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View allAll Photos Tagged stormwater+management

This was taken at the Gregory Casey Stormwater Management Facility on Strandherd Drive in Barrhaven 5 minutes from my house. Thank you to my friend Dev at Devill Photography for telling me about this location.

 

Click twice on the image to enlarge it.

Cattails release their seeds in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. There are several stormwater management areas where wetland flora can thrive in the area.

 

Unfortunately, you can see a gentle scratch that was picked up on the scan of the film. I hate to squeegee my film after processing, since I very frequently damage the film. However, I always seem to keep making the same mistakes anyway. Old habits die hard.

 

Check out an album containing more of my photos shot in 2018.

 

Asahi Pentax Spotmatic 1

Asahi Takumar f4 300 mm lens

 

Manfrotto tripod and ball head.

Metered with a Sekonic L-358.

 

135 format Ilford FP4 Plus 125 ISO film.

 

Scanned using a Nikon Super CoolScan 9000 ED with the FH-835S 35mm strip film tray.

HFF! One of three photos taken while I was on a walk in my Humber Bay Shores neighbourhood today. The heron stands in the Stormwater Management Facility waiting to dive and catch a fish.

 

Thanks for visiting. Stay healthy, safe and hopeful. #BeKind

American Bittern

 

Apparently someone at some point discarded their goldfish in this stormwater management pond. The bird caught five of them (of various colours) in the hour or so that I watched.

The bees were attracted to the Irish-grown, green roof system which has a number of positive impacts on the environment. Not only does the roof promote urban biodiversity, but improves stormwater management by reducing rainwater runoff and enhances overall water quality. The greenery also reduces dust and air pollutants and provides heat insulation, which helps to advance the University’s sustainability goals.

 

The extensive vegetated roofing system is composed of a range of different plant varieties including sedums, small grasses, herbs and flowering herbaceous plants, all which require minimal maintenance. Species in the green roof may include Sedum Acre Aureum, Sedum Album Coral Carpet, Sedum Album Mini, Sedum Hispanicum, Sedum Summer Glory, Sedum Reflexum or Sedum Weihenstephaner Gold.

 

The build-up of the roof includes a reservoir board to store stormwater which is then used to maintain the plants. In the courtyard of the UCD Moore Centre for Business, a pollinator garden will further support the ‘All-Ireland Pollinator Plan’ with pollen-rich flowers and safe nesting sites along the garden edges. In time, the open green space will be used to host student events.

 

A new bicycle park will also feature as part of the outdoor enhancements around the UCD Moore Centre for Business.

  

the UCD College of Business is undergoing a €20m expansion to help grow its facilities to better prepare students for ever-changing work environments. This part of the €65m investment to develop the UCD College of Business strategy announced in 2016.

 

The new UCD Moore Centre for Business will open September 2019, and will feature interactive learning, extensive co-working zones, and a 320-seat lecture theatre.

 

The facility, under construction next to the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business at Belfield, will also include an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Hub, Media Suite, Skills Quarter Support Area, and THINK Lab.

 

_X4A5407bwv3.jpeg

 

The bees were attracted to the Irish-grown, green roof system which has a number of positive impacts on the environment. Not only does the roof promote urban biodiversity, but improves stormwater management by reducing rainwater runoff and enhances overall water quality. The greenery also reduces dust and air pollutants and provides heat insulation, which helps to advance the University’s sustainability goals.

 

The extensive vegetated roofing system is composed of a range of different plant varieties including sedums, small grasses, herbs and flowering herbaceous plants, all which require minimal maintenance. Species in the green roof may include Sedum Acre Aureum, Sedum Album Coral Carpet, Sedum Album Mini, Sedum Hispanicum, Sedum Summer Glory, Sedum Reflexum or Sedum Weihenstephaner Gold.

 

The build-up of the roof includes a reservoir board to store stormwater which is then used to maintain the plants. In the courtyard of the UCD Moore Centre for Business, a pollinator garden will further support the ‘All-Ireland Pollinator Plan’ with pollen-rich flowers and safe nesting sites along the garden edges. In time, the open green space will be used to host student events.

