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METZ - Place Saint Louis - France - ( best viewed on black )

the 15th century St. Louis Square with vaulted gallery and arches.

these arches sheltered in this period bankers and stockbrokers.

 

Metz, sous les arcades de la Place Saint Louis, datant du 15ème siècle.

ces arcades abritaient à l'époque banquiers et agents de change.

The Bow Valley Ranch is one of my very favorite places in Fish Creek Park, and I have been visiting it my whole life. I have always lived within either walking or biking distance of it, and it is such a beautiful place; a grand old house and outbuildings that you can get guided tours through the interiors of, incredible environs, a cool and educational visitor centre with a little mini-museum of Fish Creek Park in it, many paths to various amazing spots branching off from this location, and, of course, all the awesome local history associated with the site.

 

The history of the Ranch House and area, courtesy of www.bowvalleyranche.com:

 

While native people probably hunted in the Bow Valley as early as 1,000 years ago, white men arrived in this region only recently. The earliest European explorers reached the foothills of the Rocky Mountains about the middle of the eighteenth century; as far as is known, the first white man to set eyes on the Bow River was David Thompson, who visited the confluence of the Bow and the Elbow in 1767. Following the explorers came a slow trickle of fur traders, and following them came the missionaries.

 

It was not until the 1870's that the first homesteader established a permanent farm in the Bow Valley area. The homesteader was John Glenn, an experienced farmer, trapper, and prospector, who had searched for gold in California and the Cariboo and traveled through much of the West before coming to the Bow River country. The homestead he chose - an ideal site where Fish Creek joins the Bow - "had everything a settler could desire".

 

It was with John Glenn that the history of Bow Valley Farm began. Glenn built a log house and barns, and cleared nine acres of land. He also set up an irrigation system, the first in Alberta - on the bottom twenty-one acres of his farm. The rich glacial silt produced good crops, up to 220 bushels of potatoes per acres. By 1879 he was comfortably established.

 

Two years earlier, in 1877, the Blackfoot Confederacy, along with the Sarcee and Stony tribes, signed a treaty with the federal government. By the terms of the agreement Treaty No. 7, as it was called - the Indians exchanged large tracts of land for cash payments and reserves of approximately one million acres. The government also agreed to teach the native people how to farm their land.

 

John Glenn's homestead was purchased by the government as an instructional farm, for $350, a cow and a calf. A superintendent, John Lyman, was hired to teach the Indians, and the produce grown was distributed to the Indians living on the reserves in the area. After several years the instructional program was phased out, and the government decided to re-sell the property.

 

The new purchasers were William Roper Hull, who later became one of Calgary's most prominent citizens, and his brother, John Roper Hull. In 1883, the Hull brothers were driving 1,200 head of horses from Kamloops via the Crowsnest Pass to Calgary. Impressed with the country, they decided to become permanent residents. First securing a contract with the Canadian Pacific Railways to be the sole suppliers of beef to the railway gangs in British Columbia, they quickly expanded their operation until they had a chain of fifteen butcher shops. Needing facilities for finishing cattle for slaughter, they offered to buy the 4,000-acre Government Supply Farm - as the Bow Valley Ranche was then called - for a rumored price of $30,000.

 

The Hulls made numerous improvements, including the replacement of the original log house with a two-story brick ranch house. Charlie Yuen was hired to "do odd chores and feed the crew". Under his supervision, the ranch became a showplace that welcomed many local and foreign visitors.

 

With the developing community, land use changed from farming to ranching. In 1902, the Hulls' farm was purchased by Patrick Burns, a leading Calgary rancher and meat-packer. Burns also acquired adjacent sections of land, as they became available. Eventually the Burns Ranch included some 20,000 acres bounded on the north by what is now Stampede Park, on the east by the Bow River, on the south by 146th Avenue, and on the west by MacLeod Trail - a large property by any standards, but only a small segment of Pat Burns' 450,000 acre ranching empire.

 

Patrick Burns was one of the major forces behind the growth of ranching in Alberta. He purchased large herds of purebred Hereford stock, which he used to help fellow ranchers improve the blood lines of their own cattle. A pioneer of cold-weather ranching, Burns put up 250,000 tons of hay for winter feed, and convinced other ranchers to utilize winter feeding methods themselves. He renovated the corrals and feeding pens on his ranches, and also introduced modern feed-lot techniques to finish cattle for market. Charlie Yuen continued to welcome and personally supervise the comforts of any visitor to the ranch.

 

Special mention should be made of Patrick Burns' interest in conservation. Recognizing the value of the trees in Fish Creek Valley, he directed his foreman to erect fences around the groves of aspen and poplar as protection from the cattle. They also planted some 2,000 poplar along the MacLeod Trail adjacent to Bow Valley Ranch.

 

After Patrick Burns' death in 1937, his nephew and business successor Michael John Burns came to live in Bow Valley Ranche House. Under his supervision, the ranching operation continued to prosper and he also preserved the established tradition of true western hospitality remembered by many Calgarians.

 

In failing health, Michael John Burns moved to Calgary in 1950, and his son Richard T. J. Burns came to live at the ranch. Under his management, many more improvements were made, including the construction of a tennis court, a swimming pool, and a one-story addition to the Ranch House. Richard T. J. Burns lived at the site until 1970. Between 1970 and 1973, The Ranche House was leased to Robert Peters, a Calgary stockbroker.

 

In 1973, acting on citizens' interests, the Provincial Government purchased some 1,400 acres of the Bow Valley Ranche along Fish Creek from MacLeod Trail to the Bow River, as well as other land adjacent to the Bow. On June 29, 1975, the Hon. Peter Lougheed dedicated what is now the eastern part of Fish Creek Provincial Park as "a park for all people".

 

In 1995, local residents, Larry and Mitzie Wasyliw recognized this pivotal landmark of Canadian history and established The Ranche At Fish Creek Restoration Society, with a mandate to restore the the Bow Valley Ranche to its original turn of the century grandeur. The Foreman's House was first restored in 1997 and The Ranche House restoration was completed in 1999. The Native Gardens, occupying the area between these two buildings was opened in 2000.

 

I am so happy that I was able to get out here this year with a proper camera and do it the justice it deserves!

 

Color version to come soon, as well!

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) building, located at 11 Wall Street, was built in 1903 to the Classical Revival design of George B. Post. The ten story main façade features a allegorical marble sculpture in the pediment, above six tall Corinthian capitals, called “Integrity Protecting the Works of Man," designed by John Quincy Adams Ward and executed by Paul Wayland Bartlett.

 

The New York Stock Exchange itself traces its history back to 1792 and New York Stock & Exchange Board, which was started with the Buttonwood Agreement—which was signed by 24 stockbrokers outside of 68 Wall Street. The agreement set floor commission rates and bound the signers to each other in security sales, eliminating the auctioneers. The organization drafted a formal constitution in 1817 and in 1863 shortened its name to the New York Stock Exchange before moving into a John Kellum signed building at 12 Broad Street in 1865, before settling into its current location at the turn of the century.

