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Spirea (Spireae) is a bush, with groups of small flowers. Like other members of the rose family, the flowers have five-fold symmetry, and the petals are separate from each other. From a bush in my wife's flower garden, before we moved away.

 

Isn't God a great artist? Thanks for looking.

The deciduous plants dominate the shallow waters of the wetland lake. Also known as steeple bush, for the flowers that point to the sky.

This Photograph shows the Clearwater Community Church (and Descriptive Signs), which is located at 2897 Belcher Rd, Dunedin, FL 34698 (between Republic Drive & Beverly Drive) and North of Dunedin Fire Station Number 62.

Spring in my lawn

I think that the only standing water is in the deepest part of the lake.The deep area is some degree of mud.The shallow water is dominated by steeple bush. Waiting for the rains to pick up, probably next month.

Identifier: cu31924001183205

Title: In Berkshire fields

Year: 1920 (1920s)

Authors: Eaton, Walter Prichard, 1878-1957

Subjects: Natural history Natural history

Publisher: New York and London, Harper & Brothers

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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bt that accounts in large measure for the per-sistence of the breed. But even after they are wellgrown they must often stay by the parents, for onthe Crawford Bridle Path up Mount Washington,before it breaks out of the woods above timber-line, the partridges are extremely tame, and I haveapproached within six feet of a family of eight orten, led by a big cock. They went on feeding quiteundisturbed, scratching up the mossy soil with softlittle coots, like gentler domestic hens, and all fol-lowing behind the cock. There is nothing, to me, more fraught with charmand delightful associations than a New Englandupland pasture, a pasture of irregular outline, withcapes of fir and birch jutting into it from the sur-rounding forest, with a mountain going up above POKING AROUND FOR BIRDS NESTS 145 and a long green valley dropping away below, per-haps to the distant white spire of the village church,with patches here and there of raspberry and blue-berry and huckleberry bushes, and cow-paths amid

 

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The Blackbirds make lively, the air over the sedgy borders ofstreams and -ponds the fragrant sweet-fern, with thistle tops and steeple-bush to prick the field with pink, with the tinkle ofa distant cow-bell—and, as the sun is sinking in thewest, the fairy flutes of the white-throated sparrows!It is on the edges of such pastures that the white-throats (or Peabody birds) build their nests, from,the Adirondack and White Mountains northward.I think they infrequently nest farther south. In 146 IN BERKSHIRE FIELDS the Berkshire Hills, at any rate, they are migrants,though I have two personal records of them here inmid-July, and have not attained their true songwhen they pass through. The books of bird songsalmost invariably give the white-throats melodysomething as follows: And that is the way he sings till he reaches the WhiteMountains. But there, at least, he invariably, inmy experience, adds two more intervals, his songbeing as follows: This song, with its clearly marked intervals and

  

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Spiraea tomentosa, Jackson County Wisconsin, 22 August 2019.

It's called steeple bush for the flowers that point to the sky. Not really a bush, but in the proper moist environment it forms a thick bush. When the ground gets dry one can walk trough it, but it slows you down.

Spiraea tomentosa, Jackson County Wisconsin, 22 August 2019.

Spiraea tomentosa, Jackson County Wisconsin, 22 August 2019.

Spiraea tomentosa, Jackson County Wisconsin, 22 August 2019.

We are having a series of rain storms. The ground is very wet.

Gnesta, Sweden

 

Spiraea douglasii is a deciduous, clump-forming shrub that will spread by suckers to form colonies over time. It typically grows 4-6’ tall. It is native from Alaska to northern California and Montana where it is often found growing in moist soils of marshes, swamps, bogs, damp meadows and along streams.

 

Genus name comes from the Greek word speira meaning wreath in reference to the showy flower clusters seen on most shrubs in the genus.

 

Specific epithet honors Scottish botanist David Douglas.

 

www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDe...

