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10 1/4" x 14"

Arches 140#CP

 

I rarely believed retired folks when they said that they became so busy after retirement that they didn't know when they had time to work ... well, I'm singing a different song now. Either I'm slowing down significantly, finding more to do, or am more distracted - but the days seems to whiz by in a blur of motion, and I fall into bed each night and think "where did the time go!" Perhaps it's a bit of all of that that has me as busy as I was before, though I've exchanged 'work' obligations for home and family obligations. I'm finally spending a bit more time with my grands, getting some VERY much needed things done in and around the house, and my social life has picked up too. All good things -- and I have to admit, busier than I had anticipated in any of my retirement imaginings.

 

I painted this 'splash and splatter' simply for the colors .... I hadn't worked on a S&S for a while - the method I enjoy when I want to focus and find something recognizable from a page of freely tossed water and paint. I find the method relaxing, challenging and fun ... and so, anemones...

 

My garden tomatoes have gone gangbusters -- but the 5 vines I have are all the salad type tomatoes - especially Juliets and cherries. I have found over the years that the Juliets (those 2" grape shaped tomatoes) to be the very best for surviving North Carolina's extreme summer heat and humidity and most of all, semi-drought conditions. These last two weeks, we've had significant rain, and the vines are now over the porch rail making picking a challenge - it's like finding the jewels in the jungle ....

 

I've been dehydrating some tomatoes and mostly enjoying a simple meal of tomatoes and onions sauteed in butter and olive oil, flavored with basil, and served over spaghetti. My summertime favorite for a quick, light, easy to fix dinner or lunch.

 

We matted a few more paintings this weekend for an upcoming festival in August - a one-day event at one of my favorite retail nurseries. This is a first time event for them as well as for me, so we'll see how it goes.

 

I hope you have a super week!!!

a chat app can prove to be a boon in several other operations like retail, in-app messaging, social communication, private group connect and much more. The options are endless and are left only to the bounds of imagination.

 

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Proxy Falls taken with my Holga last Fall on the same day as this other shot captured with my Pentax 6x7.

 

Working retail as I do, I deal with a lot of different types of customers, most of those I sell cameras to though are students, relative newcomers when it comes to purchasing cameras. As such, a lot of what I do over the counter involves educating as well as selling. Or put another way, re-educating.

 

See, many people operate under a fair number of misconceptions when it comes to photography, and I want to take a bit of time tonight to combat one of them in particular; in order to take professional quality photographs you need professional quality cameras.

 

Frankly, if the person selling you a camera tells you this, it really means they are just trying to sell you something more expensive, that and they are probably paid on commission. And they would probably auction off a family member for the right price.

 

I know, many you already realize this is bogus thinking, nonetheless many of us succumb to it. There is something reassuring in knowing your camera has a price tag to rival your social security number. I mean, come on, if you have to skip two mortgage payments how can that camera NOT be good right? Well chances are it is a good camera. Doesn't mean it is the right camera for you though.

 

And I guess it all depends on how we define good. Oh boy, that is a topic that requires about three hours and four beers...

 

I always stress that it is how you USE the camera, not the camera itself that makes the most difference and I stand by that. If I sound like a broken record at times, it is merely because it is true and a very valuable lesson to learn. It is one of the things I try to demonstrate with my stream. I shoot five main cameras, though I cycle in others here and there. My main 35mm is my Nikon FM2n. In the store I work at, this camera costs $200 in perfect working order with a warranty. That $200 buys me a camera that will last for decades, will cost about $120 to refurbish when it wears out every 10-15 years or so and will stay in the family my entire life unless I drop it in the ocean as I seem to be more than capable of doing. Plus it takes images that are incredibly sharp and can be printed as large as 24x36 with a fairly high degree of quality. Sure I could have bought an F3 ($300-400), an F4 ($400), an F5 ($500) or an F6 ($1000 or more). Heck the F6 is the latest and greatest film camera out there. It does everything except sweep the kitchen floor. I have shot it, everytime you press the shutter it sounds like the camera is silkily whispering "damn fine shot". Then again, with the same lenses it will take the exact same quality image as my FM2. And sure, it is whiz-bang, but then again pretty much every automatic feature on cameras these days can be duplicated manually. These cameras don't allow you to do things less expensive and sophisticated cameras won't, they generally just tend to make those things quicker and easier. That is what all that extra money tends to buy you, speed and convenience, not necessarily better quality. More on that possibly in a bit.

 

My second camera, also my main landscape camera these days, is my Pentax 67. This was once a top of the line medium format camera. It produces large 6x7cm negatives with detail and resolution that still blow my mind. I would even go so far as to say it produces a higher resolution, sharper image than all but the most expensive of digital cameras can compete with. It also cost me $200. I am on my third one due to two unfortunate accidents. I have spent less than $700 combined on all three.

 

My third is my pinhole, brand new for $250. For those who are familiar with my pinhole images, not much more needs to be said. For those who are not, it is an incredibly interesting camera that captures a perspective unlike most other photography. All without the benefit of a lens, auto-focus, a meter of any kind, not a single gear, wire or circuit. It scoffs if you mention LCD in fact.