 

The New York Stock Exchange was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1985.

 

National Register #78001877 (1978)

 

Several years ago I watched the inspiring film Mao’s Last Dancer. This adaptation of a best selling autobiography is a true story about the remarkable life of Li Cunxin. Born into a peasant family in an impoverished village in China, Li went on to become one of the world’s most famous dancers.

 

After dancing for the Houston Ballet for sixteen years he fell in love with an Australian ballerina and moved to Melbourne. Becoming the principal dancer with the Australian Ballet, Li later began to live a double life as both a dancer and a stockbroker. In Li’s next chapter, he left dance behind and rose to become a senior manager at one of the largest broking firms in Australia. Until now…

 

After a fifteen-year absence from ballet, Li has just returned as the newly appointed Artistic Director of Queensland Ballet.

 

Enter Alexia! ... continue reading at alexiasinclair.com/queensland-ballet

 

Strobist Info:

Key: 7' Octa on a boom just out of frame top right.

Window: Beautydish on C-Stand outside window at 1.5 stops above key.

Rim: Umbrella behind toys out of frame to the left, about 2-2.5 stops below key.

Trigged: via pocket-wizards

 

Props:

Snow is made from Styrofoam, it's typically used in stage productions. I wanted it to look very set like. The cardboard ring boxes were made by hand, and I illustrated the nutcracker drawing in photoshop, printed it via large format printer and then spray adhesive to the lids of the boxes.

 

The ribbon was also hand made by me, I needed it to hold it's shape so I sewed fencing wire into the edges of the ribbon so it could be shaped on set.

 

Behind the Scenes video - alexiasinclair.com/queensland-ballet-2013-behind-the-scenes

© All rights reserved.

Went down to the city last night as there was some students riots going on in the west-end. Managed to get quite a few shots before being stopped - then released by police - just doing routine checks but annoying all the same.. This is down at Bank Circus looking back at the city, I'll label a few buildings for you :)

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Here's my BLOG on LightStreams.. it's part fun part tutorial so you might find something interesting in there.. Here's the link again..

ray-wise.blogspot.com/2011/10/light-stream-photography.html

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Flickr Interesting | www.raywise.co.uk | Twitter | Blog | Facebook

My books; London Lights | Golden Hours

Rodmarton Manor looks as if it might belong to the 16th century yet this curving, multi-gabled residence was built in the 20th century, between 1909-1929. The architects were Ernest and Sidney Barnsley who were based in nearby Sapperton and specialised in Arts and Crafts design. The house was built for wealthy stockbroker Claud Biddulph and his wife Margaret who filled the house with specially commissioned furniture. They also created what many regard as the finest Arts and Crafts garden in England, a design dominated by massive yew hedges and extravagant topiary.

 

I first went to Rodmarton in 1999, the year the Biddulph Family began opening to the public. Our second visit, in September 2014, revealed a house and a garden in a state of serious neglect, though the hedges and topiary are still maintained. Few gardens in England are as romantic or as atmospheric as Rodmarton - it just needs a fortune to restore it.

Biography:

Why do we prefer one image over another? This is the question that motivates me and keeps me coming back for more.

 

After graduating from The Ohio State University with degrees in Economics and International Studies, I worked as a stockbroker for two years before realizing that dollar signs and decimal points did not inspire me the way photography could. I wallpapered my cube with editorial images and realized I needed a change. In 2002, I moved to San Francisco to pursue my passion for photography and learn the skills required of all great image-makers.

 

I draw inspiration from a game- and toy-crazed youth – playing with Legos, Star Wars action figures, and G.I. Joe characters. During adolescence, my imagination ran wild as the Dungeon Master for our neighborhood group's Dungeon & Dragons games.

 

The images presented in this collection, titled "Hero Collective," blend traditional and modern photographic techniques to create something truly original. This series imagines the world of art toys at play. What would they be doing if left unattended?

 

Combining realistic environments with pop culture icons, these images exemplify the cumulative outcome of millions of decisions by artists and designers around the world. These characters exist in their own narrative and now in mine.

 

For the past 15 years, I've been learning how to see. The camera helps me focus.

 

CCSF Photography and You:

I loved my experience at CCSF and some of the people I met there have become life-long friends.

 

Bob McAteer was my first instructor and his "Introduction To Lighting" class was so helpful and fun. He is an excellent teacher who encouraged me to continue learning. In his class, I met other photography assistants who helped me begin freelance photo assisting. Holman Turner's "Portraiture" class and his "Business Marketing" workshop were inspirational, and provided a solid foundation for my success today.

 

In addition to the photography classes, I enrolled in two Photoshop classes. I was able to transition from freelance assisting, to full-time Photo Retoucher at Pottery Barn, where I worked for 6 years before moving on. I currently work as a production artist at Apple Inc.'s Screen Team, designing UI for iOS devices, retouching lifestyle photography, and illustrating hardware, cases, and packaging.

 

I think back to my City College night classes and am thankful for everything I learned and the people I met. City College helped me develop my vision and enabled me to have a fulfilling career. I will always be thankful for the opportunities I've been given and the people who helped me along the way.

Looking very English in his bowler hat

 

19 of my '50 by 50' A day late ~ sorry!

 

Better on black

André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.[1][2]

 

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazines, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France's first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

 

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Kert%C3%A9sz

Ringwood State Park is a 5000-acre (20 km²) state park in Passaic County in northeastern New Jersey, USA. The Park is located in the heart of the Ramapo Mountains in Ringwood. Its forests are part of the Northeastern coastal forests ecoregion.[1]

It contains the New Jersey Botanical Garden at Skylands, historic Ringwood Manor and Skylands Manor, and the Shepherd Lake Recreation Area. The park is operated and maintained by the New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry.

Skylands Manor, a forty-four-room English Jacobean mansion, was designed in the 1920s by John Russell Pope for Clarence McKensie Lewis, a wealthy stockbroker and civil engineer. The gardens were established by lawyer Francis Lynde Stetson, who owned Skylands from 1891 to 1922. The 96-acre (390,000 m2) botanical garden contains a variety of plants, evergreens and deciduous trees and shrubs. The landscaping includes a crabapple vista, terraced gardens, perennial and annual gardens and woodland paths. The extensive gardens offer views of the Ramapo Mountains. Skylands Manor is open for tours one Sunday per month March through November.

 

Ringwood Manor was home to a number of well-known ironmasters from the 1740s to the late 19th century. During the American Revolution, Robert Erskine managed ironmaking operations from Ringwood, and became George Washington's first geographer and Surveyor-General, producing maps for the Continental army; Washington visited the Manor House several times. Ringwood iron was used in the famous Hudson River Chain, and for tools and hardware for the army. One of the Manor's last owners was Abram S. Hewitt, ironmaster, educator, lawyer, U.S. Congressman, and mayor of New York City. The Manor is part of a National Historic Landmark District and is open for tours from Wednesday through Sunday year round from 10 am to 3 pm.