Spiraea douglasii, steeple bush, starts shutting down in the fall. The deciduous plants keep their leafs, and the flowers still point to the sky

Steeplebush covers the shallow water of the wetland. The shallow waters of the lake are still dry. Waiting for the rains...

 

The steeple bush that dominates the shallow waters is buried by the wet snow

Over the wetland lake. The Spiraea douglasii is showing some new flowers.

Spiraea douglasii spends winter dormancy in the shallower waters of the wetland lake. The steeples are the spent flowers pointing up to the sky. The ground out here is still pretty wet.

As the lake water recedes, the lake plants are already growing. It seems like a short growing season.

A little colour in an hour of darkness.

Still a lot of water in the lake at this time. June 9, 2018.

The deciduous plant that dominates the shallow water of the wetland, which was tamped down by ice in a late winter storm.

Title: Kelsey's hardy American plants and Carolina mountain flowers

Identifier: CAT31285620

Year: 1902 (1900s)

Authors: Harlan P. Kelsey (Firm); Kelsey, Harlan P; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nursery stock Massachusetts Boston Catalogs; Trees Seedlings Catalogs; Shrubs Catalogs; Plants, Ornamental Catalogs; Flowers Catalogs

Publisher: [Boston, Mass. ] : Harlan P. Kelsey

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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K a to a n a, North Carolina, and "Boston, Massachusetts HARDY NATIVE SHRUBS • DECIDUOUS, Con. SALIX discolor. Pussy Willow. 8-25 ft. Good shrub for wet situations, quick growth. Silky " aments" appearing in earliest spring before the leaves. Cuttings, 10c. ea., 50c. for 10. sericea. Silky Willow. 5-12 ft. Showy spreading variety, densely flowered. 2-3 ft., 35c. ea., $3 for 10. SAMBUCUS canadensis. Common Elder. 4-10 ft. A fine shrub for massing. Showy cymes of white flowers in June and July and black-purple fruit. 1-2 ft., col., 15c. ea., $1 for 10. racemosa. Red- Berried Elder. 2- 12 ft. Very showy flowers in May and handsome bright red fruit in June. 1-2 ft., 25c. ea , $1.75 for 10. SPIRAEA du- mosa. West- e r n Spiraea. Low spreading sort. Very rare. i%-2l/2 ft., 35c. ea., $3 for 10. salicifolia. Meadow Sweet. 2-4 ft. Flowers white in June or July. 3- 4 ft., 25c. ea., $2 for 10; clumps, 4-6 ft., 35c. ea., $3 for 10. tomentosa. Steeple Bush. 2-4 ft. Fuzzy, dense, upright rose- colored panicles in June and July. 1-2 ft., 25c. ea., $2 for 10. van houttei. 4- 5 ft. Not na- tive. Bushy variety with abundant white flowers. 2-3 ft., 25c. ea., $2 for 10. STUARTIA pentagyna. Southern Stuartia. 6-15 ft. This, the so-called "American Camellia," is one of the most rare and beautiful of all North American shrubs. An erect shrub, well foliaged and with large, axillary flowers, 3 to 4 inches across, with white-creamy petals, deeply crenulated in the margins, resembling some of the single Camellias. June. 6-12 in., 25c. ea., $2 for 10; 1-2 ft., 40c. ea., $3 for 10; 2-3 ft., 75c. ea., $6 for 10. (See illustration.) SYMPHORICARPUS racemosus. Snowberry. 4 ft. A shrub much used for massing, the showy white-berried fruit hanging till late. Clumps, 1-2 ft., 15c. ea., $1.25 for 10; 2 ft., 25c. ea., $2 for 10. symphoricarpus (vulgaris). Coral Berry. 2-5 ft. With smaller berries than the preceding, which are red and thickly clustered. Clumps, 2-3 ft., 25c. ea., $1.50 for 10; 3-4 ft., 35c. ea., $2.50 for 10.

