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A couple of shots with the 50mm for a change: looking from the lifts towards platform 1.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

The steps from platform 1 back up the the lifts and stairs.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

The only completed passageway leading from the lift shaft to Platform 1.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Platform 1:I managed to get to the front of the tour to get this shot with no people in it.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

1964 was a year of considerable change in Britain, with the abolition of hanging and a new economic confidence.

 

Culturally, Britannia was ruling the waves with The Beatles, The Kinks and The Rolling Stones topping the charts.

 

Ambitious plans were agreed with the French government for a Channel Tunnel to be built by the end of the decade.

 

It was a time of great change as Britain had finally shed its post-war austerity and looked forward with a new confidence and prosperity.

 

The year was one of major upheaval in British history. National Service had been abolished in 1960 but the final troops involved on their compulsory military tour of duty were not sent home until the end of December 1963.

 

Unlike their fathers and grandfathers, teenagers in 1964 were not facing the prospect of a European war and increasing living standards allowed them a disposable income.

 

The Labour leader, Harold Wilson, entered the 1964 campaign determined to end "13 wasted years" under the Tories.

 

The populist Wilson seemed to reflect the public mood for change. The Conservative leader, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, was widely perceived as a distant, awkward aristocrat. Nevertheless, Wilson won only a tiny majority; another election seemed imminent.

 

By the time of the 1964 general election, the Conservative Party had been in power for 13 years. Since Prime Minister Harold Macmillan's election victory in 1959, Conservative fortunes had plummeted.

 

The buoyant economy that led to Macmillan's election was faltering by 1961. The following year, in a bid to restore his popularity, Macmillan sacked seven members of his cabinet in a move dubbed the "Night of the Long Knives". It was a ploy that failed. The Government ran into further problems when Britain's application to join the Common Market was rejected by the French President, Charles de Gaulle.

 

Scandal added to the Government's woes when John Profumo, the Minister for War, was forced to resign after he admitted lying to Parliament over his involvement with the call girl, Christine Keeler. The Government looked tired, embattled and increasingly out of step with the public mood.

 

In 1964, an ailing socialist broadsheet, 'The Daily Herald', was re-launched as 'The Sun' and in 1968 the owners (Reed International) put it up for sale. Of the two bidders (the other being Labour MP, Robert Maxwell), Murdoch won with a bid for £800,000. In 1967 he had already purchased the 'News of the World'.

 

The new 'Sun' re-launched in 1969 and became a spicier version of 'The Mirror'. The very first issue carried a photo of the Rolling Stones with a naked female. Sex was to be the main ingredient of the paper. Soft porn came to fill almost every page together with lurid sex stories. Within 100 days, circulation had jumped from 850,000 to 1.5 million. By 1987 the paper was making £1 million a week These profits were pumped into BSkyB and Fox, subesquently turning them into the two biggest pillars of the Murdoch empire today.

 

What's on TV?

 

The Magic Roundabout, The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, My Fair Lady and The Pink Panther, Mary Poppins was there any other year in the fabulous 1960’s which produced so many entertainment trendsetters as 1964?

 

On TV for the first time, in the domestic comedy Bewitched, the nation was delighted to meet long-suffering Darrin and his

wife Samantha, the most attractive witch to ever ride a broomstick.

 

The Crossroads motel, which featured Brummie accents for the first time on TV, The Magic Roundabout opened its doors and Dougal, Zebedee and Florence delighted children and adults alike by taking us for a ride on The Magic Roundabout, one of the most successful children’s shows ever seen on TV.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zCGjSoZzkY

 

In January, Steptoe and Son, an unlikely comedy written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson about a family rag and bone business, was declared Britain’s most popular TV show. With battling father and son wonderfully portrayed by Wilfred Bramble and Harry H.Corbett the show went on to become something of an institution. It was claimed that 26 million viewers in 9,653,000 homes had tuned in to the latest series.

 

Labour leader Harold Wilson secretly lobbied the BBC to change the time of popular comedy Steptoe and Son on the night of the 1964 election because he feared working class voters would stay at home and watch the show instead of supporting his candidates.

 

According to new archive footage held by the BBC, Mr Wilson went to the home of BBC Director General Sir Hugh Greene and told him the show could cost him 20 seats.

 

Mr Wilson was leader of the opposition and was seeking to oust the Conservative Prime Minister Alec Douglas Home. The Labour leader thought the planned repeat of the sit-com starring Harry H Corbett and Wilfrid Brambell would hit them badly.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPDgpkf27r8

 

Much excitement was caused when a new TV channel appeared in 1964 and BBC 2 was born. Play School, the first programme to be screened, took us through the window to meet Little Ted and Big Ted, plus kids all-time favourite presenter Johnny Ball, who grew up in Kingswood, Bristol.

 

A lighter, much more transportable TV set, with an 11-inch screen and weighing only 16 lbs, appeared in the shops in August. These sets received BOTH ITV and BBC services on special “rabbits ears” aerials. If you couldn’t afford a telly, and many couldn’t 60 years ago, you could hire one for six shillings and sixpence a week.

 

UK TV Adverts from 1964 Including: Kellogg's Corn Flakes, Dual Floor Polish, Goodyear G8 Tyres, Surf Washing Powder, BSM School Of Motoring, St Bruno Pipe Tobacco, Brolac Paint, Fairy Washing Up Liquid, Body Mist Deodorant and S & H Pink Stamps.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcKuOMVcqfI

 

Sport on TV

 

Sports fans weren’t forgotten. On the 22 August 22, they were treated to the voice of Kenneth Wolstenholme and the very first Match of the Day. A paltry 50,000 viewers tuned in to watch Liverpool beat Arsenal 3-2. But very often all the fans got were recorded highlights rather than live action. It didn’t transfer from minority channel BBC 2 to the mainstream BBC 1 until after the World Cup triumph of 1966.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZGixE07jaU

 

1964 was, of course the year of the Tokyo Olympics. We won four gold medals. Mary Rand from Wells (who was also named BBC sports personality of the year) won the long jump, Anne Parker and Lynn Davies the 800 metres and Ken Mathews the 20km race walk.

 

Music

 

1964 was a golden year for pop music. The Rolling Stones, The Dave Clark Five, Liverpool’s The Swinging Blue Jeans, Manchester’s The Hollies and the late Dusty Springfield launched a BBC flagship Top of the Pops. Coming from its first home, a converted Manchester church.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUFFRd27YDw

 

The Beatles had by 1964 already toured the country to unbelievably hysterical scenes and were at their peak, scoring number one hits with Can’t buy me Love, A Hard Day’s Night and I Feel Fine. In February Beatle-mania gripped the US as the Fab Four took the place by storm, capturing the first five places in the singles charts as well as the top two positions in the album listings. In July, 10,000 screaming teenage fans thronged London’s West End as Princess Margaret arrived for the Premiere of their first film A Hard Day’s Night.

 

Even before Pan Am flight 101 touched down at JFK Airport in New York it was obvious that The Beatles had already conquered the American market. In January 'I want to hold your hand' sold half a million records in less than a fortnight, and is number one in the USA at the start of February.

 

A crowd of 3,000 screaming fans waits for the arrival of the Fab Four; the LP 'Meet the Beatles' hits number one at the end of January and stays there for almost three months; before they land music stations throughout the country are playing Beatles songs more than anybody else's, and after they land some stations play almost nothing else for days.

 

Once installed in their hotel in New York, The Plaza, the band is to all intents and purposes under siege by fans eager to see them, or seemingly to rip them limb from limb given the chance.

 

The highlight of the brief trip to the USA comes on February 9 , with their appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show. There are 728 seats available for the show; 50,000 apply for them. The Beatles play five songs, opening with 'All my Loving' and closing with 'I Want to Hold your Hand', with much screaming to accompany every note.

 

According to TV ratings company Nielsen their appearance on the show was seen by 73 million viewers. Beatlemania had arrived with a bang.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hlm7JyCHwcE

 

More than 300 people are injured in Liverpool when a crowd of some 150,000 people welcome The Beatles back to their home city.

 

The Beatles gain the Christmas number one for the second year running with I Feel Fine, which has topped the singles charts for the third week running. The Beatles have now had six number ones in the United Kingdom alone.

 

The Rolling Stones, founded by Cheltenham blues fanatic Brian Jones and fronted by the energetic, rubber lips, Mick Jagger, had their first top 10 hit with Not Fade Away.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-ycN9EOi8o

 

Talented songwriters, the Davies brothers, came up with the

Kinks’ first hit, You really Got Me, and a sensational young Scots lass with a husky voice called Lulu had a smash with that Isley Brothers favourite Shout.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2GmzyeeXnQ

 

For these young people, recently dubbed teenagers, Bob Dylan described the situation pretty accurately when he sang 'The Times They Are A-Changin', released in January 1964.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=abGzxWuLQP8

 

For those wanting to hear more pop music than was available via the BBC (which wasn’t much until Radio One came along)

 

Radio Caroline, the first pirate ship, began broadcasting from

international waters in March. It was legal, just, but the government didn’t like it. In May, the vessel was joined by Radio Atlanta.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8xvfBraulg

 

The United Kingdom held a national selection to choose the song that would go to the Eurovision Song Contest 1964. It was held on 7 February 1964 and presented by David Jacobs.

 

"I Love the Little Things" by Matt Monro won the national and went on to come 2nd in the contest.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=EX-ud8sm6Hg

 

Film-goers that memorable year were not disappointed. Sean Connery’s James Bond battled it out with Goldfinger, while Ian Fleming, James Bond’s creator, died of a heart attack in August aged just 56. The big romance of the year was the March marriage of glamorous movie stars Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSFE_xqL5Rk

 

UK News

 

In October the Labour Party, with canny pipe- smoking Yorkshireman Harold Wilson at the helm of a national economic plan, regained power after 13 years of Tory rule.

 

1964: 'Great Train Robbers' get 300 years

 

Some of the longest sentences in British criminal history have been imposed on men involved in the so-called "Great Train Robbery".

 

Sentences totalling 307 years were passed on 12 men who stole £2.6m in used bank notes after holding up the night mail train travelling from Glasgow to London last August.

 

The judge at Buckinghamshire Assizes in Aylesbury, Mr Justice Edmund Davies, said it would be "positively evil" if he showed leniency.

 

The robbery was the biggest-ever carried out in Britain.

 

Violent disturbances between Mods and Rockers at Clacton beach

 

Gang fights have gone on in Britain for centuries; but in the mid-1960s a tribal element arrived on the scene in the form of Mods and Rockers.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Rj-OHCusEI

 

Mods were cool: they wore Italian-style suits beneath badge-bedecked parkas; they had carefully coiffed hair; rode Lambretta and Vespa scooters; and listened to new bands like The Who and The Small Faces and ska greats like Prince Buster. Rockers were grungier: they wore leathers as befitted ton-up bikers; had long and often greasy hair; and were fans of Elvis, Buddy Holly and Gene Vincent.

 

The two tribes went to war first – at least in a large scale fight – in Clacton over Easter 1964. But the Whitsun weekend of May 18 and 19 saw things escalate hugely. There were battles in Broadstairs , Bournemouth , Hastings , Margate , Clacton again, and most notably in Brighton . Thousands from each side had gathered in theory for a seaside break that turned into turf battles: deckchairs were a weapon of convenience; flick-knives favoured by many Mods; bike-chains by Rockers.

 

As ever the poor police stood between the factions and had bottles thrown at them.

 

Middle Britain panicked into thinking civilisation was coming to an end. It didn’t; but hundreds of teenagers were fined, and some had short prison sentences for their part in the violence.

 

Moors murders: A missing persons investigation is launched in Fallowfield, Manchester, as police search for twelve-year-old Keith Bennett, who went missing on the previous evening.

 

Peter Anthony Allen, at Walton Prison in Liverpool, and Gwynne Owen Evans, at Strangeways Prison in Manchester, are hanged for the murder of John Alan West on 7 April, the last executions to take place in the British Isles.

 

On the local front, Avonmouth’s 1,500 dockers walked out on strike in January. The same month, the Lord Mayor of Bristol opened the first of five tower blocks to be built at Hartcliffe and in March Mr Marples announced the route of the M5 motorway through Gloucestershire and Somerset. In July, as the school holidays started, it was reported that there were 100 miles of traffic jams on the A38, then still the main route from the Midlands to the South-West.

 

1964 The Cost of Living

 

Television viewing

 

TV Rental for a 17 inch TV from Derwent’s of Park St. was six shillings and six pence (6s 6d) a week and for a giant 19 inch, nine shillings and seven pence. (9s 7d) At John James shops, the best deal in town, a set cost just four shillings if you rented it over three years. New TV’s were expensive in 1964. John James were offering a top 19 inch model with 625 lines for 68 guineas. Average wages at the time were anything from £10 to £15 a week. Having said that you could buy an ordinary model for a modest 29 Guineas. . '

 

Holidays

 

Package holidays had started to boom in 1964. Everybody was mad about them because it gave you the chance to fly for the first time and experience a ‘foreign’ holiday in the sun. "

 

Top Bristol travel agents Hourmont were offering 15 days away in Majorca for £41 -10s or the same time in Benidorn on the Costa Blanca for £43.00. At the cheaper end of the market LEP Travel could offer the same holiday for £29-18-0. Four days in Paris - flying from Lulsgate - would only set you back £19.00.

 

Housing

 

In 1964 you could buy a terraced Victorian house in Totterdown for £1 ,300 or an established house in leafy Westbury Park for about £5,000. Somewhere cosy in Eastville was about £2,000 and an ordinary three-bedroom semi about £3,000. But there were bargains to be had if you had money in the bank and a little foresight. An eight-room house in Clifton-wood, in need of renovation but overlooking the docks, was advertised for £800 — cash in hand only.

 

High street prices

 

A trip to a good hairdressers has always been expensive. In 1964 a perm could cost you 42 shillings, just over £2.00, while that fur trimmed coat from C&As would set you back seven guineas. '

 

Furnishing your house? You could bring home a modern Scandinavian three-piece suite forjust 32 guineas. lf, however, you were happy with an ordinary fireside chair, you’d get one from a department store for £8-10s-0d.

 

A state-of-the-art automatic washing machine, not a twin tub, cost a whopping £50.00.

 

A new baby? Horwoods in Old Market were selling top line prams for £17-19-6.

 

Transport

 

On the Roads in 1964 there were just a few sections of Motorway open but a big construction of the motorway system was underway seeing more sections opening each year.

 

Those actually open in 1964 were as follows:

 

M1 Junctions 5 to 18, M2 Junctions 2 to 5, M4 The Chiswick flyover (Junction 1) and Junctions 5 to 9, M5 Junctions 4 to 8, M6 Junctions 13 to 35, M20 Junctions 5 to 8 and the M45, M63 and M10 were complete.

 

Latest cars on the road in 1964 included the Vauxhall Viva and the Ford Anglia the Cortina also being a very popular car of the time.

 

The Forth Road Bridge was opened and in 1965 the Severn Bridge was opened.

 

If you were lucky enough to fly in 1964 you would of probably flown by BOAC ( British Overseas Airways Corporation ) or BEA (British European Airways ) and the VC 10 was the latest aeroplane.

 

Ford Anglias were all the rage in 1964. A second hand one cost £490.00. A new Mini would set you back about £448 and a popular Triumph Herald £515.

 

Announcement that American car manufacturer Chrysler is taking a substantial share in the British Rootes Group combine, which includes the Hillman, Singer and Sunbeam marques.

 

Daihatsu becomes the first Japanese car-maker to import passenger cars to the United Kingdom, launching its Compagno on the British market.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhSXNr4_hUA

 

Beer & Fags

 

Beer was between 1/6 and 2/0 a pint; a double whisky or other spirit was rather more. Indeed, in those days spirit drinkers usually kept out of rounds and bought their own.

 

Smoking was still extremely popular in 1964, nearly 70% of men and around 40% of women smoked. The most popular brand in the UK was "Embassy Filter".

 

One old shilling (1/0) was worth 5 new pence.

 

Government figures show that the average weekly wage is £16. £10 banknotes are issued for the first time since the Second World War.

 

Teen girls' magazine Jackie first published.

 

The final edition of the left-wing Daily Herald newspaper is published. The Sun newspaper goes into circulation, replacing the Daily Herald.

 

Sport

 

Fred Trueman – ‘Fiery Fred’ – was one of England’s greatest cricketers, becoming the first English bowler to take 300 test wickets when he dismissed Australian batsman Neil Hawke in the Oval test of 1964, Colin Cowdray taking the catch at slip.

 

Typically of his career he was coming back after having been dropped for the previous match (at Old Trafford ). This was doubtless partly as he was past his very best – though a mediocre Trueman was better than many subsequent England quicks at the top of their game - partly as he rarely found favour with the gentleman amateurs who still had a major say in the sport both at Yorkshire and in the England set-up.

 

Had he perish the thought been subservient he would probably have played another dozen tests or so.

 

There was little that was conventional about Fred Trueman , except perhaps his classically smooth bowling action.

 

Through his career he regularly managed to get on the wrong side of many blazer-bedecked committee types who ran cricket “In my day” as he would have said with his favourite post-career phrase. As a summariser on Test Match Special he continued to annoy some of the playing establishment, never one to water down deserved criticism, especially of lack of effort, thought or heart – “I don’t know what’s going off” his exasperated response to such moments.

 

Trueman was indefatigable, and achieved his 300 wickets by bending his back – not like some by bending his arm.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=aP9J5akyKTQ

 

Liverpool win the Football League First Division for the sixth time in their history.

 

West Ham United win the FA Cup for the first time in their history, beating Preston North End 3-2 at Wembley Stadium.

 

5 April 1964 - Tottenham captain Danny Blanchflower, 38, announced his retirement from playing.

 

8 April 1964 - Blackburn Rovers are announced as England's participant in the 1964 edition of the International Soccer League.

 

11 April 1964 – Scotland beat England 1–0 in the British Home Championship to leave the two level on four points in the final table. Northern Ireland subsequently defeated Wales to finish level on points with the other two, thus ensuring that the title was shared between three nations.

 

12 April 1964 – The Sunday People publishes allegations that lead to a betting scandal. It reported that Mansfield Town player Jimmy Gauld had, over several years, systematically engaged in match fixing, and that many other players were involved.

 

18 April 1964 – Liverpool beat Arsenal 5–0 at Anfield to secure the title. In their penultimate game of the season, Ipswich Town lose 3–1 to Blackburn Rovers, confirming their relegation two years after winning the League championship.

 

22 April 1964 – Leicester City win the League Cup – their first major trophy – with a 4–3 aggregate victory over Stoke City.

 

25 April 1964 – On the final day of the Second Division season, Leeds United win 2–0 at Charlton Athletic and Sunderland fail to beat Grimsby Town, meaning Leeds were crowned champions.

 

2 May 1964 – West Ham United beat Preston North End 3–2 at Wembley to win the FA Cup for the first time. Trailing 2–1 going into the final minutes of the match, West Ham scored two goals in as many minutes to the deny Preston.

 

Other News

 

All schools in Aberdeen are closed following 136 cases of typhoid being reported.

 

Terence Conran opens the first Habitat store on London's Fulham Road.

 

"Pirate" radio station Radio Sutch begins broadcasting from Shivering Sands Army Fort in the Thames Estuary.

 

Official opening of the UK's first undercover shopping centre, at the Bull Ring, Birmingham.

 

The Post Office Tower in London is completed, although it does not begin operation until October 1965.

 

Some 90% of British households now own a television, compared to around 25% in 1953 and 65% in 1959.

 

The first successful Minicomputer, Digital Equipment Corporation’s 12-bit PDP-8, is marketed.

 

Toy of the year: Mr Potato Head

 

1964 USA

 

1964 as the war in Vietnam and US Congress Authorizes war against N Vietnam more American servicemen were dying, and after three civil rights workers were murdered in Mississippi the president signed the Civil Rights act of 1964 but this did not stop the violence as it continued to increase in many American Cities.

 

Lyndon Johnson was also returned to power after a landslide victory. This was also the year The Beatles took the world and America by storm and Beatlemania went into overdrive as they released a series of number one hits including "I want to hold your hand" , "All my Loving" . Other British groups also found success including The Rolling Stones and The Animals and together with the American Talent of The Supremes and Bob Dylan many say this was one of the greatest years for music in the last century.

 

Also one young loud talented boxer by the name of Cassius Clay won the Boxing World heavyweight championship from Sonny Liston.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3PI95z_iMo

 

1964 World Headlines

 

13 Jan - Riots in Calcutta leave more than 100 dead

 

More than 100 people have been killed following Hindu-Muslim rioting in the Indian city of Calcutta.

 

06 Feb - Green light for Channel Tunnel

 

The British and French Governments have announced their commitment to build a tunnel under the English Channel.

 

07 Feb - Beatlemania arrives in the US

 

The four members of the British hit band, the Beatles, have arrived in New York at the start of their first tour of the United States.

 

12 Feb - Deaths follow Cyprus truce breach

 

Fighting between ethnic Turks and Greeks in the disputed island of Cyprus has left at least 16 people dead.

 

25 Feb - Cassius Clay crowned world champion

 

Cassius Clay, 22, has been crowned heavyweight champion of the world after beating Sonny Liston in one of the biggest upsets in boxing's history.

 

29 Feb - Royal baby for leap year day

 

The Queen's cousin, Princess Alexandra, has given birth to a son at her home in Surrey.

 

12 Mar - Hoffa faces eight years behind bars

 

The president of the powerful American Teamsters union has been sentenced to eight years in jail on bribery charges.

 

14 Mar - Jack Ruby sentenced to death

 

Jack Ruby has been sentenced to death after being found guilty of the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of President John F Kennedy.

 

19 Mar - 'Ambitious' plans for south east

 

Three new cities are proposed for south east England as part of the largest regional expansion plan in Britain. The 'new towns' eventually created were Milton Keynes, Havant and Basingstoke.

 

16 Apr - 'Great Train Robbers' get 300 years

 

Some of the longest sentences in British criminal history have been imposed on men involved in the so-called "Great Train Robbery".

 

14 May - Nasser and Khrushchev divert the Nile

 

President Gamal Abdul Nasser of Egypt and Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev have marked the first stage in the building of the Aswan High Dam.

 

27 May - Light goes out in India as Nehru dies

 

Jawaharlal Nehru, founder of modern India and its current prime minister, has died suddenly at the age of 74.

 

12 Jun - Nelson Mandela jailed for life

 

The leader of the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, Nelson Mandela, has been jailed for life for sabotage

 

17 Jun - Japan trade fair floats into London

 

The first purpose-built floating trade fair has docked at Tilbury in London with 22,000 samples of Japanese goods on board.

 

02 Jul - President Johnson signs Civil Rights Bill

 

The Civil Rights Bill - one of the most important piece of legislation in American history - has become law.

 

04 Aug - Three civil rights activists found dead

 

The bodies of three civil rights workers missing for six weeks have been found buried in a partially constructed dam near Philadelphia, Mississippi.

 

10 Aug - Guns fall silent in Cyprus

 

The United Nations has brokered another ceasefire in Cyprus, defusing the growing crisis between Greek and Turkish Cypriots and heading off the threat of invasion by Turkey.

 

04 Sep - Forth Road Bridge opened

 

The Queen has officially opened Europe's longest suspension bridge linking Edinburgh to Perth across the River Forth.

 

15 Sep - The Sun newspaper is born

 

The Sun newspaper is published today for the first time.

It is replacing the Mirror Group's Daily Herald, which has been losing readers and advertising revenue for several years.

 

28 Sep - Kennedy murder was 'no conspiracy'

 

There was no conspiracy surrounding the death of President Kennedy but there were serious failures by those responsible for his protection, according to a government report.

 

12 Oct - Labour voters are 'bonkers' says Hogg

 

A senior Conservative minister has stolen the show at the Conservative news conference by branding all Labour voters "bonkers".

 

Quintin Hogg, Lord President of the Council and Secretary for Education and Science, made his quip after mounting a stinging attack on Labour's policies.

 

15 Oct - Khrushchev 'retires' as head of USSR

 

Nikita Khrushchev has unexpectedly stepped down as leader of the Soviet Union.

 

25 Oct - President Kaunda takes power in Zambia

 

Zambia has become the ninth African state to gain independence from the British crown.

 

03 Nov - Election triumph for Lyndon B Johnson

 

Lyndon Baines Johnson has been elected president of the United States defeating hard-line Republican Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona by an overwhelming majority.

 

23 Dec - Beeching to leave British Railways

 

The chairman of the British Railways Board is to part company with the organisation and return to his post at Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI).

 

31 Dec - Campbell speeds to double record

 

Donald Campbell has broken the world water speed record, becoming the first man to break the world land and water speed records in the same year.

