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South Glamorgan - DSC_2506_tonemapped

South Glamorgan - DSC_2479_tonemapped

This forms part of the long exposure series.

 

I used a B&W 110 ND.

Cardiff Bay - DSC_2661

Cardiff Bay - DSC_2683

Not as posh as city of London ? Cardiff city centre can beat it any day:))

 

South Glamorgan - DSC_2493_tonemapped

South Glamorgan - DSC_2440_tonemapped

The sun begins to cut through morning mist and factory smoke draped over East Bute Dock, Atlantic Wharf in Cardiff.

 

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South Glamorgan - DSC_2473_tonemapped

Cardiff Bay - DSC_2605

Cardiff Bay - P1070282

Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff Bay - DSC_2132

Llanblethian’s castle is known as “St Quentin’s Castle” which belies the fact that the masonry structure standing above the River Thaw today was built by Earl Gilbert de Clare in the early C14th. However, it may occupy the site of an earlier keep. It’s also unclear if his castle was ever finished; though it’s imposing and recently restored grade 2 listed gatehouse is recorded to have served as a prison in Tudor times. Facing it on Mount Ida across the river the remains of another medieval fortification can still be made out.

  

Today Llanblethian is virtually without commercial or industrial premises. It lies in a predominantly agricultural setting surrounded by farms whose names are still echoed in today’s domestic dwellings such as Kingscombe House and Stallcourt House. However, it has boasted at least three water mills. Corn was ground at The Mill at the foot of St Quentin’s Hill from the early C16th; while another mill stood opposite the parish hall and a fulling mill - for producing traditional Welsh flannel - was powered by Factory Brook from the C14th until production ceased in 1913. In the mid C20th Llanblethian’s Post Office was to be found on Factory Road and there was a bakery on Greenfield Way. Picton House on Church Road and Belgrave House at the start of Llanmihangel Road were once the Picton Arms and the Kings’s Head; the Cross Inn alone continues as a public house. From at least 1841 until 1903 the Cross Inn was owned/managed by my great, great grandparents - William James (born in Llysworney in 1840) and Ann James nee Elward (born in St. Donats in 1842).

 

www.llanblethiancommunitygroup.org.uk/LCG/Village_History...

The fires of Sauron's Uruk-hai army light up the sky with foreboding as we approach Isengard by way of South Glamorgan.

 

More realistically, this is a summer dawn seen from Nash Point on the south coast of Wales. Nash Point on the Heritage Coast is known for its marvelous cliffs and rock pavements.

 

(D6330)

Cardiff Bay Barrage lies across the mouth of Cardiff Bay, Wales between Queen Alexandra Dock and Penarth Head. It was one of the largest civil engineering projects in Europe during construction in the 1990s.The origin of the scheme dates back to a visit by the Secretary of State for Wales Nicholas Edwards Conservative MP for Pembrokeshire to the largely-derelict Cardiff docklands in the early 1980s. An avid opera enthusiast, Edwards envisaged a scheme to revitalise the area incorporating new homes, shops, restaurants and, as a centrepiece, an opera house at the waterside. However the tidal nature of Cardiff Bay, exposing extensive mudflats save for two hours either side of high water, was seen as aesthetically unappealing.

 

Edwards credited the solution to this perceived problem to a Welsh Office civil servant, Freddie Watson. Watson proposed building a barrage stretching across the mouth of Cardiff Bay from Cardiff Docks to Penarth, which would impound freshwater from the rivers Ely and Taff to create a large freshwater lake, thus providing permanent high water. By making the area more appealing, investment was to be attracted to the docklands.

 

The barrage was consequently seen as central to the regeneration project. In 1987, prior to approval of the construction of the barrage, the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation was established to proceed with redeveloping the docklands, a sixth of the entire area of the city of Cardiff.

Cardiff Bay - DSC_2632

Cardiff Bay Barrage lies across the mouth of Cardiff Bay, Wales between Queen Alexandra Dock and Penarth Head. It was one of the largest civil engineering projects in Europe during construction in the 1990s.The origin of the scheme dates back to a visit by the Secretary of State for Wales Nicholas Edwards Conservative MP for Pembrokeshire to the largely-derelict Cardiff docklands in the early 1980s. An avid opera enthusiast, Edwards envisaged a scheme to revitalise the area incorporating new homes, shops, restaurants and, as a centrepiece, an opera house at the waterside. However the tidal nature of Cardiff Bay, exposing extensive mudflats save for two hours either side of high water, was seen as aesthetically unappealing.