 

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Stuartia pentagyna. American Camellia. 23

  

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Identifier: illustratedguide00stev

Title: An illustrated guide to the flowering plants of the middle Atlantic and New England states (excepting the grasses and sedges) the descriptive text written in familiar language

Year: 1910 (1910s)

Authors: Stevens, George T. (George Thomas), 1832-1921

Subjects: Plants

Publisher: New York, Dodd, Mead and company

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

  

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p, individual flowers 1/6to 1/4 in. broad, white or pinkish-white. In moist grounds and on hill-sides in southern section of our range. June-Aug. 2. S. latifolia, Borkh. ]\Teadow Sweet. Similar to No. 1, but twigsare reddish or reddish-brown. Color of flowers as in No. 1. Common inpastures, etc. June-Aug. 3. S. tomentosa. L. (Fig. 3, pi. 62.) Hardtiack. Steeple Bush.Erect, slender shrub, generally with few or no branches. Stem coveredwith soft hairs. Flowers in a tall conical cluster, purple or pink. Inold fields and pastures in our area. July-Sept. 4. S. corymbosa, Raf. Cokymbed Spiraea. Leaves broadly oval oregg-shaped. Flowers in a spreading flattened cluster (corymb), white.Rocky places. New Jersey and south. May-June. 3- GILLENIA, Mcrnch. (Porteranthus, Britten) Erect herbs from a perennial root. Leaves 3-foliate with conspicouastipules. Flowers wiiitc or ])iiik with .5 hnig narrow petals insertedinto the throat of the calyx. Calyx tubular, of 5 sepals. Stamens 10 ROSE FAMILY 309

 

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Plate 62 1 Spiraea salicifolia. 2. Pl.ysocarpus opulifolius. 3. Spiraea tomentosa.4 Gillenia trifohata. 5. G. stipulata. 6. Kubus Chamaemorus. 7. R. odo- ratus. 310 ROSACEAE to 20, quite short. Seed carpels 5, united at base, each carpel with 2to 4 seeds. Stipules linear, not leaf-like G. irifoliata Stipules large, leaf-like G. stipulata 1. G. trifoliata, (L.) Moench. (Fig. 4, pi. 62.) Indian Physic.Bowmans Root. Plant 2 to 4 ft. high. Leaves 3-foliate; at the base,where the leaflets unite at the stem, are 2 narrow lance-shaped stipuleswithout teeth. Flowers in loose terminal clusters, the ovary small, thepetals long, slender, spreading, white or pink. Pods reddish. Wood-lands, southern part of our region. May-June. 2. G. stipulata, (Muhl.) Trel. (Fig. 5, pi. 62.) American Ipecac.Resembles tlio last species, but at the base of the 3 leaflets, which havea short leaf-stalk, is a pair of broad leaf-like stipules, giving the leafthe appearance of having 5 leaflets. The stipules are toothe

  

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Many of these deciduous plants circle the deep water of the weland.

Hardhack (Spiraea Douglasii), also known as "steeple bush". Native to the Pacific Northwest.

 

SOOC

 

Bradley Lake, Puyallup, WA | July 2009.

 

HPPT!

Title: The drug plants of Illinois

Identifier: drugplantsofilli44teho

Year: 1951 (1950s)

Authors: Tehon, L. R. (Leo Roy), 1895-1954

Subjects: Botany, Medical; Botany

Publisher: Urbana, Ill. : Natural History Survey Division

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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SPIGELIA MARILANDIGA L. In- dian pink, pink-root, worm-grass. American worm root, Carolina pink, star bloom. Loganiaceae.—An erect, unbranched, smooth herb l/^ to 2 feet high, perennial; rootstock (rhizome) small, short, dark, rough, fibrous-rooted, pleas- antly aromatic; stems usually several, 4- angled; leaves opposite, sessile, ovate, acuminate; flowers scarlet or crimson, yel- low within, funnel-shaped, 1 to 2 inches long, in solitary (sometimes 2 or 3), termi- nal, 1-sided, stalked spikes; fruit a double, few-seeded capsule, each part globular and small. The rhizome and roots collected after the plant has flowered. Locally abun- dant but scattered in woods through the Ozark region of Illinois and south to the Ohio River, Contains a volatile oil, resin, tannin, the alkaloid spigeline, and a bitter principle. Used as a vermifuge. \Ruellia ciliosa Pursh, Tennessee pink- root, is often confused with true pink-root by collectors. Care should be taken to avoid collecting Tennessee pink-root, as buyers de- mand true pink-root.]