 

100 most popular hits in the UK singles music charts in 1964

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bx1982r049g

 

01 Jim Reeves - I Love You Because

02 Jim Reeves - I Won't Forget You

03 Roy Orbison - It's Over

04 Roy Orbison - Oh Pretty Woman

05 The Beatles - A Hard Day's Night

06 Cilla Black - You're My World

07 Cilla Black - Anyone Who Had A Heart

08 The Searchers - Needles And Pins

09 The Honeycombs - Have I The Right?

10 Manfred Mann - Do Wah Diddy Diddy

11 Herman's Hermits - I'm Into Something Good

12 Dave Clark Five - Glad All Over

13 The Bachelors - Diane

14 The Rolling Stones - It's All Over Now

15 The Beatles - Can't Buy Me Love

16 Billy J Kramer & The Dakotas - Little Children

17 The Bachelors - I Believe

18 The Beatles - I Want To Hold Your Hand

19 Julie Rogers - The Wedding

20 Peter & Gordon - World Without Love

21 The Four Pennies - Juliet

22 Millie - My Boy Lollipop

23 Brian Poole & The Tremeloes - Someone, Someone

24 The Swinging Blue Jeans - Hippy Hippy Shake

25 Sandie Shaw - (There's) Always Something There To Remind Me

26 The Kinks - You Really Got Me

27 The Searchers - Don't Throw Your Love Away

28 The Supremes - Baby Love

29 Gerry & The Pacemakers - I'm The One

30 The Supremes - Where Did Our Love Go

31 Dave Clark Five - Bits And Pieces

32 The Bachelors - I Wouldn't Trade You For The World

33 The Four Seasons - Rag Doll

34 The Beatles - I Feel Fine

35 The Rolling Stones - Not Fade Away

36 The Animals - House Of The Rising Sun

37 The Hollies - Just One Look

38 Matt Monro - Walk Away

39 The Merseybeats - I Think Of You

40 The Barron Knights - Call Up The Groups

41 Petula Clark - Downtown

42 Gene Pitney - I'm Gonna Be Strong

43 Gene Pitney - Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa

44 PJ Proby - Hold Me

45 Dusty Springfield - I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself

46 Brenda Lee - As Usual

47 The Kinks - All Day And All Of The Night

48 Dusty Springfield - I Only Want To Be With You

49 The Searchers - When You Walk In The Room

50 Cliff Richard - Constantly

51 Val Doonican - Walk Tall

52 The Rolling Stones - Little Red Rooster

53 The Beatles - She Loves You

54 Mary Wells - My Guy

55 The Nashville Teens - Tobacco Road

56 The Rockin' Berries - He's In Town

57 The Shadows - Rise And Fall Of Flingel Bunt

58 Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders - Um Um Um Um Um Um

59 The Bachelors - Ramona

60 Cliff Richard - On The Beach

61 The Swinging Blue Jeans - You're No Good

62 Manfred Mann - Sha La La

63 Manfred Mann - 5-4-3-2-1

64 Dave Berry - The Crying Game

65 Doris Day - Move Over Darling

66 The Beach Boys - I Get Around

67 Louis Armstrong - Hello, Dolly!

68 Marianne Faithfull - As Tears Go By

69 Chuck Berry - No Particular Place To Go

70 Dionne Warwick - Walk On By

71 Applejacks - Tell Me When

72 Eden Kane - Boys Cry

73 The Fourmost - A Little Loving

74 Brian Poole & The Tremeloes - Candy Man

75 Gene Pitney - That Girl Belongs To Yesterday

76 The Hollies - Here I Go Again

77 Frank Ifield - Don't Blame Me

78 The Ronettes - Baby I Love You

79 Lulu & The Luvvers - Shout

80 Big Dee Irwin - Swinging On A Star

81 Gerry & The Pacemakers - Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying

82 The Hollies - We're Through

83 Jim Reeves - There's A Heartache Following Me

84 Dean Martin - Everybody Loves Somebody

85 Gigliola Cinquetti - Non Ho L'Eta Per Amarti

86 Dave Clark Five - Can't You See That She's Mine

87 The Hollies - Stay

88 Freddie & The Dreamers - I Understand

89 Cilla Black - It's For You

90 The Migil Five - Mocking Bird Hill

91 Cliff Richard - Twelfth Of Never

92 Dusty Springfield - Losing You

93 PJ Proby - Together

94 The Animals - I'm Crying

95 Elvis Presley - Kissin' Cousins

96 Peter & Gordon - Nobody I Know

97 Kathy Kirby - Let Me Go Lover

98 Henry Mancini Orchestra - How Soon?

99 The Zombies - She's Not There

100 The Mojos - Everything's Alright

 

Top Twenty TV Shows in 1964 were

 

1. Steptoe and Son (BBC)

2. Sunday Palladium (ITV)

3. Coronation Street (ITV)

4. Dick Powell Theatre (BBC)

5. Take Your Pick (ITV)

6. Royal Variety Show (BBC)

7. No Hiding Place (ITV)

8. Armchair Theatre (ITV)

9. It's Tarbuck (ITV)

10. Crane (ITV)

11. Stars and Garters (ITV)

12. Double Your Money (ITV)

13. Emergency Ward Ten (ITV)

14. Around the Beatles (ITV)

15. Frank Ifield Show (ITV)

16. The Avengers (ITV)

17. Christmas Comedy (ITV)

18. Miss World 1964 (ITV)

19. Max Bygraves (ITV)

20. Love Story (ITV)

 

That Was the Year That Was - 1965

 

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/17316629146/

 

The rest of the tour behind me as I get my shots! This is looking towards the dead end, the track ends about 25m down this tunnel.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Other members of the tour crowd round to listen, I get more shots!

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Two of the guides stand at the end of platform 1 nearest Holborn, as we make our way over to platform 2.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Trains would have left through this portal on the short run to Holborn.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Bristol Accountants (Public) and Commission Agents

 

Adams George, 9 Nicholas street

Ainsworth R. 52 Southville

Alexander Daniel, & Co. 49 Broad st

Atkins Robert, 2 Cathay parade

Baker William, 3 Cotham place

Barklay William, 1 Southville place

Barnard, Thomas, Tribe & Co., Albion chambers

Barnard and Hare, 5 Nicholas street

Bessell Charles, 8 Brighton place

Bowman W. Athenaeum chambers

Bragge C. W. 2 Clare street

Brookman W. F. Small street court

Bryant G. S. Steghen street

Burgess W. J . Somerset square

Challacombe J . 13 Victoria st. Stapleton road

Chapman C. W. Exchange East

Coleman R. J . 27 Cumberland street

Collel1s B. D. 10 Marlbro’ hill

Collins James, 39 Broad street

Collins P. 12 Dighton street

Cossham S. Shannon court

Curnick D. 13 Claremont place

Curnick Thomas, 6 Oxford st, Ashley rd

Curtis, Jenkins, & Co. Exchange bulds

Daniels J. R. Barnabas terrace

Davies J . E. 2 Nicholas street

Denning, Smith, & Co. Shannon court, Corn street

Downing J . 47 High street

Driver Frederick, H. 6 Brookfield crescent

Dunne J . 7 Prince’s place

Dutson R. A. Richmond rd, Montpelier

Easterling Thomas, 14 Duke street

Everett John A. 55 Southville

Forbes A. 3 Nicholas street

Fryer Charles, 4 Exchange, east

Grace J . H. Royal Insurance builds

Grigg W. H. 30 Clare street

Hancock, Triggs & Co. 13 John street

Hannam J . 8 Redcliff parade, East

Hatton Joseph, 9 Dean street

Hext W. Coronation road

Hitchins W. Picton street

Hobbs John, 16 Dowry parade

Hunt Nathan, 11 Belmont terrace

Hutchins George E. 20 Bridge street

Hutchinson & Dodds, Shannon court

Jarritt G. T. 6 Cumberland terrace

Johnston Alfred, 6 King square

Jones E. Bianca villa, Ashley hill

Joyce S. 24 Bridge street

Langworthy R. 15 Dighton street

Lewis George, 2 Bristol chambers

Lloyd Henry, 26 Clare street

Lucas J . D. 52 Thrissell street

Lyddon J . W. 3 Small street

Martin L. B. Athenzeum chambers

Palmer Arthur, 13 Small street

Parsons John, Athenmum chambers, Nicholas street

Pike E. J . 30 Clare street

Pitt J . S. 16 John street

Power James, 22 Broad street

Preston John, 5 Nelson place, Easton

Prowse H. 13 Queen square

Pullin F. 28 Claremont street

Raggatt D. Coronation road

Selfe T. V. Avon cottage, Southville

Slader —. 5 Wells street, Culver street

Sloman J . R. 16 Nelson pde, Bedminster

Smith S. & Co. 1 Queen’s road and 30 Clare street

Smith W. Washington, 16 Cathay

Spickett M. 16 Goodhind street

Sprod Sidney & Son, 1 Baldwin st

Stevens A. Nicholas street chambers

Stooke George, 9 Upper Montague st

Tarr R. 1 Walton terrace, City road

Thrower —. 2 Exchange buildings

Tricks, Son, & Wallop, City chambers

Triggs P. 24 City road

Tripney and Co. Bridge street

Ullathorne J. Drawbridge Hotel

Wade T. F. 57 Queen square

Ware Charles, 11A Small street

Warley James, 2 Cotham place

Watling John, Shannon court

Weeks William, 1 Baldwin street

Whittard D. M. 5 Prospect terrace, Bedminster

Williams James, Small street court

Williams W. H. & Co. Exchange

Withy E. C. 14 Ashton terrace

 

Account-Book Manufacturers

(see bookbinders)

 

Agents Commission & General

 

Alexander M. J . F. & A. Narrow quay

Alman Jacob, 10 Wells street

Barnard, Thomas, Tribe & Co. Albion chambers

Bassey James, 12 Walton terrace, City rd.

Brasher C. F. & Co. 2 Bread street

Broughton T. A. B. & Co. 10 Welsh back

Cook & Son, Baldwin street

Coleman T. 4 Colston pde. Stapleton rd

Curtis J . T. 4 Welsh back

Fisher J . S. and Co. 30 Queen square

Forbes A. 3 Nicholas street

Glasson and Co. Lucas hall, Marsh st

Good Charles, 12 Cathay (com.)

Grace James and Henry, Corn street

Hall & Adey, Grove avenue

Hobbs John, Imperial chambs. Corn st

Homes E. Stephen street

Hutchins George E. 20 Bridge street

Jenkins Henry, 6 Kingston villas

Kruger, Beale, & Co. Royal Insurance buildings

Lee E. T. Small street

Le Ray J . 46 Broad Quay

Lucas G. W. 11 High street

Palmer A. 13 Small street

Pearce R. & Son, King square avenue

Pike Thomas, 4 Prince street

Powell David Henry

Riley E. 42 Bridge street

Simmester William, 15 Prince street

Sinclair Ben'amin, City chambers

Sprod S. & Son, 1 Baldwin street

Steeds J. P. Athenaeum chambers

Stoate, Hosegood, & Co. 42 Back st

Sayce, Jones & Co. 30 Clare street

Wicks F. H. New buildings, Small st

Wilson J. F. 7 Bridge street

Whitwill M. & Son, The Grove

Woodall T. W. 42 Bridge street

 

Advertising

 

Bingham R. W. 8-9 Broad street

Grace J. & H. Royal chambers, Corn st

Hayward J. 1 Corn street

 

In Bankruptcy

 

Barnard, Thomas, & Co. Albion chambers

Power J. 22 Broad street

Williams W. H. & Co. Exchange

Parsons John, Athenaeum chambers, Nicholas street

 

To Publishers

 

Besley F. B. 30 City road

Cooking T. B. 2 Bishop street

Corbett William, 7 Stokes croft

Farrell Thomas, 7 Bishop street

Hall James, 4 St Stephen’s avenue

Hutchison A. 24 Broad street

Nelson A. B. 5 Brunswick square

 

For Steam Packets and Vessels

 

Barrett R. J. 6 Bathurst parade

Bax Thomas, 86 Narrow quay (Hayle Steam Packet office)

Bristol Steam Packet Company, Prince street (South Wales)

Bull T. 11 Redcliff parade (Cardiff Towing Company)

Davey W. L. 34 Welsh back

Evans G. H. Canons’ marsh wharf (North Devon and Liverpool)

Evered & Sampson, Clare street hall (Cardiif & Portishead)

Haynes I. Welsh back for Newport traders

Pockett J. W. 8 Narrow quay (Swansea Packet office)

Rowe P. Redcliif back (Rotterdam and Liverpool)

Scammel T. The Grove (Avon Packet office)

Thomas & Son, 42 Welsh back (Neath, Llanelly, & Swansea)

Trusted T. The Grove (Hyam’s Monmouth Steam Packet)

Turner, Edwards, & Co. 20 Queen sq (shipping office)

Warne W. G. 46 Broad quay (Bideford and Barnstaple)

Whitwill M. & Co. Grove avenue (shipping office)

 

Agents Various

 

Audcent A. 9 Park street (wines and brandies)

Butcher William, Rupert st. (stoneware pipes, fire-clay goods)

Cripps Richard, Redclilf wharf (general)

Egerton J. W. 13 Narrow quay (C. Whittall & Co. Smyrna)

Esendie A. 4 Charlotte street, Queen square (French houses)

Forbes A. 3 Nicholas street (provisions)

Ford G. E. 35 Queen square (merchant traders)

Fowler James, Dean street (metal traders)

Harris W. K. Welsh back (customs and forwarding)

Hole William & Co. 15 St James’s sq (manufacturers)

Hutchison A. Guildhall chambers (M‘Phun and Son)

James R. C. & Co. 29 Bridge street

Llewellin W. D. 27 Avon crescent (mineral)

Lockey J. 4 Park street (W. & A. Gilbey’s wines)

Lucas E. R. 41 High street (tea)

Richardson George, 3 Windsor terrace, Totterdown (shipping)

Speller J. 60 Broad quay (sheathing metal, felt, and oakum)

Whitwill, Gibson, and Co. The Grove (Enthoven’s Yellow metal)

 

Agricultural Implement Makers and Dealers

 

Baker William, 62 Temple street

Bartlett and Son, 1 Welsh back

Bristol Implement Co. 47 Thomas st

Bristol Waggon Works Company, Temple street

Cambridge, E. & Co. St. Philip’s Works

Munro A. Meadow street

Vemnan W. N. 41 West street

 

Ale and Porter Merchants

(see also Brewers, and Brewers’ Agents)

 

Brain & Son, Redcliff back

Dunlop, Mackie & Co. Broad quay

Hope G. M. & Co. 14 Narrow quay

Lavington W. F. & Co. 49 to 53 Baldwin street

Paul & Co. 1 Regent place, Clifton

Powell G. F. Pennywell road

Price W. K. 1 Nicholas street

Stone H. 61-62 Broadmead

Tyler R. 82 Stokes croft

Wetherman H. S. 17 Small street

 

Ale and Porter Stores

(also see Beer Retailers)

 

Bennett Fred. 19 Milk street

Bishop Joseph, 30 North street

Bond T. Beaufort street, Stapleton road

Bonner Francis, Pennywell road

Bray George, 11 King square avenue

Bryant William, Hope Chapel hill

Burnett J. L. 15 Portland st. Kingsdown

Chandler J. Marlborough hill

Clyma L. 6 Portland place

Christiansen Agnes, Pipe lane, St Augustines

Cockram G. Wellesley st. Lawrence hill

Crew T. Croft house, Stokes croft

Crook John, Hotwell road

Dando John, Highbury place

Evans John, 18 Union street

Evans William, Richmond road

Farmer Margaret, 89 Temple street

Flowers Edward, Nicholas street

Gates W. St. Michael’s crescent

Gay A. J. Ashley road

George M. A. 10 Redcliff hill

Henderson E. Brandon steep

Hillier F. Bath road, Totterdown

Hodges Alfred, 27 Mardyke, Hotwells

Hosegood Samuel, Jacob street

Jones Eliza, 6 Merchants’ parade

King Walter, 7 Stokes croft

Larcombe James, 17 Wilson street

Leonard William, 129 Thomas street

Lewis R. Clifton place, Stapleton road

Loft W. L. Carolina place, King square

Mealing William, 21 Grosvenor place, St Paul’s

Ousley John, 6 Hillgrove street

Phillips Robert, Blackboy hill

Price M. A. Colston street, Cathay

Prickett John, 30 Maryport street

Rea Thomas, Frogmore street

Reeves Henry, Tankard’s close

Reeves T. B. 41 Castle street

Richards Norman. 16 Paul street

Riseley J. 27 Bath street

Rowland M. Nicholas street

Seamer James, Wilder street

Shepstone J. Upper Temple back

Smith Samuel, 17 Easton parade

Spragg G. 9 Surrey street

Stanley Francis, St James’s churchyd

Stenner Joseph, 10 Newfoundland st

Tilley Alice, 28 Castle street

Tovey Samuel, Orchard st. St Phllips

Tripp Francis, Horton street

Trotman C. 9 Bindon place, Redland

Venn Caroline, Nicholas street

Watts G. W. 1 Love street, South

Webber Francis, Byron place

Whatley & Payne, 17 Newfoundland st

White J. Trinity street, Newtown

Williams John, Barton road

Winniat Ann, Wilder street

Wise Jesse, Christmas steps, Lewin's mead

 

Alkali Manufacturers and Dealers

 

Cook W. & Son, 53 Baldwin street

Netham Chemical Co. Limited, St. George’s, Netham

Pochin A. D. & Co. Temple backs

Whitwill Mark & Son, The Grove (agents to Tennant and Sons, Glasgow)

 

Anchorsmiths

 

(earliest recorded anchorsmiths in Bristol was as early c1391)

 

Baker, Houghton & Co. Redcliff back

Bell and Daniel, Marsh street

Tratman Brothers, 77 The Quay

 

Annatto Manufacturers and Seed suppliers

 

Clements S. G. & Co. 9, 12, 13, and 14 Lewin’s mead

 

Appraisers

(see Auctioneers below)

 

Alman Jacob, 10 Wells street

Bodey J. 43 Park street

Grace J. & H. Royal Insurance buildings

Hughes & Son, 38 College green

Jones John, 12 Wells street and Culver Street

Parsons John, Athenaeum chambers, Nicholas street

Smith & Co. 13 St Augustine’s parade

Tricks, Son & Wallop, Bristol chambers

Ullathorne J. Drawbridge Hotel

Williams W. H. & Co. Exchange, Corn street

 

Architects

 

Armstrong & Thomas, Athenaaum chambers, Nicholas street

Bevan J. Nicholas street

Bindon John, Guildhall chambers

Bompas E. G. Quay street

Clark J. A. 23 Broad street

Eyland E. S. 1 St Michael’s park

Fripp S. C. 6 Exchange, West

Foster & Wood, 6 Park street

Gingell W. B. 37 Corn street

Godwin & Crisp, Quay street

Hansom & Son, Arlington villas

Hawtin W. H. 38 College green

Hirst J. H. 8 Small street

Horwood, Son, & Barnes, 26 Broad st

Lloyd H. 29 Clare street

Masters H. 17 Charlotte street, Park st

Ponton & Gough, Atheneeum chambers

Popes & Bindon, Guildhall chambers

Rumley C. F. 35 Broad quay

Sedding John D. 11 Park street

Thomas J. Nicholas street

Underwood C. Rupert chambers

 

Artists

 

Beeks Edward, Athenaium chambers, Nicholas street

Branwhite C. Westfield park (landscape)

Brett I. 9 Westfield par

David R. B. 7 Dowry square (landscape and portrait)

Durond A. Queen’s villa, Goldney road

Ennel N. 26 The Triangle, Clifton

Fisher J. 59 Whiteladies road

Frank W. A. 2 Victoria place, South

Hewett H. 2 Freeland place (landscape)

Midwinter W. H. 24 College green

Park H. Orchard street

Praeger E. 13 Cambridge place

Roberts J. 6 Union street

Seed T. 4 Ruysdael place, Byron place, The Triangle (portrait)

Syer John, 6 Aberdeen terrace

Tucker R. 18 Hampton terrace

West E. F. Observatory, Clifton down

 

Artists’ Colormen

 

Frost John, 16 Clare st. & 19 The Triangle (later Frost & Reed)

Short and Son, 8 Broadmead

Way C. 17 Royal promenade

 

Attorneys

(see professional directory)

 

Auctioneers and Appraisers

 

Adams G. Nicholas street

Alexander, Daniel, & Co. 49 Broad st

Alman J. 10 Wells street

Ashmead G. & Son, Small street

Barnard, Thomas, Tribe, & Co. Albion chambers

Bowman William, Athenaeum chambers

Chapman George, 3 King street

Coombs G. Phippen street, Redcliff

Crouch James & Co. 22 Clare street

Denning, Smith, & Co. Shannon court

Downing J. 11 High street

Fargus H. R. & Co. 4 Clare street

Fowler H. P. All Saints’ passage

Fryer Charles, 4 Exchange, East

Fielder J. H. College street

Gerrish John, Lion chambers

Hancock & Hancock, 37 Park street

Hill Edwin, 1 Hampton terrace, Wells road

Hutchins George E. 20 Bridge street

Hutchinson & Dodds, Shannon court

Nichols George, 63 Broad street

Hurndall John S. St. Nicholas chambers

Lyddon J. W. 3 Small street

Morris R. W. 5 Clare street

Nash J. 11 Bridge street

Palmer Arthur, 13 Small street

Parsons John, Athenaaum chambers, Nicholas street

Pitt J. S. 16 John street

Smith J. 20 Old Market street .

Smith S. & Co. 1 Queen’s road and 30 Clare street

Sprod & Son, 1 Baldwin street

Standerwick George, Gower villa, Cheltenham road

Stevens Augustus, St. Ewen’s chambers, Nicholas st

Tricks, Son, & Wallop, High street, Nicholas street, Small street

Tripney & Co. Bridge street

Wall J. B. 15 Pritchard street

Wheller W. 4 Trafalgar place, Clarence road

Wigens G. C Exchange, Corn street

Williams W. H. & Co. Exchange, Corn street

Woolcott F. Rupert chambers. Quay street

Syon House derives its name from Syon Abbey, a medieval monastery of the Bridgettine Order, founded in 1415 on a nearby site by King Henry V. The Abbey moved to the site now occupied by Syon House in 1431. In 1539, the abbey was closed by royal agents during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and the monastic community was expelled.

 

In the 18th century, Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland, commissioned architect and interior designer Robert Adam and landscape designer Lancelot "Capability" Brown to redesign the house and estate. Work began on the interior reconstruction project in 1762. Five large rooms on the west, south and east sides of the House, were completed before work ceased in 1769. A central rotunda, which Adams had intended for the interior courtyard space, was not implemented, due to cost.

1964 was a year of considerable change in Britain, with the abolition of hanging and a new economic confidence.

 

Culturally, Britannia was ruling the waves with The Beatles, The Kinks and The Rolling Stones topping the charts.

 

Ambitious plans were agreed with the French government for a Channel Tunnel to be built by the end of the decade.

 

It was a time of great change as Britain had finally shed its post-war austerity and looked forward with a new confidence and prosperity.

 

The year was one of major upheaval in British history. National Service had been abolished in 1960 but the final troops involved on their compulsory military tour of duty were not sent home until the end of December 1963.

 

Unlike their fathers and grandfathers, teenagers in 1964 were not facing the prospect of a European war and increasing living standards allowed them a disposable income.

 

The Labour leader, Harold Wilson, entered the 1964 campaign determined to end "13 wasted years" under the Tories.

 

The populist Wilson seemed to reflect the public mood for change. The Conservative leader, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, was widely perceived as a distant, awkward aristocrat. Nevertheless, Wilson won only a tiny majority; another election seemed imminent.

 

By the time of the 1964 general election, the Conservative Party had been in power for 13 years. Since Prime Minister Harold Macmillan's election victory in 1959, Conservative fortunes had plummeted.

 

The buoyant economy that led to Macmillan's election was faltering by 1961. The following year, in a bid to restore his popularity, Macmillan sacked seven members of his cabinet in a move dubbed the "Night of the Long Knives". It was a ploy that failed. The Government ran into further problems when Britain's application to join the Common Market was rejected by the French President, Charles de Gaulle.

 

Scandal added to the Government's woes when John Profumo, the Minister for War, was forced to resign after he admitted lying to Parliament over his involvement with the call girl, Christine Keeler. The Government looked tired, embattled and increasingly out of step with the public mood.

 

In 1964, an ailing socialist broadsheet, 'The Daily Herald', was re-launched as 'The Sun' and in 1968 the owners (Reed International) put it up for sale. Of the two bidders (the other being Labour MP, Robert Maxwell), Murdoch won with a bid for £800,000. In 1967 he had already purchased the 'News of the World'.

 

The new 'Sun' re-launched in 1969 and became a spicier version of 'The Mirror'. The very first issue carried a photo of the Rolling Stones with a naked female. Sex was to be the main ingredient of the paper. Soft porn came to fill almost every page together with lurid sex stories. Within 100 days, circulation had jumped from 850,000 to 1.5 million. By 1987 the paper was making £1 million a week These profits were pumped into BSkyB and Fox, subesquently turning them into the two biggest pillars of the Murdoch empire today.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cg1WHbSkL_Q

 

What's on TV?

 

The Magic Roundabout, The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, My Fair Lady and The Pink Panther, Mary Poppins was there any other year in the fabulous 1960’s which produced so many entertainment trendsetters as 1964?

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRybY0XQ8Ig

 

On TV for the first time, in the domestic comedy Bewitched, the nation was delighted to meet long-suffering Darrin and his

wife Samantha, the most attractive witch to ever ride a broomstick.

 

www.dailymotion.com/video/x1iry6w

 

The Crossroads motel, which featured Brummie accents for the first time on TV, The Magic Roundabout opened its doors and Dougal, Zebedee and Florence delighted children and adults alike by taking us for a ride on The Magic Roundabout, one of the most successful children’s shows ever seen on TV.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wwSLsuF2HI

 

In January, Steptoe and Son, an unlikely comedy written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson about a family rag and bone business, was declared Britain’s most popular TV show. With battling father and son wonderfully portrayed by Wilfred Bramble and Harry H.Corbett the show went on to become something of an institution. It was claimed that 26 million viewers in 9,653,000 homes had tuned in to the latest series.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZIPpI2XE9s

 

Labour leader Harold Wilson secretly lobbied the BBC to change the time of popular comedy Steptoe and Son on the night of the 1964 election because he feared working class voters would stay at home and watch the show instead of supporting his candidates.

 

According to new archive footage held by the BBC, Mr Wilson went to the home of BBC Director General Sir Hugh Greene and told him the show could cost him 20 seats.

 

Mr Wilson was leader of the opposition and was seeking to oust the Conservative Prime Minister Alec Douglas Home. The Labour leader thought the planned repeat of the sit-com starring Harry H Corbett and Wilfrid Brambell would hit them badly.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjTyFeAslpE

 

Much excitement was caused when a new TV channel appeared in 1964 and BBC 2 was born. Play School, the first programme to be screened, took us through the window to meet Little Ted and Big Ted, plus kids all-time favourite presenter Johnny Ball, who grew up in Kingswood, Bristol.

 

A lighter, much more transportable TV set, with an 11-inch screen and weighing only 16 lbs, appeared in the shops in August. These sets received BOTH ITV and BBC services on special “rabbits ears” aerials. If you couldn’t afford a telly, and many couldn’t 60 years ago, you could hire one for six shillings and sixpence a week.