 

The Shepherd Lake Recreation Area is centered on 74-acre (300,000 m2), spring-fed Shepherd Lake. Swimming, boating (electric motors only) and fishing are permitted, and boat rentals are available. A network of trails maintained by the New York - New Jersey Trail Conference surrounds the lake; some are multi-use trails, and may be used for hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, cross country skiing or snowmobiling. A 7.5-mile (12.1 km) mountain bike loop, maintained by the Jersey Off Road Bicycling Association, is especially popular.

Shepherd Lake also operated as a ski area during the '60s and included a rope tow and double chairlift. Hiking to the top of the hill will reveal the top station and bullwheel of the chairlift. The old ski slope is now mostly overgrown. Sledding used to be permitted on the lower half but is no longer allowed due to the safety hazard of sledding into Shepherd Lake. Sledding is still available in the park on two hills in the Ringwood Manor section.

Die Casa Vicens in Barcelona ist ein bekanntes Werk des katalanischen Architekten Antoni Gaudí.

Die Kommission wurde in den Jahren 1883-1885 für Manuel Vicens i Montaner, ein wohlhabender Börsenmakler erstellt.

 

The Casa Vicens in Barcelona is a well-known work of Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí.

The commission was created in the years 1883-1885 for Manuel Vicens i Montaner, a wealthy stockbroker. (Wikipedia)

André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.[1][2]

 

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazines, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France's first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

 

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Kert%C3%A9sz

'A stockbroker urged me to buy a stock that would triple its value every year. I told him, ''At my age, I don't even buy green bananas."' - Senator Claude D. Pepper

 

I really never have been a forward-thinker at any age. A prof once asked us where we wanted to be in five years. I realized I had no idea. When a co-worker showed me Windows 3.1, I thought it nonsensical to need to multitask. I never see the future. I mean, really did you imagine that people would pay money for water in plastic bottles or never be without a cell phone in their hands?

  

odc: future

It’s obvious that this is a flawed shot that dammed pole breaks up the composition. Choices: throw it away just cannot do it, airbrush it out no idea how to and no inclination. Maybe a heavy crop but then I would lose some of the subjects. Decision: show it as it is. I rather like the expressions on the faces particularly the girl with a blue dress. So I crave your indulgence

I will be away from a computer this weekend heading down to London to join a demonstration against this government’s savage attack on public services. I ask you this...... if there is a flood fire or terrorist incident who deals with it , bankers and stockbrokers? I think not...its public servants. Also while I am on the soap box a message of solidarity with trade unionists in the State of Wisconsin who are having their rights to belong to trade unions removed. You cannot fight for freedoms around the globe and deny your own citizens their basic human rights.

www.amnesty.org.uk/news_details.asp?NewsID=19332

See you all next week

 

THANKS FOR YOUR VISIT HAVE A GREAT DAY

To see keithhull's Most Interesting Photos on Flickriver

 

André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.[1][2]

 

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazines, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France's first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

 

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Kert%C3%A9sz

My Blog | My website | Facebook Page | Twitter

 

The Royal Exchange was officially opened on 23 January 1571 by Queen Elizabeth I who awarded the building its royal title and licence to sell alcohol.[1] During the 17th century, stockbrokers were not allowed in the Royal Exchange because of their rude manners, hence they had to operate from other establishments in the vicinity, such as Jonathan's Coffee-House. Gresham's original building was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. A second complex was built on the site, designed by Edward Jarman, and opened in 1669, but was also destroyed by fire on 10 January 1838.[2] It had been used by the Lloyd's of London insurance market, which was forced to move temporarily to South Sea House following the 1838 fire.

  

A statue inaugurated in 1844 of the Duke of Wellington outside the Royal Exchange.

The third Royal Exchange building, which still stands today, was designed by William Tite and adheres to the original layout – consisting of a four-sided structure surrounding a central courtyard where merchants and tradesmen could do business. The internal works, designed by Edward I'Anson in 1837, made use of concrete — an early example of this modern construction method.[3] It features pediment sculptures by Richard Westmacott (the younger), and ornamental cast ironwork by Henry Grissell's Regent's Canal Ironworks. It was opened by Queen Victoria on 28 October 1844, though trading did not commence until 1 January 1845.

In June 1844, just before the reopening of the Royal Exchange, a statue of Arthur Wellesley, the first duke of Wellington, was inaugurated outside the building. It was sculpted from enemy cannon captured during Wellington's victorious battles.

Paul Julius Reuter established the Reuters news agency at No. 1, Royal Exchange Buildings (opposite and to the east of the Royal Exchange) in 1851. It later moved to Fleet Street.

In 1892, scenes from London's history were painted on the first-floor walls by artists including Sir Frederick Leighton and Sir Frank Brangwyn.

With the outbreak of the Second World War, trading at the Royal Exchange virtually ended. At the War's end, the building had survived the Blitz, albeit with some near misses.

Modern use

  

In 2001 the Royal Exchange was once again extensively and sympathetically remodelled by architects Aukett Fitzroy Robinson with the result that today it is an appropriate home for many of the world's finest merchants. Reconstruction of the courtyard created new boutiques and restaurants to compliment the existing retailers on the perimeter. The Royal Exchange is now a luxurious retail centre with shops, cafes and restaurants. Shops include Boodles, Hermès, Haines & Bonner and Tiffany & Co. In 2003 the Grand Café and Bar was launched and completed the building as a destination with both luxury retail outlets and sophisticated dining options in the heart of the City.

In Royal Exchange Buildings, a lane by the eastern entrance to the Royal Exchange, stands two statues: one of Paul Julius Reuter who founded his news agency there, and one of George Peabody who founded the Peabody Trust.

The Royal Exchange is currently owned by the Irish Bank Resolution Corporation and Alanis Capital, the property vehicle of the McCormack family of Ireland. In 2013 it was announced that the site would be sold with a 104-year lease. The sale is expected to fetch £80 million

 

Above info from wiki

André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.[1][2]

 

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazines, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France's first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

 

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Kert%C3%A9sz

Around the turn of the twentieth century journalist Charles Birch Crisp stood unsuccessfully for the Oldham two-member seat in parliament alongside a successful young Winston Churchill. He then established himself first as a stockbroker and soon after as a financier.

 

By 1912, at the age of forty-four Crisp was profiled in the 'Financial News', having arranged a £10 million pound loan for the Chinese Government, as 'a new and potent factor in international finance', and 'absolutely in his prime' with 'no saying where he will go if his life is spared in health and strength for the next twenty years'.

 

Two years earlier Crisp had bought a small 1865 country house, Moor Close, in Binfield, Berkshire and within months he had commissioned a twenty four year old Oliver Hill, first to transform the house and then to create a new garden, dedicated to his new daughter Sylvia.

 

Hill enlarged the property in Jacobethan style with Lutyens influences and with a battlemented tower; the garden featured staircases, pools and pavilions and was influenced by the style of Gertrude Jekyll.

