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South Indian filter coffee is a coffee drink made by mixing frothed and boiled milk with the decoction obtained by brewing finely ground coffee powder in a traditional Indian filter. The drink known as Kaapi, is the South Indian phonetic rendering of "coffee". The drink is also referred to as Madras filter coffee, Madras kaapi, Kumbakonam degree coffee, Mylapore filter coffee, or Mysore filter coffee. Outside India the term "filter coffee" may refer to drip brew coffee, which is a distinct form of preparing coffee.

Coffee has been grown in India since the 1600s, when it was first brought to India from Yemen by Muslim saint named Baba Budan.[1] The most commonly used coffee beans are arabica and robusta. These are grown in different states of South India, such as in the hills of Karnataka (Kodagu, Chikkamagalur and Hassan), Tamil Nadu (Nilgiris District, Yercaud and Kodaikanal), Kerala (Malabar region) and Andhra Pradesh (Araku Valley). The beans are usually medium-roasted and finely ground and blended with roasted chicory. The final coffee powder composition is typically equal quantities of Plantation A and Peaberry with between 10 and 30 percent chicory added in, producing a distinct aroma, thickness and colour in the resulting coffee.

Masala Tea and South Indian Filter Coffee - Chennai Banana Leaf, Syndal AUD2.50 each

 

Masala tea is also known as Chai or Masala Chai. This version had strong cardamom flavours, which i liked, but reminds Julia of the dentist! :P

 

The coffee wasn't very strong, but had a lot of evaporated milk, which made it quite thick. Not my cup of tea. :P

  

On the menu:

- Masala Tea - Sowkarpet Masala Tea

- South Indian Filter Coffee - Mylapore Mami's Kaapi

 

Chennai Banana Leaf

252 Blackburn Rd, Glen Waverley

Phone

(03) 9886 5500

 

Other photos

- Idli with Sambar and Chutney

- Veettu Dosai with Pumpkin and Cauliflower Curries

- Iddiyappam with Lamb Curry

- Masala Tea and South Indian Filter Coffee

 

Reviews:

- Chennai Banana Leaf - The Age, Epicure

- Chennai Banana Leaf - Mietta's

  

Veettu Dosai with Pumpkin and Cauliflower Curries - Chennai Banana Leaf, Syndal AUD7.00

 

A lighter and less oily version of a dosai. I like a dosai with soft fluffy bits like this, with a bit of a sour tang from the fermented batter, and crunchy edges, but more often that not, the whole dosai ends up crunchy.

 

Chennai Banana Leaf

252 Blackburn Rd, Glen Waverley

Phone

(03) 9886 5500

 

Other photos

- Idli with Sambar and Chutney

- Veettu Dosai with Pumpkin and Cauliflower Curries

- Iddiyappam with Lamb Curry

- Masala Tea and South Indian Filter Coffee

 

Reviews:

- Chennai Banana Leaf - The Age, Epicure

- Chennai Banana Leaf - Mietta's

  

yes i know I upload a lot of sun shots, but this has been a habit of mine even before I got the photobug. I watch every sunrise and have been for many many years. some I record like this one, some I just watch, have endless cups of coffee (south indian filter coffee OF COURSE) and get ready for my trip to the throne room.

I would be up first thing in the morning, take a shower, get dressed and enjoy freshly made breakfast and browse through the morning paper followed by a stroll in and around the city lanes....... being a morning person has its own benefits :-)

A pour of hot milk over coffee liquor makes a delightful cup of South Indian filter coffee..

Indian filter coffee is a coffee drink made by mixing frothed and boiled milk with the decoction obtained by brewing finely ground coffee powder in a traditional Indian filter. The drink known as Kaapi, is the South Indian phonetic rendering of "coffee". The drink is also referred to as Madras filter coffee, Madras kaapi, Kumbakonam degree coffee, Mylapore filter coffee, or Mysore filter coffee. Outside of India the term "filter coffee" may refer to drip brew coffee, which is a distinct form of preparing coffee.

 

Coffee has been grown in India since the 1600s, when it was first brought to India from Yemen by Muslim saint named Baba Budan.[1] The most commonly used coffee beans are arabica and robusta. These are grown in different states of South India, such as in the hills of Karnataka (Kodagu, Chikkamagalur and Hassan), Tamil Nadu (Nilgiris District, Yercaud and Kodaikanal), Kerala (Malabar region) and Andhra Pradesh (Araku Valley). The beans are usually medium-roasted and finely ground and blended with roasted chicory. The final coffee powder composition is typically equal quantities of Plantation A and Peaberry with between 10 and 30 percent chicory added in, producing a distinct aroma, thickness and colour in the resulting coffee.