 

My fourth, which this image was taken with, is my Holga. $25. No, I am not missing a zero. It is a plastic toy camera that retails for about $25. Certainly not a perfect camera, but then again is there such a thing? No, there isn't. And if the person behind the counter tells you there is, well see the fourth paragraph above. I was down in Yosemite last year browsing the Ansel Adams gallery in the park, and there is a piece by a photographer named Ted Orland. It is an amazing work and though I do not remember the price on it, it was a lot and well worth it. It was taken with a holga.

 

My fifth is my Leica M3, which is a contradiction to the point I am trying to make, that camera sold for about $700. Though these days, that is about average for most DSLRs. Though honestly it is more of a specialty camera for me and of all the cameras listed above, is one of the ones that gets used the least.

 

I am not trying to trumpet my nifty frugalness or impress upon you my ability to not irrationally and impulsively spend my camera budget. The point I am trying to make is that it has always been, and always will be good photographers behind cameras that make good images. Note I have not attached any adjective to cameras, because none needs to be. To be blunt, a photographer is either skilled at what they do, or they are not, or they are somewhere in between hopefully moving towards the former and not the latter. A camera will not change this, though it may seem like it does. And true, cameras can help us see differently, they can help us take different pictures, but that is all they do at the most. Help. We take the pictures, good or bad, and it can be done on all cameras, expensive or not.

 

Buying the best camera is very very very rarely buying the more expensive camera. Rather it is a moderately tricky process of figuring out what you want to do as a photographer and buying the camera that is the best fit. Want to take odd, alternative artsy photos? Buy a holga, a lomo or a fish eye. Photojournalism? Then you probably want a rugged DSLR. Landscape with the intent to make murals? Medium or large format. Do you want something lightweight? You will want to buy a plastic camera (which will also break on you in a matter of a few years). Do you prefer a heavy and rugged camera for backpacking? Go with one of the SLRs of the 60s or 70s like a Minolta SRT or Pentax K1000. Want to try out medium format on a budget? Get a twin lens. A top notch Yashica Mat 124G can be found for $250 or less.

 

There are options, sometimes a seemingly overwhelming number of them. Start with yourself. Figure out what you need in a camera (much less than you might think). Plan how and where you will use a camera. Make a list and stick to it. Otherwise you are just going to be paying for a number of features you never actually get around to using. Expensive is not always the answer, but then again neither is cheap. It really revolves around your needs. You are matching a camera to yourself, not the other way around.

 

Anyway, hope that is somewhat intelligible. And hope you enjoy the photo. I find it interesting to compare the two images, both medium format, but one shot through a high end glass lens, the other a toy plastic camera. I like them both, a lot. And both are very different images taken from almost the exact same spot. That too is the beauty of different cameras, they allow photographers to realize different visions. Just remember, photography begins and ends with living, breathing human beings. Cameras are just means to that end.

  

Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

An empty retail space in the largest mall in America.

 

0091

Cool girl holding a mirror and getting ready for a party

City of Almere and MVRDV present Vision 2030

(Almere, June 26, 2009) Dutch new town Almere plans to grow with 60,000 houses, 100,000 working places and all related facilities. By this Almere will grow into the fifth city of the Netherlands in an effort to relief and to offer qualities to the urbanised west of the Netherlands. MVRDV was commissioned to collaborate with the city to design a concept structure vision to accommodate this growth. The growth will take place in four main areas: Almere IJ-land, a new island off the coast in the IJ-lake, Almere Pampus, a neighbourhood focussed on the lake and open to experimental housing, Almere Centre, an extended city centre surrounding the central lake, and Oosterwold, an area devoted to more rural and organic urbanism. Together the proposals form the new framework to accompany the growth of the city until 2030. Together with the entire board of city councilors and the mayor, Adri Duivesteijn, city councilor of Almere and Winy Maas of MVRDV, presented the concept structure vision to the ministers of Transport, Public Works and Water Management (V&W), Camiel Eurlings and minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment, Jacqueline Cramer (VROM) on June 26th. The design of IJland has been a collaboration with Adriaan Geuze of West8 and William McDonough of McDonough and Partners.

 

“The structure vision for Almere is more than an urban masterplan…” said Adri Duivesteijn, city councilor of Almere, “…it describes how the city can develop in economic, cultural and social terms. The expansion is not a quantitative effort. Even though the number of 60,000 new homes is impressive, the main objective is the addition of new qualities. Almere wants to serve the demand of the Randstad and at the same time needs the chance to develop into an ecologic, social and economically sustainable city”.

 

The Axis: Nowadays Almere is a city with 185,000 inhabitants, 30 years ago it was an empty stretch of land reclaimed from the sea. The growth will preserve and further expand Almere’s model of a poly-nuclear city. It will diversify the existing city by adding various densities, programs and characters that do not exist yet is the current situation,

The vision consists of four major development areas, each with their own character, logic and identity. These new area developments are connected by an infrastructural axis which connects the metropolitan area of Amsterdam with Almere. Between the two cities the Almere IJ-land (referring to IJ-lake) is a connector, literally as well as in economical and cultural perspective. The axis then leads to Almere Pampus, the Centre of Almere and Oosterwold in the east and will in the future be continued to connect Utrecht.