 

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SPIRAEA TOMENTOSA L. Hard- hack, woolly meadow-sweet, steeple bush, silverweed. Rosaceae.—An erect, unbranched, white-hairy shrub up to 6 feet high; stems stiff, woolly or hairy, leafy; leaves oblanceolate to oval, 1 to 2 inches long, sharply serrate, crowded, al- ternate, short-petioled, green above, white- woolly beneath; flowers white or pink, small, very numerous in large, dense, ter- minal panicles. Bark of stem and root, also the leaves, collected. Infrequent, or locally common or abundant, in sand barrens and sandy woods in the northeastern quarter of the state. Contains tannic and gallic acids. Used as an internal and topical astringent.

  

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Red Admiral on what appears to be Steeple-bush (Spiraea douglasii) - Mount Desert Island, Maine

For the All New Scavenger Hunt #15 - A church with an adjacent cemetery. This cemetery's well established trees don't allow for much of a view of the church, but it's a lovely old cemetery! A county highway runs between the church and the cemetery.

The Spiraea douglasii was still putting leaves out.

Title: According to season; talks about the flowers in the order of their appearance in the woods and fields

Identifier: accordingtoseas00pars

Year: 1902 (1900s)

Authors: Parsons, Frances Theodora, 1861-1952

Subjects: Flowers

Publisher: New York, Scribner

Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries

  

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PLATE XIX

 

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STEEPLE-BUSH Spircea tomentosa

  

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Spiraea douglasii. Also known as hardhack. I see the spent flowers that look like steeples on the bush. The wetland is shutting down for the winter.

Title: An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British possessions : from Newfoundland to the parallel of the southern boundary of Virginia and from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the 102nd meridian

Identifier: ed2illustratedflo02brit

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Britton, Nathaniel Lord, 1859-1934; Brown, Addison, 1830-1913

Subjects: Botany

Publisher: New York : Scribner

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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3. Spiraea tomentosa L. Hardback. Steeple-bush. Fig. 2217. Spiraea tomentosa L. Sp. PI. 489. 1753. Erect, shrubby, usually simple, the stems floccose-pubescent. Leaves short-petioled, ovate or oval, 1-2' long, 6"-l2" wide, unequally ser- rate, obtuse or acutish at the apex, narrowed or roimded at the base, glabrous and dark-green above, woolly-pubescent with whitish hairs be- neath ; stipules deciduous or none; flowers pink or purple, rarely white, about 2" broad, in dense terminal panicles; follicles pubescent. In swamps and low ground. Nova Scotia to Mani- toba, south to Georgia and Kansas. Silver- -weed. White cap. Meadow-sweet. Poor man Spice-hardhack. Rosy-bush. July-Sept. -soap.

  

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Title: An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British possessions : from Newfoundland to the parallel of the southern boundary of Virginia and from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the 102nd meridian

Identifier: ed2illustratedflo02brit

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Britton, Nathaniel Lord, 1859-1934; Brown, Addison, 1830-1913

Subjects: Botany

Publisher: New York : Scribner

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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3. Spiraea tomentosa L. Hardback. Steeple-bush. Fig. 2217. Spiraea tomentosa L. Sp. PI. 489. 1753. Erect, shrubby, usually simple, the stems floccose-pubescent. Leaves short-petioled, ovate or oval, 1-2' long, 6"-l2" wide, unequally ser- rate, obtuse or acutish at the apex, narrowed or roimded at the base, glabrous and dark-green above, woolly-pubescent with whitish hairs be- neath ; stipules deciduous or none; flowers pink or purple, rarely white, about 2" broad, in dense terminal panicles; follicles pubescent. In swamps and low ground. Nova Scotia to Mani- toba, south to Georgia and Kansas. Silver- -weed. White cap. Meadow-sweet. Poor man Spice-hardhack. Rosy-bush. July-Sept. -soap.

