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Stinking chamomile, according to my plant-identifying app

 

Pentax MX, Pentax SMC f1.7 50mm lens, f1.7, 1/1000, Ektachrome E100

lab developed

 

This image is protected by copyright and may not be used in any way, for any purpose, without my written permission. Please contact me if you would like to use any of my photos.

 

[19-037-016]

Leucanthemum vulgare, commonly known as the ox-eye daisy, oxeye daisy, dog daisy, Vilallonga de Ter, Ulldeter, Ripollès, Girona, Catalonia.

 

CATALÀ

La margarida de prat o margaridot (Leucanthemum vulgare, Sinònim Chrysanthemum leucanthemum), és un tipus de margarida molt estesa originària d'Europa i de les regions asiàtiques de clima temperat. Ha estat introduïda a Amèrica del Nord, Austràlia i Nova Zelanda on s'ha tornat una mala herba comuna i també és plantada a la vora de les carreteres.

Planta perenne que fa de 6 a 100 cm d'alçada, erecta glabra o pubescent i que presenta nombroses formes. Les fulles són verd fosques a les dues bandes, les fulles mitjanes de la tija i també les superiors oblongues o rarament linears, de més de 2 mm d'ample i regularment dentades. Capítols solitaris o en grups, lígules blanques. No produeix papus. Floreix de maig a setembre.

VIQUIPÈDIA

 

ENGLISH

Leucanthemum vulgare, commonly known as the ox-eye daisy, oxeye daisy, dog daisy and other common names, is a widespread flowering plant native to Europe and the temperate regions of Asia, and an introduced plant to North America, Australia and New Zealand.

Leucanthemum vulgare is a perennial herb that grows to a height of 60 cm (24 in) or more and has a creeping underground rhizome. The lower parts of the stem are hairy, sometimes densely hairy but more or less glabrous in the upper parts. The largest leaves are at the base of the plant and are 4–15 cm (1.6–5.9 in) long, about 5 cm (2.0 in) wide and have a petiole. These leaves have up to 15 teeth, or lobes or both on the edges. The leaves decrease in size up the stem, the upper leaves up to 7.5 cm (3.0 in) long, lack a petiole and are deeply toothed.

The plant bears up to three "flowers" like those of a typical daisy. Each is a "head" or capitulum 2–6 cm (0.79–2.36 in) wide. Each head has between fifteen and forty white "petals" (ray florets) 10–20 cm (3.9–7.9 in) long surrounding the yellow disc florets. Below the head is an involucre of glabrous green bracts 7–10 mm (0.28–0.39 in) long with brownish edges. Flowering mostly occurs from late spring to early summer. The seed-like achenes are 1–3 mm (0.039–0.118 in) long and have ten "ribs" along their edges but lack a pappus.

Ox-eye daisy is similar to shasta daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum) which has larger flower-heads (5–12 cm (2.0–4.7 in) wide) and to stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula which has smaller heads (1.5–3 cm (0.59–1.18 in) wide). Leucanthemum vulgare was first formally described in 1778 by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck who published the description in Flore françoise.It is also known by the common names ox-eye daisy, dog daisy, field daisy, Marguerite, moon daisy, moon-penny, poor-land penny, poverty daisy and white daisy.

Ox-eye daisy is native to Europe, and to Turkey and Georgia in Western Asia. It is a typical grassland perennial wildflower, growing in a variety of plant communities including meadows and fields, under scrub and open-canopy forests, and in disturbed areas. The species is widely naturalised in many parts of the world and is considered to be an invasive species in more than forty countries. It grows in temperate regions where average annual rainfall exceeds 750 mm (30 in), and often where soils are heavy and damp. It is often a weed of degraded pastures and roadsides.

Ox-eye daisy spreads by seeds and by shallow, creeping rhizomes. A mature plant can produce up to 26,000 seeds that are spread by animals, vehicles, water and contaminated agricultural produce, and some seeds remain viable for up to nearly forty years. It is not palatable to cattle and reduces the amount of quality pasture available for grazing. In native landscapes such as the Kosciuszko National Park in Australia, dense infestation can exclude native plants, causing soil erosion and loss of soil organic matter.