 

The 'Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser' in another 1912 profile of Crisp stated: 'If the truth were told, his heart is in his Berkshire estate and in the beautiful country house which he has designed and built to please himself. His house is on a hill and its great spacious windows gratify his love of broad views to every point of the compass. From the roof he can see all around him. And that is the nature of the man - free, unfettered, far ranging, yet homely and healthy'.

 

Moor Close was Hill's first independent architectural commission and he went on to become a prominent architect in the thirties and forties.

 

The 'Financial News' prophesy for the future of Charles Birch Crisp for the next twenty years proved reasonably accurate, but by the end of the 1920s he was experiencing financial problems, and by 1938 his creditors repossessed the property and his house and gardens fell into decline.

 

Today Moor Close is a college operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Most viewed collage for March 2011.

BEST SEEN LARGE.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepperpot,_Godalming

Just a beautiful and smartly dressed young Mum caring for her child as she takes a leisurely walk down the High Street looking in all the Clothes/Fashion shops this prosperous town has. They are mainly 'hobby shops' being owned by the many well-to-do stockbrokers whose wives wish to sell fancy goods to all their equally wealthy friends. Well it does keep them off the streets, I suppose. Mary Portas would have a field day!

30/08/18 Today this picture became my 43rd to reach 100,000 views. I knew that red dress would attract a lot of attention.

There may be other W123 CE Coupes that have been chopped, Crayford did some, among other coach builders but none are like this one.

In 1988 a Swedish stockbroker had a hankering for a 4/5 seat Mercedes convertible with power hood, no such car existed of course, the only car MB built was the SL which failed on two out of three counts.

So the gentleman approached a certain Mr Leif Mellberg, "Who?" I hear you ask..Among other things Mellberg built the EV-1 SAAB concept car of 1985 and in 1984 the SAAB Speedster-a heavily restyled 900 with convertible top,

Speedster - www.saabclub.gr/history/modelhistory/modelspeedsterimages...

EV-1 - hooniverse.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/ev1.jpg

So, who better to talk to?

Mellberg was supplied the 1980 Merc 280 CE Coupe, and took it apart, chopped the roof off and fitted a bespoke power hood. It didn't stop there though, he also fitted electric windows, full leather seating-all heated, wood trim, bespoke interior lighting, cruise control and a new stereo. The chrome bolt on wires were added at the same time along with the extra chrome, the whole lot was topped off with a new coat of metallic blue, a lovely shade I think. the stockbroker was then handed a bill for £21000, nearly double the price of the original car.

The car was put away just two years later after problems in the stock market led to financial trouble for the owner and it didn't surface again until 1995. To date the car has covered just 30000 miles.

I think you'll agree, it's simply stunning.

André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.[1][2]

 

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazines, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France's first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

 

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Kert%C3%A9sz

The Pavillion

 

For a prime site on the Low Green facing over the Firth of Clyde the Corporation of Ayr held an architectural competition in 1904 to design a Pavilion which would express the prosperity of Ayr and its position as one of the main holiday resorts on the Clyde coast.

The winning architect was James Hunter Kennedy and the stylish Pavilion opened in 1911, complete with its long narrow auditorium and horseshoe gallery, seating 1200 in total (now some 600), and promenade accommodation for 1300 more, with refreshment and retiring rooms. Set in promenade gardens, with putting greens adjacent, it has tall elegant Italianate towers at each corner. A Winter Garden fronting it (but dismantled in the 1970s) provided lunches and teas, and a place to change after enjoying the Green or beach.

 

Ben Popplewell took over the lease in 1913. He was a stockbroker who made money from running music hall entertainments in Bradford`s Frizinghall Pavilion, the name he gave to the former concert hall of the 1904 Bradford Exhibition, after dismantling and re-siting the building. In the Ayr Pavilion he presented a whole range of performers including Harry Lauder, Florrie Forde and Fred Karno. The theatre gained a reputation as the "house that rocks with laughter".

 

In 1918 the lease was taken over by the Collins Variety Agencies of Glasgow until 1922 when they started developing their own circuit of theatres, most notably the Pavilion Theatre, Glasgow, the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh and the Shakespeare Theatre, Liverpool. Fred Collins added a whole range of new artistes including a young Tommy Morgan and Dave Willis. Ben Popplewell came back to Ayr and by agreement with Collins resumed the lease. Three years later he bought the Gaiety and concentrated variety there, but continued the family`s interest in the Pavilion into the 1960`s.

 

For four seasons, starting in 1926, the Charlie Kemble's Entertainers were the summer residents. During the 1930`s it served as a dance hall and concert venue. When America entered WWII the US Air Force took over Prestwick airport in 1943, making it their largest and busiest air base in Britain, and they brought a special wood from America to lay a new dance floor in the Pavilion. After the war ice skating seasons were introduced. Dances remained popular, including outdoors dancing. In the 1950s and 60s jazz bands from all over Britain entertained the dancers. To be followed by rock bands.

 

In 1974 the scenery grid and stage were restored, and the balcony refurbished, by Ayr Intimate Opera, allowing their productions of opera, often with sets from Scottish Opera, over the next 10 years; and the classical Ayr Concert Series with visiting orchestras, instrumentalists and choirs. It was a venue for many events including the British Chess Championships. The Pavilion later became a discotheque and night club. Currently it is operated as Pirate Pete`s Adventure Play Centre for families.

 

Written by Graeme Smith for - arthurlloyd.co.uk

The Music Hall and Theatre History Website

 

Madness - House of Fun

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJ2X9SANsME

Please right click the link and open in a new tab. Thank you !

 

Rollingstone1's most interesting photos on Flickriver

© All rights reserved. Use without permission is illegal

 

The Banker's Lobbyist's Law Firm, Clark, Lytle, Gedulgig & Cranford are seeking $850,000 & 6 months time to INVESTIGATE the OCCUPY WALL STREET protesters, as a counter-offensive to find the source of the funding for the Movement that has been sweeping the nation(& the World!)!

Bohner, Ohio congressman & house speaker, has two of his former gophers, Cranford & Geduldig, working on the spy on the OCCUPY WALL STREET protest operation. The Cry-baby & co-horts are WATCHING YOU/SPYING ON ALL OF US! VOTE ALL THE SCOUNDRELS OUT OF OFFICE--elect local citizens with no dues

to pay to Big Corporations, Banks, Stockbrokers, Military & Arms Dealers! DON'T LET POLITICIANS BET ON THE

STOCK MARKETS! A job made in Heaven--Congressional immunity goes with it!

André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.[1][2]

 

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazines, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France's first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

 

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Kert%C3%A9sz

As we go on

We remember

All the times we

Had together

And as our lives change

From whatever

We will still be

Friends Forever

 

So if we get the big jobs

And we make the big money

When we look back now

Will our jokes still be funny?

Will we still remember everything we learned in school?

Still be trying to break every single rule

Will little brainy Bobby be the stockbroker man?

Can Heather find a job that won't interfere with her tan?

I keep, keep thinking that it's not goodbye

Keep on thinking it's a time to fly

And this is how it feels

 

La, la, la, la:

Yeah, yeah, yeah

La, la, la, la:

We will still be friends forever

 

Will we think about tomorrow like we think about now?