 

Almere IJ-land: Together with West 8 and William McDonough, MVRDV worked on the unique opportunity to design a series of urban and nature reserve islands. The new rail connection to Amsterdam and a needed ecological intervention in the IJ-lake offered the potential to propose the creation of a living area with 5,000 up to 10,000 homes, combined with this nature development. IJ-land combines ecological and infrastructural interventions with the possibility to live and work in a natural riparian environment. The island could also be part of the possible Dutch bid for the 2028 Olympic Games.

 

Almere Pampus: This area will combine the feeling of a coastal town with high density and make room for 20,000 homes, all streets are all leading to the boulevard at the lake. The existing maintenance harbour will be reused for leisure and floating villages. There will be a new train station with a plaza at the coast.

 

Almere Centre: The current centre will grow and extend to the southbank of the Weerwater , turning the central lake into the Weerwater-park and becoming in time the cultural and economical heart of the city. On the junction of the new axis, a motorway and the rail connection the motorway will be covered which makes it possible to develop up to 5,000 homes, offices and public amenities. The central station will be developed into an economical hub and will be surrounded with new program.

 

Almere Oosterwold: This large area in the east offers room for up to 18,000 new homes and a variety of functions such as business and retail centres. It will be developed following individual and collective initiatives, from small scale to large scale, with plots that are always surrounded by nature development, urban agriculture or local parks. The area will reserve areas for future development after 2030.

 

The vision 2030 is not a blueprint but a flexible development strategy. Duivesteijn: “It is a framework which can be filled in by the people of the city. By remaining flexible we create possibilities to adjust the plans to future opportunities.” Almere wants to develop according to this structure vision in order to become an ecological, social and economically sustainable city. For this large investments in infrastructure are needed to connect the city with in future 350,000 inhabitants to its surroundings and to Amsterdam

 

Winy Maas will remain involved in the further development of the concept structure vision in a supervising role. MVRDV has a long history of engagement with Almere: Earlier projects included two studies on new ways of organic urban development for Almere Hout and Almere Homeruskwartier, a study for the A6 Boulevard and the study for Pampus harbour, a neighbourhood of 500 floating dwellings. MVRDV’s Jacob van Rijs currently works on part of Olympiakwartier, a dense urban district of in total 220.000m2 mix use with public facilities.

 

When I immigrated to Canada at the age of 17 I went through a culture shock. The most differences between the Canadian society and the Iraqi society are the lack of commitment, and how lightly love is treated here. I first came to realize that commitment is not highly valued here at my first summer job: people simply didn't care about the company, the products they were producing, their co-workers, or the owners—they only wanted their pay checks. I don't even want to start talking about love here, because I don't know where to start and where to end! I just want to make one comment about love:

 

Love is not only a feeling, if it was our Lord Jesus Christ wouldn't command us to love our enemies (Matthew 5:44). Because when was the last time you felt love towards your enemy? So love is also a commitment: while a feeling is something you can't control, a commitment you certainly can. It is after you make the commitment to pray and do good to your enemies that the feeling of love may come.

 

I remember while I was new in Canada I watched on a Judge Judy show a woman suing her common-law husband who is 25 years old because he does not work or help her around the house because he only plays video games with his friends, while she takes care of their 2 children. I had to laugh when I heard that, as I was new to this concept of a 25 years old man who does nothing with his life but play video games! Then around that time I heard in the morning news that a man was wanted in a drive-by shooting related to gang wars, and they said he was 35 years old! I was very shocked to find out that a 35 years old man is still in a gang and he goes around shooting people! It took me few years to figure out what is going on to a high percentage of people here: people (both males and females, but it seems males have a higher percentage) seem to go through infancy, childhood, adolescence, but have such a hard time passing into adulthood. Let me give you an example:

 

Boys in Iraq when they grow up they are constantly reminded that one day they are going to be men. For example, when my brother-in-law (who is from Egypt) goes to do a business deal he takes my 6 years old nephew with him because he wants his son to see that life is not all playing and that it requires seriousness and responsibility. And we are also told to keep our word—that is if we say something we stick by it. Because Iraq is a cultural society a man's worth is valued by how he values his own words. Let's say a man promises his neighbour to help him fix his car in the evening. If evening comes and the man doesn't show up then he cannot be trusted, if he cannot be trusted then he is not dependable, which mean his services will not be required, and if you are not needed in the society then you are not important. This idea here is almost non-existing. At university for example students are constantly being formed into groups of about 5 people and have to work as a group to get a project done. It is almost always that one group member or more either doesn't show up to a meeting, or is late, or has not done his or her part. Many have no feelings of responsibility or commitment. Yet, those same students are expected to graduate in a year or so and become leaders of families and our society!