This plant was top-ranked for pollen production per floral unit sampled at the level of the entire capitulum, with a value of 15.9 ± 2 μL, in a UK study of meadow flowers.

Leucanthemum vulgare is one of the most widespread weeds in the Anthemideae. It became an introduced species via gardens into natural areas in parts of Canada, the United States,[14] Australia,[3] and New Zealand.[15] In some habitats it forms dense colonies displacing native plants and modifying existing communities.

Ox-eye daisy commonly invades lawns, and is difficult to control or eradicate, since a new plant can regenerate from rhizome fragments[9] and is a problem in pastures where beef and dairy cattle graze, as usually they will not eat it, thus enabling it to spread; cows who do eat it produce milk with an undesirable flavor. It has been shown to carry several crop diseases.

This species has been declared an environmental weed in New South Wales and Victoria. In New South Wales it grows from Glen Innes on the Northern Tablelands to Bombala in the far southeast of the state, and there are significant populations in the Kosciuszko National Park where it has invaded subalpine grassland, snowgum (Eucalyptus pauciflora) woodland and wetlands. In Victoria it is a prohibited species and must be eradicated or controlled.

VIKIPEDIA

  

blooming very early near Cloverdale, California

One corner of a potato field had been neglected, and all sorts of native plants had moved in. I think this is stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula), but in any case the area was a lovely change from monotonous maize, grass, and wheat fields.

 

Canon EOS 5D mark III, Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM, Canon EF Extender 1.4x III (handheld).

700mm, f/5.6, 1/640, ISO 400.

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

Edible Parts: Leaves,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic; Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

Edible Parts: Leaves,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic; Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

Edible Parts: Leaves, Flowers,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

Edible Parts: Leaves,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic; Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

These visitors added their color to the bloomfest along the trails. Clockwise from top left, they are:

 

Shortfruit Stork's Bill (erodium brachycarpum) - Non-native

Coastal Heron's Bill (erodium cicutarium) - Non-native

Rose Clover (trifolium hirtum) - Invasive non-native

Hairy Vetch (vicia villosa) - Non-native

English Plantain (plantago lanceolata) - Non-native weed

Shepherd's needle, Venus' needle (scandix pecten-veneris) - Non-native - Thanks Willie!

Beaked Hawksbeard (crepis vesicaria) - Non-native

Mayweed, Dog Fennel, Stinking Chamomile (anthemis cotula) - Non-native

Scarlet Pimpernel (anagallis arvensis) - Non-native

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

NO:Tappgåseblom LAT:Anthemis cotula ENG:Stinking Chamomile SP:Manzanilla hedionda

Sted/Place:Estepona (Malaga) Dato/Date:03 2010 Str:15-90 cm Blomstring/Flowering:Mars-juli (3-7) Habitat:Åkerland, beitemarker,avfallsplasser.

 

En av mange kurvplanter ned hvite kronblader og gul krone. Etterhvert begynner de hvite kronbladene å henge (som hos kamille) og den gule kronen blir stående oppreist som en tapp som har gitt planten navnet tappgåseblom.

Sterk duft. Fjæraktig bladverk. Vokser ofte i store tepper i landskapet.

Anthemis cotula, common name: "stinking chamomile". Large size.

I thnk this is Stinking Chamomile (Anthemis cotula), because it did smell and it doesn't look like Scented Mayweed (which is originally what I thought it was). Ellenbrook Fields, near Hatfield, Hertfordshire, 31 August 2013.

 

To see my collections, go here: www.flickr.com/photos/anemoneprojectors/collections/.

Stinking Chamomile (Asteraceae) - Ashley Warren Area, Whitchurch, Hants

A dear little (rather unattractively named) Stinking Chamomile flower, smiling among the grey concrete. I couldnt resist getting a shot.

