W. W. (William Willard), 1872-1932, joint author

Subjects: Trees Forests and forestry

Publisher: Winston, M. I. & J. C. Stewart, public printers

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

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be excluded from allyoung growth, until it is too large for them to injure. The most valuable trees occurring on the oak flats are the sev-eral species of white oak and the Spanish oak, and forest manage-ment should have for its object the increasing of the proportion ofthese, and preventing the water oaks and other less valuable spe-cies from supplanting them. On large areas where indiscriminate culling has to a greatextent removed ihe species of white oak, less valuable trees havealready followed, and bat little can be done in the way of naturalregeneration to raise the standard. Artificial re-introduction ofthe white oaks is necessary. This can be accomplished by thin-ning the existing wood of the least desirable species or by remov-ing decrepit specimens, and underplanting with acorns, preferablywith those of the swamp chestnut oak, since in the latitude ofthis State that is the most vigorous-growing species and reachesthe largest size on such soils. Or, the swamp chestnut oak or

 

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THE GUM AND CYPRESS SWAMlS. 173 other desired species, can be introduced gradually beneath suchbreaks in the cover as are occasioned from time to time by wind-falls or by cnlling. If the underplanting is done by seeding, and where acorns areabundant or can be cheaply obtained this is the pieferable way,being less expensive than raising young plants in nursery rows andthen transplanting, the acorns should be gathered in the autumn, assoon as they have fallen ; if they are to be kept for spring plant-ing they should be deeply packed iri fresh sand on the north sideof a barn or some other cool situation. If the acorns of the chest-nut oak are allowed to lie on the ground too long after falling,particularly if the w^eather is moist and warm, a great part ofthem will have begun to sprout and then cannot well be kept overwinter. Tlie acorns of this oak are more difficult to keep overAvinter than those of any other, and they retain their germinativepower for the shortest time. For these reas

  

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Identifier: baganda00john

Title: The Baganda

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: John Roscue

Subjects:

Publisher: MacMillian

Contributing Library: Gumberg Library, Duquesne University

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

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d to remove any propert)-, but might onlytake his wives and cattle. But if he was deposed because hehad been accused of some misdemeanour, the King alsocaptured his wives and cattle, provided that he could findthem. The wives and family would at once flee to places ofsafety when they knew that the chief had been deposed ; andthey would take away as much of his property as they couldremove without being caught. W^hen a chief was promotedto a new office, he was required to give up all his possessionsexcept the moveable goods ; nor did he receive any com-pensation, either for buildings or for any improvements whichhe might have made. This system deterred men from plant-,ing trees of slow growth, such as coffee-trees, upon officialestates, because they would not reap any benefit from them ; VIII govp:rnment 239 such trees they planted only upon the freehold estates of theclan. A chief was required to keep his official estates ingood order, or he would be fined and deposed, but the benefit

 

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FIG. -A ROAD AND BRnjGE THROUC^jIf A SWAMl. of any improvements he might make, or of the houses hemight build, was reaped by his successor. Each District-Chief had to maintain in good order a road, Roads andsome four yards wide, reaching from the Capital to his ^^^ Pcountry scat; in some instances, as in the case of Budu, this ^^^ 240 THE BAGANDA chap. road was nearly a hundred miles long. A chiefs country-seat was more like a small town than a village, for there hewas supreme, living in great state, and having a large enclo-sure in which there were often hundreds of women and slaves.In front of his main entrance a wide space was cleared, vary-ing in size according to his rank, but often two hundred yardssquare; this was kept free from weeds or grass. In theprovinces the District-Chief was the principal magistrate, andhe had his sub-chiefs to assist him in trying cases in theirdistricts. The sub-chiefs were independent of the chief in

  

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Identifier: baganda00john

Title: The Baganda

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: John Roscue

Subjects:

Publisher: MacMillian

Contributing Library: Gumberg Library, Duquesne University

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

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FIG. -A ROAD AND BRnjGE THROUC^jIf A SWAMl. of any improvements he might make, or of the houses hemight build, was reaped by his successor. Each District-Chief had to maintain in good order a road, Roads andsome four yards wide, reaching from the Capital to his ^^^ Pcountry scat; in some instances, as in the case of Budu, this ^^^ 240 THE BAGANDA chap. road was nearly a hundred miles long. A chiefs country-seat was more like a small town than a village, for there hewas supreme, living in great state, and having a large enclo-sure in which there were often hundreds of women and slaves.In front of his main entrance a wide space was cleared, vary-ing in size according to his rank, but often two hundred yardssquare; this was kept free from weeds or grass. In theprovinces the District-Chief was the principal magistrate, andhe had his sub-chiefs to assist him in trying cases in theirdistricts. The sub-chiefs were independent of the chief in

 