 

UK TV Adverts from 1964 Including: Kellogg's Corn Flakes, Dual Floor Polish, Goodyear G8 Tyres, Surf Washing Powder, BSM School Of Motoring, St Bruno Pipe Tobacco, Brolac Paint, Fairy Washing Up Liquid, Body Mist Deodorant and S & H Pink Stamps.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcKuOMVcqfI

 

Sport on TV

 

Sports fans weren’t forgotten. On the 22 August 22, they were treated to the voice of Kenneth Wolstenholme and the very first Match of the Day. A paltry 50,000 viewers tuned in to watch Liverpool beat Arsenal 3-2. But very often all the fans got were recorded highlights rather than live action. It didn’t transfer from minority channel BBC 2 to the mainstream BBC 1 until after the World Cup triumph of 1966.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIHPVNWqPPw

 

1964 was, of course the year of the Tokyo Olympics. We won four gold medals. Mary Rand from Wells (who was also named BBC sports personality of the year) won the long jump, Anne Parker and Lynn Davies the 800 metres and Ken Mathews the 20km race walk.

 

Music

 

1964 was a golden year for pop music. The Rolling Stones, The Dave Clark Five, Liverpool’s The Swinging Blue Jeans, Manchester’s The Hollies and the late Dusty Springfield launched a BBC flagship Top of the Pops. Coming from its first home, a converted Manchester church.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUFFRd27YDw

 

The Beatles had by 1964 already toured the country to unbelievably hysterical scenes and were at their peak, scoring number one hits with Can’t buy me Love, A Hard Day’s Night and I Feel Fine. In February Beatle-mania gripped the US as the Fab Four took the place by storm, capturing the first five places in the singles charts as well as the top two positions in the album listings. In July, 10,000 screaming teenage fans thronged London’s West End as Princess Margaret arrived for the Premiere of their first film A Hard Day’s Night.

 

Even before Pan Am flight 101 touched down at JFK Airport in New York it was obvious that The Beatles had already conquered the American market. In January 'I want to hold your hand' sold half a million records in less than a fortnight, and is number one in the USA at the start of February.

 

A crowd of 3,000 screaming fans waits for the arrival of the Fab Four; the LP 'Meet the Beatles' hits number one at the end of January and stays there for almost three months; before they land music stations throughout the country are playing Beatles songs more than anybody else's, and after they land some stations play almost nothing else for days.

 

Once installed in their hotel in New York, The Plaza, the band is to all intents and purposes under siege by fans eager to see them, or seemingly to rip them limb from limb given the chance.

 

The highlight of the brief trip to the USA comes on February 9 , with their appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show. There are 728 seats available for the show; 50,000 apply for them. The Beatles play five songs, opening with 'All my Loving' and closing with 'I Want to Hold your Hand', with much screaming to accompany every note.

 

According to TV ratings company Nielsen their appearance on the show was seen by 73 million viewers. Beatlemania had arrived with a bang.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MG-DXGKDBcA

 

More than 300 people are injured in Liverpool when a crowd of some 150,000 people welcome The Beatles back to their home city.

 

The Beatles gain the Christmas number one for the second year running with I Feel Fine, which has topped the singles charts for the third week running. The Beatles have now had six number ones in the United Kingdom alone.

 

The Rolling Stones, founded by Cheltenham blues fanatic Brian Jones and fronted by the energetic, rubber lips, Mick Jagger, had their first top 10 hit with Not Fade Away.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-ycN9EOi8o

 

Talented songwriters, the Davies brothers, came up with the

Kinks’ first hit, You really Got Me, and a sensational young Scots lass with a husky voice called Lulu had a smash with that Isley Brothers favourite Shout.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2GmzyeeXnQ

 

For these young people, recently dubbed teenagers, Bob Dylan described the situation pretty accurately when he sang 'The Times They Are A-Changin', released in January 1964.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5al0HmR4to

 

For those wanting to hear more pop music than was available via the BBC (which wasn’t much until Radio One came along)

 

Radio Caroline, the first pirate ship, began broadcasting from

international waters in March. It was legal, just, but the government didn’t like it. In May, the vessel was joined by Radio Atlanta.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8xvfBraulg

 

The United Kingdom held a national selection to choose the song that would go to the Eurovision Song Contest 1964. It was held on 7 February 1964 and presented by David Jacobs.

 

"I Love the Little Things" by Matt Monro won the national and went on to come 2nd in the contest.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CbGadthX_0

 

Film-goers that memorable year were not disappointed. Sean Connery’s James Bond battled it out with Goldfinger, while Ian Fleming, James Bond’s creator, died of a heart attack in August aged just 56. The big romance of the year was the March marriage of glamorous movie stars Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSFE_xqL5Rk

 

UK News

 

In October the Labour Party, with canny pipe- smoking Yorkshireman Harold Wilson at the helm of a national economic plan, regained power after 13 years of Tory rule.

 

1964: 'Great Train Robbers' get 300 years

 

Some of the longest sentences in British criminal history have been imposed on men involved in the so-called "Great Train Robbery".

 

Sentences totalling 307 years were passed on 12 men who stole £2.6m in used bank notes after holding up the night mail train travelling from Glasgow to London last August.

 

The judge at Buckinghamshire Assizes in Aylesbury, Mr Justice Edmund Davies, said it would be "positively evil" if he showed leniency.

 

The robbery was the biggest-ever carried out in Britain.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIZlkJ1miHw

 

Violent disturbances between Mods and Rockers at Clacton beach

 

Gang fights have gone on in Britain for centuries; but in the mid-1960s a tribal element arrived on the scene in the form of Mods and Rockers.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Rj-OHCusEI

 

Mods were cool: they wore Italian-style suits beneath badge-bedecked parkas; they had carefully coiffed hair; rode Lambretta and Vespa scooters; and listened to new bands like The Who and The Small Faces and ska greats like Prince Buster. Rockers were grungier: they wore leathers as befitted ton-up bikers; had long and often greasy hair; and were fans of Elvis, Buddy Holly and Gene Vincent.

 

The two tribes went to war first – at least in a large scale fight – in Clacton over Easter 1964. But the Whitsun weekend of May 18 and 19 saw things escalate hugely. There were battles in Broadstairs , Bournemouth , Hastings , Margate , Clacton again, and most notably in Brighton . Thousands from each side had gathered in theory for a seaside break that turned into turf battles: deckchairs were a weapon of convenience; flick-knives favoured by many Mods; bike-chains by Rockers.

 

As ever the poor police stood between the factions and had bottles thrown at them.

 

Middle Britain panicked into thinking civilisation was coming to an end. It didn’t; but hundreds of teenagers were fined, and some had short prison sentences for their part in the violence.

 

Moors murders: A missing persons investigation is launched in Fallowfield, Manchester, as police search for twelve-year-old Keith Bennett, who went missing on the previous evening.

 

Peter Anthony Allen, at Walton Prison in Liverpool, and Gwynne Owen Evans, at Strangeways Prison in Manchester, are hanged for the murder of John Alan West on 7 April, the last executions to take place in the British Isles.

 

On the local front, Avonmouth’s 1,500 dockers walked out on strike in January. The same month, the Lord Mayor of Bristol opened the first of five tower blocks to be built at Hartcliffe and in March Mr Marples announced the route of the M5 motorway through Gloucestershire and Somerset. In July, as the school holidays started, it was reported that there were 100 miles of traffic jams on the A38, then still the main route from the Midlands to the South-West.

 

1964 The Cost of Living

 

Television viewing

 

TV Rental for a 17 inch TV from Derwent’s of Park St. was six shillings and six pence (6s 6d) a week and for a giant 19 inch, nine shillings and seven pence. (9s 7d) At John James shops, the best deal in town, a set cost just four shillings if you rented it over three years. New TV’s were expensive in 1964. John James were offering a top 19 inch model with 625 lines for 68 guineas. Average wages at the time were anything from £10 to £15 a week. Having said that you could buy an ordinary model for a modest 29 Guineas. . '

 

Holidays

 

Package holidays had started to boom in 1964. Everybody was mad about them because it gave you the chance to fly for the first time and experience a ‘foreign’ holiday in the sun. "

 

Top Bristol travel agents Hourmont were offering 15 days away in Majorca for £41 -10s or the same time in Benidorn on the Costa Blanca for £43.00. At the cheaper end of the market LEP Travel could offer the same holiday for £29-18-0. Four days in Paris - flying from Lulsgate - would only set you back £19.00.

 

Housing

 

In 1964 you could buy a terraced Victorian house in Totterdown for £1 ,300 or an established house in leafy Westbury Park for about £5,000. Somewhere cosy in Eastville was about £2,000 and an ordinary three-bedroom semi about £3,000. But there were bargains to be had if you had money in the bank and a little foresight. An eight-room house in Clifton-wood, in need of renovation but overlooking the docks, was advertised for £800 — cash in hand only.

 

High street prices

 

A trip to a good hairdressers has always been expensive. In 1964 a perm could cost you 42 shillings, just over £2.00, while that fur trimmed coat from C&As would set you back seven guineas. '

 

Furnishing your house? You could bring home a modern Scandinavian three-piece suite forjust 32 guineas. lf, however, you were happy with an ordinary fireside chair, you’d get one from a department store for £8-10s-0d.

 

A state-of-the-art automatic washing machine, not a twin tub, cost a whopping £50.00.

 

A new baby? Horwoods in Old Market were selling top line prams for £17-19-6.

 

Transport

 

On the Roads in 1964 there were just a few sections of Motorway open but a big construction of the motorway system was underway seeing more sections opening each year.

 

Those actually open in 1964 were as follows:

 

M1 Junctions 5 to 18, M2 Junctions 2 to 5, M4 The Chiswick flyover (Junction 1) and Junctions 5 to 9, M5 Junctions 4 to 8, M6 Junctions 13 to 35, M20 Junctions 5 to 8 and the M45, M63 and M10 were complete.

 

Latest cars on the road in 1964 included the Vauxhall Viva and the Ford Anglia the Cortina also being a very popular car of the time.

 

The Forth Road Bridge was opened and in 1965 the Severn Bridge was opened.

 

If you were lucky enough to fly in 1964 you would of probably flown by BOAC ( British Overseas Airways Corporation ) or BEA (British European Airways ) and the VC 10 was the latest aeroplane.

 

Ford Anglias were all the rage in 1964. A second hand one cost £490.00. A new Mini would set you back about £448 and a popular Triumph Herald £515.

 

Announcement that American car manufacturer Chrysler is taking a substantial share in the British Rootes Group combine, which includes the Hillman, Singer and Sunbeam marques.

 

Daihatsu becomes the first Japanese car-maker to import passenger cars to the United Kingdom, launching its Compagno on the British market.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhSXNr4_hUA

 

Beer & Fags

 

Beer was between 1/6 and 2/0 a pint; a double whisky or other spirit was rather more. Indeed, in those days spirit drinkers usually kept out of rounds and bought their own.

 

Smoking was still extremely popular in 1964, nearly 70% of men and around 40% of women smoked. The most popular brand in the UK was "Embassy Filter".

 

One old shilling (1/0) was worth 5 new pence.

 

Government figures show that the average weekly wage is £16. £10 banknotes are issued for the first time since the Second World War.

 

Teen girls' magazine Jackie first published.

 

The final edition of the left-wing Daily Herald newspaper is published. The Sun newspaper goes into circulation, replacing the Daily Herald.

 

Sport

 

Fred Trueman – ‘Fiery Fred’ – was one of England’s greatest cricketers, becoming the first English bowler to take 300 test wickets when he dismissed Australian batsman Neil Hawke in the Oval test of 1964, Colin Cowdray taking the catch at slip.

 

Typically of his career he was coming back after having been dropped for the previous match (at Old Trafford ). This was doubtless partly as he was past his very best – though a mediocre Trueman was better than many subsequent England quicks at the top of their game - partly as he rarely found favour with the gentleman amateurs who still had a major say in the sport both at Yorkshire and in the England set-up.

 

Had he perish the thought been subservient he would probably have played another dozen tests or so.

 

There was little that was conventional about Fred Trueman , except perhaps his classically smooth bowling action.

 

Through his career he regularly managed to get on the wrong side of many blazer-bedecked committee types who ran cricket “In my day” as he would have said with his favourite post-career phrase. As a summariser on Test Match Special he continued to annoy some of the playing establishment, never one to water down deserved criticism, especially of lack of effort, thought or heart – “I don’t know what’s going off” his exasperated response to such moments.

 

Trueman was indefatigable, and achieved his 300 wickets by bending his back – not like some by bending his arm.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=aP9J5akyKTQ

 

Liverpool win the Football League First Division for the sixth time in their history.

 

West Ham United win the FA Cup for the first time in their history, beating Preston North End 3-2 at Wembley Stadium.

 

5 April 1964 - Tottenham captain Danny Blanchflower, 38, announced his retirement from playing.

 

8 April 1964 - Blackburn Rovers are announced as England's participant in the 1964 edition of the International Soccer League.

 

11 April 1964 – Scotland beat England 1–0 in the British Home Championship to leave the two level on four points in the final table. Northern Ireland subsequently defeated Wales to finish level on points with the other two, thus ensuring that the title was shared between three nations.

 

12 April 1964 – The Sunday People publishes allegations that lead to a betting scandal. It reported that Mansfield Town player Jimmy Gauld had, over several years, systematically engaged in match fixing, and that many other players were involved.

 

18 April 1964 – Liverpool beat Arsenal 5–0 at Anfield to secure the title. In their penultimate game of the season, Ipswich Town lose 3–1 to Blackburn Rovers, confirming their relegation two years after winning the League championship.

 

22 April 1964 – Leicester City win the League Cup – their first major trophy – with a 4–3 aggregate victory over Stoke City.

 

25 April 1964 – On the final day of the Second Division season, Leeds United win 2–0 at Charlton Athletic and Sunderland fail to beat Grimsby Town, meaning Leeds were crowned champions.

 

2 May 1964 – West Ham United beat Preston North End 3–2 at Wembley to win the FA Cup for the first time. Trailing 2–1 going into the final minutes of the match, West Ham scored two goals in as many minutes to the deny Preston.

 

Other News

 

All schools in Aberdeen are closed following 136 cases of typhoid being reported.

 

Terence Conran opens the first Habitat store on London's Fulham Road.

 

"Pirate" radio station Radio Sutch begins broadcasting from Shivering Sands Army Fort in the Thames Estuary.

 

Official opening of the UK's first undercover shopping centre, at the Bull Ring, Birmingham.

 

The Post Office Tower in London is completed, although it does not begin operation until October 1965.

 

Some 90% of British households now own a television, compared to around 25% in 1953 and 65% in 1959.

 

The first successful Minicomputer, Digital Equipment Corporation’s 12-bit PDP-8, is marketed.

 

Toy of the year: Mr Potato Head

 

1964 USA

 

1964 as the war in Vietnam and US Congress Authorizes war against N Vietnam more American servicemen were dying, and after three civil rights workers were murdered in Mississippi the president signed the Civil Rights act of 1964 but this did not stop the violence as it continued to increase in many American Cities.

 

Lyndon Johnson was also returned to power after a landslide victory. This was also the year The Beatles took the world and America by storm and Beatlemania went into overdrive as they released a series of number one hits including "I want to hold your hand" , "All my Loving" . Other British groups also found success including The Rolling Stones and The Animals and together with the American Talent of The Supremes and Bob Dylan many say this was one of the greatest years for music in the last century.

 

Also one young loud talented boxer by the name of Cassius Clay won the Boxing World heavyweight championship from Sonny Liston.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=OezriPEepZs

 

1964 World Headlines

 

13 Jan - Riots in Calcutta leave more than 100 dead

 

More than 100 people have been killed following Hindu-Muslim rioting in the Indian city of Calcutta.

 

06 Feb - Green light for Channel Tunnel

 

The British and French Governments have announced their commitment to build a tunnel under the English Channel.

 

07 Feb - Beatlemania arrives in the US

 

The four members of the British hit band, the Beatles, have arrived in New York at the start of their first tour of the United States.

 

12 Feb - Deaths follow Cyprus truce breach

 

Fighting between ethnic Turks and Greeks in the disputed island of Cyprus has left at least 16 people dead.

 

25 Feb - Cassius Clay crowned world champion

 

Cassius Clay, 22, has been crowned heavyweight champion of the world after beating Sonny Liston in one of the biggest upsets in boxing's history.

 

29 Feb - Royal baby for leap year day

 

The Queen's cousin, Princess Alexandra, has given birth to a son at her home in Surrey.

 

12 Mar - Hoffa faces eight years behind bars

 

The president of the powerful American Teamsters union has been sentenced to eight years in jail on bribery charges.

 

14 Mar - Jack Ruby sentenced to death

 

Jack Ruby has been sentenced to death after being found guilty of the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of President John F Kennedy.

 

19 Mar - 'Ambitious' plans for south east

 

Three new cities are proposed for south east England as part of the largest regional expansion plan in Britain. The 'new towns' eventually created were Milton Keynes, Havant and Basingstoke.

 

16 Apr - 'Great Train Robbers' get 300 years

 

Some of the longest sentences in British criminal history have been imposed on men involved in the so-called "Great Train Robbery".

 

14 May - Nasser and Khrushchev divert the Nile

 

President Gamal Abdul Nasser of Egypt and Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev have marked the first stage in the building of the Aswan High Dam.

 

27 May - Light goes out in India as Nehru dies

 

Jawaharlal Nehru, founder of modern India and its current prime minister, has died suddenly at the age of 74.

 

12 Jun - Nelson Mandela jailed for life

 

The leader of the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, Nelson Mandela, has been jailed for life for sabotage

 

17 Jun - Japan trade fair floats into London

 

The first purpose-built floating trade fair has docked at Tilbury in London with 22,000 samples of Japanese goods on board.

 

02 Jul - President Johnson signs Civil Rights Bill

 

The Civil Rights Bill - one of the most important piece of legislation in American history - has become law.

 

04 Aug - Three civil rights activists found dead

 

The bodies of three civil rights workers missing for six weeks have been found buried in a partially constructed dam near Philadelphia, Mississippi.

 

10 Aug - Guns fall silent in Cyprus

 

The United Nations has brokered another ceasefire in Cyprus, defusing the growing crisis between Greek and Turkish Cypriots and heading off the threat of invasion by Turkey.

 

04 Sep - Forth Road Bridge opened

 

The Queen has officially opened Europe's longest suspension bridge linking Edinburgh to Perth across the River Forth.

 

15 Sep - The Sun newspaper is born

 

The Sun newspaper is published today for the first time.

It is replacing the Mirror Group's Daily Herald, which has been losing readers and advertising revenue for several years.

 

28 Sep - Kennedy murder was 'no conspiracy'

 

There was no conspiracy surrounding the death of President Kennedy but there were serious failures by those responsible for his protection, according to a government report.

 

12 Oct - Labour voters are 'bonkers' says Hogg

 

A senior Conservative minister has stolen the show at the Conservative news conference by branding all Labour voters "bonkers".

 

Quintin Hogg, Lord President of the Council and Secretary for Education and Science, made his quip after mounting a stinging attack on Labour's policies.

 

15 Oct - Khrushchev 'retires' as head of USSR

 

Nikita Khrushchev has unexpectedly stepped down as leader of the Soviet Union.

 

25 Oct - President Kaunda takes power in Zambia

 

Zambia has become the ninth African state to gain independence from the British crown.

 

03 Nov - Election triumph for Lyndon B Johnson

 

Lyndon Baines Johnson has been elected president of the United States defeating hard-line Republican Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona by an overwhelming majority.

 

23 Dec - Beeching to leave British Railways

 

The chairman of the British Railways Board is to part company with the organisation and return to his post at Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI).

 

31 Dec - Campbell speeds to double record

 

Donald Campbell has broken the world water speed record, becoming the first man to break the world land and water speed records in the same year.

 

100 most popular hits in the UK singles music charts in 1964

 

01 Jim Reeves - I Love You Because

02 Jim Reeves - I Won't Forget You

03 Roy Orbison - It's Over

04 Roy Orbison - Oh Pretty Woman

05 The Beatles - A Hard Day's Night

06 Cilla Black - You're My World

07 Cilla Black - Anyone Who Had A Heart

08 The Searchers - Needles And Pins

09 The Honeycombs - Have I The Right?

10 Manfred Mann - Do Wah Diddy Diddy

11 Herman's Hermits - I'm Into Something Good

12 Dave Clark Five - Glad All Over

13 The Bachelors - Diane

14 The Rolling Stones - It's All Over Now

15 The Beatles - Can't Buy Me Love

16 Billy J Kramer & The Dakotas - Little Children

17 The Bachelors - I Believe

18 The Beatles - I Want To Hold Your Hand

19 Julie Rogers - The Wedding

20 Peter & Gordon - World Without Love

21 The Four Pennies - Juliet

22 Millie - My Boy Lollipop

23 Brian Poole & The Tremeloes - Someone, Someone

24 The Swinging Blue Jeans - Hippy Hippy Shake

25 Sandie Shaw - (There's) Always Something There To Remind Me

26 The Kinks - You Really Got Me

27 The Searchers - Don't Throw Your Love Away

28 The Supremes - Baby Love

29 Gerry & The Pacemakers - I'm The One

30 The Supremes - Where Did Our Love Go

31 Dave Clark Five - Bits And Pieces

32 The Bachelors - I Wouldn't Trade You For The World

33 The Four Seasons - Rag Doll

34 The Beatles - I Feel Fine

35 The Rolling Stones - Not Fade Away

36 The Animals - House Of The Rising Sun

37 The Hollies - Just One Look

38 Matt Monro - Walk Away

39 The Merseybeats - I Think Of You

40 The Barron Knights - Call Up The Groups

41 Petula Clark - Downtown

42 Gene Pitney - I'm Gonna Be Strong

43 Gene Pitney - Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa

44 PJ Proby - Hold Me

45 Dusty Springfield - I Just Don't Know What To Do With Myself

46 Brenda Lee - As Usual

47 The Kinks - All Day And All Of The Night

48 Dusty Springfield - I Only Want To Be With You

49 The Searchers - When You Walk In The Room

50 Cliff Richard - Constantly

51 Val Doonican - Walk Tall

52 The Rolling Stones - Little Red Rooster

53 The Beatles - She Loves You

54 Mary Wells - My Guy

55 The Nashville Teens - Tobacco Road

56 The Rockin' Berries - He's In Town

57 The Shadows - Rise And Fall Of Flingel Bunt

58 Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders - Um Um Um Um Um Um

59 The Bachelors - Ramona

60 Cliff Richard - On The Beach

61 The Swinging Blue Jeans - You're No Good

62 Manfred Mann - Sha La La

63 Manfred Mann - 5-4-3-2-1

64 Dave Berry - The Crying Game

65 Doris Day - Move Over Darling

66 The Beach Boys - I Get Around

67 Louis Armstrong - Hello, Dolly!

68 Marianne Faithfull - As Tears Go By

69 Chuck Berry - No Particular Place To Go

70 Dionne Warwick - Walk On By

71 Applejacks - Tell Me When

72 Eden Kane - Boys Cry

73 The Fourmost - A Little Loving

74 Brian Poole & The Tremeloes - Candy Man

75 Gene Pitney - That Girl Belongs To Yesterday

76 The Hollies - Here I Go Again

77 Frank Ifield - Don't Blame Me

78 The Ronettes - Baby I Love You

79 Lulu & The Luvvers - Shout

80 Big Dee Irwin - Swinging On A Star

81 Gerry & The Pacemakers - Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying

82 The Hollies - We're Through

83 Jim Reeves - There's A Heartache Following Me

84 Dean Martin - Everybody Loves Somebody

85 Gigliola Cinquetti - Non Ho L'Eta Per Amarti

86 Dave Clark Five - Can't You See That She's Mine

87 The Hollies - Stay

88 Freddie & The Dreamers - I Understand

89 Cilla Black - It's For You

90 The Migil Five - Mocking Bird Hill

91 Cliff Richard - Twelfth Of Never

92 Dusty Springfield - Losing You

93 PJ Proby - Together

94 The Animals - I'm Crying

95 Elvis Presley - Kissin' Cousins

96 Peter & Gordon - Nobody I Know

97 Kathy Kirby - Let Me Go Lover

98 Henry Mancini Orchestra - How Soon?

99 The Zombies - She's Not There

100 The Mojos - Everything's Alright

 

Top Twenty TV Shows in 1964 were

 

1. Steptoe and Son (BBC)

2. Sunday Palladium (ITV)

3. Coronation Street (ITV)

4. Dick Powell Theatre (BBC)

5. Take Your Pick (ITV)

6. Royal Variety Show (BBC)

7. No Hiding Place (ITV)

8. Armchair Theatre (ITV)

9. It's Tarbuck (ITV)

10. Crane (ITV)

11. Stars and Garters (ITV)

12. Double Your Money (ITV)

13. Emergency Ward Ten (ITV)

14. Around the Beatles (ITV)

15. Frank Ifield Show (ITV)

16. The Avengers (ITV)

17. Christmas Comedy (ITV)

18. Miss World 1964 (ITV)

19. Max Bygraves (ITV)

20. Love Story (ITV)

The bottom of the 160 step staircase; the lifts no longer work. The sign pointing to the Bakerloo Line is left over from the last film to be shot there.

 

Aldwych tube station is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand, after the street on which it is located, and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street, near Aldwych. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

The Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) first proposed a station in the Strand area in a private bill presented to Parliament in November 1898.[2] The station was to be the southern terminus of an underground railway line planned to run from Wood Green station (now Alexandra Palace) via Finsbury Park and King's Cross and was originally to be located at the corner of Stanhope Street and Holles Street, north of the Strand. When the two streets were scheduled for demolition as part of the London County Council's plans for the construction of Kingsway and Aldwych, the GN&SR moved the location to the junction of the two new roads.[3] Royal Assent to the bill was given and the Great Northern and Strand Railway Act 1899 was enacted on 1 August.[4]

In September 1901, the GN&SR was taken over by the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway (B&PCR), which planned to build an underground line from South Kensington to Piccadilly Circus via Knightsbridge. Both were under the control of Charles Yerkes through his Metropolitan District Electric Traction Company and, in June 1902, were transferred to Yerkes' new holding company, the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL).[5] Neither of the railways had carried out any construction, but the UERL obtained permission for new tunnels between Piccadilly Circus and Holborn to connect the two routes. The companies were formally merged as the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) following parliamentary approval in November 1902.[6][7][8] Prior to confirmation of the merger, the GN&SR had sought permission to extend its line southwards from the future junction of Kingsway and Aldwych, under Norfolk Street to a new interchange under the Metropolitan District Railway's station at Temple. The extension was rejected following objections from the Duke of Norfolk under whose land the last part of the proposed tunnels would have run.[9]

In 1903, the GNP&BR sought permission for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to run under Leicester Square, Strand, and Fleet Street and into the City of London. The branch would have passed and interchanged with the already approved Strand station,[10] allowing travel on the GNP&BR from Strand in three directions. The deliberations of a Royal Commission on traffic in London prevented parliamentary consideration of the proposal, which was withdrawn.[11]

In 1905, with the Royal Commission's report about to be published, the GNP&BR returned to Parliament with two bills for consideration. The first bill revived the 1903 proposal for a branch from Piccadilly Circus to the City of London, passing and interchanging with Strand station. The second proposed an extension and relocation of Strand station to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. From there the line was to continue as a single tunnel under the River Thames to Waterloo. The first bill was again delayed and withdrawn. Of the second, only the relocation of Strand station was permitted.