Identifier: fieldwoodlandpla00furn

Title: Field and woodland plants

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors: Furneaux, William S

Subjects: Wild flowers Shrubs

Publisher: London New York : Longmans, Green, and Co.

Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

The Venuss looking-glass or CornBelltlower. 292 FIELD AND WOODLAND PLANTS and tilt outer ones mucli larger, curved, irregular, and brightl)lue. The fruit is surmounted by a pappus of short, simple hairs.One of the most beautiful of the corn-field flowers is the CornMarigold or Yellow Ox-eye Daisy {Chrysanthemum segehim), easilydistinguished by its rather large flower-heads, solitary on terminalpeduncles, with bright golden-yellow ray and disc. It grows from

 

Text Appearing After Image:

AKLKT ]niIICRN-EL. twelve to eighteen inches high, and flowers from May to July. Itmay be identified by the aid of the coloured illustration onPlate VII. The CornChainonn]c{Anfhe.mis arvensis),oi the same order, is notunfrequently seen in corn fields, flowering from June to August.It is much like the Scentless Mayweed (p. 188) and the CommonChamomile (p. 268) in general appearance, but may be easilydistinguished with a little care. It is a rather coarse plant, moreor less clothed with a silky down ; and its freely-branched stem isusually erect, and from one to t\\ o feet high. The leaves are pinnate, IN THE CORN FIELD 293 with leaflets divided into very narrow, almost hairlike segments ;and the tiower-heads are rather large, with white ray and yellowdisc, solitary on the tops of leafy stalks. The involucre bracts areacute; the receptacle conical; and ray florets always possess a style.The Stinking Chamomile or Stinking Mayweed (AnthemisCotiila) is another similarcorn-field plant, but

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

I photographed this same patch of wild flowers last Wednesday (29th August 2007). I thought they were Stinking Chamomile but I now think they are probably Scentless Mayweed. Whichever species they are - I had great fun photographing them and I went back for more today (Sunday 2nd September)

 

It's odd that I am writing an introduction to a series of photographs when it will be the last picture you see. Flickr is all backwards really.

 

Anyway, if you are still reading this.....

 

I was thrilled by the Mayweed and amazed by how many other wildflowers I saw today. I intend to post several picture and I hope I don't bore you with them too much.

Found on waste ground at Yeovil, Somerset, England.

Photographed 16 June 2009.

Found on waste ground at Yeovil, Somerset, England.

Photographed 16 June 2009.

Found on waste ground at Yeovil, Somerset, England.

Photographed 16 June 2009.

Stinking Chamomile (Asteraceae) - Ashley Warren Area, Whitchurch, Hants

The final seven, but not the last of the flower shots from our hike at Rancho San Antonio. These are, left to right, top row first:

 

Mayweed, Dog Fennel, Stinking Chamomile (anthemis cotula) - non-native

Gray Mule Ears (wyethia helenioides)

Slender Cottonweed, Q Tips (micropus californicus)

 

Blue Dicks (dichelostemma capitatum)

Tomcat Clover (trifolium willdenovii)

Zigzag Larkspur (delphinium patens)

Coast Man-root, Wild Cucumber (marah oregana) - Note both 5 and 6 petal variations.

Also called stinking chamomile, dog fennel, horse fennel and a hundred other names. Can cause skin irritation if handled.

Anthemis cotula

Semiahmoo Spit, Blaine, WA

September 1, 2007

 

Probably stinking chamomile, but I didn't think to sniff it at the time...

Mating cabbage white butterfly's on dog fennel.

13 Oct 2017.

Buffalo Psychiatric Center, Erie Co, NY.

Found in a disturbed area.

NO:Tappgåseblom LAT:Anthemis cotula ENG:Stinking Chamomile SP:Manzanilla hedionda

Sted/Place:Estepona (Malaga) Dato/Date:03 2010 Str:15-90 cm Blomstring/Flowering:Mars-juli (3-7) Habitat:Åkerland, beitemarker,avfallsplasser.