 

The problem lies in that most people live here by preference rather than convictions. Their thoughts pattern usually goes like this: I feel like it therefore I will do it, or I don't feel like it therefore I won't do it. People live by preferences when they are selfish and self centred. But living by convictions and commitments requires selflessness and sacrifice. And as Christians it is essential that we keep our words and promises. Because if we desire to be like our Lord then we have to be trustworthy, faithful, selfless, and committed like Him. It is essential that we live by convictions.

 

Imagine marriage run by feelings alone? Who feels like taking the garbage out? Who feels like changing diapers? Who feels like waking up 3 times a night to a crying child? Who feels like paying the mortgage? Who feels in love the same with their spouse after 30 years?

 

Another problem people face here is that at such a young age they engage in sexual immorality, and associate love with it, and experience rejection. If a person has had multiple sex partners by the time they are 20 years old, what value does marriage, love, or commitment have to them anymore? That's why it is so important that Christians raise their children on Biblical principles and enforce those principles.

 

I am not saying that in Iraq people don't break their promises, and people in Canada are not trustworthy, all I am saying is that the percentage of people who are untrustworthy, take love easily, and don't value commitment is much higher here. And I am not saying that if you promise something you have to always keep it. If you promise in your anger to commit a sin then don't do it. Or if you promise doesn't fit God's will then don't do it. And I am also not saying you should become like a machine living without feelings but by commands alone. The goal here is not to be become a perfectionist or ignore your humanity; the goal here is to be trustworthy, dependable, and not disappoint God and people as long as it depends on you. The idea here is to be a adult (responsible) man or woman.

 

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Few months ago I read in the February 2009 InTouch magazine a story of a Christian man's divorce that really touched me. I cried when I read it because the emotions he expressed were so true of a rejected, fooled, deceived, mistreated, and disesteemed person. The story reminded me of a movie that was based on a true story of a man committing adultery with his secretary, and then divorcing his completely unsuspecting wife to marry his mistress. The sad part of the story is that he only felt guilty for a while, while she had to live with the feelings of being rejected, unloved, unimportant, deceived, and had to deal with disappointment, shame and labels (because of society), and having no support in raising their sons for many years. On top of that, when holidays came her sons went to spend time with their dad while she stayed home alone. It is amazing how the actions of one person can harm another so greatly. Sometimes we think that the person who does the wrongdoings reaps the consequences for his or her actions immediately, but often times this is not the case and that the victim suffers for much longer. At least that's sometimes true here on earth, but in heaven everything is fair and no time is longer than an eternity in hell.

 

Sometimes people say that it takes two people to ruin a marriage. I don't believe in that: I think it needs only one person to ruin a marriage (of course, it can also take two people). You only need one hand to be missing for you not to be able to clap. Few years ago at work a woman discovered her husband was committing adultery with a co-worker who was 20 years his junior. The wife was very crushed. Then a co-worker told me that her sons say that she doesn't even cook at home. I answered her, "That's non-sense, if he was that hungry he should cook himself, order food, or take them out for dinner. How is food connected to adultery?" It seems that we humans love to blame the victim for the crime, but this doesn't please God.

 

I also know a very godly Iraqi man who loved a girl with all of his heart for 3 years. There was nothing he wouldn't do for her as long as it made her happy and it wasn't a sin. Then one day she told him that she couldn't marry him because he was a construction worker, and even though he made good money he was worth nothing because he doesn't have a degree. He was shocked when he heard her say that to him, because he wanted to marry her! After all those years, money spent and efforts from his part, and all that love, that's what she thought of him? Few months later he heard that she got married to a doctor. Six months later she sent him an e-mail apologizing, asking his forgiveness saying that she still loves him. He wrote her back with the supervision of his pastor and addressing her as "sister" saying that what happened has happened, and he prays for her and her husband, wishes them the best, and that he doesn't want her to contact him anymore because she is a married woman now. Since then I wondered: Why make a mess of your life? Why not value someone who you know in your heart that this person genuinely loves you? And we all know how difficult it is to find someone who loves you unconditionally and is committed to you. Why marry someone for the wrong reasons and regret it later? I want to say this to the ladies reading this:

 

There is nothing more attractive in a woman than knowing she is wise, and have a strong character. (That's why so many men find girls who wear glasses attractive!) It is a beautiful thing in a woman to have an independent character. And by independent I don't mean rebellious or that she doesn't respect other people's thoughts, but I mean to be dependent on God's Word and to know who she is in Him and what His will is and to live a godly life—that she is not easily persuaded to do things. I am saying this because in the Middle Eastern culture and even among many Christians, women seem to be so easily influenced by whatever a man says. When I get married, if it is God's will, I want my wife to have her own character, her own thoughts and to ask, "Is what my husband saying correct? Is it supported Biblically?" And if it is not then I would love for her to correct me. Just as I am supposed to be the man of the house, she is supposed to be my helper, and how can she helps me when she just duplicates my thoughts, and doesn't question my decisions?! Interestingly, the most independent in her thinking godly woman I know is also the best wife I know. The Bible says in Proverbs 31:

 

"{10} A wife of noble character who can find?

She is worth far more than rubies.

{11} Her husband has full confidence in her

and lacks nothing of value."

 

[How can a husband have full confidence in his wife if he knows she is easily influenced?]