 

A new bicycle park will also feature as part of the outdoor enhancements around the UCD Moore Centre for Business.

  

the UCD College of Business is undergoing a €20m expansion to help grow its facilities to better prepare students for ever-changing work environments. This part of the €65m investment to develop the UCD College of Business strategy announced in 2016.

 

The new UCD Moore Centre for Business will open September 2019, and will feature interactive learning, extensive co-working zones, and a 320-seat lecture theatre.

 

The facility, under construction next to the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business at Belfield, will also include an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Hub, Media Suite, Skills Quarter Support Area, and THINK Lab.

 

www.ucd.ie/newsandopinion/news/2019/september/01/ucdmoore...

 

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My walk continues as i walk alongside the Stormwater Management Facility in Humber Bay Park W. and observe many types of ducks and wildlife. This park is listed as one of the top 13 spots to see birds in Toronto in the City's Birds of Toronto Biodiversity Series booklet, which is available in libraries across the city.

 

"Stormwater management practices help minimize the impact of polluted runoff flowing into lakes and streams, and reduce the strain that stormwater places on municipal infrastructure. Stormwater refers to rainwater and melted snow that flows over roads, parking lots, lawn and other sites in urban areas."

 

Best seen large by clicking on the photo.

 

Thanks for your visits and feedback, much appreciated.

This is a picture of a marsh in an artificial pond which is part of the stormwater management system at Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) in Arnold, Maryland.

the UCD College of Business is undergoing a €20m expansion to help grow its facilities to better prepare students for ever-changing work environments. This part of the €65m investment to develop the UCD College of Business strategy announced in 2016.

 

The new UCD Moore Centre for Business will open September 2019, and will feature interactive learning, extensive co-working zones, and a 320-seat lecture theatre.

 

The facility, under construction next to the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business at Belfield, will also include an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Hub, Media Suite, Skills Quarter Support Area, and THINK Lab.

 

The bees were attracted to the Irish-grown, green roof system which has a number of positive impacts on the environment. Not only does the roof promote urban biodiversity, but improves stormwater management by reducing rainwater runoff and enhances overall water quality. The greenery also reduces dust and air pollutants and provides heat insulation, which helps to advance the University’s sustainability goals.

 

The extensive vegetated roofing system is composed of a range of different plant varieties including sedums, small grasses, herbs and flowering herbaceous plants, all which require minimal maintenance. Species in the green roof may include Sedum Acre Aureum, Sedum Album Coral Carpet, Sedum Album Mini, Sedum Hispanicum, Sedum Summer Glory, Sedum Reflexum or Sedum Weihenstephaner Gold.

 

The build-up of the roof includes a reservoir board to store stormwater which is then used to maintain the plants. In the courtyard of the UCD Moore Centre for Business, a pollinator garden will further support the ‘All-Ireland Pollinator Plan’ with pollen-rich flowers and safe nesting sites along the garden edges. In time, the open green space will be used to host student events.

 

A new bicycle park will also feature as part of the outdoor enhancements around the UCD Moore Centre for Business.

  

_X4A5404BWV

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keeps debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

The bees were attracted to the Irish-grown, green roof system which has a number of positive impacts on the environment. Not only does the roof promote urban biodiversity, but improves stormwater management by reducing rainwater runoff and enhances overall water quality. The greenery also reduces dust and air pollutants and provides heat insulation, which helps to advance the University’s sustainability goals.

 

The extensive vegetated roofing system is composed of a range of different plant varieties including sedums, small grasses, herbs and flowering herbaceous plants, all which require minimal maintenance. Species in the green roof may include Sedum Acre Aureum, Sedum Album Coral Carpet, Sedum Album Mini, Sedum Hispanicum, Sedum Summer Glory, Sedum Reflexum or Sedum Weihenstephaner Gold.

 

The build-up of the roof includes a reservoir board to store stormwater which is then used to maintain the plants. In the courtyard of the UCD Moore Centre for Business, a pollinator garden will further support the ‘All-Ireland Pollinator Plan’ with pollen-rich flowers and safe nesting sites along the garden edges. In time, the open green space will be used to host student events.