Can we survive it out there?

Can we make it somehow?

I guess I thought that this would never end

And suddenly it's like we're women and men

Will the past be a shadow that will follow us 'round?

Will these memories fade when I leave this town

I keep, keep thinking that it's not goodbye

Keep on thinking it's a time to fly

 

explore #97

stockbroker on board. You are allowed to use this image on your website. If you do, please link back to my site as the source: creditscoregeek.com/

 

Example: Photo by Credit Score Geek

 

Thank you!

Mike Cohen

Exploitation of many by few.

 

The following is an extract from "Cross of Gold Speech" by William Jennings Bryan, from his campaign speech in 1896. I have included this speech extract because it can be applied in many ways to the on-going 2007/08/09/10/.... economic crisis brought on by the cancer on society known as Bankers who through their actions are 90% responsible for decimating the lives, hopes and dreams of thousands and thousands of people and families around the world. Unscrupulous Bankers with their shady business practices, 'cheap money' lending have knowingly plundered global economies around the world for their own financial gain, they have been allowed to bring economies to their knees without fear of repercussion because of lax Government controls (The other 10%). They not only capitalised on the failing economies they had created, they had little compunction in returning to the ‘trough’ like 'PIGS' to plunder from the struggling masses once again during the economic recovery.

 

"Cross of Gold Speech" from William Jennings Bryan, campaign speech, 1896.

 

Mr. Carlisle said in 1878 that this was a struggle between "the idle holders of capital" and "the struggling masses, who produce the wealth and pay the taxes of the country," and my friends, the question we are to decide is: Upon which side will the Democratic party fight: upon the side of the "idle holders of idle capital" or upon the side of "the struggling masses?" That is the question, which the party must answer first, and then it must be answered by each individual hereafter. The sympathies of the Democratic Party, as shown by the platform, are on the side of the struggling masses who have ever been the foundation of the Democratic Party. There are two ideas of government. There are those who believe that, if you will only legislate to make the well-to-do prosperous, their prosperity will leak through on those below. The Democratic idea, however, has been that if you legislate to make the masses prosperous, their prosperity will find its way up through every class, which rests upon them.

 

You come to us and tell us that the great cities are in favour of the gold standard; we reply that the great cities rest upon our broad and fertile prairies. Burn down your cities and leave our farms and your cities will spring up again as if by magic; but destroy our farms and the grass will grow in the streets of every city in the country.

  

Many people ask how I came to be able to speak to so many animals and develop so many contacts in the Animal Kingdom.It all started with Tabsaco. I was practicing my rudimentary bear on these fellows and getting absolutely no response. It was frustrating because bear is the simplest of all animal languages. Months of study and all I got were stares. In my frustration I shouted out, "Does anyone here speak English". Tabasco stood up and introduced himself. It turns out he had just gotten out of school at the University of Maine where he played football and majored in business. He was a stockbroker learning the trade and he spoke fluent English.I was young and single myself so we began with some other friends to hit the bars on Friday nights and chase women. Tabasco was the perfect wingman . Tall, dark and handsome he made an impact on the ladies. He had an unusual penchant for sweet drinks that guys usually don't drink like Mai Tais and Singapore Slings. Never knew another guy who ordered drinks like that. Will have to come back as I have to leave the cell for dinner.

A religiousity of events repetitiously shown as actuality, to fill our thought cells, with the elemental basics of irrelevant distractions. The natural order of pre-established program-feeds echoes throughout the electronic, miasmatic nets, so that the political, psychopathic criminals running this planet can safely SMILE IN UNISON@ pseudo-important non-events of SELF-PROMOTION & ELITIST gratification! Meanwhile, thousands of these "world leaders" OWN the KOOL-AID of SUBJUGATION, as they instill programmed, stimulus-response electromagnetically, through cell phones, blasting subconscious, subliminal messages & programs, designed to redirect man-kind's goal, & quests for true liberation & freedom. FORGET FUKUSHIMA, FORGET CHILDREN WHO work as slaves, & go to bed hungry every night, starving in the world's ghettos, while wealthy bankers, Ngos, stockbrokers & rulers, scientists, & computer programmers enlist the most modern technology to consolidate their control over the intentionally drugged masses of human ignorance! FORGET SYRIA, FORGET CHINA, FORGET HEALTH CARE & EDUCATION. It's all about Paris Hilton, New Jersey trash-re ality crap, "star- dom," & making millions on the Internet...FORGET COMPASSION & VALUES, FORGET YOUR FELLOW BEINGS, FORGET MORALS & cleaning-up HAITI! like Timothy Leary used to say, "Turn On, Tune-in & DROP OUT," only this time it is electric drugs & phones, not LSD. DON'T DRINK THEIR KOOL-AID or FRY YOUR BRAIN-Question authority, even physicists, they work for the NUCLEAR CARTELS...

  

High Street, looking towards Bristol Bridge Castle Park on left. The buildings on the right are as they were in November 1940, but most with different occupiers - they still survive today, having changed very little over the last sixty years.

 

Bristol High Street - 1937

 

1-2 Irish Linen & Hosiery Association Ltd. - Hosiers

 

This building, called the Dutch House, was originally built in 1676 as a dwelling house at the junction of the four oldest streets in the city. It was unusual, though not unique, for Bristol to have a building of five storeys and an attic (and possibly cellar) and was an outstanding feat of timber construction. Why it was called the Dutch House is not clear, one theory being that the timber frame was constructed in Holland.

 

Until 1940, it was probably the most photographed building in Bristol, and its many occupiers over the years included: 1810 - Castle Bank Established by James George — a member of the family which ran Georges Brewery - and four partners. 1826 - Stuckeys Bank 1866 - T.W. Tilley, Hatters Shop. - This appears to be when it was first called the Dutch House and the battlements, weather vane and flagpole were added. 1902 - Parry Bros, Tobacconist.

 

1908 - The building was saved from demolition by the Lord Mayor's casting vote, the City Council wanting to widen the road. Instead of demolition, the shopfront was cut back to allow extra room for the pavement to pass beneath the overhanging upper floor, and columns were added to support the upper floors.

 

As well as the unusual appearance, one item of particular interest was a two-dimensional cast-iron soldier on the first-floor balcony of the High Street/Wine Street corner - it was 6ft high, lin thick and wearing a uniform complete with musket and backpack.

 

The soldier first appeared in a picture of the Dutch House dated 1878 and there have been many pictures of it since, but curiously the soldier is absent from some (possibly removed at intervals for restoration). The building was severely damaged on 24 November 1940 and, at 11.00 a.m. on 27 November 1940, the remains were reluctantly pulled down. The cast-iron soldier survived and found its way for a short time to the top of Philips Furniture Store in Broadmead. Today it lies in the basement of the City Museum — surely a place for its permanent display as near as possible to the site of the Dutch House could be found.