 

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Title: On the birds' highway;

Identifier: cu31924022531390

Year: 1899 (1890s)

Authors: Howe, Reginald Heber, 1875-; Fuertes, Louis Agassiz, 1874-1927

Subjects: Birds

Publisher: Boston, Small, Maynard & Company

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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UNDER SHADOW OF WACHUSETT 87 bird flew while his mate scolded and hov- ered above the boat. Paddling up, I was taken aback to find in the crotch of the stub, but a foot above water, their nest and in it three blotched eggs. As I left them to their lighthouse home I wished them well, but if they had left the land for safety I had misgivings whether their offspring would ever reach terra firma, for their first flight would have to be over fifty yards. A wild venture for a young king. A kingfisher seemed to agree with me as he flew over. On the morning of July nineteenth I started on a seven-mile drive to the summit of Wachusett. The sky was overhung with dark rain-clouds as the horse trotted over the pond bridges leav- ing the farm. The roadside was gay with summer flowers; fire-weed, wood lilies, meadowsweet and steeple-bush caught the eye. Swallows circled about the old farms, cedar birds whined in the orchards and indigo birds sang incessantly from the young birches. Many vesper

  

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Title: An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British possessions, from Newfoundland to the parallel of the southern boundary of Virginia, and from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the 102d meridian

Identifier: cu31924024548525

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Britton, Nathaniel Lord, 1859-1934; Brown, Addison, 1830-1913

Subjects: Botany; Botany

Publisher: New York, Scribner

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Genus 2, ROSE FAMILY. 245

 

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I. Spiraea latifolia (Ait.) Borkh. American Meadow-sweet. Quaker Lady. Fig. 2215. 5'. salicifolia latifolia Ait. Hort. Kew. 2 : 198. 1789. 5'. latifolia Borkh. Handb. Forstbot. 1871. 1803. An erect shrub, 2°-6° high, simple, or branched above, nearly glabrous, the stems reddish or purplish. Leaves petioled, broadly oblanceolate or obovate, glabrous or very nearly so, sharply and rather coarsely serrate, especially above the middle, i'-2' long, 4"-i8" wide, or on young shoots much larger, obtuse or acutish at the apex, cuneate to rounded at the base, pale beneath; stipules deciduous or none; flowers white or pinkish-tinged, 2"-2" broad, in dense terminal panicles; follicles glabrous. In moist or rocky ground, Newfoundland to Saskatchewan, Virginia and western Pennsylva- nia. Called also queen-of-the-raeadow. Spice hard- hack. June-Aug. Included in our first edition in the description of the Asiatic S. salicifolia L., which has pubes- cent inflorescence, pink flowers and narrower ob- long leaves; it is sometimes cultivated and has escaped to roadsides in northern New York. 2. Spiraea alba DuRoi. Narrow-leaved Meadow-sweet. Fig. 2216. S. alba DuRoi, Harbk. Baumz. 2 ; 430. 1772. 5. salicifolia lanceolata T. & G. Fl. N. A. i : 415. 1840. A shrub up to 5° high, the twigs yellowish- brown, puberulent when young. Leaves petioled, narrowly oblanceolate to oblong, puberulent on the veins beneath, sharply and mostly finely ser- rate, acute at each end, i'-2j' long, 5"-8" wide; inflorescence narrowly paniculate, densely puberu- lent or tomentulose; petals white, suborbicular about i" long; follicles glabrous. In wet soil, Ontario to New York, North Carolina, Saskatchewan, Indiana and Missouri. June-Aug. 3. Spiraea tomentosa L. Hardback. Steeple-bush. Fig. 2217. Spiraea tomentosa L. Sp. PI. 489. 1753. Erect, shrubby, usually simple, the stems floccose-pubescent. Leaves short-petioled, ovate or oval, i'-2' long, 6"-i2" wide, unequally ser- rate, obtuse or acutish at the apex, narrowed or rounded at the base, glabrous and dark-green above, woolly-pubescent with whitish hairs be- neath; stipules deciduous or none; flowers pink or purple, rarely white, about 2" broad, in dense terminal panicles; follicles pubescent. In swamps and low ground, Nova Scotia to Mani- toba, south to Georgia and Kansas. Silver-leaf or -weed. White cap. Meadow-sweet. Poor man's-soap. Spice-hardhack. Rosy-bush. July-Sept.