 

A new bicycle park will also feature as part of the outdoor enhancements around the UCD Moore Centre for Business.

  

the UCD College of Business is undergoing a €20m expansion to help grow its facilities to better prepare students for ever-changing work environments. This part of the €65m investment to develop the UCD College of Business strategy announced in 2016.

 

The new UCD Moore Centre for Business will open September 2019, and will feature interactive learning, extensive co-working zones, and a 320-seat lecture theatre.

 

The facility, under construction next to the UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business at Belfield, will also include an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Hub, Media Suite, Skills Quarter Support Area, and THINK Lab.

_MG_3921ir850nm

Spherical panorama of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

Spherical panorama of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

Title: Coast watch

Identifier: coastwatch00uncs_7

Year: 1979 (1970s)

Authors: UNC Sea Grant College Program

Subjects: Marine resources; Oceanography; Coastal zone management; Coastal ecology

Publisher: [Raleigh, N. C. : UNC Sea Grant College Program]

Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina

Digitizing Sponsor: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

eliminated, Tius decided to chemically synthesize sarcophytol A in the labora- tory. To synthesize a substance, chemists design and build molecules like archi- tects design buildings. Usually the syn- thesized compound is slightly different from the original, and chemists call these analogs. Tius developed four analogs of sarcophytol A, with all retaining an alco- hol group that he felt held the key to the substance's anti-tumor activity. After testing, two of the analogs proved suc- cessful and were actually more active anti-tumor promoters than the natural sarcophytol A. Despite these successes, drug devel- opment is still a wave of the future. Tius says an even more potent analog is needed before drug development can be contemplated. But he believes that a drug can be developed. "Such a drug would shield a person from developing cancer," Tius says. "People who are in a high-risk group to develop cancer, such as those who have intestinal polyps, are in remission or have a family history of the disease, would be likely candidates for this treatment." N.C. Stormwater Management Conference Stormwater is a universal byproduct of paving and building. Water that runs off streets and parking lots has to be disposed of properly, and it's a planning issue that most local governments grapple with. The latest information in managing stormwater will be presented at the N.C. Stormwater Management Conference, Feb. 17-18, at the Radisson Hotel in Asheville. Among the presentations will be a talk on stormwater education given by Barbara Doll, N.C. Sea Grant's coastal water quality specialist. The conference is sponsored by the Land-of-Sky Regional Council and N.C. Division of Environmental Management to help local government officials de- velop comprehensive stormwater man- agement programs. It will highlight exist- ing and future stormwater regulations and focus on compliance by local gov- ernments. The conference will also be useful to state and federal officials, engineers and project design professionals, homebuild- ers and economic developers, landown- ers, water resource professionals, natural resource managers, environmentalists and concerned citizens. The conference fee is $60 after Feb. 4, and it includes a stormwater manage- ment guidebook, other handouts, two lunches and all breaks. For a registration form, write LOSRC, 25 Heritage Drive, Asheville, NC 28806. Or call 704/ 254-8131 for information. Painting Storm Drains to Clean Up Rocky Branch Creek Sometimes spray painting is more than graffiti. It can be a public service. Environmental clubs at N.C. State University joined a November storm drain stenciling project to heighten awareness of Rocky Branch Creek and reduce the pollution that drains into it. N.C. Sea Grant sponsored the project to stencil about 80 campus drains and catch basins with the phrase, "Don't Dump! Drains To Rocky Branch Creek."

 

Text Appearing After Image:

mmm to mm HMCH CREEK The next phase of the project, di- rected by coastal water quality specialist Barbara Doll, is to expand stenciling to drains in Raleigh and the coast. A priority of this effort is to heighten awareness of rivers, creeks and estuaries and to alert the public that dis- charges into storm drains can pollute these valuable resources, Doll says. After a rain, water and pollutants from streets and sidewalks collect in these drains and travel to nearby waters through a series of pipes that make up the stormwater system. These drains are also commonly misused as dumping sites for paint, grass clippings, street litter, motor oil and other wastes. "Many people either don't consider where these drains go or they assume the drains are connected to the wastewater treatment plant," Doll says. "This type of nonpoint source pollution is a serious problem for most urban lakes and streams." Currently, storm drain stenciling programs are reducing urban water pollu- tion in 31 states. Leading programs are in Virginia and Maryland in the Chesapeake Bay area, New York and Connecticut in areas draining to Long Island Sound and Florida. In North Carolina, Doll and state agencies are working to expand storm drain painting projects. The recent NCSU stenciling project targeted drains on university property in the watershed of Rocky Branch Creek, which drains into the Neuse River via Walnut Creek. Over the years, the creek has been plagued by problems associated with development and urban activities. It was once declared the state's most pol- luted urban stream by the N.C. Division of Environmental Management. Today, it continues to suffer from algal blooms, slimy green algae on rocks, severe sloughing and erosion of the streambanks, damaged culverts and storm drain systems, poor water clarity and surface patches of oil and grease. Doll is working with NCSU to re- pair the environmental damage to the creek. In addition to the stenciling project, she is involved in a larger cam- pus project to stabilize the Rocky Branch streambanks and improve water quality. For more information about storm drain stenciling, contact Doll at 919/ 515-5287 or write her at N.C. Sea Grant, Box 8605, Raleigh, NC 27695-8605. 24 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1993

  

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) Stormwater management at this beach parking lot controls the quantity and quality of the rain and stormwater that runs off the parking lot in Town Neck Beach, Sandwich, MA, on October 10, 2019. The grade of the parking lot brings water into common channels at the ends and intermediate points. It enters a cement basin/channel where the water slows over cement ridges, rocks, and sand layers. The slower cleaner water disperses into the tidal wetlands. The process helps keep debris and sand from entering the wildlife and shellfish habitat.

 

Stormwater Runoff Control (NRCS Conservation Practice 570) provides control of quantity and quality of runoff caused by construction operations at development sites, and by other land-disturbing activities

The purpose of this practice is to regulate the rate and amount of water runoff and sediment from development sites during and after construction operations, to minimize flooding, erosion, and sedimentation. The practice is used when there is a need to compensate for increased peak discharges and erosion resulting from construction operations at development sites or other disturbed areas needing this conservation practice. For more information about this, please see nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1255157.pdf

 

NRCS has a proud history of supporting America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. For more than 80 years, we have helped people make investments in their operations and local communities to keep working lands working, boost rural economies, increase the competitiveness of American agriculture, and improve the quality of our air, water, soil, and habitat.

 

As the USDA’s primary private lands conservation agency, we generate, manage, and share the data, technology, and standards that enable partners and policymakers to make decisions informed by objective, reliable science.

 

And through one-on-one, personalized advice, we work voluntarily with producers and communities to find the best solutions to meet their unique conservation and business goals. By doing so, we help ensure the health of our natural resources and the long-term sustainability of American agriculture.

 

Farm Production and Conservation (FPAC) is the Department’s focal point for the nation’s farmers and ranchers and other stewards of private agricultural lands and non-industrial private forest lands. FPAC agencies implement programs designed to mitigate the significant risks of farming through crop insurance services, conservation programs, and technical assistance, and commodity, lending, and disaster programs.

 

The agencies and services supporting FPAC are Farm Service Agency (FSA), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Risk Management Agency (RMA).

 

NRCS – NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

FPAC - Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

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The Sandhill Cranes were the first audience members for today's announcement at Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge, and they wholeheartedly approve. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6 recognized several groups for their innovative work in environmental justice (EJ). The plan is the first environmental justice strategic plan for a public land site, and aims to serve as a model for other urban public lands.

 

The plan was developed by Los Jardines Institute, Coming Clean, and Friends of Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge using a grant from EPA, as well as a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The groups worked with the Mountain View Neighborhood Association to develop a plan to integrate the needs and mission of the refuge with those of the community. By using surveys and research the groups learned of the community’s environmental concerns, such as stormwater management and water quality, and developed the plan to incorporate those concerns into the development and management of the refuge.

 

The work supports the EJ 2020 Action Agenda, which is EPA’s five-year plan for achieving environmental justice goals. EJ 2020, focuses attention on environmental and public health issues and challenges facing the nation’s minority, low-income, tribal and indigenous populations.

