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Surrounded by offices of glass and steel, the historic Sungnyemun Gate is one of Seoul's most iconic landmarks.

Namdaemun, officially known as the Sungnyemun (literally Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul City Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market is next to the gate.

The gate, dating back to the 14th century, is a historic pagoda-style gateway, and is designated as the first National Treasure of South Korea. It was once one of the three major gateways through Seoul's city walls which had a stone circuit of 18.2 kilometres (11.3 mi) and stood up to 6.1 metres (20 ft) high. It was first built in the last year of King Taejo of Joseon's reign in 1398, and rebuilt in 1447, during the 29th year of King Sejong the Great of Joseon's reign.[1]

In 2008, the wooden pagoda atop the gate was severely damaged by arson.[2] Restoration work on the gateway started in February 2010 and was completed in 29 April 2013.[3] It was officially reopened on 5 May 2013, after a five-year restoration period.[4]

Namdaemun, officially known as the Sungnyemun (literally Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul City Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market is next to the gate.

The gate, dating back to the 14th century, is a historic pagoda-style gateway, and is designated as the first National Treasure of South Korea. It was once one of the three major gateways through Seoul's city walls which had a stone circuit of 18.2 kilometres (11.3 mi) and stood up to 6.1 metres (20 ft) high. It was first built in the last year of King Taejo of Joseon's reign in 1398, and rebuilt in 1447, during the 29th year of King Sejong the Great of Joseon's reign.[1]

In 2008, the wooden pagoda atop the gate was severely damaged by arson.[2] Restoration work on the gateway started in February 2010 and was completed in 29 April 2013.[3] It was officially reopened on 5 May 2013, after a five-year restoration period.[4]

Sungnyemun (숭례문) Gate in Namdaemun in Seoul South Korea

숭례문(Sungnyemun)

Treasure of the country Number 1 . Sungnyemun. in korea. Tnx for visit to my page. Tnx a lot ! via 500px ift.tt/1n0MKJC

Another effort at Sungnyemun Gate, this time with the Nikor lens and better weather.

Nikon D600 with 35mm f/2 AF-D lens

Manual

ISO: 100

Shutter: 10"

Aperture: f/14

Focal length: 35mm

Filters: Hoya Pro 1 circular polarizer

Seoul, South Korea

 

Nikon D5300

The newly restored Sungnyemun Gate, the historic southern entrance to Seoul.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Surrounding its namesake gate Namdaemun (Sungryemun, Seoul's historic southern main gate), this traditional market is full of eye candies, sounds, and more. Even with my extremely limited time in Seoul on this day, I must spend some time here.

 

Volunteer tourist information guides are easily identifiable by their red parkas and hats as seen here. They wear badges that indicate which languages they can speak; the two gentlemen in front can speak a Chinese dialect and Japanese, respectively.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Namdaemun, officially known as the Sungnyemun (literally Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul City Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market is next to the gate.

The gate, dating back to the 14th century, is a historic pagoda-style gateway, and is designated as the first National Treasure of South Korea. It was once one of the three major gateways through Seoul's city walls which had a stone circuit of 18.2 kilometres (11.3 mi) and stood up to 6.1 metres (20 ft) high. It was first built in the last year of King Taejo of Joseon's reign in 1398, and rebuilt in 1447, during the 29th year of King Sejong the Great of Joseon's reign.

In 2008, the wooden pagoda atop the gate was severely damaged by arson. Restoration work on the gateway started in February 2010 and was completed in 29 April 2013. It was officially reopened on 5 May 2013, after a five-year restoration period.

Sungnyemun City Gate, Seoul, Korea.

May 2013.

Canon 6D.

 

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Nikon D600 with 35mm f/2 AF-D lens

Manual

ISO: 100

Shutter: 10"

Aperture: f/14

Focal length: 35mm (cropped)

On location with: John Deacon, Kihyun Kim

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... 남대문 or Sungnyemun 숭례문

 

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Sungnyemun is considered the most important historical and cultural treasure in South Korea for its 600-year-old history as well as its symbolic role as protector of the king and capital, which was why it was given the official title of the number one national treasure by the government's Cultural Heritage Administration.

Namdaemun (Hangul: 남대문; Hanja: 南大門, South Great Gate), officially known as the Sungnyemun (Hangul: 숭례문; Hanja: 崇禮門, Gate of Exalted Ceremonies), is one of the Eight Gates in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon dynasty. The gate is located in Jung-gu between Seoul Station and Seoul Plaza, with the historic 24-hour Namdaemun market next to the gate.

Sungnyemun, Seoul, Korea.

May 2013.

Canon 6D.

 

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Facebook

See my photos currently available through Getty Images

Nandaemun Seoul, South Korea

Sony NEX-5

This is Seoul's main southern gate. Its official name is Sungryemun , which I am using for my Korean and Chinese captions, but everyone refers to it as Namdaemun (남대문, 南大門), or Southern Gate, for all practical purposes.

 

It is such a prominent symbol of Korean architecture that it was designated as National Treasure No. 1.

 

Destroyed by arson in 2008, the gate was restored using authentic historical building methods and survey drawings, and re-dedicated in 2013. It's my first time back in Seoul since the restoration, and I'm glad to see it standing again, especially since several years ago, I built a Lego version of this gate at home.

This photo by James Palsgrove, 765th Transportation Railway Shop Battalion (TRSB), shows wounded soldiers being loaded onto a hospital train for transport to the rear. The 765th TRSB, which was part of the 3rd Transportation Military Railway Service (TMRS), operated four hospital trains that traveled between Pusan and the front lines, picking up wounded and sick soldiers at the front and transporting them to hospitals and hospital ships in the rear. Each train was composed of six cars. Jim accompanied the hospital trains to and from the front lines.

 

This photo is especially touching to me because I was in Taekwangni, our last rail station north, during the Battle of White Horse Mountain in October 1952, and witnessed a similar scene of many soldiers wounded in the battle being loaded onto a hospital train. The hospital train was parked in front of the old box car that served as the Taekwangni rail station.

 

I'm indebted to Jim for allowing me to use his photo. I am not able to locate most of the numerous photos I took while in Taekwangni on that trip.

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