  

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Identifier: illustratedflor02brit

Title: An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British possessions : from Newfoundland to the parallel of the southern boundary of Virginia and from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the 102nd meridian; 2nd ed.

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Britton, Nathaniel Lord, 1859-1934 Brown, Addison, 1830-1913

Subjects: Botany

Publisher: New York : Scribner

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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beneath, sharply and mostly finely ser-rate, acute at each end, i-2i long, 5-8 wide;inflorescence narrowly paniculate, densely puberu-lent or tomentulose; petals white, stiborbicularabout i long; follicles glabrous. In wet soil, Ontario to New York, North Carolina.Saskatchewan, Indiana and Missouri. June—Aug. 3. Spiraea tomentosa L. Hardback.Steeple-bush. Fig. 2217. Spiraea tomciilosa 1.. Sp. PI. 489. 1753. Erect, shrubby, usually simple, the stemsfloccose-pubescent. Leaves short-petioled, ovateor oval, 1-2 long, 6-i2 wide, unequally ser-rate, obtuse or acutish at the apex, narrowed orrounded at the base, glabrous and dark-grcu-above, woolly-pubescent with whitish hairs Iineath; stipules deciduous or none; flowers pinl.or purple, rarely white, about 2 broad, in denseterminal panicles; follicles pubescent. In swamps and low ground. Nova Scotia to Mani-toba, south to Georgia and Kansas. Silver-leaf or-weed. White cap. Meadow-sweet. Poor mans-soap.Spico-hardhack. Rosy-bush. July-Scpt.

 

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Something For Hope

 

At the present rate it must come to pass

And that right soon, that the meadowsweet

And steeple bush, not good to eat,

Will have crowded out the edible grass.

 

Then all there is to do is wait

For maple, birch, and spruce to push

Through meadowsweet and steeple bush

And crowd them out at a similar rate.

 

No plow among these rocks would pay.

So busy yourself with other things

While the trees put on their wooden rings

And with long-sleeved branches hold their sway.

 

Then cut down the trees when lumber grown,

And there's your pristine earth all freed

From lovely blooming but wasteful weed

And ready again for the grass to own.

 

A cycle we'll say of a hundred years.

Thus foresight does it and laissez-faire,

A virtue in which we all may share

Unless a government interferes.

 

Patience and looking away ahead,

And leaving some things to take their course.

Hope may not nourish a cow or horse,

But spes alit agricolam 'tis said.

 

Green Mountain National Forest; Rt 125, Ripton, Vermont

We used to attend this church for a while. It had a bell up top with a rope that lead down and the kids could pull.

 

I don't think I have particularly fond memories of this place.

This church is in use - spotted as we walked back from Cong to Ashford Castle - on the other side of the river.

Spiraea x pseudosalicifolia, late June. A hybrid between Spiraea douglasii (Steeple-bush) and Spiraea salicifolia (Bridewort) - commonly known as Confused bridewort.

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