 

Learn more about EJ 2020: bit.ly/2g707aZ

Credit Jessie Jobs/USFWS

A common ornamental grass used here as part of green infrastructure for managing stormwater in Tempe, Arizona, at the north end of the ASU campus.

The Sandhill Cranes were the first audience members for today's announcement at Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge, and they wholeheartedly approve. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6 recognized several groups for their innovative work in environmental justice (EJ). The plan is the first environmental justice strategic plan for a public land site, and aims to serve as a model for other urban public lands.

 

The plan was developed by Los Jardines Institute, Coming Clean, and Friends of Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge using a grant from EPA, as well as a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The groups worked with the Mountain View Neighborhood Association to develop a plan to integrate the needs and mission of the refuge with those of the community. By using surveys and research the groups learned of the community’s environmental concerns, such as stormwater management and water quality, and developed the plan to incorporate those concerns into the development and management of the refuge.

 

The work supports the EJ 2020 Action Agenda, which is EPA’s five-year plan for achieving environmental justice goals. EJ 2020, focuses attention on environmental and public health issues and challenges facing the nation’s minority, low-income, tribal and indigenous populations.

 

Learn more about EJ 2020: bit.ly/2g707aZ

Credit Jessie Jobs/USFWS

The Sandhill Cranes were the first audience members for today's announcement at Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge, and they wholeheartedly approve. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6 recognized several groups for their innovative work in environmental justice (EJ). The plan is the first environmental justice strategic plan for a public land site, and aims to serve as a model for other urban public lands.

 

The plan was developed by Los Jardines Institute, Coming Clean, and Friends of Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge using a grant from EPA, as well as a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The groups worked with the Mountain View Neighborhood Association to develop a plan to integrate the needs and mission of the refuge with those of the community. By using surveys and research the groups learned of the community’s environmental concerns, such as stormwater management and water quality, and developed the plan to incorporate those concerns into the development and management of the refuge.

 

The work supports the EJ 2020 Action Agenda, which is EPA’s five-year plan for achieving environmental justice goals. EJ 2020, focuses attention on environmental and public health issues and challenges facing the nation’s minority, low-income, tribal and indigenous populations.

 

Learn more about EJ 2020: bit.ly/2g707aZ

Credit Jessie Jobs/USFWS

Taken on my walk through the Humber Bay Park West Toronto this morning. It was cold and the water was only partly frozen. So many ducks and 4 swans gathered in the unfrozen area of the Stormwater Management Facility.

 

Thanks for visiting, enjoy each day.

Taken on my walk through the Humber Bay Park West Toronto this morning. It was cold and the water was only partly frozen. So many ducks and 4 swans gathered in the unfrozen area of the Stormwater Management Facility. It was not sunny so this looks like a black and white photo:)

 

Thanks for visiting, enjoy each day.

The other are all lined up to fly! I just went for a walk and captured these birds in flight (series of three shots)

 

Stay blessed and enjoy your day, my friends:) © All Rights Reserved

 

No Usage Allowed in Any Form Without the Written Consent of Judy Meikle

Centennial Drive, Kingston Ontario

North stormwater management pond

Happy Sunday and week ahead to all my Flickr friends,

 

One of two photos featuring ducks taken recently in the Humber Bay Park West. Best seen large by clicking on the photo.

 

Thanks for visiting and for your comments.

I went for a walk yesterday, through the Humber Bay Park West and found a group of photographers with long lenses taking photos of the large group of ducks congregating in the Stormwater Management Facility. So many photo ops! Best seen large by clicking on the photo,

 

Thanks for visiting and enjoy your day.

 

The City of Lenexa in the US state of Kansas has taken a new approach to stormwater management issues in partnership with the local community. Rather than defining stormwater as a problem to solve it now looks upon it as an asset upon which to capitalise. The result has led to an innovatively designed dam and spillway with impressive architectural features.

 

Lake Lenexa dam was completed in 2007 and its design and associated improvements not only provide for flood control and water quality issues, but have also made a valuable addition to the city’s park system.