 

"{13} She selects…. {14} She bringing…. {15} She gets up…she provides…. {16} She considers… she plants…. {17} She sets about her work…. {18} She sees that her trading is profitable…. {19} She holds…. {20} She opens her arms to the poor and extends her hands to the needy…. {21} She has no fear…. {22} She makes…. {25} She is clothed with strength and dignity; she can laugh at the days to come. {26} She speaks with wisdom, and faithful instruction is on her tongue."

 

[This is a woman has an independent mind and a strong character, works hard, and make profitable deals, she is confident and makes wise decisions, and her husband has confidence in her and is respected—that's a godly woman.]

 

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So for few months now I have decided to take a photo to illustrate the pain a man or a woman go through when the wife or the husband commit adultery. And yesterday at university with the help of few classmates I was able to take that photo. The photo is dedicated to William Ryder (whose story is posted below), and all wronged persons out there whose only crime is that they loved so purely that they didn't see evil coming.

 

I hope you like the photo and the writing :)

 

PS: The one thing I don't understand about adultery is how come it is not against the law! I mean, marriage is a contract and both parties agree on its terms and sign it, right? Then how come the breach of this contract is not against the law? I mean, if you do it in business you get sued and have to pay for it. So why is destroying a family, and the lives of the wife or husband, and the children is not punishable by law?

 

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This (unexpected) Life

Surviving the pain of labels and “good intentions”

by William Ryder

 

I will always remember that night with crystal clarity. We had just moved to a new city eleven days earlier to enable Amy, my wife of three years, to begin a Master’s program. Having graduated from seminary ten weeks prior, I was working a retail job while I searched for a church ministry position. Weary from a ten-hour workday framed by a one-hour commute, I slowly climbed the steps to our new apartment.

 

Inside, I sank gleefully into my favorite chair and turned my attention to Amy, who was sitting at the edge of the couch beside me. She nervously cleared her throat and said, “We need to talk.” I was not prepared for what came next. In what seemed like a single breath she said, “Well, I have not been very happy lately. I have been racking my brain trying to figure out why, and I think I’ve finally realized the truth. I don’t love you. I don’t have the feelings for you that I think a wife should have for her husband. I think marrying you was a mistake, and I don’t want to be married anymore.”

 

Wow. There was simply no response in my mind to what she had said. I was numb. I stood up and paced the floor as I desperately strove to work through this information. I understand that in most divorces, both parties usually see it coming; however, there is occasionally that hapless idiot who’s caught completely off guard. That was me, catching butterflies in left field while my wife decided she no longer loved me.

 

Almost immediately, Amy moved out of our apartment to stay with a friend. She would speak to me only through e-mails and, soon after, her attorney. I stayed there alone for several weeks, pleading with her to change her mind. However, two months after the initial bombshell, Amy had divorce papers drawn up, and I realized that our marriage was truly over. Knowing her decision was final, and because I had no job or friends in the new city, I agreed to leave town.

 

I remember walking through the apartment, trying to separate “my” things from “her” things. It was impossible—like reaching inside of a baked cake, trying to pull out the individual ingredients. No longer was there a unity of belongings, but rather a collection of two people’s possessions thrown together. Looking over all our stuff, I was no longer able to see any gray; everything was either black or white, hers or mine, staying or going.

 

As I made the last inspection after packing all of my things into a U-Haul, my attention paused at a framed wedding picture on the kitchen table. For a moment, I stopped breathing. Picking it up, I looked into the eyes of that beautiful bride, and I trembled. Returning the photograph to the table, I became painfully aware of the now-defunct piece of gold on my left hand. I slowly pulled the wedding band off my finger, gently kissed it, and sat it on the table beside the portrait. Then I turned, walked outside, and locked the door behind me. At that moment, in every way, I was a man with no home.

 

Weeks later, I suffered the tremendous indignity of piecing together the abhorrent truth behind Amy’s departure. Her “rational, adult decision” to leave our marriage was a sham; she’d actually been embroiled in an affair with another man for almost a year—one third of our marriage. This was the “friend” with whom she was staying while I pled for her to return. With this insight, my last hopes were destroyed, and I signed the divorce papers . . . two days before Thanksgiving.

 

This is my story. Tragic? Absolutely. Pitiful? Without a doubt. The real question, though, is, Why should you care about all of this? Why did I have to invite you into the darkest part of my private nightmares? The answer, sadly, is that if you do not have such a painful story yourself, you can be certain that you know someone who does. Roughly half of all marriages in America end in divorce; for born-again Christians, the percentage is, surprisingly, higher. Despite all of these “newly single” people populating American churches, the church in general has no idea how to react, relate, or respond to the needs of this heartbroken crowd.

 

I believe the first obstacle that must be conquered is a matter of identity. Let me explain: In the past few years, I have become painfully aware of how, when, and where the word “divorce” is used. It often appears in a checklist under the heading “Marital Status,” which gives people four options: single, married, widowed, or divorced. I’ve seen this in the most unexpected places, from a church visitor information card to an application for health insurance.