 

The linking of the GN&SR and B&PCR routes meant that the section of the GN&SR south of Holborn became a branch from the main route. The UERL began constructing the main route in July 1902. Progress was rapid, so that it was largely complete by the Autumn of 1906.[13] Construction of the Holborn to Strand section was delayed while the London County Council constructed Kingsway and the tramway subway running beneath it and while the UERL decided how the junction between the main route and the branch would be arranged at Holborn.[14][note 1]

Strand station was built on the site of the Royal Strand Theatre, which had closed on 13 May 1905 and been demolished. Construction of the station began on 21 October 1905,[16] to a design by the UERL's architect Leslie Green in the UERL house style of a two-storey steel-framed building faced with red glazed terracotta blocks, with wide semi-circular windows on the upper floor.[17] The station building is L-shaped, with two façades separated by the building on the corner of Strand and Surrey Street. The Strand façade is narrow with a single semi-circular window above the entrance. The façade in Surrey Street is wider with a separate entrance and exit and a shop unit. In anticipation of a revival of the extension to Waterloo and the City route, the station was built with three circular lift shafts able to accommodate six trapezium-shaped lifts. Only one of the shafts was fitted out, with two lifts.[18] The other two shafts rose from the lower concourse to the basement of the station, but could have been extended upwards into the space of the shop unit when required. A fourth smaller-diameter shaft accommodated an emergency spiral stair.[19]

The platforms are 92 feet 6 inches (28.19 m) below street level and are 250 feet (76 m) long;[16] shorter than the GNP&BR's standard length of 350 feet (110 m).[20] As with other UERL stations, the platform walls were tiled with distinctive patterns, in this case cream and dark green. Only parts of the platform walls were decorated because it was planned to operate the branch with short trains.[16] Due to the reduced lift provision, a second route between the platforms and lifts was never brought into use and was left in an unfinished condition without tiling.

 

The GNP&BR's main route opened on 15 December 1906, but the Strand branch was not opened until 30 November 1907.[22] Initially, shuttle trains operated to Holborn from the eastern platform into the through platform at Holborn. At peak times, an additional train operated alternately in the branch's western tunnel into the bay platform at Holborn. During the first year of operation, a train for theatregoers operated late on Monday to Saturday evenings from Strand through Holborn and northbound to Finsbury Park; this was discontinued in October 1908.[16]

In March 1908, the off-peak shuttle service began to use the western platform at Strand and the through platform at Holborn, crossing between the two branch tunnels south of Holborn. Low usage led to the withdrawal of the second peak-hour shuttle and the eastern tunnel was taken out of use in 1914.[23][24] On 9 May 1915, three of the Underground stations in the area were renamed and Strand station became Aldwych.[22][note 2] Sunday services ended in April 1917 and, in August of the same year, the eastern tunnel and platform at Aldwych and the bay platform at Holborn were formally closed.[25] A German bombing campaign in September 1917 led the disused platform being used as storage for 300 pictures from the National Gallery until December 1918.

 

In October 1922, the ticket office was replaced by a facility in the lifts.[25] Passenger numbers remained low: when the station was one of a number on the network considered for closure in 1929, its annual usage was 1,069,650 and takings were £4,500.[27][note 3] The branch was again considered for closure in 1933, but remained open.[25]

Wartime efficiency measures led to the branch being closed temporarily on 22 September 1940, shortly after the start of The Blitz, and it was partly fitted out by the City of Westminster as an air-raid shelter. The tunnels between Aldwych and Holborn were used to store items from the British Museum, including the Elgin Marbles. The branch reopened on 1 July 1946, but patronage did not increase.[28] In 1958, the station was one of three that London Transport announced would be closed. Again it survived, but the service was reduced in June 1958 to run only during Monday to Friday peak hours and Saturday morning and early afternoons.[29][note 4] The Saturday service was withdrawn in June 1962.[29]

  

Shelterers inside Aldwych station during the Blitz, 1940.

 

After operating only during peak hours for more than 30 years, the closure announcement came on 4 January 1993. The original 1907 lifts required replacement at a cost of £3 million. This was not justifiable as only 450 passengers used the station each day and it was losing London Regional Transport £150,000 per year. The Secretary of State for Transport granted permission on 1 September 1994 to close the station and the branch closed on 30 September.

 

Although the Piccadilly Circus to City of London branch proposal of 1905 was never revisited after its withdrawal, the early plan to extend the branch south to Waterloo was revived a number of times during the station's life. The extension was considered in 1919 and 1948, but no progress towards constructing the link was made.[28]

In the years after the Second World War, a series of preliminary plans for relieving congestion on the London Underground had considered various east-west routes through the Aldwych area, although other priorities meant that these were never proceeded with. In March 1965, a British Rail and London Transport joint planning committee published "A Railway Plan for London" which proposed a new tube railway, the Fleet line (later renamed the Jubilee line), to join the Bakerloo line at Baker Street then run via Bond Street, Green Park, Charing Cross, Aldwych and into the City of London via Ludgate Circus, Cannon Street and Fenchurch Street before heading into south-east London. An interchange was proposed at Aldwych and a second recommendation of the report was the revival of the link from Aldwych to Waterloo.[31][32] London Transport had already sought parliamentary approval to construct tunnels from Aldwych to Waterloo in November 1964,[33] and in August 1965, parliamentary powers were granted. Detailed planning took place, although public spending cuts led to postponement of the scheme in 1967 before tenders were invited.[29]

Planning of the Fleet line continued and parliamentary approval was given in July 1969 for the first phase of the line, from Baker Street to Charing Cross.[34] Tunnelling began on the £35 million route in February 1972 and the Jubilee line opened north from Charing Cross in May 1979.[35] The tunnels of the approved section continued east of Charing Cross under Strand almost as far as Aldwych station, but no work at Aldwych was undertaken and they were used only as sidings.[36] Funding for the second phase of the work was delayed throughout the 1970s whilst the route beyond Charing Cross was reviewed to consider options for serving anticipated development in the London Docklands area. By 1979, the cost was estimated as £325 million, a six-fold increase from the £51 million estimated in 1970.[37] A further review of alternatives for the Jubilee line was carried out in 1980, which led to the a change of priorities and the postponement of any further effort on the line.[38] When the extension was eventually constructed in the late 1990s it took a different route, south of the River Thames via Westminster, Waterloo and London Bridge to provide a rapid link to Canary Wharf, leaving the tunnels between Green Park and Aldwych redundant.[39]

In July 2005, Ove Arup & Partners produced a report, DLR Horizon 2020 Study, for the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) examining "pragmatic development schemes" to expand and improve the DLR network between 2012 and 2020. One of the proposals was an extension of the DLR from Bank to Charing Cross via City Thameslink and Aldwych. The disused Jubilee line tunnels would be enlarged to accommodate the larger DLR trains and Aldwych station would form the basis for a new station on the line, although requiring considerable reconstruction to accommodate escalators. The estimated cost in 2005 was £232 million for the infrastructure works and the scheme was described as "strongly beneficial" as it was expected to attract passengers from the London Underground's existing east-west routes and from local buses and reduce overcrowding at Bank station. The business case assessment was that the proposal offered high value, although similar values were calculated for other extension proposals from Bank. Further detailed studies were proposed.

 

Because it was a self-contained section of the London Underground which was closed at weekends and for extended periods during weekdays, Aldwych station and the branch line from Holborn were popular locations for filming scenes set on the Tube even before their closure. Since the branch's closure in 1994, its use in film productions has continued, with the station appearing as itself and, with appropriate signage, as other stations on the network.[29] The track and infrastructure are maintained in operational condition, and a train of ex-Northern line 1972 tube stock is permanently stabled on the branch. This train can be driven up and down the branch for filming. The physical connection with the Piccadilly line northbound tracks remains, but requires manual operation.[41]

Films and television productions that have been shot at Aldwych include:

The Gentle Gunman (1952)[29]

Battle of Britain (1969)[42]

Death Line (1972)[29]

Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1986)[29]

The Krays (1990)[43]

Patriot Games (1994)[43]

Creep (2004)[42]

V for Vendetta (2006)[42]

The Good Shepherd (2006)[42]

Atonement (2007)[42]

28 Weeks Later (2007)[42]

The Edge of Love (2008)[42]

Mr Selfridge (2013) [44]

The pre-war operation of the station features in a pivotal scene in Geoffrey Household's novel Rogue Male, when the pursuit of the protagonist by an enemy agent sees them repeatedly using the shuttle service on the branch line. A chase through Aldwych station ends with the agent's death by electrocution on the track.[45] A much modified and expanded version of the station appears as a level in the video game Tomb Raider III.[46] The music video for The Prodigy's song "Firestarter" was filmed in the disused eastern tunnel and one of the unused lift shafts.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Any reference to (RoH) means the Roll of Honour Website, to which I am deeply indebted.

 

www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Aylsham.html

The Roll of Honour site refers to the War memorial in the churchyard. Although there is also a wooden memorial plaque in the church, this appears to be identical in practically every detail, other than adding that the Korean War individual died in 1952.

 

Francis Henry FROSTICK………………………………...............(RoH)

 

Able Seaman R/543. Hawke Bn. R.N. Div., Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Died Tuesday 24 April 1917. Age 26. Son of James and Emily Frostick, of Hungate St., Aylsham, Norfolk. Commemorated: ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 1

 

On Churchyard War Memorial F H Frostick

On Church Memorial board F H Frostick

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=1557805

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a Frank Frostick,on the census, aged 11 and living at the Cottages by the Mill, Oxnead. Frank was born at Aylsham. His parents are James, (aged 46 and a Cattleman on Farm from Banningham), and Emily, (aged 45 and from Skeyton). Their other children are Elsie, (aged 3, born Oxnead), Frederick, (aged 7, born Aylsham), and William, (aged 15 and a Bricklayers Labourer, born Heigham).

On the DayWESTERN FRONT

9 April-15 May Battle of Arras, including

23-24 April Second Battle of the Scarpe (Second phase of Arras Offensive), 63rd (RN) Division captured Gavrelle

The attack on Gavrelle was commenced on 23 April and was carried out by the 189th and 190th Brigades. At 4.45 a.m. Nelson and Drake battalions went over the top under cover of an artillery barrage. The first line of German trenches was quickly taken, and an hour later the attack was ceased at the edge of the village.

 

The artillery barrage was relocated across the village, which was reduced to rubble. Other battalions from the brigade were moved forward. House to house fighting led to the taking of Gavrelle, at the cost of 1,500 casualties.

Virtually all the remaining reservists of the original Royal Naval Division lost their lives at Gavrelle. They were the veterans who had survived the fighting at Gallipoli and at the Ancre.

www.wereldoorlog1418.nl/RND-Royal-Naval-Division/index.html

www.naval-history.net/xDKCas1917-04Apr.htm

 

H J GIBBONS……………………………….............................(RoH)

 

No further information available at present.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial H J Gibbons

On Church Memorial board H J Gibbons

CWGC

Possibly H J East Surrey Regiment died 1916

www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=576007

Or Henry John, Royal Lancaster Regiment, died 1918

www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=301567

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a 14 year old Henry G, born Aylsham, and now employed as an Errand Boy at Chemist, living at 9 West Street, Cromer. His mother Alice M M, (age 36 and from Colby) has re-married, and so Henry is living with his step-father, James Norgate, a 32 year old Corn Porter from North Walsham).

 

William GILES………………………………............................(RoH)

 

Private 51361. 2nd Bn., Manchester Regiment. Killed in action Friday 19 April 1918 in France & Flanders. Age 27. Born Skeyton. Lived Aylsham. Enlisted Norwich. Son of William and Annie Giles, of Woodgate Cottages, Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: QUESNOY FARM MILITARY CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Ref. C. 7.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial W Giles

On Church Memorial board W Giles

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=590871

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is an 8 year old “Willie” Giles, living at North Walsham Road, Skeyton, the village of his birth. Willie’s parents are William, (aged 35 and a Cattle Feeder on Farm from Scottow), and Annie, (aged 38 and from Scottow). Their other children are Alice, (aged 5, born Sketon), George, (aged 12, born Oxnead), John, (aged 9, born Swanton Abbott), Martha, (aged 13, born Swanton Abbott), and Sidney, (aged 2, born Skeyton).

On the day April 1918

Ayette attacked and carried. Batt was in the front line until the 25th 14 KIA, 87 wounded, 16 gassed, 1 missing.25th withdrawn to Barly

www.themanchesters.org/2nd batt.htm

 

Clare Horsley GOULDER……………………………….............(RoH)

 

Corporal 13146. 8th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Died Tuesday 31 October 1916. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Norwich. Buried: AYLSHAM CEMETERY, Norfolk, United Kingdom. Ref. B. 77.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial C H Goulder

On Church Memorial board C H Goulder

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2802302

Norlink No archive items.

 

There is a memorial to all the Goulder boys who died in the Great War in Aylsham Cemetery. Clare is listed as having been wounded on the Somme on the 1st July 1916, and subsequently dying in Hospital on the 31st October 1916. He was born on the 14th January 1892.

1901 Census The 9 year old Clare H is recorded at Pound Lane, Aylsham. His parents are John, (aged 56 and a Farmer and Manure Agent from Wramplingham), and Mary, (aged 52 and from Stretford, Lancashire). Their other children are Colin Chas, (aged 11), Frances M, (aged 12), John Lee, (aged 17), and Sybil M, (aged 19). The Goulders have two live in servants.

 

John Lee GOULDER………………………………................(RoH)

(There is a picture of John on the RoH website)

 

Serjeant 2179. 1st/5th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action Saturday 21 August 1915. Born and enlisted Aylsham. Commemorated: HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 42 to 44.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial J L Goulder

On Church Memorial board J L Goulder

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=693690

Norlink No archive items.

 

There is a memorial to all the Goulder boys who died in the Great War in Aylsham Cemetery. John Lee is listed as having died in action at Suvla. He was born the 16th April 1883.

1901 Census The 17 year old John Lee is recorded at Pound Lane, Aylsham. His parents are John, (aged 56 and a Farmer and Manure Agent from Wramplingham), and Mary, (aged 52 and from Stretford, Lancashire). Their other children are Colin Chas, (aged 11), Frances M, (aged 12), Clare H, (aged 9), and Sybil M, (aged 19). The Goulders have two live in servants.

On the Day 21st August 1915

 

Having lost over 200 men from the battalion shortly before this on the 12th, the battalion was to lose at least another 36 on this day.

 

Robert Christopher GOULDER………………………………..(RoH)

 

Lance Corporal 13188. 8th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action Saturday 1 July 1916. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Norwich. Commemorated: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 1 C and 1 D.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Not noted by me

On Church Memorial board R C Goulder

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=786636

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census A 14 year old Robert Goulder, born Aylsham, is recorded as a Boarder at a Private Grammer School in Banham, Norfolk. Ten years earlier, the same individual is now listed as Robert C. and is living at Cromer Road, Aylsham with his parents John and Mary - see family details recorded for Clare and John Lee. The only additional child listed appears to be a Humphrey W, (aged 6 in 1891, born Aylsham)

On the Day The 6th Battalion, Royal Berks went over the top alongside the 8th Norfolks on the first day of the Somme. The story of what happened to the two units can be read here,

www.6throyalberks.co.uk/1stJuly/default.html

 

The 8th Battalion as part of the 18th (Eastern) Division was present on the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916. They got beyond their initial target and had by 5.00pm reached the German trenches known as "Montauban Alley". Over one hundred men and three officers had been killed.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Norfolk_Regiment

 

Arthur Robert HALL………………………………..........................(RoH)

 

Sapper 230925. 130th Field Coy., Royal Engineers. Died Friday 18 October 1918. Born and lived Aylsham. Enlisted Cromer. Buried: ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France. Ref. S. II. J 9.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Not noted by me

On Church Memorial board A Hall

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=518028

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a 14 year old Arthur, born Aylsham, employed as a Stonemason, and currently residing at Millgate, Aylsham. His parents are Charles, (aged 48 and a Stone Mason from Cossey, Norfolk), and Susanna, (aged 47 and from Burgh). Their other children are Ada, (aged 25 and a Drapers Assistant), Alfred, (aged 17 and a Grocers Assistant), Bessie, (aged 18 and a Drapers Assistant), Frank, (aged 7), and Harry, (aged 11).

 

Arthur James HORNE………………………………......................(RoH)

 

[C.D. Gives surname as HOME.] Private 27389. 6th Bn., Somerset Light Infantry. Formerly G/37364 Royal Fusiliers. Killed in action in France & Flanders on Saturday 3 November 1917. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Norwich. Husband of Mrs. L. Farrow (formerly Horne), of Footpath House, Swanton Abbott, Norwich, Norfolk. Commemorated: TYNE COT MEMORIAL , Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Panel 41 to 42 and 163A.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Not noted by me

On Church Memorial board A J Horne

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=837244

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 12 year old Arthur J, employed as an Errand Boy\Porter, is recorded at Woodgate Cottage, Aylsham. His parents are Johnathan, (aged 39 and a Team Man on farm from Foulsham), and Mary Ann, (age 40 and from Norwich). Their other children are Bertie S, (aged 1), Gladys F, (aged 3), and Walter S, (aged 7). Also living with them are Johnathan’s father, James, (aged 82 and from Saxthorpe, on Parish Poor Relief).

 

Eric HORNER………………………………..................................(RoH)

(There is a picture of Eric on the RoH website)

 

Lance Corporal 11376. 6th Bn., Yorkshire Regiment. Killed in action Saturday 21 August 1915. Born Aylsham. Enlisted South Shields. Commemorated: HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 55 to 58.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Not noted by me

On Church Memorial board E Horner

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=691984

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 9 year old Eric is resident at Cawston Road, Aylsham. His parents are Frederick J, (aged 37 and a Blacksmith from Calthorpe), and Eliza, (aged 37 and from Aylsham). Their other children are Cora, (aged 12), Ella, (aged 12), Hilda, (aged 4), Leonard, (aged 11), and Raymond, (aged 7).

1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=124...

On the Day The Yorkshires were involved in the costly Battle of Scimitar Hill and the attack on “W” Hills on this day.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Scimitar_Hill

www.firstworldwar.com/battles/scimitarhill.htm

 

G HUNT……………………………….........................................(RoH)

 

No further information available at present.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Not noted by me

On Church Memorial board G Hunt

CWGC

 

Possibly George Lewis aged 18 of the 1st/5th Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding) Regiment. His parents are shown as residing at Neatishead.

www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=794393

 

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census Possibilities are:-

George, (aged 2), living at Hungate Street, Aylsham. Parents Arthur, (32, Agricultural Labourer), Alice (33, born Fritton) - other children Arthur W. (6), and Florence C (4).

George, (aged 16 - Cattle Man on Farm), living at Mucklands, Aylsham..Mother Elizabeth, (aged 39 and a Widow from Barningham Parva) - other children Bertie, (aged 12), Daisy, (aged 10), Lily, (aged 8), and Sidney, (aged 14 and a Baker).

 

(Charles) Frederick KNIGHTS……………………………….........(RoH)

 

Private 127984. 34th Coy., Machine Gun Corps (Inf). Formerly 35348 East Surrey Regiment. Killed in action Thursday 11 April 1918 in France & Flanders. Born Northrepps. Lived Aylsham. Enlisted Cromer. Son of Fredrick Charles Knights. Commemorated: PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 11.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Not noted by me

On Church Memorial board F Knights

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=869316

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a 2 year old Frederick Knights living at Norwich Road, Aylsham who was born at Southrepps. He is living with his Grand-Parents Frederick, (aged 50 and a Railway Porter from Diss), and Alice, (aged 40 and from Wells, Norfolk). The children of Frederick and Alice are Adeline, (aged 14), Anne, (aged 19), Bertie G, (aged 5), Edith, (aged 11), and Sidney, (aged 9).

  

C LEE………………………………............................................(RoH)

 

No further information available at present.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Looks more like G Lee but carving not in common with other C’s or G’s

On Church Memorial board C Lee

CWGC

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a 9 year old Charles H Lee, born Cawston and now living at Cawston Road, Aylsham. His parents are Herbert Wm, (aged 31 and a Farm Bailiff from Cawston), and Elizabeth, (aged 31 and also from Cawston). Their other children are Sidney S., (aged 4, born Cawston), Valentine E. (aged 2, born Aylsham) and Walter W. (aged 7, born Cawston).

 

This points us to a possible match on the CWGC database - Charles Herbert Lee who was 26 when he died on the 14/11/1918. His wife had re-married, and was now living at Aldborough, but Charles is buried in the Churchyard of St Giles, Colby, Norfolk. Charles is on the Colby War Memorial. He had served as a Pioneer in the Royal Engineers.

www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2802318

www.roll-of-honour.com/Norfolk/Colby.html

 

If they are all the same individual, then Charles is probably the brother of the Sydney listed below.

 

Sydney Samuel LEE………………………………......................(RoH)

 

Private 22202. 2nd Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Died Sunday 7 January 1917. Age 20. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Norwich. Son of Hubert William and Elizabeth Lee, of Beer House Farm, Cawston, Norfolk. Commemorated: KIRKEE 1914-1918 MEMORIAL, India. Face C.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial S Lee

On Church Memorial board S Lee

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=1481525

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a 4 year old Sidney S Lee, born Cawston and now living at Cawston Road, Aylsham. His parents are Herbert Wm, (aged 31 and a Farm Bailiff from Cawston), and Elizabeth, (aged 31 and also from Cawston). Their other children are Charles H., (aged 9, born Cawston), Valentine E. (aged 2, born Aylsham) and Walter W. (aged 7, born Cawston).

 

(Frank) Sydney LEMAN………………………………................(RoH)

Private 40900. 11th Bn., Essex Regiment. Formerly 32927 Suffolk Regiment. Died of wounds Saturday 23 March 1918 in France & Flanders. Age 35. Born Kelling. Lived Aylsham. Enlisted Cromer. Buried: DERNANCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION, Somme, France. Ref. III. J. 46.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial S Leman

On Church Memorial board S Leman

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=37479

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census No apparent match. On the 1891 Census, the 9 year old Frank, having been born at Kelling was by now living at The Street, (Possibly Kelling or Erpingham - original is a poor quality scan). His parents are John Leman, (aged 31 and an Agricultural Labourer, place of birth illegible on the Genes Re-united site - possibly Erpingham) and Jane, (aged 30 and probably from Kelling). I believe the other children are Jane, Agnes, Stuart and Arthur, but I shall roll my eyes next time I hear someone waffle on about how standards of hand-writing used to be so much better in Victorian times J

On the DayThe 11th Essex had been heavily engaged in holding back the German onslaught of their 1918 Spring Offensive which had commenced on the 21st.

www.gutenberg.org/files/20115/20115-h/20115-h.htm#page044

Private Leman may well have picked up his fatal wounds during this time.

 

B MARSHALL……………………………….....................................(RoH)

 

No further information available at present.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial B Marshall

On Church Memorial board B Marshall

CWGC

 

Possibly Bertie Walter, aged 22, of the 35th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, who died 30/11/1917. Bertie’s parents (James & Laura) are recorded as living at Stafford Street, Norwich.

www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=554906

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census No obvious match for any B Marshall and no obvious Marshall connection with Aylsham.

 

Frederick MOY………………………………..................................(RoH)

 

Private 240040. 1st/5th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action Thursday 19 April 1917. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Millgate, Higham, Norfolk. Buried: GAZA WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Ref. XXII. G. 5.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial F Moy

On Church Memorial board F Moy

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=650910

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census No obvious match on the 1901 or 1891 Censuses. There are two Moy familys, both with numerous sons, and Aylsham connections - one having subsequently moved to Old Buckenham, but there is not even a middle initial F. on any of them.

On the Day 19th April 1917 During the 2nd Battle of Gaza,

Facing the Tank Redoubt was the 161st Brigade of the 54th Division. To their right were the two Australian battalions (1st and 3rd) of the Imperial Camel Corps Brigade who had dismounted about 4,000 yards from their objective. As the infantry went in to attack at 7.30am they were joined by a single tank called "The Nutty" which attracted a lot of shell fire. The tank followed a wayward path towards the redoubt on the summit of a knoll where it was fired on point blank by four field guns until it was stopped and set alight in the middle of the position.

The infantry and the 1st Camel Battalion, having suffered heavy casualties on their approach, now made a bayonet charge against the trenches. About 30 "Camels" and 20 of the British infantry (soldiers of the 5th (territorial Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment) reached the redoubt, then occupied by around 600 Turks who immediately broke and fled towards their second line of defences to the rear.