 

South Indian filter coffee is brewed with a metal device that resembles two cylindrical cups, one of which has a pierced bottom that nests into the top of the "tumbler" cup, leaving ample room underneath to receive the brewed coffee. The upper cup has two removable parts: a pierced pressing disc with a central stem handle and a covering lid. (A similar device is used to brew Vietnamese coffee.)

 

The upper cup is loaded with freshly ground coffee. The grounds are then compressed (i.e., tamped) with the stemmed disc into a uniform layer across the cup's pierced bottom. The coarser the coffee grinds, the more one has to tamp the coffee to retain the same extraction. With the press disc left in place, the upper cup is nested into the top of the tumbler and boiling water is poured inside. The lid is placed on top, and the device is left to slowly drip the brewed coffee into the bottom. The chicory holds on to the hot water a little longer, letting the water dissolve and extract more of the coffee grinds.

  

Traditional Madras-style dabarah, or davarah, and tumbler placed with the open end facing down as customary

The resulting brew is generally much stronger than Western drip/filter coffee, and often stronger than even espresso.

 

Traditionally, the coffee is consumed by adding 1–2 tablespoons of the brew to a cup of boiling milk with the preferred amount of sugar. The coffee is drunk from the tumbler (although a word of English origin, it seems to be the most commonly used name for this vessel), but is often cooled first with a dabarah - "dabarah" (also pronounced in some regions as 'davarah'): a wide metal saucer with lipped walls.

 

Coffee is typically served after pouring back and forth between the dabara and the tumbler in huge arc-like motions of the hand. This serves several purposes: mixing the ingredients (including sugar) thoroughly; cooling the hot coffee down to a sipping temperature; and most importantly, aerating the mix without introducing extra water (such as with a steam wand used for frothing cappucinos). An anecdote related to the distance between the pouring and receiving cup leads to another name for the drink, "Meter Coffee"

 

Coffee is something of a cultural icon in Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh especially the Coastal Andhra regions, Kerala and Tamil Nadu whereas in Telangana state Chai is a cultural icon. It is customary to offer a cup of coffee to any visitor. Coffee was originally introduced by Baba Budan to South India in the 17th century and became very popular under British rule. Until the middle of the 20th century traditional households would not use granulated sugar but used jaggery or honey in coffee. The coffee culture in India has had a renaissance of sorts with the establishment of popular and contemporary chains like Cafe Coffe Day and Starbucks.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_filter_coffee

 

From Saravana Bhavan. South Indian filter coffee served in tumbler and dabarah.

really amazing south indian filter coffee!! ohhhhhhhh how i miss it!

South Indian filter coffee is creamy and sweet.

South Indian Filter Coffee

How to prepare a good South Indian Filter coffee

  

1- Boil pure water(mineral water recommended) in a steel vessel.

  

2- fill the upper chamber of the coffee filter with fresh coffee powder depending on the size of the coffee filter and the number of coffee tumblers required.Minimum you should keep fourheaped tea spoon full of coffee powderif the filter is small and six if the filter is large. If you keep less,the water will just run away from the upper chamber without percolation. Even for single person there should be a minimum amount required.If the number of tumblers required is more additional coffee powder is to be added.

  

3- The coffee powder in the upper chamber should not be too loose or too tight. Just press the coffee powder with your fingers gently. If it is too loose hot water will just run through the powder without any percolation. If the powder is too tight the water settles down on top of the powder and will not percolate down and even if it does it takes lot of time.

  

4- Place the plunger on top of the coffee powder.

  

5- Place the upper chamber on the top of the lower chamber tightly.

  

6-Pour the boiling water on top of the plunger and keep the lid.

  

7- Keep aside the filter for 20 to 30 minutes for brewing. The decoction will be collected in the bottom chamber.

  

8- Boil the fresh degree milk in a stainless steel vessel.

  

9- Take the tumbler from the davara set, add 1/2 inch level of filtered decoction, and add hot milk to the required strength of the coffee.If you want your coffee to be strong add less milk and for lighter coffee add more milk. Add sugar as per the taste. The proportion of milk to the decoction has to be experimented initially till you hit the required taste.

  

10- Hold the coffee tumbler in your right hand and the davara saucer in your left hand and start whisking the coffee from tumbler to saucer and saucer to tumbler in quick motions repeatedly for three or four times till a nice brown froth is collected by the aerated coffee. Take care not to spill the coffee in the process. By practice you develop the art of whisking the coffee.

  

11- Keep the coffee tumbler in the davara saucer and serve.

We stopped at Annalakshmi - a new restaurant in Aluva (near Kochi) on July 9, 2011 for a late breakfast. We had aloo poori, dosa, utthapam and filter coffee. It totaled about Rs 170.

 

YUM!

 

Photographer Jennifer Kumar is an American living in India as is a cross-cultural coach at Authentic Journeys. Follow her on Facebook - www.facebook.com/authenticjourneys

South Indian Filter Coffee