 

3-13 Jones & Co. Ltd. - Department Store

 

(See Wine Street)

 

14-15 G.A. Dunn & Co. Ltd. - Hat Manufacturers

 

This building (called Gloster House) was on the corner of Mary-le-Port Street. It was rented from Jones & Co. Ltd and Dunn's moved here on 19 March 1913, then selling only hats. The premises were destroyed on 24 November 1940 and the business transferred across the road to 41 High Street until March 1946, eventually moving to 48 The Horsefair, the business by then being a men's outfitters.

 

16-17 Stead & Simpson Ltd. - Boots and Shoes

 

Stead and Simpson had traded from here since the 1920s, the premises surviving the blitz and the company continuing to trade here until 1960, when it was demolished to allow development of the area.

 

Above this shop (and 18-19) was Princes Restaurant, which opened in 1924. Its entrance was in Mary-le-Port Street via a staircase between Ideal Cleaners and Stead & Simpson. It was open from 9.00 a.m. until 9.00 p.m. and provided a silver service. Unusually for this area, it was open on Sundays, no doubt because of the demand created by those people attending the many local churches. The business also catered for wedding receptions, club dinners, private parties, whist drives, private and club dances, as well as outside catering.

 

18-19 Singer Sewing Machine Co. Ltd. - Sewing Machines

 

Singer's had operated from these premises since around 1887 until its destruction following enemy action. Upper floors: Princes Restaurant - J. Mahoney, Gent's Hairdressers - Maison Louise, Ladies' Hairdressers.

 

20 H. Salanson & Co. Ltd. - Opticians/Cameras

 

This company was established in 1887 by Alfred Salanson at 28 High Street and moved to these premises in the 1890s, selling electrical accessories for the 'new electric light'. Over the following forty years there was diversification into optical and ophthalmic-goods, microscopes, spectacles, cameras and photographic equipment and by 1940 the company also sold a limited range of toys.

 

(There was a story concerning a young boy who had saved his money to buy some toy soldiers from the shop and had managed to get there just before closing time on Saturday 23 November 1940 - the following Monday would have been too late!) After the blitz, the company moved to Narrow Wine Street (they already had premises in nearby Castle Mill Street), in 1957 to Fairfax Street and in 1987 to The Horsefair in Broadmead. In 1992 the business was acquired by the London Camera Exchange, the name of a longstanding Bristol business therefore disappearing overnight.

 

21 Duck, Son & Pinker Ltd. - Piano Warehouse

 

As well as pianos, this company also sold gramophones and radiograms, and had other premises in Queen's Road. The premises in High Street were destroyed in the war and in 1952 Duck, Son & Pinker Ltd traded from a hastily-built single-storey building in Lower Castle Street. By 1975 they were operating from premises in The Arcade, Broadmead.

 

22 Posada Wine & Spirit Co. - Public House

 

The Posada had been at these premises since at least 1893 and occupied the ground floor and cellar. In November 1940 the landlord was F. Gee; the premises survived the blitz of 24 November and it then only traded from 10.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., that is until the blitz of 3 January 1941 finished it off! Upper floors: A.E.G. Harding Accountant - National Amalgamated Union of Shop - Assistants, Warehousemen and Clerks - Wainwright Paving & Contracting Co. Ltd - Scottish National Key Registry & Assurance Association Ltd.

 

23-25 United Clothiers Ltd. - Outfitters

 

This business dealt in men's and boys' clothes. It survived the war and traded here until the building was demolished to allow development of the High Street/Wine Street area in the late 1950s.

 

26 Thirty-Five Shilling Tailors. - Gents Tailors

 

Survived the raid of November 1940, but not that of 3 January 1941.

 

27-28 Scholastic Trading Co. Ltd. - Booksellers, etc.

 

The business was established in 1860 and moved to these premises in the 1890s (the premises were previously occupied by Salanson's, who moved to 20 High Street). These premises extended into 27—29 Bridge Street and there was also an additional shop at 20 Bridge Street. The premises were destroyed in the blitz of 3 January 1941 (there were approximately 200 staff at this time) and they moved to premises at 32 St Nicholas Street. An advertising board for Scholastic remained on the High Street site until its development in the 1960s. The company still trade today under the name of Blandfords at 25 St Stephen's Street.

 

St Nicholas Church

 

Originally built around 1250, the building which existed at the time of the blitz was built in 1769. At the outbreak of the Second World War it was classed as a public air-raid shelter and the Angel Fountain (on the High Street wall) was removed for safety. It was extensively damaged following the blitz of 24 November 1940, but temporary repairs allowed services to resume in 1941. This continued until 1959, when the parish of St Nicholas merged with St Stephen's and many of the contents were moved to St Stephen's Church.

 

Permanent repairs were completed, and in 1973 it became a church museum. In 1992 the museum closed, and two years later it became the Tourist Information Centre. The Tourist Information Centre has now moved to The Harbourside and the ground floor of St Nicholas Church is unused.

 

Two items of interest are still applicable today: the clock in the tower has a seconds hand, which is reputed to be the only one on a public clock in England; and the Curfew Bell rings for seven and a half minutes every day immediately after the clock has finished striking 9.00 p.m., in continuation of a paractice which has been associated with the church since medieval times.

 

31 Olivers Wine Vaults. - Public House

 

(Proprietors: Olivers 1913 Ltd) Brewery: Bass - This business opened around 1921, the premises being destroyed in the blitz of 3 January 1941.

 

32 Maynards. - Confectioners

 

Maynards had many local shops and these premises were destroyed following the blitz on 3 January 1941. The building (Nos 32 and 33) was particularly ornate — originally built in 1867 (designed by Archibald Ponton) as one shop, the frontage changed very little until its destruction. The ground floor had one central column (leaving the rest free for plate glass) separating Nos 32 and 33 and the three upper floors' frontage was each split into five equal units by colonnettes, each floor different and with a wealth of decoration.

 

32A Bentleys.- Opticians

 

(Proprietor: C.H. Dunsdon)

 

33 Maypole Dairy Co. Ltd. - Dairy produce

 

This was one of thirteen shops which Maypole had in Bristol by 1939, these premises being occupied by them since 1902. Butter was patted and cheese cut to size on the premises in front of customers. The premises were destroyed by the blitz of 3 January 1941.

 

34 Lawleys Ltd. - China and Class Dealers

 

Premises destroyed on 3 January 1941. The business still trades today from a unit in The Galleries Shopping Centre.

 

35 Alex R. Morrison. - Restaurant

 

In 1939 you could purchase a Savoury Tea for one shilling (5p) or supper for one shilling nine pence (8p) and sit in a room with potted palms and spotless table linen. Alcoholic drinks were available, but had to be brought from the Crown Public House in the Market (staff had access to the Crown via a connection at the back of the premises. Before this, drinks were brought in via the Flower Market!). There was a separate private room seating seventy available for evening dinners. The premises were destroyed on 3 January 1941.

 

36 W.E. Massingham Ltd. - Bootmakers

 

The premises here were destroyed on 3 January 1941. Upper floors: W.E. Massingham, Chiropodist - Miss C.B. Allen

 

37-38 Purity Milk Bars.