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FIG. 36.—MAKINC; A BRIDGE AND ROAD IN A SWAMP. managing their own portion of land ; they ordered their mento work upon roads, to bridge swamps, or to build for them ;but they had to consult their District-Chief about mattersconcerning the State and State work. The sub-chiefs werealso appointed by the King and by the Council (Lukiko) totheir office, and they could not be deposed except by theKings consent. Each sub-chief had to keep in good repairthe road from the District-Chiefs residence to his own resi-dence ; thus it was possible to reach all parts of the countrywith comparative ease. The rivers, owing to the growth inthem of papyrus and grass, often formed large swamps, some- VIII GOVERNMENT 241 times several miles wide, and it became necessary to makepaths of raised earth through them, with bridges thrown overthe actual streams. If the streams were too wide for thepeople to bridge, they had to make a long detour till theycould find a place sufficiently narrow to bridge. Sometim

  

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Parida que le hará gracia como muuuuucho a los asturlinuxeros XD

Title: The land of the muskeg [microform]

Identifier: cihm_16172

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Somerset, H. Somers (Henry Somers)

Subjects: Hunting; Chasse

Publisher: London : W. Heinemann

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

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FROM THE ATHADASKA LANDING 19 ran blood from the bites of the bull-doo; flies. As we marched at a foot-pace, we had not made more than five miles by camping-time. On the following morning we made a very early start, and soon passed the ox-train. Charley, the head of the Hudson Bay Company's transport on this road, an old hand at

 

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srUCK IN A SWAMl' the work, drove the horse-wagon and came ahead with us. Here and there we crossed little open meadows, and it was in one of these that the wagon became hopelessly bogged. The team could not draw it out of the mud-hole, so we unhitched the horses and waited for the coming of the oxen. On their arrival we harnessed five oxen

  

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Title: American forests

Identifier: americanforests14natiuoft

Year: (s)

Authors: National Irrigation Association (U. S. ); New Jersey Forestry Association; South Jersey Woodmen's Association; American Forestry Association

Subjects: Forests and forestry -- Periodicals

Publisher: Washington [etc. ] American Forestry Association [etc. ]

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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I0o8 DRAIXIXG THE SWAMl'S 209 However, the constitution is some- times a serious stumbling block to the carrying out of good policies, as it is a safe-guard against the consumma- tion of bad ones. There are many, nevertheless, who believe that both irrigation and drain- age of private lands by Federal agency is a constitutional privilege, if not a duty, of the General Government. Senator Xewlands puts it, that drain- age considered broadly is an inter- state affair in its direct effects, because it influences the flow of interstate rivers; a disturbance of the conditions trend of the times ^ecms U) be to ac- cord more power to the stale thai7 heretofore, and to take into considera- tion broadly the question of general welfare. For instance, the Suj)rcme Court of the State of Maine handed down an opinion during the month, that the State Legislature had a right to prevent forest destruction or waste on private lands. If a legislative body has such a right and power to go on to privately owned landi—and the opinion calls attention to the fact that all lands are originally derived from the State—and t'revent the owner

 

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Swamp scene in Dugdemona Bottom, Louisiana of run-off or drainage in any one lo- cality must aft'ect other localities wide- ly separated, and in the case of drain- age on a large scale the changes caused would be very great. Yet even aside from this phase of the question, the projects and commodities from drainage reclamation would enter in- to interstate commerce; and the Sen- ator holds that upon this broad ground alone the Nation would be warranted in prosecuting the work. \'arious other good constitutional lawyers have stated their belief in the constitutionalitv of such work. The from wasting his timber, a natural re- source, in the interests of the general welfare, it should similarly have a right to go upon private waste lands and make them productive. The fact that in irrigation, as well as in the pro- posed drainage construction, the cost of the Government work is returned to the Government, removes the ob- jection of many legislators wlio look with disfavor ujion annual appropria- tions for internal improvements, the benefits from which come back to the Government onlv indirectlv.

  

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Title: The land of the muskeg [microform]

Identifier: cihm_16172

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Somerset, H. Somers (Henry Somers)

Subjects: Hunting; Chasse

Publisher: London : W. Heinemann

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

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CAMIMNl. IN SWAMl* 87 I) siij)|)()se iina^iiicd. ^cry cold, nd so did 1 journey, iscn con- ; torrent, :ren_nth of liiul much ied down Several lave been away he a swirlino- beat back ;m with a ak(i one's At last, hausted, ty times ohn and 3und the haste to the way n a little wooden was pro- coyottes Is. The man had csideiuK di».'d as he had lived, upon the luiiitinL;- trail, ami had been buried in his deep forests, far from the (Kv(;llin!4s of men. The j;rave seemed pitiful in its lontdiness, but 1 suppose that it was as he would have wished. About midday we descended into an open flat, and, skirting- the climii)s of low bush, came to the jincture of the South I'ine and the main river. We. should nf)w b(; forced to cross to the; northern shore.

 

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'Alion MIDIiW WE l)liS( KNDi;!) 1N10_.\\ OI'KN ir.Al' and we thought it best to take the rivers in detail, crossimj- the south river first, and then turnino; our attention to the main stream, which was smaller and less ra[)id abov(; the conlluence, although still about six hundred feet broad. \\'(^ soon foimd, however, that the horses would be obliged to swim in any case, and as we had no wish to spoil our provisions and ammunition, or lose any of the pack animals, we determined to make a dug-out canoe, I" *7'

  

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