 

The issue is that people have grown accustomed to categorizing others according to certain “pegs” in their social life. The problem with this, however, is that there is no such thing as a “divorced person.” Divorce is an event, not a condition. My divorce was something that happened to me, a tragedy in my past. However, that misfortune should not characterize my whole life from now on.

 

The church can go a long way toward ministering to the expansive population of “new singles” by simply striking the word “divorced” from its vocabulary. Using the term as an adjective simply identifies an individual by a horrible event in his life. In this, saying, “Will is a divorced person” is tantamount to saying, “Frank is a pancreatic cancer person.” No one would be insensitive enough to say the latter, so why should it be acceptable to commonly say the former?

 

The most shocking and hurtful appearance of the “divorce check-box” that I have seen was actually church-related. I had taken myself out of the ministry search for almost a year while I worked through my divorce. Then, as I began to test the waters, I wrote to local denominational associations, asking for help in finding possible positions in their areas. One group mailed back a Personal Inventory Checklist to be stapled to my résumé. The checklist contained a brief list of yes/no questions that inquired about any involvement in child abuse, spousal abuse, and other indiscretions. There, wedged neatly between “Obscene/Harassment Phone Calls” and “Do you use illegal drugs?” was the question, “Have you been divorced?” It was then I realized that, in many people’s opinions, my new peer group consisted of wife beaters and child molesters. I completed the form, but obviously never heard from any church in that area.

 

Another problem is the “civilian’s” inability to understand what divorce does to a person. Unfortunately, many well-meaning people attempt to help their hurting friends by uttering the five most potentially destructive words imaginable: “Get on with your life.” This encouragement is built on the premise that their friend’s life is still there, but he has just removed himself from it. This is a mistake. Even though he may still be breathing, your friend’s life, for all intents and purposes, was terminated by his divorce.

 

Let me demonstrate this point from my own experience. For eight long, continuous years I worked hard in school, held a full-time job, took on various church leadership roles, got married, and began making long-term career and family plans. However, my wife’s actions effectively ended that life. In a real sense, my divorce murdered the man and the minister that I was becoming. I will simply never be that man again.

 

The miracle is that God has raised a new life from the ashes. I now have a new career and ministry that I adore. I honestly cannot imagine being happier doing anything else. Does this mean that my current life will always be second-string to what “might have been”? I don’t think so; however, I do know that this life came about only through time, patience, and the determined work of God. Do not be quick to urge the newly single person to “get on with his life”; he may actually be stuck between the old life and the new. Only the Holy Spirit and a hearty amount of patience will truly enable him to get on with his new life.

 

When my ordeal first began in August of 2000, I met with a trusted mentor—a minister who had been through a similar situation. He said something to me that I’ll never forget: “William, nothing I say can make this less painful. But I do know that if you get through a major crisis like divorce with your faith intact, you will understand some things about God that a lot of people never realize.” Now, looking back, I see that he was right. I have never been more aware of the enduring presence of the Holy Spirit than I have these past few years. I have never before known the complete joy and release of casting everything at the foot of the cross and coming to God with a broken heart and empty hands. Mostly, though, I never expected to actually like my new life, but God was more gracious than I ever imagined.

 

If you are standing where I have been, or if you love someone who is going through the whirlwind of divorce, do no expect any trite words of comfort and solace here. However, if you are a hurting individual who is crying out to God for the strength to endure, be encouraged by His response through the apostle Peter: “[Cast] all your anxiety upon Him, because He cares for you . . . And after you have suffered for a little while, the God of all grace, who called you to His eternal glory in Christ, will Himself perfect, confirm, strengthen and establish you” (1 Peter 5:7, 10). Even if the present seems insurmountable, you can trust that the future is wide open for your success, love, and happiness. How do I know? Because God said so, and because He has done it for me.

 

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Source: InTouch Magazine, February 2009

 

(Toronto, ON; fall 2009.)

 

The founding families of Sharon first settled on a flat plain bordering the Shenango River (this area is situated between two hills and is the current location of Sharon's downtown business district). According to local legend, the community received its name from a Bible-reading settler who likened the location to the Plain of Sharon in Israel.

Initially a center of coal mining, Sharon's economy transitioned to steelmaking and other heavy industry following the Industrial Revolution. Following the extensive national deindustrialization of the 1970s and 80's, the city's economy diversified and is now based primarily on light industry, education, health care, and social services.

NRHP District ~ Historic Downtown District

Designed in 1924 as a Lodge for the Order of the Elks, the building remains as one of the finest examples of the neo-classic revival style that grew in popularity during the 1920s. After the Elks left the building it operated as the Henry Clay Hotel for almost 40 years, then as a YWCA until 1988. This building was restored by City Properties and now has retail shops, condos, office space and rental space for events. This building is a great example of the adaptive reuse of a building, combining all the different uses into one property.

In an effort to improve its overall shopping experience, Oakbrook Center has undergone the largest renovation in its history; enhancing its common areas and expanding them to accommodate special events and social gatherings.