 

Milk bars were premises where you bought plain and flavoured milk drinks. Customers could also watch staff cooking ring doughnuts (fried in deep fat) just inside the front windows. This type of business was a recent import from the USA and the staff dressed as Americans.

 

Between Nos 38 and 39 was the entrance to the Flower Market.

 

39-40 Andersons Rubber Co. Ltd. - Rainwear Specialists

 

This company was established in 1851 and had premises in London and Bristol. These premises survived the war and in August 1970 were altered to be the High Street entrance to the Rummer (Andersons moving to the Byzantine-style building on Stokes Croft). Upper floors: Abbey Road Building Society - Employers Mutual Insurance Association Ltd - Air Way Ltd, Sanitary Cleaning Systems - McCullochs, Wholesale Jewellers.

 

41 Faringdon Shoe Co. Ltd. - Boot/Shoe Sales

 

Upper floor: (known as All Saints Chambers) Everymans Insurance Brokers - Madame Rosina, Clairvoyant (''World' celebrated clairvoyant and psychic adviser with studio over Faringdon Shoe Shop, open 10.00a.m. - 6.00 p.m.')

 

The premises, which still survive today, were occupied by G.A. Dunn, Hats (previously at 14-15 High Street) from 1944 into the 1970s.

 

42 H.W. Edwards. - Manufacturers Agent

 

Upper floors: J. C. Godwin & Son, Stockbrokers - Glynnes, Ladies' Hairdressers - F.C. Price Ltd, Financiers - The premises survived the blitz and after the war were occupied by Paige, Costumiers and later by Cona Coffee. The building still exists today.

 

43 H.W. Sapsed. - Watch Repairer

 

The building still survives today and occupants after the war included Scholls Shoes and The Card Cabin.

 

44 J. Beardmore. - Fancy Goods Dealers

 

(Proprietor: W.L. Mottershead) Upper floor: J. Beavis, Dentist - M. Roth, Bespoke Tailor - D. Gregory, Ladies' Hairdresser - The building survived the blitz, with Beardmore continuing to trade here into the 1950s, and still exists today.

 

45 Parry Bros - Tobacconist

 

These premises were occupied by Parry Bros since at least 1909. The premises survived the war and Parry's were still there into the 1970s. The building still exists today. Upper floors: Maison Hollyman, Ladies' Hairdresser.

 

46 Bollom of Bristol Ltd. - Dyers and Cleaners

 

These premises survived the war and Bollom occupied it before and immediately after (later occupants being Cole & Pottow, Tailors in the 1950s and Irish Linen in the 1960s). The building still exists today. Bollom had many premises in Bristol, their main works and registered office being in Horfield Road.

 

Between Nos 46 and 47 High Street was a narrow entrance to All Saints Court.

 

47-48 Hodders Ltd. - Chemists

 

Hodders was established in 1846 in Broad Street. They occupied these premises in the late 1930s and by 1940 this was one of thirty branches in and around Bristol. These premises survived the war and Hodders continued to trade here into the 1970s. Today, all of Hodders' shops have closed, though this building still exists.

 

49 W.W. Kemp & Son Ltd. - Gold and Silversmith Retailers

 

The company was established in 1881 (by one brother; another setting up the business of Kemp Bros, Jewellers, in Union Street) at 60 Stokes Croft and moved to these premises (called Regent House) in around 1920. In 1933, the shop had to be temporarily closed when Gary Grant was choosing an engagement ring for his first bride. The building survived the war and the Kemp's remained here until 1961 (the premises were later occupied by Tudor Facey & Miller, Photographers) when they moved to Carlton Court in Westbury-on-Trym, where they still trade today. The building itself also still exists today.

André Kertész (2 July 1894 – 28 September 1985), born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his groundbreaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.[1][2]

 

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazines, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France's first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

 

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Kert%C3%A9sz

The Hirshhorn Museum's founding donor, Joseph H. Hirshhorn (1899–1981), immigrated to New York from Latvia when he was eight years old. His widowed mother settled with her children (Joseph was the twelfth of thirteen) in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn.

 

In time, Joseph Hirshhorn would become a financier, philanthropist, and well-known collector of modern art whose gift to the nation of nearly 6,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, and mixed media pieces established his namesake museum on the National Mall. The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden has been open to the public since 1974.

 

At the age of thirteen, Hirshhorn left school to become a newsboy. Two years later he took his first salaried job, on Wall Street in Manhattan, earning $12 per week. At sixteen, he launched his career as a financier by using his savings of $255 to become a stockbroker.

 

When he was eighteen, Hirshhorn acquired his first works of art: two etchings by the sixteenth-century German artist Albrecht Dürer, purchased for $75 each. This acquisition marked the beginning of a lifelong passion for collecting art, facilitated by an innate talent for making money. In the late 1940s, Hirshhorn's mining investments in uranium-rich Canadian land cemented his status as a wealthy man.

 

Hirshhorn eventually turned his attention to the art of contemporary masters, becoming an avid collector of works by living painters such as Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Arshile Gorky, Edward Hopper, Larry Rivers, and Raphael Soyer. He socialized with many of these artists and assisted them when he could. For example, Hirshhorn helped Willem de Kooning, a good friend, finance the construction of a Long Island studio in exchange for works of art.

 

As a collector, Hirshhorn was also interested in works by American painters of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including Thomas Eakins, Louis Eilshemius, Ashcan School artists, and first-wave modernists in touch with European developments.

 

Hirshhorn was a frequent and welcome visitor in the studios of those whose works he collected, and many of these visits were commemorated with photographs. One such occasion was a 1966 visit to Pablo Picasso at Mas Notre Dame de Vie, near Mougins, in the south of France. The photographer Edward Steichen was a guest of Hirshhorn and his wife, Olga, at their house, Villa Lou Miradou, in Cap d'Antibes.

  

Hirshhorn may be most well-known as a collector of nineteenth and twentieth-century sculpture. He acquired major works by pioneers such as Auguste Rodin and Constantin Brancusi, as well as innovative contemporaries, including Alexander Calder, Henry Moore, and Alberto Giacometti. Developing friendships with these artists, Hirshhorn showed his enthusiasm in numerous ways, such as by visiting Moore's studio and enjoying the lively art scene with Giacometti.

Groundbreaking

 

The breadth of Hirshhorn's sculpture collection was unknown to the general public until 1962, when selected works were loaned to the Guggenheim Museum in New York for a major exhibition. Several international museums and governments courted the intrepid collector, but he ultimately bequeathed his comprehensive modern art holdings to the Smithsonian Institution. Lady Bird Johnson, wife of then-President Lyndon B. Johnson, played a supporting role by paying personal visits to the Hirshhorns. After an Act of Congress established the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in 1966, the Johnsons joined the Hirshhorns for the museum's groundbreaking in January 1969, just prior to the inauguration of President Richard M. Nixon.

 

The Horatio Alger Award, which commemorates determination, perseverance, and success in the face of adversity, was, appropriately, one of many honors with which Hirshhorn was recognized during his lifetime.