 

Following major storms and flooding in 1998, the City of Lenexa embarked on a new stormwater management programme called ‘Rain to Recreation’. The programme was an opportunity to take a fresh look at the issue from a more environmentally focused perspective. The objectives of the programme include capturing stormwater in the upstream wetlands and removing sediment to improve water quality. In addition, the programme also focuses on the protection and restoration of the natural environment, and providing recreational and educational opportunities for the community. Hence the idea of turning rain into recreation was born.

 

Standing at 15m high and 244m long, Lake Lenexa dam is located just upstream of a housing development in a part a the city, with a total population of 45,000 residents. The structure is the largest and most visible component of the Rain to Recreation programme which meant that community involvement was a critical component from the outset.

 

‘The community was very involved in the overall decisions about what the dam was going to look like,’ says Scott R Brand, geotechnical engineer from Black and Veatch who oversaw the design and construction of the dam and spillway. ‘An extensive community outreach programme was held with the community to get a consensus on the design aspects of the project.’

 

Due to the high visibility of the scheme, aesthetics played an important role in the design of the dam, bridge and spillway sections. Architectural plans were all coordinated to maximise benefit to the community.

 

The unique layout and principle features of the dam and spillway structure symbolise the cycle of water as it moves from nature into the urban environment and then back to nature. Elements in the design include a curved dam alignment and an ogee spillway. Unusual architectural spillway features include curvilinear spillway walls, a spout structure, landscaping plans, recreational trails and a stilling basin design.

 

The spillway bridge is one of the most interesting architectural elements of the project. It consists of a curved concrete section spanning the spillway just downstream of the ogee spillway and upper basin areas. The bridge has a separate viewing canopy on a cantilevered section supported by drilled piers socketed into the underlying bedrock. The idea is for this to be a focal point of the project where visitors can view the cascading pools and fountains from the pedestrian bridge which spans the spillway.

 

Park and educational facilities surround the dam and reservoir. Stream restoration projects and shoreline improvements have also been made. The effects to downstream habitats were minimised by providing stream flow augmentation.

 

Source: www.waterpowermagazine.com/features/featuredesigner-label...

Taken recently on a walk with Ottavia and Gloria, two ardent Flickr members!! Enjoy your day and keep smiling:)

 

Please click on the photo to see it large in the light box. © All Rights Reserved

Explore #92 on November 18, 2011 - thanks © All Rights Reserved

 

No Usage Allowed in Any Form Without the Written Consent of Judy Meikle

Virginia Key, Key Biscayne, FL

 

Yes, it's that tree again... one of my favorite trees. The shot isn't spectacular but I am happy that my tree is still there. A few weeks ago when I drove over the Rickenbacker Causeway to my horror I had to see that most trees along Hobie Beach and Virginia Key had been cut down and most of the beach areas closed off. It looks horrible. My trees on Hobie Beach and Virginia Key are still standing, but who knows for how long?

 

View On Black

 

I did an internet search and that's what I found:

 

Rickenbacker Causeway Shoreline and Roadway Protection Project

The project is along Rickenbacker Cswy south shoreline areas, located on Hobie Island (to the west) and Virginia Key (to the east), bisected by the Rickenbacker Cswy in Miami, Florida. The scope of work includes three components: 1) shoreline stabilization; 2) stormwater management and parking improvements; 3) exotic vegetation removal and landscaping of upland area.

 

Exotic vegetation removal? Yeah right! They just want more paved parking spots and then probably charge everyone for parking there. That's what I think.

I went for a walk yesterday, through the Humber Bay Park West and found a group of photographers with long lenses taking photos of the large group of ducks congregating in the Stormwater Management Facility. So many photo ops! Best seen large by clicking on the photo,

 

Thanks for visiting and enjoy your day.

 

Stormwater Management System

Humber Bay Park East

Toronto, ON

 

Follow me on Instagram | Find me on Facebook

 

D800 | Nikkor 20mm 1.8G | 1/2000 sec | f5.6 | ISO 160

All Image Rights Reserved to Randy Barba

I went for a walk yesterday, through the Humber Bay Park West and found a group of photographers with long lenses taking photos of the large group of ducks congregating in the Stormwater Management Facility. So many photo ops! Best seen large by clicking on the photo,

 

Thanks for visiting and enjoy your day.