 

One of the Center’s noteworthy additions is a new vortex inspired water feature located at one of the complex’s main entrances. The fountain’s innovative design creates multiple effects with a single jet. The basin alternatively drains and fills, building up to form a bubbling pool before gradually ebbing away, revealing brightly illuminated columns of water arranged within the spiral. Over 50 of Crystal’s nozzles and LED lights entertain shoppers throughout the day.

Theater District, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

 

The Music Box Theater survives today as one of the historic playhouses that symbolize American theater for both New York and the nation. Constructed shortly after the end of World War I, the Music Box was built by producer Sam Harris to house Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues.

 

Sam Harris was a legendary Broadway producer, who first reached fame through his successful partnership with George M. Cohan, and then collaborated with Irving Berlin and later with Kaufman and Hart. Irving Berlin is among the greatest and best-known American songwriters of this century. Together they staged Berlin's Music Box Revues for the first five years of the 1920s.

 

C. Howard Crane was a nationally prominent theater architect when Harris and Berlin hired him, along with his associate E. George Kiehler, to design the Music Box. Besides his two Broadway houses (the Music Box and the Guild -- now the Virginia), he designed legitimate theaters and grand movie palaces in cities across the country, and later in England.

 

The Music Box Theater represents a special and important aspect of the nation's theatrical history. Beyond its historical importance, its facade is an unusually handsome Palladian-inspired design.

 

For over half a century, beginning with the Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues, the Music Box Theater has served as home to countless numbers of the plays through which the Broadway theater has come to personify American theater. As such, it continues to help define the Broadway theater district, the largest and most famous concentration of legitimate stage theaters in the world.

 

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

 

The development of the Broadway Theater District

 

The area of midtown Manhattan known today as the Broadway theater district encompasses the largest concentration of legitimate playhouses in the world. The theaters located there, some dating from the turn of the century, are significant for their contributions to the history of the New York stage, for their influence upon American theater as a whole, and in many cases for their architectural design.

 

The development of the area around Times Square as New York's theater district at the end of the 19th century occurred as a result of two related factors: the northward movement of the population of Manhattan Island (abetted by the growth of several forms of mass transportation), and the expansion of New York's role in American theater. The northward movement of Manhattan's residential, commercial, and entertainment districts had been occurring at a steady rate throughout the 19th century. In the early 1800s, businesses, stores, hotels, and places of amusement had clustered together in the vicinity of lower Broadway. As New York's various businesses moved north, they began to isolate themselves in more or less separate areas: the financial institutions remained downtown; the major retail stores situated themselves on Broadway between 14th and 23rd Streets, eventually moving to Herald Square and Fifth Avenue after the turn of the century; the hotels, originally located near the stores and theaters, began to congregate around major transportation centers such as Grand Central Terminal or on the newly fashionable Fifth Avenue; while the mansions of the wealthy spread farther north on Fifth Avenue, as did such objects of their beneficence as the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

The theater district, which had existed in the midst of stores, hotels, and other businesses along lower Broadway for most of the 19th century, spread northward in stages, stopping for a time at Union Square, then Madison Square, then Herald Square. By the last two decades of the 19th century, far-sighted theater managers had begun to extend the theater district even farther north along Broadway, until they had reached the area that was then known as Long Acre Square and is today called Times Square.

 

A district of farmlands and rural summer homes in the early 1800s, Long Acre Square had by the turn of the century evolved into a hub of mass transportation. A horsecar line had run across 42nd Street as early as the 1860s, and in 1871, with the opening of Grand Central Depot and the completion of the Third and Sixth Avenue Elevated Railways, it was comparatively simple for both New Yorkers and out-of-towners to reach Long Acre Square. Transportation continued to play a large part in the development of the area; in 1904 New York's subway system was inaugurated, with a major station located at 42nd Street and Broadway. The area was then renamed Times Square in honor of the newly erected Times Building. The evolution of the Times Square area as a center of Manhattan's various mass transit systems made it a natural choice for the location of legitimate playhouses, which needed to be easily accessible to their audiences.

 

The theater business that invaded Long Acre Square at the end of the 19th century consisted of far more than a few playhouses, for at that time New York was the Starting-point for a vast, nationwide entertainment

 

network known as "the road." This complex theater operation had its beginnings in the 1860s when the traditional method of running a theater, the stock system, was challenged by the growing popularity of touring "combination" shows. In contrast to the stock system, in which a theater manager engaged a company of actors for a season and presented them in a variety of plays, the combination system consisted of a company of actors appearing in a single show which toured from city to city, providing its own scenery, costumes, and sometimes musical accompaniment. Helped by the expansion of the nation's railroads after the Civil War, the combination system soon killed off the majority of stock companies. By 1904 there were some 420 combination companies touring through thousands of theaters in cities and towns across the country.

 

Of crucial importance to the operation of the combination system was a single location where combination shows could be cast, rehearsed, tried out, and then booked for a cross-country tour. Since New York was already regarded as the most important theater city in America, it is not surprising that it became the headquarters for the combination system. In addition to the many theaters needed for an initial Broadway production for the combinations before they went on tour, New York's theater district encompassed rehearsal halls, the headquarters of scenery, costume, lighting, and makeup companies, offices of theatrical agents and producers, theatrical printers and newspapers, and other auxiliary enterprises. Close to the theater district were boarding houses catering to the hundreds of performers who came to New York in the hope of being hired for a touring show or a Broadway production.