 

Dividing his time between Washington, DC, and Naples, Florida, Hirshhorn remained a vigorous collector and patron of the arts until his death in 1981. His subsequent bequest to the museum nearly doubled the size of the collection.

 

Today, building on this original foundation of artworks from Joseph Hirshhorn's personal collection, the museum's curators continue to refine and expand the collection, which today numbers more than 12,000 pieces. A consistent influx of new acquisitions invigorates and extends Joseph Hirshhorn's legacy of passion for the art and artists of our time.

I spotted this old sign down some of the back streets of the City. Pater & Co have long since ceased trading.

Bristol Harbour was the original Port of Bristol, but as ships and their cargo have increased in size, it has now largely been replaced by docks at Avonmouth and Portbury. These are located 7 miles (11.3 km) downstream at the mouth of the River Avon.Glassboat opened in 1986 and boom times soon followed on board. ‘The late 80s was the heyday for the financial services industry, stockbrokers and accountants moved in droves from London to cheaper, more attractive Bristol, where they kept up their tradition of long lunches. Glassboat was awash with pinstripe and backslapping.’ As you’d expect, given its unique character, Glassboat has seen more than its fair share of colourful evenings. Notably, there was the visit of Marmaduke Hussey, a former BBC chairman and war hero, who unhitched his prosthetic leg during a boozy fundraising dinner and had to be helped onshore at the end of the night. ‘Marmaduke phoned in the morning, but could not convince Annette, the cleaning lady, that he had lost his leg the night before. His chauffeur had to return to the boat and retrieve the leg from the general detritus.’

The Nakanoshima Central Hall, which features two concert halls and a restaurant that serves nostalgic menu items, is a Neo-Renaissance building made of red brick that was built between 1916 and 1918 with funds donated by the stockbroker Einosuke Iwamoto. The symbol of the Nakanoshima Area, it reopened in November 2002 after completion of a four-year restoration project to repair both its exterior and interior and to strengthen it against earthquakes. All the stained glass windows have been repaired or renewed, as have the crystal chandeliers. And the dramatic ceiling painting ”Tenchi Kaibyaku,” which depicts the creation of the Universe according to Japanese myth, has been restored to its original vivid colors. (Osaka-info.com)

Once called “the Queen of Memphis” and “the most complex, the most fabulous building in Memphis,” the Sterick Building featured a white stone spire topped with a green tile roof; its own bank, pharmacy, barber shop and beauty parlor; and stockbrokers' offices. The first three floors were made from granite and limestone. From the lobby, which was said to “rival the beauty of a Moorish castle,” its eight high-speed elevators ferried the building's 2,000+ workers and guests to the upper floors, including the Regency Room restaurant on the top floor.

 

Thomson Rd, Ipoh.

The eastern suburbs of Ipoh bounded by Tambun Road and Gopeng Road accommodated the leafy suburbs developped during the boom years for Ipoh in the 1920s and 1930s. Many salubrious bungalows and residences popped up along with social diversions such as the Perak Turf Club (1926), the Ipoh Golf Club (1932) and St Andrew's Church (1929). Life for the residents was comfortable with large houses, set amongst large gardens, with space for amahs' quarters. The houses were in a variety of styles from earlier Straits Ecletic to Anglo-Malay bungalows (as is the case here) to Home Counties 'stockbroker belt' architecture of the 1930s. The original residents would have been expatriate mining staff or those employed in government administration or the service industries in Ipoh. It is unlikely that this house would have been originally a Chinese residence as it is not ostentatious enough to suggest a towkay's home.

 

The architectural style here is a typical Anglo-Malay bungalow, found throughout the Straits Settlements and the FMS. It combines Eurpean architectural idiom (particularly Palladian elements) with Chinese and Malay styles with adaptations to the tropical climate for ventilation and protection from sun and rain; louvred French windows, high ceiling interiors, clerestorey windows, porte-cohere and the use of air-wells and vents in the loft.

 

Sadly, this beauty now lies abandoned and awaits its fate; its roof broken, wooden shutters falling apart and rotting. The once neat lawn is now a riot of lalang grass. The future doesn't bode well. Next door is a sprawling brand new residential complex named "The Thompsons", full of modern bungalow-style houses priced at MYR2.6m - 5.3m. The owner of this house is probably just waiting for the right asking price from a developer...

 

By the way, the old name for the road (now called Jalan Tun Dr Ismail) was Thomson Road (without a 'p'), named after Henry Wagstaffe Thomson, the 17th British Resident of Perak (1927-1929). It is something of an inaccuracy, therefore, for the new residential complex to be named 'The Thompsons" - with a 'p. Reminds me of those twin bungling detectives in the Tintin books, Thomson and Thompson.

Old well pump. Built in the early 19th century for the local people by the land owner. I suspect that the stockbrokers and merchant bankers that live in this area nowadays have little use for it.

It's freezing out, like really.

T and I have been bums all day, pardon going to the Wolf of Wall Street, which I feel was a cautionary tale, but really just made me want to be a male stockbroker in the late 80s.

The high tomorrow is -10. I quit the midwest.

 

Also, I have another photo from today in the comments. It was really hard to chose today.

The financial center of Santiago where is the stock market, offices and stockbrokers.

 

Another one from Sunday morning where I met up with Chris and Sue down at Hastings Point.

 

ISO100

f11 with -1 compensation

2.5 Seconds

Hitech 0.9ND Reverse Grad filter

Edited using Luminosity Masks

© 2015 Alan Mackenzie.

 

www.alanmackenziephotography.com

 

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I made the decision to travel 100 miles this year, after the Angmering Park Estate ruined their bluebell wood by dumping tonnes of waste wood instead of turning it into wood chips. A decade-long wait is on the cards before it rots down.

 

Dockey Wood, in Buckinghamshire is a popular location for visitors and photographers. Situated in a wealthy stockbroker belt, the woodland is a 90 minute walk from Tring railway station. After photographing the bluebells, I set off to find a pub in Little Gaddesden. Along the way, a group of about 50 Fallow deer had crossed the road to graze in a field. Fallow deer normally bolt on sight when I'm in Sussex; I shone my torch and 50 stationary pairs of eyes stared back. Earlier in the day, I noticed that Fallow deer on the Ashridge Estate don't run away and just behave like farm sheep. I would be interested to know why Ashridge deer are so tolerant of people.

 

I had let myself in for an uncomfortable night in Dockey Wood. Without a tent and only (a now binned) sleeping bag, I endured a cold, damp and sleepless night, pacing about to keep myself warm. Dawn came quicker than I expected. About ten photographers turned up in their cars. I prefer my dawn photos, as the presence of extra tree cover on the north side of Dockey Wood prevented blown out highlights from appearing in the frame. ND grad filters are a must.

 

I'm happy with my experience of Dockey Wood, but never again! Getting there from Brighton is too much hassle, in terms of cost, time, delays from broken down trains at Clapham Junction and long walks along busy roads.

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