 

Stormwater Management System

Humber Bay Park East

Toronto, Ontario

 

Follow me on Instagram | Find me on Facebook

 

D800 | Nikkor 28-70 2.8D @ 40mm | 1/640 sec @ f5 | ISO 100

All Image Rights Reserved to Randy Barba

Stormwater Management System

Humber Bay Park, Toronto

 

Follow me on Instagram | Find me on Facebook

 

D800 | Nikkor 28-70 2.8D @ 28mm | 1/125 sec @ f7.1 | ISO 100

B+W HTC-Pol

All Image Rights Reserved to Randy Barba

I went for a walk yesterday, through the Humber Bay Park West and found a group of photographers with long lenses taking photos of the large group of ducks congregating in the Stormwater Management Facility. So many photo ops! Best seen large by clicking on the photo,

 

Thanks for visiting and enjoy your day.

 

I went for a walk yesterday, through the Humber Bay Park West and found a group of photographers with long lenses taking photos of the large group of ducks congregating in the Stormwater Management Facility. So many photo ops! Best seen large by clicking on the photo,

 

Thanks for visiting and enjoy your day.

 

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL 6

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

 

This photo shows a common rendition of a raingarden used for primary treatment of stormwater runoff. This particular raingarden is located on campus at the University of Maryland College Park and provides two major ecosystem services. The first service is stormwater management and flood prevention. Precipitation falls into the garden but is also deposited there via drainage channels from the adjacent parking lot and a rain spout which funnels water from the top of the adjacent building. The water then reduces in speed and is given the chance to infiltrate into the ground through the bed of the raingarden whereas it could not on the impermeable surfaces of the roof and parking lot. The ability to infiltrate into the ground is essential to prevent flooding in local waterways because it reduces the amount running off into said waterways. After infiltration the precipitation joins the groundwater supply, helping to sustain the freshwater supply in the area. The second major ecosystem service provided by the raingarden is the filtering and partial sanitation of the water that passes through it. As the water infiltrates and passes trough the layers of soil in the raingarden, the dissolved nutrient ions in the water are available for uptake by plant roots while larger organic compounds are caught in the soil and used by soil microbes. By the time the water has passed through the biofilter which is the raingarden and entered the groundwater, the pollutant and nutrient load has been reduced significantly and the water will be available for use in the future.

HFF to all my Flickr contacts! Thanks for your visits and comments:) Enjoy today and stay blessed:)

Lady Beetles (Harmonia dimidiata, Coccinellidae)

 

"The conservation of insects is not a priority for most urban dwellers, yet can be accomplished in urban settings by the careful design of urban nature."

 

"In creating designs for the built environment, landscape architects alter and create habitats. In each design, there is opportunity for conservation, stewardship, and restoration."

 

"Ecological site design is based in principles of sustainability and so must address the well being of humans and nature simultaneously. This powerful approach for insect conservation is illustrated in examples from around the world focusing on roadway-easement corridors, stormwater management areas, and greenrooms."

 

(excerpts from Designing for Conservation of Insects in the Built Environment)

 

All the planning and research in the world will not prevent the insects reinhabiting what they have lost and what was rightfully theirs.

 

Synanthropes is a term applied to species of wild animals and plants of various kinds that live near, and benefit from, an association with humans and the somewhat artificial habitats that humans create around them. Those habitats include houses, gardens, farms, roadsides, garbage dumps, and so on.

 

Anthropophilia means a preference for humans and is typically used to describe parasites or dermatophytes which prefer humans over other animals. Endophilia refers specifically to a preference for being in human habitats, especially inside dwellings. The term zoophilia describes animals which prefer non-human animals for nourishment.

Whereas synanthropic refers to organisms that live close to human settlements and houses, eusynathropic is used to describe those that actually live within human housing.

 

Pu'er, Yunnan, China

   

Clasping coneflower in bloom in the stormwater management prairie at McConnell Air Force Base in Kansas. This prairie was seeded with 100% native plants to help lower maintenance costs and absorb stormwater to curb stream erosion.

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