 

Edwards credited the solution to this perceived problem to a Welsh Office civil servant, Freddie Watson. Watson proposed building a barrage stretching across the mouth of Cardiff Bay from Cardiff Docks to Penarth, which would impound freshwater from the rivers Ely and Taff to create a large freshwater lake, thus providing permanent high water. By making the area more appealing, investment was to be attracted to the docklands.

 

The barrage was consequently seen as central to the regeneration project. In 1987, prior to approval of the construction of the barrage, the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation was established to proceed with redeveloping the docklands, a sixth of the entire area of the city of Cardiff.

Cardiff Bay - DSC_2114_tonemapped

From Penarth Beach - DSC_2516

Aerial Shots of Tremorfa.

Barry Island - DSC_2527

Aerial Shots of Tremorfa.

Candid captured in Stafford, England.

Nathan Cleverly (right) and Tony Bellew meet at a press and public conference overseen by boxing promoter Eddie Hearn (centre) in Cardiff City Hall. Their WBO world light-heavyweight title rematch is on November 22nd at the Liverpool Echo Arena.

 

More: www.demotix.com/news/5909332/boxers-nathan-cleverly-and-t...

 

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Cardiff Bay - P1070241

Aerial Shots of Tremorfa.

On my visit, the tunnel was particularly misty at times, esp. nearer the south portal. This view from the north end is not too bad. The rustiness to the side is the result of just the one reinforcing ring found throughout the whole just over a mile long bore. This might be a metal butt joint, as the bore showed no signs of bulging or stress.

Cardiff Bay Barrage lies across the mouth of Cardiff Bay, Wales between Queen Alexandra Dock and Penarth Head. It was one of the largest civil engineering projects in Europe during construction in the 1990s.The origin of the scheme dates back to a visit by the Secretary of State for Wales Nicholas Edwards Conservative MP for Pembrokeshire to the largely-derelict Cardiff docklands in the early 1980s. An avid opera enthusiast, Edwards envisaged a scheme to revitalise the area incorporating new homes, shops, restaurants and, as a centrepiece, an opera house at the waterside. However the tidal nature of Cardiff Bay, exposing extensive mudflats save for two hours either side of high water, was seen as aesthetically unappealing.

 

Edwards credited the solution to this perceived problem to a Welsh Office civil servant, Freddie Watson. Watson proposed building a barrage stretching across the mouth of Cardiff Bay from Cardiff Docks to Penarth, which would impound freshwater from the rivers Ely and Taff to create a large freshwater lake, thus providing permanent high water. By making the area more appealing, investment was to be attracted to the docklands.

 

The barrage was consequently seen as central to the regeneration project. In 1987, prior to approval of the construction of the barrage, the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation was established to proceed with redeveloping the docklands, a sixth of the entire area of the city of Cardiff.

Cardiff Bay Barrage lies across the mouth of Cardiff Bay, Wales between Queen Alexandra Dock and Penarth Head. It was one of the largest civil engineering projects in Europe during construction in the 1990s.The origin of the scheme dates back to a visit by the Secretary of State for Wales Nicholas Edwards Conservative MP for Pembrokeshire to the largely-derelict Cardiff docklands in the early 1980s. An avid opera enthusiast, Edwards envisaged a scheme to revitalise the area incorporating new homes, shops, restaurants and, as a centrepiece, an opera house at the waterside. However the tidal nature of Cardiff Bay, exposing extensive mudflats save for two hours either side of high water, was seen as aesthetically unappealing.

 

Edwards credited the solution to this perceived problem to a Welsh Office civil servant, Freddie Watson. Watson proposed building a barrage stretching across the mouth of Cardiff Bay from Cardiff Docks to Penarth, which would impound freshwater from the rivers Ely and Taff to create a large freshwater lake, thus providing permanent high water. By making the area more appealing, investment was to be attracted to the docklands.

 

The barrage was consequently seen as central to the regeneration project. In 1987, prior to approval of the construction of the barrage, the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation was established to proceed with redeveloping the docklands, a sixth of the entire area of the city of Cardiff.

A dark figure out from the tree looming and sinking slowly in the deep forest, reaching out with clawed fingers and raised arms.

 

I have mirrored a half of the frame to create this effect.

 

Tree in the woods near Cardiff, South Glamorgan, Wales, UK.

   

In Bute Park in the centre of Cardiff, sunlight and cow parsley under the trees in Blackweir Wood.

 

Explore #25, 22nd May 2014 - Thanks everyone!

blacksmith at st fagans museum in wales. handheld at iso 3200 and still a fantastic quality!

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