 

En av mange kurvplanter ned hvite kronblader og gul krone. Etterhvert begynner de hvite kronbladene å henge (som hos kamille) og den gule kronen blir stående oppreist som en tapp som har gitt planten navnet tappgåseblom.

Sterk duft. Fjæraktig bladverk. Vokser ofte i store tepper i landskapet.

Found on waste ground at Yeovil, Somerset, England.

Photographed 16 June 2009.

Also called stinking chamomile, dog fennel, horse fennel and a hundred other names. Can cause skin irritation if handled.

Anthemis cotula

Semiahmoo Spit, Blaine, WA

September 1, 2007

 

NO:Tappgåseblom LAT:Anthemis cotula ENG:Stinking Chamomile SP:Manzanilla hedionda

Sted/Place:Estepona (Malaga) Dato/Date:03 2010 Str:15-90 cm Blomstring/Flowering:Mars-juli (3-7) Habitat:Åkerland, beitemarker,avfallsplasser.

 

En av mange kurvplanter ned hvite kronblader og gul krone. Etterhvert begynner de hvite kronbladene å henge (som hos kamille) og den gule kronen blir stående oppreist som en tapp som har gitt planten navnet tappgåseblom.

Sterk duft. Fjæraktig bladverk. Vokser ofte i store tepper i landskapet.

NO:Tappgåseblom LAT:Anthemis cotula ENG:Stinking Chamomile SP:Manzanilla hedionda

Sted/Place:Estepona (Malaga) Dato/Date:03 2010 Str:15-90 cm Blomstring/Flowering:Mars-juli (3-7) Habitat:Åkerland, beitemarker,avfallsplasser.

 

En av mange kurvplanter ned hvite kronblader og gul krone. Etterhvert begynner de hvite kronbladene å henge (som hos kamille) og den gule kronen blir stående oppreist som en tapp som har gitt planten navnet tappgåseblom.

Sterk duft. Fjæraktig bladverk. Vokser ofte i store tepper i landskapet.

NO:Tappgåseblom LAT:Anthemis cotula ENG:Stinking Chamomile SP:Manzanilla hedionda

Sted/Place:Estepona (Malaga) Dato/Date:03 2010 Str:15-90 cm Blomstring/Flowering:Mars-juli (3-7) Habitat:Åkerland, beitemarker,avfallsplasser.

 

En av mange kurvplanter ned hvite kronblader og gul krone. Etterhvert begynner de hvite kronbladene å henge (som hos kamille) og den gule kronen blir stående oppreist som en tapp som har gitt planten navnet tappgåseblom.

Sterk duft. Fjæraktig bladverk. Vokser ofte i store tepper i landskapet.

Species from Europe and North Africa

 

Now invasive in North America, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand

 

A major weed in croplands

 

Common name: Stinking chamomile

 

Photographed along the eastern edge of the Railroad Prairie Natural Area, Prairie County, Arkansas

NO:Tappgåseblom LAT:Anthemis cotula ENG:Stinking Chamomile SP:Manzanilla hedionda

Sted/Place:Estepona (Malaga) Dato/Date:03 2010 Str:15-90 cm Blomstring/Flowering:Mars-juli (3-7) Habitat:Åkerland, beitemarker,avfallsplasser.

 

Stengelfeste.

En av mange kurvplanter ned hvite kronblader og gul krone. Etterhvert begynner de hvite kronbladene å henge (som hos kamille) og den gule kronen blir stående oppreist som en tapp som har gitt planten navnet tappgåseblom.

Sterk duft. Fjæraktig bladverk. Vokser ofte i store tepper i landskapet.

Mayweed or Dog Fennel - this plant is very aromatic, causing some people to call it Stinking Chamomile but I find its odor very pleasant - has a variety of medicinal uses but can cause allergies and skin irritation - it is considered an invasive weed - photographed July 2, 2011 at Stones River National Battlefield

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