The British and Australians held on unsupported for about two hours by which time most had been wounded. With no reinforcements at hand and a Turkish counter-attack imminent, the survivors endeavoured to escape back to their own lines.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Gaza

More than a thousand one hundred of the men of the 54th posted killed wounded or missing were from the two Norfolk regiment battalions, equating to 75% of their strength. Eastern Daily Press "Sunday" section May 5, 2007

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Gaza

 

William NORTON………………………………...............................(RoH)

 

Private 41117. 7th Bn., The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regt.) attd. 288th Coy., Royal Engineers. Died Saturday 17 March 1917. Age 41. Born and lived Aylsham. Enlisted Cromer. Son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Norton, of Aylsham; husband of S. E. Norton, of Pound Rd., Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: WARLINCOURT HALTE BRITISH CEMETERY, SAULTY, Pas de Calais, France. Ref. V. E. 4.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial W Norton

On Church Memorial board W Norton

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=91524

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 25 year old William, born Aylsham, is employed as a Domestic Gardener and is living on Hungate Street, Aylsham with his widowed mother Esther, (aged 48 and born Edgefield). Also living with them are William’s brothers Albert, (aged 15 and a Cattle Feeder on Farm), Augustus, (aged 12) and Frederick, (aged 9).

 

J C PAYNE……………………………….........................................(RoH)

 

[No record on CD.] Private T/254791. Army Service Corps. Died Thursday 20 December 1917. Age 35. Buried: AYLSHAM CEMETERY, Norfolk, United Kingdom. Ref. G. 70.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial J C Payne

On Church Memorial board J C Payne

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2802303

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 1901 Census has a 17 year old James C, born Aylsham and employed as a Bricklayers Labourer. He is living at Drabblegate, Aylsham with his parents William, (aged 44 and a Bricklayer), and Sophia, (aged 40). Their other children are Blanch, (aged 10), Eliza, (aged 13), Ethel S, (aged 8), Frederick H, (aged 19 and a Gardener, (not Domestic)), Harry E. (aged 7), Katie (aged 6), and William, (aged 4).

 

Frederick PEGG……………………………….............................(RoH)

 

Corporal 12967. 7th Bn., Suffolk Regiment. Killed in action Wednesday 27 March 1918. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Lowestoft. Commemorated: POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 25

 

On Churchyard War Memorial F Pegg

On Church Memorial board F Pegg

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=1586611

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 14 year old Frederick, born Aylsham, is living on Hungate Street and employed as an Errand Boy. His parents are Alfred Charles, (a 47 year old Carpenter from Heydon), and Clara, (47 and from Wood Dalling). Their other children are Benjamin A, (aged 15 and a Newspaper Boy), Caroline E, (aged 22), Francis H, (aged 13), Marshall A, (aged 20 and a Bricklayers Labourer), and Stephen S.A. (aged 11).

On the dayThe 7th Suffolks were involved in the fighting retreat that was gradually bringing the German Spring Offensive to a halt before Albert.

1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=111...

 

W J PITCHER………………………………...............................(RoH)

 

Possibly: Wilfred Pitcher. Private 240948. 1st/5th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Died in Palestine on Thursday 19 April 1917. Enlisted East Dereham. Buried: GAZA WAR CEMETERY, Israel. Ref. XXIII. D. 10.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial W J Pitcher

On Church Memorial board W J Pitcher

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=651074

Norlink No archive items.

 

There is a memorial to Wilfred’s father Elliot who died in 1934 in Aylsham cemetery. This also lists a son Wilfred John who fell in action in Egypt, 19th April 1917.Elliot’s wife, (and presumably Wilfred’s mother) is listed as Alice Mary.

1901 Census The 1 year old Wilfred, born Aldborough, is living Near the Green, Aldborough. His parents are Elliott, (aged 25 and a Domestic Gardener) and Alice, (aged 22 and from Saxthorpe). Wilfred has a brother George, (aged under 1).

On the dayMore than a thousand one hundred of the men of the 54th posted killed wounded or missing were from the two Norfolk regiment battalions, equating to 75% of their strength. Eastern Daily Press "Sunday" section May 5, 2007

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Gaza

19th April 1917 During the 2nd Battle of Gaza,

 

Facing the Tank Redoubt was the 161st Brigade of the 54th Division. To their right were the two Australian battalions (1st and 3rd) of the Imperial Camel Corps Brigade who had dismounted about 4,000 yards from their objective. As the infantry went in to attack at 7.30am they were joined by a single tank called "The Nutty" which attracted a lot of shell fire. The tank followed a wayward path towards the redoubt on the summit of a knoll where it was fired on point blank by four field guns until it was stopped and set alight in the middle of the position.

The infantry and the 1st Camel Battalion, having suffered heavy casualties on their approach, now made a bayonet charge against the trenches. About 30 "Camels" and 20 of the British infantry (soldiers of the 5th (territorial Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment) reached the redoubt, then occupied by around 600 Turks who immediately broke and fled towards their second line of defences to the rear.

The British and Australians held on unsupported for about two hours by which time most had been wounded. With no reinforcements at hand and a Turkish counter-attack imminent, the survivors endeavoured to escape back to their own lines.

To the right (west) of Tank Redoubt, the 3rd Camel Battalion, advancing in the gap between two redoubts, actually made the furthest advance of the battle, crossing the Gaza-Beersheba Road and occupying a pair of low hills (dubbed "Jack" and "Jill"). As the advances on their flanks faltered, the "Camels" were forced to retreat to avoid being isolated.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Gaza

 

E J PRESTON………………………………................................(RoH)

 

Possibly: Ernest James Preston. Gunner 906467. 337th Bde., Royal Field Artillery. Died in Mesopotamia on Monday 28 October 1918. (CD gives date as 25 October 1918). Lived and enlisted Norwich. Buried: BASRA WAR CEMETERY, Iraq. Ref. I. S. 3.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial E J Preston

On Church Memorial board E J Preston

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=631320

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 4 year old Ernest J is living at Buxton Road, Aylsham, the town of his birth. His parents are Leonard J, (34 and a Road Surveyor from Hevingham), and Louisa E, (aged 30 and from Highfield, Sussex). The Prestons also have a daughter, Florence M, aged 1. Although I only have access to the high-level search on the 1911 census, Ernest is still recorded in the District of Aylsham. I can only assume he either moved to Norwich to seek work or that the Ernest James on the RoH site is a different individual.

 

C RISEBOROUGH……………………………….........................(RoH)

 

Possibly either: Charles Riseborough. Gunner 98474. Guards Div. H.Q., Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action in France & Flanders on Sunday 3 October 1915. Born Holt. Enlisted Norwich. Buried: FOSSE 7 MILITARY CEMETERY, MAZINGARBE, Pas de Calais, France. Ref. I. A. 2. Or: Charles James Riseborough. Private22396 "A Coy. 8th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action in France & Flanders on Wednesday 19 July 1916 . Age 25. Born Wickmere. Enlisted Norwich. Son of Herbert and Mary Ann Riseborough, of Wickmere, Norwich. Commemorated: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL Somme, France. Pier and Face 1 C and 1 D.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial C Riseborough

On Church Memorial board C Riseborough

CWGC

www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=563714

www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=1551611

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 1901 census has a 17 year old Charles, born Aylsham, employed as a Shepherd, and living at Drabblegate, Aylsham. His parents are James, (aged 40 and a Shepherd from Erpingham), and Fanny, (aged 38 and from Aylsham). Their other children are Albert, (aged 14, born Ingworth, and a Shepherd), Charles, (aged 17, born Aylsham and a Shepherd), Elenor, (aged 5, born Ingworth), James, (aged 11, born Ingworth), and Thirza, (aged 8, born Ingworth).

 

There is also a 10 year old Charles, born Weybourne, and now also living at Drabblegate, Aylsham. His parents are Robert, (aged 40 and a Blacksmith from Hempstead, Norfolk) and Martha, (aged 36, from Peckham, Norfolk). Their other children are Hilda, (aged 3, born Aylsham), John T, (aged 12, born Weybourne), Mary, (aged 11, born Weybourne), Maud, (aged 9, born Aylsham), and Sidney, (aged 4, born Aylsham).

 

There are only 2 C Riseborough’s shown on the CWGC database, and neither set of details as shown on the RoH web-site appear to tie in with the C Riseborough’s on the 1901 Census.

 

I’ve then tried the RoH details on the 1911 high level search engine. The individual born at Wickmere is now recorded as living in the District of Aylsham. I can find no match on the 1901 or 1911 Census for a Charles born in Holt.

 

The Wickmere individual was aged 9 on the 1901 Census and living at 9 Low Street, Wickmere, (in the District of Aylsham). His parents are Hebert, (aged 36 and a Horseman on Farm from Matlaske), and Mary A, (aged 39 and from Sheringham). Their other children are Fred, (aged 11), and Richard, (aged 6).

 

Edward Henry RISEBOROUGH……………………………….........(RoH)

 

Private 16114. 2nd Bn., Coldstream Guards. Killed in action Saturday 16 September 1916 in France & Flanders. Born Ingham. Lived Aylsham. Enlisted Hertford. Commemorated: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Pier and Face 7 D and 8 D.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial E Riseborough

On Church Memorial board E Riseborough

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=1551612

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 3 year old Edward H, born Ingham, is now living at Cawston Road, Aylsham. His parents are James, (aged 26 and a Yardman on Farm from Hempstead), and Mary E. (aged 27 and from Stalham). Their other child is William J, (aged 1 and born Aylsham).

On the Day15th September 1916

 

“The Guards Division went into action at Ginchy on the 15th September, supported by tanks, but these broke down or stuck in the mud. None of the enemy strongpoints had been silenced, when, for the first and indeed the only time in the regiments history, three Coldstream Battalions, 1st, 2nd and 3rd, advanced together in line.Very heavy losses were sustained against heavy hand fire and artillery, and the dead and the wounded, as they fell, frequently disappeared into the engulfing mud.

The first objectives were seized, but there was a serious hold up on the right flank, and the advance ground to a halt. The main resistance came from a complicated and extensive trench system called the Quadrilateral, from which a withering fire poured forth at the Coldstreamers. However, later in the day, it was penetrated and neutralised by other Guards units, and the Coldstream battalions were able to resume their forward movement. Within an hour the secondary objectives were taken and held, in spite of the most furious resistance. The three Coldstream battalions suffered crippling losses, no less than 40 officers and 1,326 rank and file killed or wounded. The commanding officer of the 3rd Battalion, Lt Col John Campbell, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry, rallying and encouraging his men with blasts from his hunting horn.

 

Despite their shattered condition, the Coldstreamers were back in the line within a few days, but were relieved on the 27th when the division was withdrawn for a spell in the general reserve.”

books.google.co.uk/books?id=GzRcQah1ULcC&pg=PA28&...

 

John T RISEBOROUGH………………………………...................(RoH)

 

Gunner 606180. 293rd Bty. 1st (Glam.) Bde., Royal Horse Artillery. Died in France & Flanders on Monday 26 February 1917. Age 28. Born Weybourne. Enlisted Marsham. Son of Robert and Martha Riseborough, of Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: DOULLENS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION No.1, Somme, France. Ref. III. G. 17.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial J T Riseborough

On Church Memorial board J T Riseborough

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=83398

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a 12 year old John T, born Weybourne, and now also living at Drabblegate, Aylsham. His parents are Robert, (aged 40 and a Blacksmith from Hempstead, Norfolk) and Martha, (aged 36, from Peckham, Norfolk). Their other children are Hilda, (aged 3, born Aylsham), Charles, (aged 10, born Weybourne), Mary, (aged 11, born Weybourne), Maud, (aged 9, born Aylsham), and Sidney, (aged 4, born Aylsham).

 

Oswald Herbert ROE………………………………....................(RoH)

 

Private 22993. 20th Bn., Lancashire Fusiliers. Formerly 128540 R.G.A. Killed in action in France & Flanders on Monday 16 April 1917. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Harrow, Middx. Husband of Mrs. M. Roe, of 20, Cornwall Rd., Harrow, Middx. Buried CHAPELLE BRITISH CEMETERY, HOLNON, Aisne, France. Ref. IV. E. 12.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial O Roe

On Church Memorial board O Roe

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2911925

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 17 year old Oswald is a Drapers Apprentice, living at Cawston Road, Aylsham. His parents are Frederic, (aged 50, and a “Relieving Officer”), and Emily, (aged 52, and from Lockerley, Hampshire). Their other children are Beatrice, (aged 18), Frederic, (aged 23 and a Drapers Warehouseman), and Leonard, (aged 22 and a Solicitors Clerk).

 

There is a bit more family detail here

1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=443...

 

George RUDD………………………………..............................(RoH)

 

Private 1379. 1st/5th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action in Gallipoli on Saturday 21 August 1915. Age 21. Born Hardley. Enlisted Aylsham. Son of Henry and Alice Rudd, of 16, Little Paddock St., Norwich. Commemorated: HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 42 to 44.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial G Rudd

On Church Memorial board G Rudd

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=687981

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 7 year old George who had been born at Hardley was living at Yarmouth Road, Hales by the time of the Census. His parents are Henry, a 40 year old Bricklayer from Rockland St.Mary, and Alice, aged 32 and from Langley. Their other children are Arthur, (aged 11, born Hardley), Charlotte, (aged 1, born Loddon), Ethel, (aged 9, born Hardley), Lilian, (aged 12, born Hardley), and Samuel, (aged 5, born Loddon).

On the day21st August 1915

 

Having lost over 200 men from the battalion shortly before this on the 12th, the battalion was to lose at least another 36 on this day. There was a trench raid by the Turks on the area were the 1/4ths and 1/5ths were stationed, although it is unclear whether these casualties arose from this action.

user.online.be/~snelders/sand.htm

 

Charles John RUMP………………………………......................(RoH)

 

Private 235326. "C Coy 20th Bn., The King's (Liverpool Regiment). Formerly 5283 Yorkshire Regiment. Died Thursday 12 July 1917. Age 37. Born and lived Aylsham. Enlisted Cromer. Only son of Joseph and Harriet Rump, of Aylsham; husband of Mabel Rump, of Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: RECQUES-SUR-HEM CHURCHYARD, Pas de Calais, France. South of church.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial C Rump

On Church Memorial board C Rump

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2001311

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 20 year old Charles J was employed as a Carpenter, and living at The Market Place, Aylsham, the town where he had been born. His parents are James, (aged 50 and a Gardener (not Domestic)), and Harriet, (aged 46 and from Bury St Edmunds). Also living with the Rump’s are their married daughter Beatrice M Davison, (aged 25), and her husband , James, (aged 29 and a Tailor from Aylsham), and their child, Geoffrey E, (aged 2).

 

Philip SHEPHEARD……………………………….....................(RoH)

 

Captain. Essex Regiment. Killed in action Sunday 13 June 1915. Age 31. Son of Philip C. and Pasqua Maria Shepheard, of Aylsham, Norfolk. Commemorated: HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 144 to 150 or 229 to 233.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial P Shepheard

On Church Memorial board P Shepheard

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=685314

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The only Philip Shepheard on the 1901 Census is at a Boarding School at Old Windsor, Berks, aged 17. Philip doesn’t appear to be on the 1891 Census. There is no match for either parent on the 1901 Census.

 

On the high level search of the 1911 Census, (ie the free one!), a 27 year Philip is recorded as being on Military Service Overseas. A 72 year Philip Candler Shepheard is recorded in the District of Aylsham, as is a 55 year Maria Pergua Shepheard.

 

Charles Alfred SKOYLES……………………………….........(RoH)

 

Gunner 37942. "Q Bty. 5th Bde., Royal Horse Artillery. Killed in action Wednesday 19 July 1916. Age 34. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Stratford E. Son of Thomas and Sarah Skoyles, of Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: LAVENTIE MILITARY CEMETERY, LA GORGUE, Nord, France. Ref. III. C. 22.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial C A Skoyles

On Church Memorial board C A Skoyles

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=328163

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 19 year old Charles, born Aylsham, is now residing as a Boarder at New North Road, Attleborough, and employed as a Railway Porter. No obvious match on the 1891 Census.

 

Stephen William STONE………………………………...................(RoH)

 

Private 325839. 13th Bn., Royal Scots. Formerly 3530 Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Died of wounds Tuesday 19 February 1918 in France & Flanders. Age 22. Born Hevingham. Lived Aylsham. Enlisted Normanton, Yorks. Son of Maria Eliza and the late Stephen Stone, of Town Lane, Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: TILLOY BRITISH CEMETERY, TILLOY- LES-MOFFLAINES, Pas de Calais, France. Ref. II. A. II.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial S W Stone

On Church Memorial board S W Stone

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=566360

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is no Stephen matching the RoH\CWGC details, but there is a 5 year old William, born Hevingham and now living at Little London, near Corpusty. His parents are Stephen, (aged 38 and a Navvy on the JC(??) Way, from Hevingham), and Maria, (aged 35 and from Thurgarton). Their other children are Edith, (aged 1, born Saxthorpe), Katie, (aged 11, born Hevingham), and Nellie, (aged 7, born Hevingham).

 

George Utting TINKLER………………………………...................(RoH)

 

Private S4/039150. "A Coy., Army Service Corps. Died Sunday 27 August 1916. Age 25. Son of John and Mary Frances Tinkler, of 30, Artist Row, Portland, Dorset. Born at Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: HIPSWELL (ST. JOHN) CHURCHYARD, Yorkshire, United Kingdom. (Not on CD)

 

On Churchyard War Memorial G Tinkler

On Church Memorial board G Tinkler

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=408964

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is no obvious match on the 1901 Census. There is a 9 year old George born Wigan, Lancashire, and now living at Runton near Erpingham, Norfolk. Georges parents are John, (aged 30 and a Baker \ Confectioner from Norwich), and Mary, (aged 29 and from East Runton). Their other children are Winifred, (aged 8 and born Wigan), and Thomas, (aged 5 and born East Runton).

 

Frederick TORTICE………………………………..........................(RoH)

 

Private R/367063. Army Service Corps. Died Monday 18 November 1918. Age 32. Son of Mrs. Eliza Tortice, of Town Lane, Aylsham. Buried: AYLSHAM CEMETERY, Norfolk, United Kingdom. Ref. F. 69.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial F Tortice

On Church Memorial board F Tortice

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2802304

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The only Frederick on the 1901 Census was only 5 years old, and therefore too young to match the RoH\CWGC details. However there is a Frederick of the right age on the 1891 Census, living at Drabblegate, Aylsham. His parents were James, (age 36 and an Agricultural Labourer), and Eliza, (age 36 and from Walsingham). Their other children are John H. (aged 18), Robert, (aged 15), Edward, (aged 13), William (aged 10), Thomas, (probably aged 7), and an infant son, aged 1 month.

 

F TORTICE……………………………….....................................(RoH)

 

Probably: James Tortice. RiflemanB/200134. 13th Bn., Rifle Brigade. Formerly 5/5372 Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action in France & Flanders on Sunday 25 August 1918. Age 34. Born and lived Blickling. Enlisted Norwich. Son of Henry and Jane Tortice, of 37, Silvergate, Blickling, Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: GOMIECOURT SOUTH CEMETERY, Pas de Calais, France. Ref. I. F. 6.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial F Tortice

On Church Memorial board F Tortice

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=569529

 

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The James referred to on the RoH site was aged 16, employed as a Shoemaker, and living at 37, Silvergate, Blickling. His parents were Henry, (aged 47 and a Shepherd from Aylsham), described as married, although his mother appears to be absent on the night of the Census. Also living with them are James brother, Henry, (aged 21 and a Bricklayer), and sister, May, (aged 24).

NB - there is also a Fred, aged 5, born Aylsham living on Drabblegate. There is a Fred Tortice of unknown age and with no additional information on the CWGC database. He was a Private serving in the Northamptonshire Regiment.

 

Benjamin Robert TURNER………………………………..............(RoH)

 

Serjeant 869. 1st/5th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Died in Gallipoli on Thursday 12 August 1915. (CD gives date 28 August 1915). Born and lived Aylsham. Commemorated: HELLES MEMORIAL, Turkey. Panel 42 to 44.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial B Turner

On Church Memorial board B Turner

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=683631

1901 Census The 12 year old Benjamin R. is already employed as a House Decorator. Having been born at Aylsham, he currently resided at Hungate Street. His parents are Benjamin H. (aged 36 and a House Decorator), and Mary A. (aged 36 and from Barningham Parva). Their other children are Alice M, (under 1), Charlotte, (aged 4), Herbert J, (aged 2), Maggie, (aged 10), Mary L, (aged 6), Miriam, (aged 11), and Ruth, (aged 7).

On the dayThis is the date associated with the “disappearance” of the 1st/5ths - at least in popular mythology.

user.online.be/~snelders/sand.htm

www.drdavidclarke.co.uk/vanbat.htm

 

Ralph John WADE……………………………….........................(RoH)

(There is a picture on the Roll of Honour site which notes that he died of Enteric Fever at the Alexandra Hospital)

 

Private 2063. 1st/5th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Died Wednesday 13 October 1915. Age 21. Born and enlisted Aylsham. Son of Harry R. and Leah Wade, of Penfold St., Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: ALEXANDRIA (CHATBY) MILITARY AND WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY, Egypt. Ref. D. 52.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial Ralph Wade

On Church Memorial board Ralph Wade

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=110066

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 6 year old Ralph was born at Aylsham, and at the time of the census was living at Penfold Street. His parents are Harry Wade, (aged 39 and a Whitesmith), and Leah, (aged 41 and from Booton). Their other children are Agenes, (aged 10), Charles (aged 9), Fred, (aged 4), Gertrude, (aged 1), and Harvey, (aged 3). The Wades also have a live-in servant.

 

Frederick Charles WARNE………………………………...................(RoH)

 

Gunner 102505. 265th Siege Bty., Royal Garrison Artillery. Killed in action Saturday 28 July 1917. Born and lived Aylsham. Enlisted Norwich. Buried: DICKEBUSCH NEW MILITARY CEMETERY EXTENSION, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Ref. I. B. 1.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial F Warne

On Church Memorial board F Warne

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=442406

Norlink norlink.norfolk.gov.uk/02_Catalogue/02_013_PictureTitleIn...

1901 Census The 6 year old Frederick C. was living at The Feathers Inn, Cawston Road, Aylsham. His parents were George, (aged 47 and a Licensed Victualler from Hempnall, Norfolk), and Susanna, (age 43 and from Foulsham). Their other children are Alfred J, (aged 11), Beatrice M A, (aged under 1), Christiana D, (aged 10), George J, (aged 13 and a Carpenters Apprentice), Harriet E. (aged 8), Susanna H (age 4), and William W, (age 15 and an Ironmongers Apprentice). All the children were born at Aylsham.

 

Abraham WATSON………………………………..............................(RoH)

 

Private 28203. 11th Bn., Essex Regiment. Killed in action Saturday 14 July 1917. Age 29. Born and lived Aylsham. Enlisted Cromer. Husband of Agnes Mary Jane Watson, of Unicorn Yard, Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: MAROC BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France. Ref. II. F. 13.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial A Watson

On Church Memorial board A Watson

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=523687

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census the 14 year old Abraham, working as a Farm Labourer, was born at Antingham, but living at The Rookery, Aylsham by the time of the census. His parents were Edward, (aged 53 and an Ordinary Agricultural Labourer from Sco Ruston), and Mary, (age 50 and from Coltishall). Their other children are Archer, (aged 16, an Ordinary Agricultural Labourer, born Brumstead), Claud, (aged 12, born Aylsham), and Ernest, (aged 8, born Aylsham).

 

Ernest Fountain Thomas WILLIAMSON…………………………….(RoH)

 

Lance Corporal 18900. 7th Bn., Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action Friday 4 May 1917. Age 29. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Norwich. Son of James and Sarah Williamson, of Penfold St., Aylsham; husband of Ethel E. E. Scarfe (formerly Williamson), of Matlaske, Aldborough, Norwich. Commemorated: ARRAS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Bay 3

 

On Churchyard War Memorial E Williamson

On Church Memorial board E Williamson

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=774465

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 14 year old Ernest was working as an Errand Boy and living at Hungate Street, Aylsham. His parents are James, (aged 39 and an Agricultural Labourer), and Sarah, (aged 37 and from Edgefield). Their other children are Arthur, (aged 5), George, (aged 3), James, (aged 10), Olive, (aged 1), Otto, (aged 12, and an Errand Boy), Phyllis, (aged 16, a Domestic Servant, born Edgefield), and Thomas, (aged 7).

On the DayThe Division of which 7th Norfolks were part were engaged in the Third Battle of the Scarpe (3rd - 4th May 1917).A preliminary attack on the left by 36th Brigade in the early hours of 2 May, including a gas barrage fired by Livens projectors, was not entirely successful but apparently caused considerable casualties to the enemy. The main attack was of mixed fortune, although 7th Royal Sussex reached the objective and then beat off determined counter attacks. Once again, German shellfire was the primary cause of problems and and heavy machine gun fire from Roeux caused many casualties. Shellfire was heavy over the next few days and the uncertain position of the advanced troops in Devil's Trench meant that British artillery was cautious in replying on German trenches.

www.1914-1918.net/12div.htm

 

Sidney WILSON………………………………...............................(RoH)

 

Private 18001. 1st Bn., Northamptonshire Regiment. Formerly 16751 Norfolk Regiment. Killed in action Sunday 9 May 1915. Age 32. Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Wilson, of Millgate St., Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: LE TOURET MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France. Panel 28 to 30.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial S Wilson

On Church Memorial board S Wilson

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=1564184

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census There is a 17 year old Sidney who was born in Aylsham, and at the time of the Census was working as a Bakers Assistant and living on Town Lane, Aylsham. His parents were John, (aged 40 and a General Porter from Ingworth), and Fanny, (aged 38 and from Brampton). Their children are Bertie, (aged 4), George, (aged 11 and employed as a Bakers Assistant), Herbert, (aged 1), and Sarah, (aged 10).

On the DayThe Battle of Aubers took place on this day. The 1st Northants were one of the two lead assault battalions of the southern pincer intended to surround Neuve Chappelle and assist the French in seizing Vimy Ridge. The German’s were well prepared while the artillery ammunition and gun shortage were taking a toll on how much firepower the British could bring to bear. Even while the final barrage was taking place and British troops tried to advance behind it, the German machine gunners kept on firing, taking a very heavy toll. Even when they were able to find the few gaps in the wire, the bunched up soldiers were a perfect target, and the few that made it through were easily dealt with. The casualties for the 1st Northants by the end of the day is 560, of which 17 are officers.

www.1914-1918.net/bat11.htm

 

Albert Edward WINTERBORN………………………………............(RoH)

 

Private G/21220. 7th Bn., The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regt.) Formerly 27597 Middlesex Regiment. Killed in action Monday 1 April 1918. Age 36. Husband of Hannah Winterborn, of Brandon Rd., Watton, Thetford, Norfolk. Commemorated: POZIERES MEMORIAL, Somme, France. Panel 14 and 15.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial A Winterborn

On Church Memorial board A Winterborn

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=851496

Norlink

norlink.norfolk.gov.uk/02_Catalogue/02_013_PictureTitleIn...

(Norlink notes:- Private Winterborn was born in Aylsham on 11th October 1882, and educated in Aylsham. He enlisted on 3rd May 1916, and was killed in action in France on 1st April 1918)

1901 Census The 18 year old Albert is recorded as a Coach Painters Apprentice. He was born at Aylsham and at the time of the Census lives at Mill Road, Aylsham. His Parents are George, (aged 60 and a Mill Wright), and Annie, (aged 52 and from Holme Hale). The 1891 census confirms he is an Albert E.

On the day7th Queens, as part of the 18th (Eastern) Division had taken part in the fighting retreat in the face of the German Spring Offensive which by the 1st April was starting to run out of steam.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_Offensive

(Also recorded on the Rockland St Peter Roll of Honour)

 

C H WOOD………………………………........................................(RoH)

 

No further information available at present.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial C H Wood

On Church Memorial board C H Wood

CWGC

19 Possible matches for C H Wood alone, none with any obvious link even to Norfolk.

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census No obvious links, although there is a Charles H, (aged 16) and a John, (aged 14),

both born Frettenham and both of whom no longer live with their parents - Charles is an Assistant Draper at Harvey&Nicholls Drapery in Chelsea, and lives in the shop, and John is training to be a seaman at Birkenhead. My guess would be that they were brothers and had been orphaned.

 

J H WOOD………………………………........................................(RoH)

 

No further information available at present.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial J H Wood

On Church Memorial board J H Wood

CWGC

38 Possible matches for J H Wood, none with any obvious link even to Norfolk

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census See C H Wood above.

 

James Emmanuel WYMER………………………………................(RoH)

 

[WYNLER on the CD.] Private 41492. 19th Bn., Northumberland Fusiliers, Tyneside Pioneers. Formerly 24952 West Yorkshire Regiment. Died of wounds in France & Flanders on Saturday 13 April 1918. Age 25. Born Aylsham. Enlisted Leeds. Son of John and Elizabeth Ann Wymer, of Aylsham, Norfolk. Buried: DOULLENS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION No.1, Somme, France. Ref. VI. B. 26.

 

On Churchyard War Memorial J E Wymer

On Church Memorial board J E Wymer

CWGC www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=83712

Norlink No archive items.

1901 Census The 8 year old James is listed at Drabblegate, Aylsham. His parents are John, (aged 40 and a Traction Engine Driver from Banningham), and Elizabeth, (aged 40 and from Felmingham). Their other children are Ethel, (aged 10), Maggie, (aged 2), Martha, (aged 14) and William, (aged 5).

Mathews' Bristol Street Directory 1871

 

Wilder Street, North Street to Grosvenor Road

 

John Smith, lath render

J. T. Ball and Sons, maltsters, etc

John Summerville, builder, etc

Charles Pitman

James Merry, black smith

John Tucker

Thomas Davis, chimney sweep

 

William Sherring, nail manufacturer William Nichols - In October 1884 he was 14 years old, living with his parents in Baptist Mills and working at Messrs W Sherring of Wilder Street, a nail manufactory. Whilst carrying iron from the bins he slipped and fell against the flywheel. By the time the machine was stopped, he was dead. There was a fence around the machine, but the workers were in the habit of 'pushing it aside'.

 

Withy & Co. ginger-beer, lemonade & soda-water manufacturers

James Williams, 1, Cave street cottages

Eliza Snow, fly proprietor, 2, Cave street cottages

Joseph Johnson, carpenter & undertaker, 3, Cave street cottages

George Smith, boot maker

William Lambert, grocer, etc

Joseph Chard, baker & flour dealer

J. Andrews, chimney sweeper

Ann Winniatt, shopkeeper

Joshua Williams, builder

George Mico, grocer

Mary Weston, greengrocer

James Seamer, beer seller

 

Mrs William Paul, vict, Two Trees 1794. John Lewis / 1806. Isaac Phipps / 1816. Stephen Seager / 1820 - 22. J. Morrosson / 1823 - 32. Samuel Morrosson 1834 - 45. James Vickery / 1847 - 61. James Bale / 1863. Edwin Hamber / 1865 - 69. George Lambourne / 1871. Mrs. Paul 1872 - 75. George Wintle (jnr) / 1877 - 78. Sarah Sowden / 1879 to 1882. John Sharp / 1883. C. Tomkins.

 

George Howard, vict, Albion Tavern 1841 - 53. Elizabeth Morrison / 1858 - 66. Henry Couzens / 1867 to 1868. W. Watts / 1869. Francis Virtue / 1871. George Howard 1872 to 1875. S. Barton / 1876. T. C. Manning / 1877. S. Balderson / 1878. C. Wyman / 1879. Samuel Harris / 1882 - 83. William Tarr 1885 - 88. William Bailey / 1889. George Clohesey / 1891. Sarah Ann Knight / 1892. Rosina Pollard / 1896 - 99. Charles Spiller 1901. Edward Coles.

 

Charles King, vict, Royal Oak 1832 - 34. Henry Watkins / 1869. George King / 1871. Charles King / 1872 to 1874. Mabel King / 1875 - 83. Isabella King 1885. George Knott / 1886 - 1909. Frederick King / 1914 - 17. Ellen White / 1921 - 25. Angelina Reed.

 

James Newman, vict, Crown 1860. John Yeandel / 1866 - 82. James Newman / 1883 to 1887. Kate Morgan / 1888 to 1891. Kate Rowles / 1892. Thomas Dinan 1896 - 1901. George Jenkins.

 

James Nash, vict, Royal George 1860. Ann Mundy / 1863 - 72. James Naish / 1874 - 81. Joseph W. Keall / 1882 - 87. William Clements / 1889 - 1901. James Thatcher.

 

Notes

 

Harry Dimmock - Living at Wilder Street, he was buried at St Paul on January 19th 1839 aged 71.

 

Ann Roach - Aged 21 in November 1842, she was taken to the Infirmary as while she was crossing Wilder Street she was knocked down by a fly (cab) which passed over her leg and injured it severely.

 

Wildgoose Cottages, St Philip’s Marsh

 

Wilkin’s Cottages, Folly Lane

 

William Street, Grosvenor road to Ashley Road

 

1. Maria Fuller

2. William Barter

3. Samuel David White

4. Henry Critchett

5. George Hill

6. James Wilmot

7. Herbert Cousins

8. George Browning

9. Charles Williams

10. Henry Hobbert

11. John Edward Sollis

12. Henry Tom Moody

13. David Bank Edwards

14. William Henry Thomas

15. John Goodeve, tea dealer

 

Notes

 

G Drake - Lived at 31, King Square. On 2nd March 1899 wrote to the newspaper stating that John Drake carpenter convicted of theft at the assizes was no connection. He did have a son called John who was also a carpenter who resided at 25, William Street, St Pauls.

 

William Street, Dings

 

Samuel Isles, beer retailer (Off Licence)

Francis Evans, grocer

 

William Street, Pylle Hill, Totterdown

 

2. Edwin Nott, haulier

3. George and Henry Roe

74. Henry Haskins, baker, Victoria house

 

1. Gilbert Babbage, vict, King William Hotel 1868 - 69. Aaron Davy / 1871 - 83. Gilbert Babbage / 1885 - 88. Matilda Morse / 1889 - 91. Henrietta Thomas 1892 to 1896. John Southwood / 1897. Joseph Gair / 1899. H. Smith / 1904. Emily Newman / 1909. Joseph Gullock 1912 - 21. Florence Annie Geh / 1925 - 38. Frederick Grove.

 

Williams' Court, off Barton Street

 

Richard Excell - Aged 46 in 1818, a shoemaker living with his wife in Williams' Court, Barton Street, they, were receiving relief payments from St Peter's Hospital.

 

Willway Street, Philip Street, Bedminster

 

Robert Lewis, grocer

William Morgan, mason

 

George Parker, vict, Willway Tavern 1871. George Parker / 1872 to 1886. Herman Tozer / 1887 - 89. Elizabeth Tozer / 1891 - 1906. Alfred Tozer 1909. William Saunders / 1914 - 21. Leonard Wyatt / 1925 - 31. Robert Wyatt.

 

Samuel Hardwick, vict, Eagle Tavern 1871 - 77. Samuel Hardwick / 1878. Eli Bowditch / 1881 - 82. William Fewings / 1883 - 91. William Hill / 1892. Joseph Wring 1896. Mary Jane Wring / 1899. Henry Nichols / 1901. William Bryant / 1904. M. Broomsgrove.

 

Jesse Bumbold, vict, Chequers Tavern Whitehouse Lane / Willway Street. 1865 - 87. Jesse Rumbold / 1888 - 99. Benjamin Rowse / 1901. Henry Pillinger / 1904 - 06. Mary Hampton / 1909. Henry Hampton 1914. William Bailey / 1917 - 21. Albert Evans / 1925 - 28. Nellie Catherine Foxwell / 1931. Gabriel Biggin 1934 - 38. William James Rowland.

 

Willway Street, Whipping Cat Hill to Lucky Lane

 

15. Thomas Chinnock, dairyman

Wethered, Cossham, and Wethered, coal merchants, Railway yard

 

16. J. Gazzard, grocer and beer retailer, vict, Beaufort Arms grocery, bakery and beer house. 1870 - 76. Joseph Gazzard / 1881 - 86. William Bowyer / 1888. H. Maynard / 1888 - 89. John H. Kennard / 1891. Charlotte Baker 1892. George Dunn / 1899. Elizabeth Gulley / 1901 - 06. Hannah Underdown / 1914. Harry Stubbins.

 

Wilmot’s Crescent, Rose Street, Great Gardens

 

Wilmot’s Vale, Pipe Lane, Temple

 

Wilson Avenue, Wilson Street to Cross Gardens

 

(Beaufort Cottages)

 

Mark Appleby

Charles W. Porter

John Woodward, carpenter and builder

Elizabeth Thomas

 

(Beaufort Place)

 

John Purnell

George Dowling, smith

Charles Cockle

James Bailey

Thomas Wright

Edwin Mutton, boot maker

 

Wilson Court, Wilson Street

 

Wilson Place, Wilson Street

 

John Gore, 1, Wilson villas

William Mortimer, 2, Wilson villas

John Edwards, Aldine cottage

M. Bendell, Gloster cottage

John Cockle

Joseph Baker

John Kirby

M. Fowler

William Thompson

John Southern

John Cudler, mason

Joseph Davis, painter

 

Wilson Street, Portland Square to Cross Gardens

 

1. Charles D. Hall, relieving ofiicer

2. George Higgs Masters

3. William Wills, (post office)

4. Mrs Parry

5. Angus Cameron, draper

6. Henry Jones, carpenter

7. Miss Louisa Roberts

8. James Perry, boot maker

9. Joseph Griffin

10. William Ackland

11. William Smith

12. Charles Allen

13. David Griffin

14. Amos Deacon

15. Edward Taplin

16. Thomas Jones

(Gideon Cottages Intersect)

13. James Burrell

14. George Winterson, mason

15. Charles Cuthbert

16. Daniel Chapple

17. James Larcombe, grocer & beer seller

18. Mrs Cox

19. John Routley, grocer & beer seller

(cross over)

 

St. Paul's National School, Henry George Clevely, master, Miss Wood, mistress - see below

 

19. John Clark

20. Mary Smith

21. John Marsh, wood carver

22. Samuel Pullin

23. David Williams

24. John Wakley, mason

25. Thomas Wall

26. Jane Ash

27. Elizabeth Holder

28. James Kingcott, tailor and draper

29. Frank Webb

30. George Adlam, junr.

31. Charles Phillips

Robert Nicholls

32. John Evans

33. Priscilla Mainwaring

31. Malcombe Robertson, tailor, etc

35. Sidney Sprod

36. John Postance

37. R. S. Deacon

38. Nathaniel Davis

 

Wright and Butler, lamp manufacturers of Birmingham. 1875 exhibited petroleum heating stoves at the 1875 Smithfield Club Show. Oil lamps with the American-style circular 'The Union Burner'. By 1913 they had been taken over by Falk Veritas of London but use of the Trade name continued.

 

Parochial Schools, Wilson Street, St Pauls In 1883 225 boys, 162 girls. In 1898 185 boys, 162 girls. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: George Vernon (Teacher), Miss F Perry (Teacher) 1861 Mr Clevely (Teacher), Miss Roberts (Teacher) 1883.

 

Notes: In 1858 John Henry Trinder who had been a pupil teacher at the school was made a Queen's Scholar, being entitled to 3 years' education at one of Her Majesty's Training Colleges free of charge. At the annual school treat in July 1861 400 children were present in the morning when they were examinaed in Scripture by Rev H Rogers, the incumbent and in grammar, gepgraphy and arithmetic by their respective teachers. In the evening there was a substantial tea in the school room which had been decorated with flowers and mottos. In the centre was suspended a white silk banner with a bridal rosette in the middle, as a token of regard of the incumbent's daughter, Mary Anne Rogers, who had married Thomas Byard Winter Sheppard the previous week. The banner bore the words 'God bless our pastor's daughter - Happiness attend her' in blue lettering.

 

George Vernon was Master for 18 years and in July 1868 he left to take up the Mastership of the Earl Ducies schools at Tortworth. Several of his past students started a collection and in the end there were 169 subscribers who gave a total of £25. He was presented with an English gold lever watch with guards and appendages and there was enough left over for a pair of vases for Mrs Vernon. At the presentation on July 20th he was also awarded an illuminated text. Edward William Clevely was the second son of George and Emma Clevely. He died aged 22 in October 1884. In July 1886 Ada Reilly Sims passed the examination for admittance to Red Maids.

 

Notes

 

Henry Flower - A groom in the service of Mr Tucker of Surrey Mews. He lived at 10, Wilson Street, St Pauls. In July 1885 he was riding a horse through Cumberland Street when the animal slipped and he sustained a compound fracture of the left leg.

 

Wilson Terrace, Wilson Street

 

1. Joseph Bridges

2-3. Harriett Thomas

4. George Case

5. William Blake, tailor

6. S. Barrett, painter, etc

7. Alfred Tucker

8. James Stokes

 

Windmill Hill, Whitehouse Lane

 

Edward Edgar, beer retailer

Edward Parsons, grocer

James Webber, boot maker, Clifton view cottage

Mrs Gummer, shopkeeper

Albert Stone,

Bethel Chapel (Congregational) founded 1855.

Windmill Hill Board School. Architect A R F Trew.

 

Sarah Annie Jones, vict, Rising Sun Alfred Road (Windmill Hill) 1853 - 63. William Old / 1871 - 72. Sarah Jones / 1874. William Cheeseman / 1875 to 1888. William Allen / 1889 - 92. John Crossman 1896 - 1917. William Haines / 1928 - 31. James Templar / 1933 - 50. William King / 1953. Walter Lippiatt.

 

William Bray, vict, Friendship Windmill Hill. 1871 - 1909. William Bray / 1914. Henry Bray / 1917 - 21. Maurice Gould / 1925. Rosina Gould / 1928 - 31. Rosina Parfitt 1935 - 38. Frederick Burchill / 1950 - 53. Frederick Thorne / 1960. R. C. Loveridge / 1975. D. W. Hooper.

 

Edwin Griffiths, vict, Saddler's Arms 1871. Edwin Griffiths.

 

(Providence Place)

 

Ann Callow, grocer

George Merritt, butcher

 

Stephen Hopper Hemmings, vict, Spotted Horse Providence Place (Mill Lane) 1842 - 58. Henry Wakefield / 1860 - 69. Samuel Barber / 1871 - 72. Stephen Hopper Hemmings / 1874 - 78. William Davey 1879. George Parker / 1881 - 97. Isaac Gould / 1899. William Brayley / 1904 - 38. Alfred Giles / 1944 - 50. Albert May 1953. Ernest Edward May.

 

Henry Parker, vict, Colston's Arms Providence Place, Mill Lane. 1775. Evan Williams / 1792. John Cox / 1837 - 40. James Parker / 1842 - 87. Henry Parker / 1888 - 1901. Charles R. Parker 1904. Frederick Bishop / 1904 to 1908. William Hamlyn / 1909 - 21. Thomas Horner / 1925 - 44. Edwin Nathaniel Watkins 1950 - 53. Frederick Prideaux.

 

Notes

 

John Cox (d. January 1899) Aged 43 of Alfred Road, Windmill Hill, found dead in bed. Inquest revealed he suffered pains in his chest. Verdict cardiac failure.

 

John Howell (d. February 1872) He was 46 when he was found dead in a limekiln on Windmill Hill. His wife Eliza, who had been separated from him for 5 years said he had formerly been a cooper, but due to drink he had had a paralytic seizure and had been put in the workhouse.. He had however left the day before and slept in the kiln where he was found dead by George Rogers a limeburner, on arriving for work.

 

Windmill Hill Terrace, Windmill Hill

 

New Mission, Windmill Hill This was opened in August 1884. Rev Canon Mather speaking at the ceremony said many years ago he had unsuccessfully tried to get a church built in the area and was glad to see that there was now a mission rooms. It was beautiful, inexpensive but in want of so many things, not even a harmonium as the one that was there that day had been lent to them. The room was capable of holding 230 people, being 45' 6" by 20' 6" with a gallery at one end and a movable platform at the other. On top of the building was a gilded weathervane representing a windmill. A design for a church had been approved at that time, but money was required to carry out the building of it.

 

Windsor Court, Blackfriars, Lewin’s Mead

 

Blackfriars Board School, Maudlin Street. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: J Whippey (Master), Miss Sophia Vigor (Mistress) 1883-1865 Miss Mitchell (Mistress) 1898.

 

Moravian Day, Sunday and Infant Schools, Blackfriars and Maudlin Street. In 1872 for 100 boys and 100 girls. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: Mr Stockman (Master, Miss Vigor (Mistress) 1872.

 

Windsor Court, Temple Street

 

Windsor Court, Kingsland Road

 

Windsor Terrace, Whitehouse Lane

 

William H. Gregory, chemist

Thomas Webb, greengrocer

Samuel Hignell, grocer, etc

 

John Perrett, vict, Forester's Arms Whitehouse Lane. 1871. James Perrett / 1872. John Perrett / 1874 - 77. James Crof / 1879 - 89. Wellington Beaven / 1891 - 1917. William Evans 1921 - 35. Arthur Evans / 1936 - 1937. Caroline Evans / 1937. Grace Johnson / 1944 - 53. Caroline Sutor.

 

Notes

 

Henry Dalton - In February 1872 he was 35 years old, a labourer of 28, Windsor Terrace, Bedminster. He had been unloading bags of sugar from the ship Zanzibar, when he stumbled and fell about 20 feet into the hold and died on the spot. An inquest was held.

 

Windsor Terrace, Granby Hill, near Paragon, Clifton

 

1. Joseph Tinn

2. Mrs McGeachey

3. Michael Castle

4. Rev. Walter J. Whiting

5. Isaac Allan Cooke

7. Henry Tayler

10. Miss P. Usher

Herbert De Winton, Windsor villa

William F. Fox, 1, Windsor place

Arthur Carter, 2, Windsor place

 

Windsor Terrace, St Paul’s

 

1. William Garrard

2. Robert Couch

3. Samuel James Toleman

4. Mary Matthews

5. Thomas Austin

6. Noah Browning

7. Charles Wathen

8. Sarah Harding

9. William Besley (police)

 

Windsor Terrace, Totterdown

 

Mark Thomas

George Richardson, shipping agent

W. Bucknell

Thomas Powell

Felix Raistrick

Charles Thomas, builder

Robert Goddard

John Wallbridge

William Paul, mason

Charles Woodman, cooper

J. L. Vincent, pianoforte tuner

 

Windsor Terrace, Woolcott Park

 

Henry Long

Benjamin Vowles

James Heard

J. R. Freeman

Charles Blackburn

Herr Voit, professor of music

George Vinney

Miss Chapple

George Towning

H. R. Wheeler

James Chard, British schoolmaster

Alfred R. Watson, professor of music

H. Evans

W. French, grocer & provision factor

 

Notes

 

George Wolfe 1834-1890 Born in Bristol, adopted in early life by a Mrs Buckley of Windsor Terrace, Clifton. Painted marine views and landscapes, oil and watercolour. On his marriage went to live in Hampshire.

 

Wine Street, Corn Street to Narrow Wine Street

 

1. Mary Bell, fishmonger & fruiterer

J. W. Trew, surveyor

F. Powell, lithographer

2-3. William and Alfred Edwards, hosiers, glovers, etc

4. Samuel Miller, stationer, fancy depot

5. George Nattriss, confectioner

6. Cotterell Brothers, paper-hangings manufacturers

7-8. O’Handlen & Co., umbrella & fishing tackle manufacturers

9. Samuel J. Burman, watch maker, etc

10. Charles M’Millan, tailor and draper

11-13. A. T. Maishman, milliner and fur manufacturer

14. Baker & Burt, ladies’ outfitters, etc

15-16. Charles and Son, tailors

17. Ridler, Coulman, & Co. Manchester warehousemen, etc

18. Joseph Vincent, brush & comb maker

19. G. Edwards and Son, outfitters

20. John Catlin, brush and comb maker

21. Edward John, hat maker

21. O. Ransford, wholesale hat maker

22. James Candy & Son, linen warehouse

23. John Stroud, chemist

24-26. John W. Langdon & Co. woollen merchants

27-28. Gray & Co., milliners, etc

29. J. Barker, glass and china warehouse

30. William Pockson & Son, fringe and fancy warehouse

31. Maurice Michael, watchmaker and pawnbroker

32. Wills, Biggs and Williams, general warehousemen

33-35. S. Weston, milliner and mantle warehouseman

36. Thomas Bale, watchmaker, etc

37. Martin Wintle, silk mercer, etc

38. Henry Peart, straw warehouse

39. Hillyer & Trew, hosiers & lacemen

40. Thomas Thompson, hosier & laceman

41. Henry Jacob Allis, watch maker

42. David Hyam, outfitter

43. Sharp and Granger, linen drapers

44. Todd and Co. outfitters

45-47. Snow and Taylor, linen drapers, silk mercers, etc

48. Coombs & Co. woollen drapers

49. J. Lodge & Co. bonnet, fur, and mantle warehouse

50-54. Baker, Baker, & Co. warehousemen, drapers, etc

55. Richard Taylor, linen draper, etc

56-60. Jones & Co. linen drapers, etc

61-62. D. P. Belfield & Son, toy & fancy goods warehouse

63-64. J. A. Hodgson, hosier and outfitter

65. J. Baker, hosier and shirt maker

66. Maurice Moore, tobacconist and foreign money exchange

67. Thomas W. Tilly, hat & umbrella maker & fancy bag dealer

 

Adam and Eve, Wine Street (also listed as Wine Street Passage) For sale on 19th January 1860 as in the possession of George Knowland under lease for 14 years from 14th September 1857, rent £105. Freehold and free. Listed in Inn and Commercial Tavern section.

 

Information on landlords: F Probart 1824 Edwin Ward 1836-40 George Knowland 1852 G Knowland 1867 George Frederick Knowland 1878 Elizabeth Knowland 1882. Notes: Richard Trotman described as 'late landlord' died aged 46 at Coronation Road on March 20th 1840.

 

Notes: Mr Knowland had a disagreement with T Jones of Jones & Co when the firm's new store was being erected in Wine Street owing to a part of a cellar used by Mr Knowland being purchased by Mr Jones during the construction. This boiled over on 1st May 1855. Mr Jones had been celebrating a win in Chancery with a group of friends at the house of Mr McMillan, consuming half a dozen bottles of champagne between them which they decided would benefit froma a brandy and water chaser. So they went to the Adam and Eve, whereupon Mr Knowland burst out, grabbed Mr Jones by the collar, pushed him against a wall and swore that he would not enter. After asking him by letter to apologise and send an amount to the Bristol Infirmary, to which there was no reply, Mr Jones brought a case against Mr Knowland that was heard at the Tolzey Court in July. After hearing the evidence the Recorder stated that it would be better settled out of court, which was done.

 

In 1856 John Baker was charged at Bristol Police Court with stealing three coats from the tavern, the property of Mr Knowland, the landlord. Baker, a recruit, to whom Mr Knowland was said to have shown great kindness, was said to have confessed his guilt and to be very contrite and on the landlord.s intercession the charge was dropped and Baker handed over to his sergeant.

 

In January 1870 it was reported that for many years Mr Knowland had placed on the smoking tables each Saturday a box in aid of the Royal Infirmary and General Hospital, He had regularly, until recently before his health failed, shaken the box before each customer in the 2 rooms with a friendly request for a penny. The collection for 1861 amounted to 25 guineas, in 1869 was £25 4s.

 

Mr Knowland was also a visitor at St Peter's Hospital and Robert James 'a big powerful man' who had been an inmate and knew him from this work was taken to court on 1868 for threatening him when he would not offer employment. In 1883 Mrs Knowland reported the collection boxes holding £2 12s 8d.

 

In March 1884 Albert O' Brien and Albert Richards were charged with having stolen a pint measure from the pub. It was noticed by a policeman that the measure was marked with 'Knowland, Adam and Eve' on the side. O'Brien said that he had ordered the beer just before closing time and could not finish it all so he had taken the cup away and was going to return it the next week. They were fined 11s without costs.

 

Notes

 

George Beard - In October 1892 was charged along with his elder brother George, with stealing dress material and other goods from Messrs Jones in Wine Street. George had been employed by the firm as a porter for 2 years. A shop assistant, Helen Anstey stated that she had cut a length of dress material and put it aside and when she returned it was missing. At 6pm George asked her for paper to wrap a parcel and when she followed him the cloth was found there. He pleaded guilty and when he was accompanied to 2, Orchard Street, the Batch, where he lived other pieces of material were found there. His brother lived in 54, Goodhind Street , where more material was found.

 

Eliza Emily Cottrell, of Wine Street. Declared bankrupt 2nd June 1868.

 

Joseph Dyer - A lodging house keeper of Wine Street, inserted a notice in the newspaper, February 1818, expressing thanks to the Governor, Deputy Governor and Guardians of the Poor for not prosecuting him 'for suffering Margaret Thomas, a single woman to lye in at my house of a Bastard Child, thus bringing a charge upon the parish of St Peter'.

 

Widow Foord - In 1757 was a glover. Lived near the Corn Market in Wine Street.

 

Catherine Forster (d. 18th January 1805) Eldest daughter of Mr Joseph Forster formerly an apothecary in Wine Street. Died in her 30th year of a consumption 'as did her two sisters, a few years past.' according to obituary notice.

 

Ralph Oliff - Landlord of the Three Tuns In Wine Street. Was sheriff in 1664 and mayor in 1673 and it is claimed he said he took office 'solely to persecute the Nonconformists.' Died aged 64 and was buried in the chancel of All Saints.

 

Mrs Oxley - In 1827 she and three of her children perished in a fire in Wine Street.

 

Philip Scapulis (d. 1590) Originally from Trier, a stationer lived in Wine Street. In 1577 he was involved (with others) in a dispute with the Attorney General regarding whether their houses which had previously belonged to the Merchant Tailors' Guild were therefore property of the Crown It was decided by jury that this was not the case. Wife Elizabeth, daughter Margaret, who was born in 1581 and died 4 years later. It is unlikely that he had any other children as they are not mentioned in his will which left bequests to cousins and godsons, neighbours and an ex-apprentice Richard Foorde.

 

Businesses Wine Street

 

The Don, 45 and 46 Wine Street (Clothing) The Bristol branch of the Don opened in 1883 under Manager W H Forsyth, who presided over a staff of 30. was one of many in towns throughout England. The upper floor housed workrooms, where at the end of the 19th century sewing machines were 'driven by an engine, also acting as the motor for the dynamo forming the generator for the electric light installation.' The height of technology in the high street.

 

While bespoke tailoring was carried on using these sewing machines, the ready to wear items were made at Stroud. This enabled them to charge the customer only one shilling per ready-made item over the cost price. The handsome premises were destroyed during the Second World War, although the company carried on. Moving to the top of Park Street, particularly noted in the later years as recommended suppliers of school uniforms.

 

Parnall & Sons, Narrow Wine Street Parnall's - much more than shop fitters, although this advertisement was specifically aimed at the grocery trade.

 

H G Parnall founded the business in 1820 and in 1893 it was being described as 'immense', having become a limited company some four years earlier. As well as the main warehouse and showroom in Narrow Wine Street, the company had an iron and brass foundry at Rosemary Street and a steam joinery at Fairfax Street. Scales and weighing machines (including the Patent National Balances invented by Mr Parnall and 20,000 sold between 1883 and 1893) were manufactured at Fishponds. The Patent Agate Hand Scales were described as 'specially worthy of the attention of tea dealers......when suspended above the counter they will work three times as long as any other scale without getting out of order'.

 

The wide range of items manufactured and supplied also included weighbridges (suitable for railway companies, collieries and public corporations), scoops, sack lifters, barrows and trucks, canisters (in large variety), counter boxes and window show trays, show glasses, butchers' and other warranted cutlery, marble top tables (for restaurants etc), show stands, treacle cisterns, safes and cash boxes, patent tills, provision tickets, window name plates, tobacco cutters and tobacconists' fixtures, chairs, bottling machines hand carts, coffee mills, tea mixers, hoists, lifts and gas engines.

 

They employed 10 representatives on the road and 400 workmen.

 

Winscombe Buildings, Frogmore Street

 

Winscombe Court. Frogmore Street

 

Winsford Street, Pennywell Road, Stapleton Road

 

Joseph Thorley, painter, etc

Thomas Curtis, tailor, etc

Mary Gapper, greengrocer, etc

James H. Cole, grocer & tea dealer

George Woolley

Mrs Mary Young

Charles Turner, mariner

Charles Shapland

Thomas Rutley, shoe maker

Joseph Snell, tanner, etc

Alfred Johnson, mechanic

William Rowe

Fitzroy Robert Colborne, painter and glazier

John Jennings, baker

Simeon Millman, tea dealer

 

Mary Jenkins,vict, Pine Apple Pennywell Road. In 1881 Mary Jenkins described herself as 'publican - out of business'. 1853. Robert Fewing / 1854. Mary Fewing / 1861 - 66. James Webber / 1867 - 79. Mary Jenkins / 1883 - 1904. William Whitaker 1909 - 21. Charles Tristram / 1925 - 38. Henry Castle / 1944 - 53. Edith Holbrook (James Webber was a publican, and potato dealer).

 

Winsley Villas, Coburg Road, Montpelier

 

Woburn Place, near Grenville Place, Hotwells

 

Woodbury Place, Black Boy Hill

 

Woodbury Terrace, Blackboy Hill

 

Woodland Road, Tyndall‘s Park to Cotham Road

 

Miss Butt, Bannerleigh house

James Proctor, Moreton house

Robert H. Symes, Carlton house

Capt. Charles Mallard, R.N. Dundonald house

Thomas N. Harwood

Augustus Phillips, Lansdown house

J. S. Marchant, Somerville house

William Sturge, Chilliswood house

John Hill Morgan, Parklands house

Alfred Gardiner, Dale villa

 

Iron Church In the fashionable suburb of Clifton, amid the large villas, a mission church was built of iron in 1865. Plans were drawn up for a permanent church by the celebrated architect James Piers St Aubyn, his only church in Bristol, and building was slow, 1870-81. His planned steeple, similar in appearance to that built at Christ Church, never rose above the basement stage and serves as a rather enormous NW porch.

 

Concerns about the stability of the building brought in John Bevan and he rebuilt part of the nave and chancel, completed 1909. It survived in use until 1976 when the parish was joined to St Saviour. The joint parish purchased the redundant Highbury Chapel c1975 which in turn was restored and rededicated to St Saviour & St Mary, Cotham to replace both buildings. The BBC purchased the Tyndall's Park church for use as a scenery store. The interior was subdivided and a new entrance created in the north aisle. The church was acquired in the mid-1990s by a free-church congregation, and now in use as the Woodlands Christian Centre. Work began in July 2000 to convert the upper floor into supported housing and the ground floor is to be retained for worship.

 

Houses

 

Abergeldie, Woodland Road, Clifton No 19 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

 

Bannerleigh, Woodland Road, Clifton No 15 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

 

Carlton House, Woodland Road, Clifton No 11 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

 

Dundonald House, Woodland Road, Clifton No 9 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

 

Gordon Lodge, Woodland Road, Clifton No 17 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

 

Woodland Terrace, Hampton Road to Auburn Road

 

1. David Clarke Lindsey

2. Miss Eliza Peters

3. M. A. H. Wood

5. Caroline Ridgway

6. Edward Joseph Heyre

 

Woodwell Cottages, White Hart Lane

 

Woodwell Crescent, Jacob's Wells

 

Woolcott Buildings, Lower Redland Road to Clyde Road

 

1. William Pincott

2. John Guppy

3. Benjamin Hall, grocer

4. Mrs Boxwell

5. Thomas Gammon

6. George Morgan, dairyman

7. George Parsons

8. James Carp

9. Walter Mizen, junior

10. Walter Mizen, senior

11. John Shorland, carpenter

12. Maurice Taylor, carpenter and stationer

13. Jeremiah Wicks

14. John Henson, boot maker

15. John Bool

16. William John Woodman

17. Enos Boulter

18. ?. Fear

19. John Knight

20. Enoch Ford

21. Isaac House, greengrocer & fruiterer, Fairfield cottage

22. Thomas Roberts, dairyman

23. T. Roberts, teacher of the piano, etc

24. Mrs Ann Ricketts

Miss Catherine Downs, dressmaker

William Johns

John Smith

 

Thomas Skyrme, vict, Shakespeare Tavern Lower Redland Road 1867 - 75. Thomas Skyrme / 1876 - 83. Emma Skyrme / 1885 - 92. Jane Marie Tavener / 1894 - 1928. Jane Marie Row 1931 - 35. John Pullen / 1937 - 50. William Hardwell / 1953. Lily Rose / 1975. A. T. H. Bryant Jane Marie Tavener/Rowe was the niece of Thomas and Emma Skyrme.

 

Woolcott Park, Clyde Road to Lover’s Walk

 

Uriah Mullett, dairyman & haulier

William Knowles, Rhosven lodge

Albert Gribble, Wynn house

Robert Acton Dodds, Gordon house

?. Stockwell house

Capt. Thomas W. Hives, Marlbro’ villa

George Gatchell, Carrville villa

Mrs Frankland Evelyn villa

W. B. Morgan, Brockley villa

Mrs Mary Harris, Merton villa

Mrs Hannah Hall, Eversley house

Alfred Albert Holmes, Northcote house

Arthur G. Heaven, Lyndhurst villa

Mrs Francis Gatchell, Sunnyside villa

Alfred P. Menefy, Dunmore villa

Mrs John Dix, Penmaen villa

Mrs Mary Ann Williams, Kingmead villa

Christopher Pocklington, Didsbury villa

William Arthur Leonard, Woolbury villa

John Clarke Wallop, Innisville villa

Miss C. Dickenson, Sidney lodge

George Young Home, Roseville villa

James Bailey, Sidney house

Mrs Edmond Gill, Old Cleve house

?. Rock house

Edwin Tardrew, Newlands villa

Henry Wansborough, Bewdley villa

?. Ahorn house

James Buck, Brookville lodge

Jesse Harris, Clarefont house

Eliza Knowles, Myrtle lodge

Dennis Fairchild, Melrose villa

Miss Chard, Gouldnappe house

?. Fripp, Carr villa

 

St Saviour's Infant School, Woolcott Park. In 1898 for 100 children. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: Misss A Coombe (Mistress) 1898.

 

Charles Seaman - Living at 6. Leigh Villas, Woolcott Park when prosecuted by Bristol School Board in January 1875 for not sending children to school and fined 3 shillings.

 

Woolcott Park Terrace, Woolcott Park

 

George Henry Pike, Gifford lodge

Mrs Isabella Butler, Wilton villa

Christopher Waltham Porter

Miss Morgan, ladies’ school

 

Worcester Crescent, College Road (South)

 

Woodforde Ffookes

Joseph B. Powell

Admlral James Vashon Baker

Graham Campbell

Mrs Radcliffe

Montagu Gilbert Blackburn

Miss Elizabeth Salmon

 

Worcester Lawn, College Road (South)

 

Joseph L. Roeckel, professor of music

Rev. Beedam Charlesworth

Mrs Christian C. Jones

Dr. George Thompson

 

Worcester Terrace, Clifton Park

 

Frederick William Badock, Badminton house

Misses Haycock

Henry Pritchard

Charles Stewart Clarke

Rev. Nicholas Pocock

Rev. F. Vaughan Mather

William Edward Fox

Lady Molyneaux

Arthur Montague

Mrs Catherine Span

Robert Dow Ker

Rev. Philip Ashby Phalps

Gwinnett Tyler

 

Sshools Clifton Park

 

Anna Maria Notley & Louisa Nascele Harris, school, Worcester House, Worcester Terrace.

 

Miss Bartlett's School for Young Ladies, Badminton House, Clifton park, Clifton. Listed 1898.

 

Clifton High School for Girls, Clifton Park, Clifton.

 

A R Douglas' School for Young Gentlemen, Colchester House, Clifton Park, Clifton. Listed 1898.

 

Worcester Villas, College Road (South)

 

Francis Black, M.D. Worcester lodge

William Killegrew Wait

George Wills

Major Owen, Barham lodge

Swinfen Jordan, Cherith lodge

 

Wordsworth Terrace, Woolcott Park

 

World’s End, White Hart Steps, Jacob’s Wells

 

Worrall’s Road, Caroline Row, Durdham Down

 

Wright’s Court, Pipe Lane, Temple Street

The Victims of Pan American World Airways 103

 

Pan American World Airways Flight 103 Crew

Avonye, Nichole Elizabeth, flight attendant, 44 years, born 05.05.44, Croissy-Sur-Seine, France, French

Avritt, Jerry Don, flight engineer, 46 years, born 30.07.42, Westminster, California, American

Berti, Noelle Lydie, flight attendant, 40 years, born 24.12.47, Paris, France, American

Engstrom, Siv Ulla, flight attendant, 51 years, born 21.09.37, Berkshire, England, Swedish

Franklin, Stacie Denise, flight attendant, 20 years, born 16.02.68, San Diego, California, American

Garrett, Paul Isaac, flight attendant, 41 years, born 16.11.47, Napa, California, American

Kuehne, Elke Etha, flight attendant, 43 years, born 17.03.45, Hanover, Germany, German

Larracoechea, Maria Nieves, flight attendant, 39 years, born 03.03.49, Madrid, Spain, Spanish

MacQuarrie, James Bruce, captain, 55 years, born 30.09.33, Kensington, New Hampshire, American

McAlolooy, Lilibeth Tobila, flight attendant, 27 years, born 02.11.61, Kelsterback, Germany, American

Murphy, Mary Geraldine, purser, 51 years, born 14.05.37, Middlesex, England, British

Reina, Jocelyn, flight attendant, 26 years, born 26.05.62, Isleworth, England, American

Royal, Myra Josephine, flight attendant, 30 years, born 20.12.58, London, England, American

Skabo, Irja Syhnove, flight attendant, 38 years, born 03.07.50, Oslo, Norway, American

Velimirovich, Milutin, chief purser, 35 years, born 14.10.53, Middlesex, England, American

Wagner, Raymond Ronald, first officer, 52 years, born 18.01.36, Pennington, New Jersey, American

 

Pan American World Airways Flight 103 Passengers

Ahern, John Michael Gerard, bond broker, 26 years, born 16.04.62, Rockville Center, New York, American, Seat Number 30C

Aicher, Sarah Margaret, playwright, 29 years, born 09.02.59, London, England, American, Seat Number 46C

Akerstrom, John David, 34 years, born 20.05.54, Medina, Ohio, American, Seat Number 25A

Alexander, Ronald Ely, businessman, 46 years, born 15.07.42, New York, New York, Swiss, seat number 42C

Ammerman, Thomas Joseph, marketing manager, 36 years, born 06.08.52, Old Tappan, New Jersey, American, seat number 16E

Apfelbaum, Martin Lewis, stamp dealer, 59 years, born 16.08.29, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 15H

Asrelsky, Rachel Marie, student, 21 years, born 26.11.67, New York, New York, American, seat number 38D

Atkinson, William Garretson III, engineer, 33 years, born 18.08.55, London, England, American, seat number 15A

Atkinson, Judith Ellen, art historian and consultant, 37 years, born 18.01.51, London, England, American, seat number 15B

Bacciochi, Clare Louise, hair stylist, 19 years, born 15.03.69, Warwickshire, England, British, seat number 50K

Bainbridge, Harry Michael, attorney, 34 years, born 16.11.54, Montrose, New York, American, seat number 4B

Barclay, Stuart Murray, businessman, 29 years, born 28.11.59, Farm Barnard, Vermont, Canadian, seat number 18G

Bell, Jean Mary, 44 years, born 16.03.44, Berkshire, England, British, seat number 5A

Benello, Julian MacBain, student, 25 years, born 28.12.62, Brookline, Massachusetts, American, seat number 23H

Bennett, Lawrence Ray, pharmaceutical chemist, 41 years, born 05.11.47, Chelsea, Michigan, American, seat number 15J

Bergstrom, Philip Vernon, army sergeant, 22 years, born 21.12.66, Forest Lake, Minnesota, American, seat number 46A

Berkley, Alistair David, professor of law, 29 years, born 11.04.59, London, England, American

Bernstein, Michael Stuart, lawyer, U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Special Investigation, 36 years, born 03.07.52, Bethesda, Maryland, American, seat number 47D

Berrell, Steven Russell, student, 2O years, born 19.06.68, Fargo, North Dakota, American, seat number 46F

Bhatia, Surinder Mohan, businessman, 51 years, born 21.05.37, Los Angeles, California, American, seat number 34D

Bissett, Kenneth John, student, 21 years, born 19.12.67, Hartsdale, New York, American, seat number 31J

Boatman-Fuller, Diane Anne, playwright, 37 years, born 08.01.53, London, England, American, seat number 22H

Boland, Stephen John, student, 20 years, born 28.09.68, Nashua, New Hampshire, American, seat number 46 G

Bouckley, Glen John, sales, 27 years, born 24.02.61, Liverpool, New York, British, seat number 39K

Bouckley, Paula Marie, sales, 29 years, born 14.10.59, Liverpool, New York, American, seat number 39J

Boulanger, Nicole Elise, student, 21 years, born 28.10.67, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, American, seat number 28B

Boyer, Francis, 43 years, born 22.06.45, Toulosane, France, French, seat number 9A

Bright, Nicholas, businessman, 32 years, born 29.08.56, Brookline, Massachusetts, American, seat number 13A

Browner (Bier), Daniel Solomon, 23 years, born 20.08.65, Parod, Israel, Israeli, seat number 21A

Brunner, Colleen Renee, student, 20 years, born 01.04.68, Hamburg, New York, American, seat number 44C

Burman, Timothy Guy, banker, 24 years, born 09.10.64, London, England, British, seat number 38G

Buser, Michael Warren, advertising executive, 34 years, born 08.08.54, Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, American, seat number 35B

Buser, Warren Max, civil engineer, 62 years, born 22.09.26, Glen Rock, New Jersey, American, seat number 35A

Butler, Steven Lee, teacher, 35 years, born 30.08.53, Denver, Colorado, American, seat number 36G

Cadman, William Martin, musician, 32 years, born 10.09.56, London, England, British, seat number 29J

Caffarone, Fabiana, 28 years, born 30.09.60, London, England, British, seat number 7B

Caffarone, Hernan, 28 years, born14.12.60, London, England, Argentinean, seat number 7A

Canady, Valerie, auditor, 25 years, born 29.06.63, Morgantown, West Virginia, American, seat number 24K

Capasso, Gregory, student, 21 years, born 12.12.67, Brooklyn, New York, American, seat number 48H

Cardwell, Timothy Michael, student, 21 years, born 05.07.67, Cresco, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 37D

Carlsson, Bernt Wilmar, diplomat, 50 years, born 21.11.38, New York, New York, Swedish, seat number 17H

Cawley, Richard Anthony, businessman, 43 years, born 09.07.45, New York, New York, American, seat number 16J

Ciulla, Frank, banker, 45 years, born 06.08.43, Park Ridge, New Jersey, American, seat number 11B

Cohen, Theodora Eugenia, student, 20 years, born 10.09.68, Port Jervis, New York, American, seat number 21H

Coker, Eric Michael, student, 20 years, born 23.04.68, Mendham, New Jersey, American, seat number 43B

Coker,Jason Michael, student, 20 years, born 23.04.68, Mendham, New Jersey, American, seat number 43A

Colasanti, Gary Leonard, student, 20 years, born 01.08.68, Melrose, Massachusetts, American, seat number 43C

Concannon, Bridget, 53 years, born 13.07.35, Oxfordshire, England, Irish, seat number 33H

Concannon, Sean, 16 years, born 18.02.72, Oxfordshire, England, British, seat number 33J

Concannon, Thomas, 51 years, born 21.11.37, Oxfordshire, England, Irish, seat number 33G

Corner, Tracey Jane, 17 years, born 04.05.71, Sheffield, England, British, seat number 33A

Cory, Scott, student, 20 years, born 27.09.68, Old Lyme Court, Connecticut, American, seat number 46D

Coursey, Willis Larry, military, 40 years, born 25.08.48, San Antonio, Texas, American, seat number 36K

Coyle, Patricia Mary, student, 20 years, born 04.06.68, Wallingford, Connecticut, American, seat number 20B

Cummock, John Binning, 38 years, born 31.05.50, Coral Gables, Florida, American, seat number 3A

Curry, Joseph Patrick, army captain, 31 years, born 21.03.57, Fort Devens, Massachusetts, American, seat number 44K

Daniels, William, Allen, research chemist, 40 years, born 28.03.48, Belle Mead, New Jersey, American, seat number 9H

Dater, Gretchen Joyce, student, 20 years, born 17.05.68, Ramsey, New Jersey, American, seat number 52J

Davis, Shannon, student, 19 years, born 19.02.69, Shelton, Connecticut, American, seat number 31A

Della-Ripa, Gabriel, Pan American World Airways Airlines employee, 46 years, born 03.04.42, Floral Park, New York, Italian, seat number 2B

DiMauro, Joyce Christine, marketing director, 32 years, born 09.05.56, New York, New York, American, seat number 11J

DiNardo, Gianfranca, 26 years, born 14.10.62, London, England, Italian, seat number 20C

Dix, Peter Thomas Stanley, management consultant, 35 years, born 06.05.53, London, England, Irish, seat number 14B

Dixit, Om, college professor, 54 years, born 29.12.33, Fairborn, Ohio, Indian, seat number 24A

Dixit, Shanti, 54 years, born 14.12.34, Fairborn, Ohio, American, seat number 24B

Dornstein, David Scott, student, 25 years, born 03.04.63, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 40K

Doyle, Michael Joseph, accountant, 30 years, born 21.05.58, Voorhees, New Jersey, American, seat number 9B

Eggleston, Edgar Howard III, air force sergeant, 24 years, born 13.10.64, Glens Falls, New York, American, seat number 32D

Ergin, Turhan, student, 22 years, born 14.05.66, West Hartford, Connecticut, American, seat number 28C

Fisher, Charles Thomas IV, banker, 34 years, born 24.12.53, London, England, American, seat number 25K

Flick, Clayton Lee, businessman, 25 years, born 23.02.63, Coventry, England, British, seat number 50J

Flynn, John Patrick, student, 21 years, born 24.11.67, Montville, New Jersey, American, seat number 45A

Fondiler, Arthur, attorney, 33 years, born 12.12.55, West Armonk, New York, American, seat number 47C

Fortune, Robert Gerard, insurance executive, 40 years, born 24.07.48, Jackson Heights, New York, American, seat number 1A

Freeman, Paul Matthew Stephen, 25 years, born 02.04.63, London, England, Canadian, Seat Number 46B

Fuller, James Ralph, corporate vice president, 50 years, born 17.09.38, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, America, seat number 3H

Gabor, Ibolya Robertine, 79 years, born 14.06.09, Budapest, Hungary, Hungarian, seat number 26F

Gallagher, Amy Beth, student, 22 years, born 30.08.66, Pointe Claire, Quebec, Canada, American, seat number 23G

Gannon, Matthew Kevin, foreign service officer, 34 years, born 11.08.54, Los Angeles, California, American, seat number 14J

Garczynski, Kenneth Raymond, industrial engineer, 37 years, born 17.10.51, North Brunswick, New Jersey, American, seat number 47K

Gibson, Kenneth James, army specialist four, 20 years, born 16.02.68, Romulus, Michigan, American, seat number 48K

Giebler, William David, bond broker, 29 years, born 08.07.59, London, England, American, seat number 30B

Gordon, Olive Leonora, 25 years, born 09.03.63, London, England, British, seat number 45G

Gordon-Gorgacz, Linda Susan, 39 years, born 15.09.49, London, England, American, seat number 37A

Gorgacz, Anne Madelene, 76 years, born 27.09.12, Newcastle, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 38A

Gorgacz, Loretta Anne, 47 years, born 15.03.41, Newcastle, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 37B

Gould, David, college professor, 45 years, born 03.01.43, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 22C

Guevorgian, Andre Nikolai, businessman, 32 years, born 11.11.56, Sea Cliff, New York, American, seat number 11A

Hall, Nicola Jane, 23 years, born 03.02.65, Sandton, South Africa, South African, seat number 23K

Halsch, Lorraine Frances, special education teacher, 31 years, born 06.11.57, Fairport, New York, American, seat number 35C

Hartunian, Lynne Carol, student, 21 years, born 13.03.67, Schenectady, New York, American, seat number 44A

Hawkins, Anthony Lacey, businessman, 57 years, born 13.11.31, Brooklyn, New York, British, seat number 28K

Herbert, Pamela Elaine, student, 19 years, born 27.03.69, Battle Creek, Michigan, American, seat number 37J

Hilbert, Rodney Peter, 40 years, born 19.07.48, Newton, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 16H

Hill, Alfred, 29 years, born 29.06.59, Sonthofen, Germany, German, seat number 14A

Hollister, Katherine Augusta, student, 20 years, born 26.08.68, Rego Park, New York, American, seat number 54C

Hudson, Josephine Lisa, nurse, 22 years, born 14.05.66, London, England, British, seat number 50D

Hudson, Melina Kristina, student, 16 years, born 25.01.72, Albany, New York, seat number American 29A

Hudson, Sophie Ailette Miriam, 26 years, born 22.09.62, Paris, France, French, seat number 29H

Hunt, Karen Lee, student, 20 years, born 07.01.68, Webster, New York, American, seat number 31K

Hurst, Roger Elwood, marketing manager, 38 years, born 12.07.50, Ringwood, New Jersey, American, seat number 2H

Ivell, Elizabeth Sophie, dog handler, 19 years, born 21.04.69, East Sussex, England, British, seat number 19C

Jaafar, Khalid Nazir, student, 20 years, born 01.05.68, Dearborn, Michigan, American, seat number 53K

Jeck, Robert van Houten, 57 years, born 08.10.31, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey, American, seat number 4J

Jeffreys, Paul Avron, musician, 36 years, born 13.02.52, Surrey, England, British, seat number 38J

Jeffreys, Rachel, advertising executive, 23, years, born 29.04.65, Surrey, England, British, seat number 38H

Jermyn, Kathleen Mary, student, 20 years, born 27.12.67, Staten Island, New York, American, seat number 49A

Johnson, Beth Ann, student, 21 years, born 24.03.67, Greensburg, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 36B

Johnson, Mary Alice Lincoln, student, 25 years, born 14.06.63, Wayland, Massachusetts, American, seat number 33D

Johnson, Timothy Baron, student, 21 years, born 30.11.67, Neptune, New Jersey, American, seat number 26A

Jones, Christopher Andrew, student, 20 years, born 04.03.68, Claverack, New York, American, seat number 52K

Kelly, Julianne Frances, student, 20 years, born 27.06.68, Dedham, Massachusetts, American, seat number 21E

Kingham, Jay Joseph, pharmaceuticals executive, 44 years, born 03.03.44, Potomac, Maryland, American, seat number 5B

Klein, Patricia Ann, social worker, 35 years, born 16.06.53, Trenton, New Jersey, American, seat number 28A

Kosmowski, Gregory, marketing executive, 40 years, born 08.10.48, MiIford, Michigan, American, seat number 8H

Kulukundis, Minas Christopher, ship brokerage director, 38 years, born 17.12.50, London, England, British, seat number 51K

LaRiviere, Ronald Albert, 33 years, born 19.11.55, Alexandria, Virginia, American, seat number 20H

Leckburg, Robert Milton, engineer, 30 years, born 12.10.58, Piscataway, New Jersey, seat number American 34C

Leyrer, William Chase, businessman, 46 years, born 24.08.42, Bay Shore, New York, American 2J

Lincoln, Wendy Anne, student, 23 years, born 21.01.65, North Adams, Massachusetts, American, seat number 28D

Lowenstein, Alexander Silas, student, 21 years, born 25.02.67, Morristown, New Jersey, American, seat number 20D

Ludlow, Lloyd David, army sergeant first class, 41 years, born 06.02.47, Macksville, Kansas, American, seat number 51A

Lurbke, Maria Theresia, 25 years, born 26.11.63, Balve Beckum, Germany, German, seat number 52A

Mack, William Edward, puppeteer, 30 years, born 24.04.58, New York, New York, American, seat number 36B

Malicote, Douglas Eugene, army specialist four, 22 years, born 31.08.66, Lebanon, Ohio, American, seat number 48B

Malicote, Wendy Gay, 21 years, born 31.07.67, Lebanon, Ohio, American, seat number 48A

Marek, Elizabeth Lillian, actress and peace activist, 30 years, born 17.02.58, New York, New York, American, seat number 36C

Marengo, Louis Anthony, marketing director, 33 years, born 09.02.55, Rochester, Michigan, American, seat number 3J

Martin, Noel George, 27 years, born 31.05.61, Clapton, England, Jamaican, seat number 53A

Maslowski, Diane Marie, currency trader, 30 years, born 10.08.58, New York, American, seat number 8B

McAllister, William John, 26 years, born 18.10.62 in the Isle of Mull, Argyll, Scotland , Scottish, seat number 14E

McCarthy, Daniel Emmet, banker, 31 years, born 02.11.57, Brooklyn, New York, American, seat number 6B

McCollum, Robert Eugene, university professor, 61 years, born 12.05.27, Wayne, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 7J

McKee, Charles Dennis, army major, 40 years, born 03.12.48 , Arlington, Virginia, American, seat number 15F

McLaughlin, Bernard Joseph, marketing manager, 30 years, born 12.12.58, Cranston, Rhode Island, American, seat number 36A

Melber, Jane Susan, musician and teacher, 27 years, born 01.01.61, Middlesex, England, American, seat number 27H

Merrill, John, seaman, 35 years, born 11.07.53, Hertfordshire, England, British, seat number 37K

Miazga, Suzanne Marie, student, 22 years, born 31.07.66, Marcy, New York, American, seat number 23A

Miller, Joseph Kenneth, accounting firm executive, 56 years, born 27.05.32, Woodmere, New York, American, seat number 10B

Mitchell, Jewel Courtney, army second lieutenant, 32 years, born 14.06.56, Brooklyn, New York, American, seat number 27A

Monetti, Richard Paul, student, 20 years, born 11.09.68, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, American, seat number 20E

Morgan, Jane Ann, attorney, 37 years, born 19.03.51, London, England, American, seat number 42A

Morson, Eva Ingeborg, 48 years, born 29.04.40, New, York, New York, American, seat number 19G

Mosey, Helga Rachael, student, 19 years, born 21.09.69, West Midlands, England, British, seat number 22K

Mulroy, Ingrid Elizabeth, 25 years, born 22.04.63, Lund, Sweden, Swedish, seat number 34J

Mulroy, John, journalist, 59 years, born 01.04.29, East Northport, New York, American, seat number 34G

Mulroy, Sean Kevin, 25 years, born 03.05.63, Lund, Sweden, American, seat number 34H

Noonan, Karen Elizabeth, student, 20 years, born 26.12.67, Potomac, Maryland, American, seat number 20A

O'Connor, Daniel Emmett, U.S. diplomatic service, 31 years, born 22.09.57, Dorchester, Massachusetts, American, seat number 25H

O'Neil, Mary Denice, student, 2l years, born 02.04.67, Bronx, New York, American, seat number 38K

Otenasek, Anne Lindsey, student, 21 years, born 31.01.67, Baltimore, Maryland, American, seat number 45K

Owen, Bryony Elise, 1 year, born 29.04.87, Bristol, England, British, seat number 19D

Owen, Gwyneth Yvonne Margaret, student, 29 years, born 03.05.59, Bristol, England, British, seat number 19D

Owens, Laura Abigail, 8 years, born 01.01.80, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, American, seat number 35K

Owens, Martha, 44 years, born 02.06.44, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, American, seat number 35H

Owens, Robert Plack, 45 years, born 05.03.43, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, American, seat number 35G

Owens, Sarah Rebecca, 14 years, born 09.12.74, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, American, seat number 35J

Pagnucco, Robert Italo, attorney, 51 years, born 20.10.37, South Salem, New York, American, seat number 4A

Papadopoulos, Christos Michael, 45 years, born 11.11.43, North Lawrence, New York, American, seat number 17A

Peirce, Peter Raymond, architect and student, 40 years, born 28.09.48, Perrysburg, Ohio, American, seat number 47G

Pescatore, Michael, businessman, 33 years, born 06.09.55, Solon, Ohio, American, seat number 17J

Philipps, Sarah Susannah Buchanan, student, 20 years, born 15.08.68, Newtonville, Massachusetts, American, seat number 49C

Phillips, Frederick Sandford, student, 27 years, born 08.05.61, Little Rock, Arkansas, American, seat number 21F

Pitt, James Andrew Campbell, student, 24 years, born 06.11.64, South Hadley, Massachusetts, American, seat number 29K

Platt, David, architect, 33 years, born 13.12.55, Staten Island, New York, American, seat number 8A

Porter, Walter Leonard, musician, 35 years, born 10.03.53, Brooklyn, New York, American, seat number 25C

Posen, Pamela Lynn, student, 20 years, born 30.01.68, Harrison, New York, American, seat number 26K

Pugh, William, businessman, 56 years, born 29.02.32, Margate, New Jersey, American, seat number 21D

Quiguyan, Crisostomo Estrella, hotel cashier, 43 years, born 16.03.45, London, England, Filipino, seat number 30A

Ramses, Rajesh Tarsis Priskel, 35 years, born 26.05.53, Leicester, England, Indian, seat number 22A

Rattan, Anmol, 2 years, born 24.09.86, Warren, Michigan. American, seat number 24C

Rattan, Garima, computer programmer, 29 years, born 15.07.59, Warren, Michigan, American, seat number 23D

Rattan, Suruchi, 3 years, born 20.06.85, Warren, Michigan. American, seat number 23E

Reeves, Anita Lynn, 24 years, born 03.09.64, Laurel, Maryland, American, seat number 45D

Rein, Mark Alan, businessman, 44 years, born 12.02.44, New York, New York, American, seat number 2A

Rencevicz, Diane Marie, student, 21 years, born 13.07.67, Burlington, New Jersey, American, seat number 29G

Rogers, Louise Ann, student, 20 years, born 13.02.67, Olney, Maryland, American, seat number 29D

Roller, Edina, 5 years, born 24.11.83, Hungary, Hungarian, seat number 26D

Roller, Janos Gabor, 29 years, born 26.03.59, Hungary, Hungarian, seat number 26E

Roller, Zsuzsana, 27 years, born 21.12.61, Hungary, Hungarian, seat number 26G

Root, Hanne Maria, management consultant, 26 years, born 15.12.62, Toronto, Canada, Canadian, seat number 34K

Rosen, Saul Mark, businessman, 35 years, born 24.11.53, Morris Plains, New Jersey, American, seat number 32A

Rosenthal, Andrea Victoria, student, 22 years, born 05.02.66, New York, New York, American, seat number 35D

Rosenthal, Daniel Peter, student, 20 years, born 02.06.68, Staten Island, New York, American, seat number 21J

Rubin, Arnaud David, 28 years, born 18.05.60, Waterloo, Belgium, Belgian, seat number 39G

Saraceni, Elyse Jeanne, student, 20 years, born 01.06.68, East London, England, American, seat number 36D

Saunders, Scott Christopher, student, 21 years, born 20.05.67, Macungie, Pennsylvania, American, seat number 24D

Saunders, Theresa Elizabeth Jane, marketing, 28 years, born 24.10.60, Sunbury-on-Thames, England, British, seat number 14F

Schauble, Johannes Otto, 41 years, born 08.08.47, Kappellenweg, Germany, German, seat number 49K

Schlageter, Robert Thomas, student, 20 years, born 12.08.68, Warwick, Rhode Island American, seat number 28G

Schultz, Thomas Britton, student, 20, years, born 05.01.68, Ridgefield, Connecticut, American, seat number 45C

Scott, Sally Elizabeth, chef, 22 years, born 17.01.66, Huntington, New York, British, seat number 56G

Shapiro, Amy Elizabeth, student, 21 years, born 28.10.67, Stamford, Connecticut, American, seat number 37G

Shastri, Mridula, 24 years, born 12.02.64, Oxford, England, Indian, seat number 24H

Sheanshang, Joan, 46 years, born 16.12.42, New York, New York, American, seat number 41C

Sigal, Irving Stanley, research biologist, 35 years, born 23.05.53, Pennington, New Jersey, American, seat number 13B

Simpson, Martin Bernard Christopher, financier, 52 years, born 25.10.36, Brooklyn, New York, American, seat number 27K

Smith, Cynthia Joan, student, 21 years, born 06.10.67, Milton, Massachusetts, American, seat number 41A

Smith, Ingrid Anita, chiropodist, 31 years, born 12.11.57, Berkshire, England, British, seat number 4H

Smith, James Alvin, 55 years, born 11.03.33, New York, New York, American, seat number 27G

Smith, Mary Edna, army sergeant, 34 years, born 14.07.54, Kalamazoo, Michigan, American, seat number 34A

Stevenson, Geraldine Anne, 37 years, born 31.03.51, Surrey, England, British, seat number 22E

Stevenson, Hannah Louise, 10 years, born 23.09.78, Surrey, England, British, seat number 22F

Stevenson, John Charles, 38 years, born 13.09.50, Surrey, England, British, seat number 22D

Stevenson, Rachael, 8 years, born 01.09.80, Surrey, England, British, seat number 22G

Stinnett, Charlotte Ann, 36 years, born 07.02.52, Duncanville, Texas, American, seat number 19J

Stinnett, Michael Gary, army specialist, 26 years, born 27.05.62, Duncanville, Texas, American, seat number 19H

Stinnett, Stacey Leanne, 9 years, born 30.07.79, Duncanville, Texas, American, seat number 19K

Stow, James Ralph, businessman, 49 years, born 18.07.39, New York, New York, American, seat number 15E

Stratis, Elia G., accountant, 43 years, born 17.06.45, Montvale, New Jersey, American, seat number 1B

Swan, Anthony Selwyn, 29 years, born 15.05.59, Brooklyn, New York, Trinidadian, seat number 41K

Swire, Flora MacDonald Margaret, medical student and researcher, 24 years, born 22.12.64, London, England, British, seat number 39D

Tager, Marc Alex, 22 years, born 03.08.66, London, England, British, seat number 26H

Tanaka, Hidekazu, 26 years, born 13.05.62, London, England, Japanese, seat number 24G

Teran, Andrew Alexander, student, 20 years, born 31.08.68, New Haven, Connecticut, Bolivian, seat number 27D

Thomas, Arva Anthony, student, 17 years, born 26.04.71, Detroit, Michigan, American, seat number 19A

Thomas, Jonathan Ryan, 2 months, born 29.09.88, Southfield, Michigan, American, seat number 32K

Thomas, Lawanda, air force sergeant, 21 years, born 17.02.67, Southfield, Michigan, American, seat number 32K

Tobin, Mark Lawrence, student, 21 years, born 04.04.67, North Hempstead, New York, American, seat number 32G

Trimmer-Smith, David William, publishing executive, 51 years, born 26.04.37, New York, New York, American, seat number 12A

Tsairis, Alexia Kathryn, student, 20 years, born 06.07.68, Franklin Lakes, New Jersey, American, seat number 21G

Valentino, Barry Joseph, exhibit designer, 28 years, born 25.02.60, San Francisco, California, American, seat number 20G

Van-Tienhoven, Thomas Floro, 45 years, born 30.05.43, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Argentinean, seat number 2B

Vejdany, Asaad Eidi, 46 years, born 24.02.42, South Great Neck, New York, American, seat number 20C

Vrenios, Nicholas Andreas, student, 20 years, born 20.08.68, Washington, DC, American, seat number 46E

Vulcu, Peter, stockbroker and student, 21 years, born 01.08.67, Alliance, Ohio, American, seat number 20K

Waido, Janina Jozefa, 61 years, born 19.03.27, Chicago, Illinois, American, seat number 50A

Walker, Thomas Edwin, electronics specialist, 47 years, born 11.12.41, Quincy, Massachusetts, American, seat number 16A

Weedon, Kesha, student, 20 years, born 02.10.68, Bronx, New York, American, seat number 37H

Weston, Jerome Lee, engineer, 45 years, born 11.11.43, Baldwin, New York, American, seat number 10A

White, Jonathan, accountant, 33 years, born 14.07.55, North Hollywood, California, American, seat number 55J

Williams, Bonnie Leigh, military, 21 years, born 12.01.67, Crown Point, New York, American, seat number 46K

Williams, Brittany Leigh, 2 months, born 13.10.88, Crown Point, New York, American, seat number 46J

Williams, Eric Jon, army sergeant, 24 years, born 15.08.64, Crown Point, New York, American, seat number 46J

Williams, George Waterson, army first lieutenant, 24 years, born 17.05.64, Joppa, Maryland, American, seat number 33K

Williams, Stephanie Leigh, 1 year, born 23.05.87, Crown Point, New York, American, seat number 46K

Wolfe, Miriam Luby, student, 20 years, born 26.09.68, Severna Park, Maryland, American, seat number 21K

Woods, Chelsea Marie, 10 months, born 06.02.88, Willingboro, New Jersey, American, seat number 25F

Woods, Dedera Lynn, air force sergeant, 27 years, born 04.02.61, Willingboro, New Jersey, American, seat number 25G

Woods, Joe Nathan, civilian military worker, 28 years, born 05.03.60, Willingboro, New Jersey, American, seat number 25D

Woods, Joe Nathan, Jr., 2 years, born 24.09.86, Willingboro, New Jersey, American, seat number 25E

Wright, Andrew Christopher Gillies, site agent, 24 years, born 02.05.64, Surrey, England, British, seat number 55G

Zwynenburg, Mark James, investment banker, 29 years, born 14.10.59, West Nyack, New York, American, seat number 12B

 

Lockerbie Residents

Flannigan, Kathleen Mary, 41 years, born 26.01.47, 16 Sherwood Crescent

Flannigan, Thomas Brown, 44 years, born 20.12.44, 16 Sherwood Crescent

Flannigan, Joanne, 10 years, born 13.06.78, 16 Sherwood Crescent

Henry, Dora Henrietta, 56 years, born 27.03.32, 13 Sherwood Crescent

Henry, Maurice Peter, 63 years, born 18.07.25, 13 Sherwood Crescent

Lancaster, Mary, 81 years, born 12.01.07, 11 Sherwood Crescent

Murray, Jean Aitkin, 82 years, born 29.11.06, 14 Sherwood Crescent

Somerville, John, 40 years, born 31.05.48, 15 Sherwood Crescent

Somerville, Rosaleen Later, affectionately know as 'Rosalind', 40 years, born 31.05.48, 15 Sherwood Crescent

Somerville, Paul, 13 years, born 21.01.75, 15 Sherwood Crescent

Somerville, Lyndsey Ann, 10 years, 13.07.78, 15 Sherwood Crescent

  

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Letting Agents in Surrey Quays London SE16

 

estate agents surrey

 

Letting Agents in Surrey Quays London SE16

 

Letting Agents in Surrey Quays London SE16

 

Area Comments

 

The Easternmost of the Rotherhithe areas, Surrey Quays is an amorphous area, which is basically contiguous with the old boundaries of the Surrey Commercial Docks - for the very simple reason that until 1970, that what it was. With most of the dock area filled in, the 80s and 90s saw a vast redevelopment of the area and 5000 homes being built here.

 

Essentially, Surrey Quays is a modern development, but has become a lynchpin of South London in the brief time it existed. It would be simplistic in the extreme to call it merely a mostly-recent development of course; it more than this, having become a social and entertainment and shopping capital of the area in its short life.

 

Surrey Quays is all about housing, shopping and entertainment - the exact ratio depends wha...

I once met a real estate agent who said "Never pay a penny for views."

5411. This is list of Contributors to this Photostream, unofficial but dedicated to the Royal Australian Navy's Centenary. 1911-2011. The list last appeared on July 10, the actual anniversary of the RAN's Royal Assent and Promulgation.*

 

The list, on-going and updated repeatedly, has mainly dealt with photo contributors, but evolving over the same time was the sometimes extensive photo research done by a group which we called the Photostream's far-flung Ships and Aircraft Identification Division [SAID]. The leading lights of SAID, named alphabetically, were already generous pohoto contributors Graeme Andrews, Kim Dunstan and Geoff Eastwood. Moving beyond his own areas of knowledge, Kim particularly reached far and wide, sometimes on some remarkably arcane matters such historic port timeballs, and was in turn given very generous assistance by a number of outside experts on these matters, along with ship identifications, locations and dates. It becomes too many to particularise here, but we do sincerely thank all those involved. We should also mention the repeated assistance given to Kim by Fabio Pena, Manager of the Carrier and Escort Archive of the US-based website Navsource, who was called upon frequently for help.

 

*There were of course precursors to the RAN, both in the Colonial Navies in Australia, and the Commonwealth Naval Forces formed by their merger at Federation in 1901. The 'Royal' Centenary this year was marked with due solemnity - but the official acknowledgment of landmark dates now being spread over several years and different occasions. There was not the same level of fleet ceremony and salute in 2011 as there was at the 50th and 75th 'Royal' anniversaries in 1961 and 1986 respectively, a sign perhaps of changing times.

 

The Photostream will continue, perhaps at a lesser pace, but with maintenance, on-going corrections, Big Picture replacements of favoured images, compilations of individual ship or subject links, and finally, of course, new images as they come to hand.

 

We've have enjoyed puttiung this together enormously, and once again thanks to all these generous photo contributors, also listed alphabetically:

 

GRAEME ANDREWS, OAM, RAN 1955-1968, RANR 1980, Koolewong NSW.

 

BRENT BALCHIN, RAN 1963-1974, Fish Creek, Victoria.

 

ALF BATCHELDER, Melbourne.

 

[BONNIE] RONNIE BELL, Livingston, Scotland.

 

ALAN BENN, U.K. [AlanBenn] Moderator, World Naval Ships Forums.

 

CAROLYN CHURCH, niece of the late Jack Davis [1923-2004], Sydney.

 

LATE P.O. HECTOR CLARK, courtesy his daughter FAYE CLARK, Molong, NSW.

 

BRUCE CONSTABLE, World Naval Ships Forums and /PerthOne website, Sydney.

 

LATE WILLIAM EDWARD COSH, RAN 1938-1948, via family representative Tony Gray.

 

GLEN CROUCH, COP/CPH RAN, Sydney.

 

WAYNE CUMMINGS, ME [D] RAN 1966-1971.

 

RON CUSKELLY, Senior Vice President, Queensland Air Museum, Caloundra, Qld.

 

JOHN DARROCH, Sydney Heritage Fleet.

 

BERBARD P. DELANEY, ran 1951-57, via his son BERNARD DELANEY JR.

 

TERRY DICKENS [Astral Trader] U.K. Chief Moderator, World Naval Ships Forums

 

JACK DUPEROUZEL, ex-RANFAA.

 

KIMBERLEY DUNSTAN, RAN 1958-67, Melbourne.

 

GEOFF EASTWOOD, maritime photographer, Sydney, and his late father ROGER EASTWOOD.

 

GORDON CURTIS EVANS, CPO, Air Artificer, RN [ret]. Frankston, Victoria.

 

GRAHAM GALLIOTT, ex-Australian Army 34 Water Transport.

 

ROSS GILLETT, maritime author, Sydney.

 

CMDR MACKENZIE GREGORY, St Kilda Rd, Melbourne.

 

GEOFF GREEN, ex-RAR, Mt Martha, Victoria.

 

WO OFFICER MARTIN GROGAN, RANR, Curator, HMAS Cerberus Museum, Flinders Training Establishment. Victoria.

 

DENIS HARE, 104 Signals Squadron.

 

CPO JOHN 'BLUE' HARRISON, RAN 1947-1969.

 

FRANK HOLDEN.

 

STEPHEN HOOD, RAN 1982-1998, RANC 1982-1985.

 

ROBERT E. HOSKIN, nephew of the late PO Edward Hunter McHaffie, HMAS SYDNEY [II], and author of 'A Voice from the Deep.'

 

CHRISTOPHER J. HOWELL, shipping agent , providore and maritime photographer , Bluff, New Zealand.

 

ALLAN HUBBELL, Halifax, Canada, historicakl contributions from ‘The Sphere’ magazine.

 

JOHN JEREMY, author 'Cockatoo Island: Sydney's Historic Dockyard [UNSW Press 1998, 2005].

 

IAN JOHNSON, ex-RAN, naval historian Fremantle.

 

Late DENIS KENDALL, ex-HMS Implacable, courtesy his daughter ROSEY KENDALL, active in Seaworks and Maritime Heritage, Williamstown, Vic.

 

ROSEY KENDALL.

 

RICHARD KENDERDINE, for his father, late Lt. LEONARD KENDERDINE.

 

JOHN LEPPITT, courtesy of his son JAMES LEPPITT

DR TOM LEWIS, Curator, Darwin Military Museum, East Head, Darwin NT.

 

THEO VAN LOON, maritime photographer, Hobart, Tasmania.

 

PETER LONGHURST, ex-RN, Surrey, U.K.

 

Late SHAUGHN LOWRY , via ALLEN PEW and GEOFF EASTWOOD.

 

JOHN LYALL, Sydney.

 

RONALD L. MARSH, RAN 1957-1963, Brisbane.

 

RONALD MCINTOSH, Australian Army 32nd Small Ships Sqdrn.

 

JAMIE MCINTYRE, CPO/CSM RAN 1990 - present.

 

ERN McQUILLAN, courtesy his son MICHAEL McQUILLAN.

 

ALAN MEADE, RAN 1943-1946, courtesy his son BOB MEADE.

 

ASHLEY MOORE, Sydney, with items from his own, and his late father's collection.

 

BRETT MORROW, Sydney.

 

LES NAPPER, RAN 1952-1962.

 

ROGER PEARSON, modelmaker, light coastal forces, Bendigo, Vic.

 

NEIL M. PENNY, RAN 1979-1985.

 

ALLEN PEW, Sydney.

 

JOHN PHILLIPS, images volunteer , SHF Maritime Records and Research Centre, for Davidson Collection permissiions assistance.

 

ALLEN PORTER, RAN 1941-1952, ex 20th Carrier Air Group photographer.

 

RUSSELL PRIEST, Down Under Ships Photographs, Melbourne, acquisitions, permission and donation.

 

LCDR E.D. 'SANDY' SANDBERG, Fleet Air Arm, RAN 1950-1980.

 

MICHAEL SANDBERG, Fleet Air Arm, RAN, son of above.

   

BILL SCOTT, Northumberland, U.K., colorisation of photos of the Cape Spade action from the albums of his late father Willie Scott, RN.

 

JENNY SCOTT, [Adelaide Archivist] State Library of South Australia.

 

CHRISTOPHER STOCKMAN, RAN 1974-1980, photo permissions.

 

LIZ THOMAS, Special Collections Librarian, Coffs Harbour City Library, assistance with permissions.

 

ALAN TONKIN, RN 1941-46, Carnforth, Lancs. U.K.

 

LUKE TSCHARKE, photographer, Melbourne - HMAS Castlemaine.

 

DENNIS UREN, RAN 1966-1988, RANR 20O2.

 

LATE CPL ROBERT WALDING, courtesy of his son DR RICHARD WALDING, University of Queensland, rare HMAS Vigilant photo permission.

 

TIM WEBB, maritime photographer, U.K.

 

BOB WESTTHORP, RAN 1964-88, Langwarrin, Victoria.

 

JOHN WESTWOOD, RANR Sydney Port Division 1965-1972, also with photos of his late father CPO Bill WESTWOOD, EX-HMNAS YARRA [II].

 

ROBERT WINDUSS, maritime photographer, Port Melbourne, Victoria, both for photographs and waterfront locations advice.

 

Thanks also to TONI MUNDAY, of the CrestCerberus organisation at HMAS Cerberus Museum; The Pictures Department, State Library of Victoria [La Trobe Library] ; Also COLIN ALLISON [FrigateRN] administrator of of the Nautical Pictures of Interest group on Flickr, for endless support and encouragement.

Every variety of land and seaplane used by the RAF and Fleet Air Arm passed through Whitchurch, including secret prototypes of advanced aircraft and even the RAF’s first operational jet, the Gloster Meteor.

 

The Luftwaffe, by chance or design, generally left the Lisbon flight alone. It might have been because it was useful, of course. Veteran journalist, the late Max Barnes, reckoned British agents were flown to Portugal from Whitchurch and German agents returned by the same route. It all seems rather gentlemanly now.

 

‘The Luftwaffe turned a blind eye to the Lisbon service because it served the German purpose to do so,’ claimed Barnes. ‘So Whitchurch saw the strange spectacle of bundles of British newspapers fresh from the presses being loaded on to Lisbon-b