 

As theaters were built farther uptown, the auxiliary enterprises also began to move north. By the turn of the century,

 

the section of Broadway between 37th Street and 42nd Street was known as the Rialto. Theater people gathered or promenaded there. Producers could sometimes cast a play by looking over the actors loitering on the Rialto; and out-of-town managers, gazing out of office windows, could book tours by seeing who was available.^

 

The theater district that began to move north to Long Acre Square in the 1890s was thus a vast array of business enterprises devoted to every facet of theatrical production.

 

The movement of the theater district north along Broadway had proceeded at a steady pace during the latter part of the 19th century. The Casino Theater was opened on the southeast corner of Broadway and 39th Street in 1882. A year later, it was joined by a most ambitious undertaking--the construction of the Metropolitan Opera House on Broadway between 39th and 40th Streets. In 1888, the Broadway Theater was erected on the southwest corner of Broadway and 41st Street. Five years later, the American Theater opened its doors at Eighth Avenue between 41st and 42nd Streets, as did Abbey's Theater at Broadway and 38th Street and the Empire Theater at Broadway and Fortieth Street.

 

It remained for Oscar Hammerstein I to make the move into Long Acre Square itself. At the close of the 19th century, Long Acre Square housed Manhattan's harness and carriage businesses, but was little used at night,

 

when it seems to have become a "thieves' lair."^ In 1895 Hammerstein erected an enormous theater building on Broadway between 44th and 45th Streets. The original plan for the Olympia called for a "perfect palace of entertainment--which would have included three theaters, a bowling alley, a turkish bath, cafes and restaurants." Only part of this visionary plan ever became a reality. On November 25, 1895, Hammerstein opened the Lyric Theater section of the building, and a little over three weeks later he inaugurated the Music Hall section. Never a financial success, the Olympia closed its doors two years after it opened. Nevertheless, it earned Hammerstein the title of "Father of Times Square."

 

By the turn of the century Hammerstein had built two more theaters in the Long Acre Square area, and in the years 1901-1920 a total of forty-three additional theaters appeared in midtown Manhattan, most of them in the side streets east and west of Broadway. Much of this theater-building activity was inspired by the competition between two major forces in the industry, the Theatrical Syndicate and the Shubert Brothers, for control of the road. As each side in the rivalry drew its net more tightly around the playhouses it owned or controlled, the other side was forced to build new theaters to house its attractions. The result was a dramatic increase in the number of playhouses, both in New York and across the country. After World War I, as the road declined and New York's theatrical activity increased, the general economic prosperity made possible the construction of thirty additional playhouses in the Times Square area, expanding the boundaries of the theater district so that it stretched from just west of

 

Q

 

Eighth Avenue to Sixth Avenue, and from 39th Street to Columbus Circle.

 

The stockmarket crash of 1929 and the resulting Depression causec a shrinkage in theater activity. Some playhouses were torn down, many were converted to motion picture houses, and later to radio and television studios. From the time of the Depression until the 1960s no new Broadway playhouses were constructed. Fortunately, the theaters that survive from the early part of the century represent a cross - section of types and styles, and share among them a good deal of New York's rich theatrical history.

 

Evolution of Theater Design

 

The frenzy of theater construction that occurred in New York during the first thirty years of this century brought with it an evolution in architecture and decoration. At the close of the 19th century American theaters were still being built in the style of traditional European opera houses, with high proscenium arches, narrow auditoriums, two or three balconies built in a horseshoe configuration, and dozens of boxes, some set into the front of the first balcony. Although contemporary notices of the theaters attributed specific (though often vague) styles or periods to them, their interiors were more often than not a melange of styles and colors.

 

With the increase of theater construction after the turn of the century came a new attitude toward theater architecture and decoration as firms such as Herts and Tallant, Thomas W. Lamb, and others, began to plan the playhouse's exterior and interior as a single, integrated design. The

 

Art Nouveau style New Amsterdam Theater, which opened in 1903, signalled this new seriousness in theater design.

 

Perhaps influenced by such European experiments as Wagner's Festival Theater at Bayreuth, American theater architects after the turn of the century began to structure their playhouses along different lines. Proscenium openings were made lower and wider, auditoriums were made shallower, seating was planned in a fan shape, and the number of balconies was usually reduced to one. Boxes were cut back to a minimum. The theaters that were built just before and after World War I for the most part shared this new configuration.

 

Because many of New York's extant playhouses were built during the period in which New York was serving as the starting-point for nationwide tours, they represent a style of theater architecture that is characteristic not only of New York but also of other cities across the United States, for a show which was originally produced in a New York theater would require similar conditions in the theaters in which it toured, and theater owners often hired the same architects to design and build theaters in several cities. Thus, New York's theaters set the standard for theater construction across the United States, as an inspection of designs for theaters in various cities will show.

 

The Broadway Theater in American Theatrical History

 

The playhouses scj.ll standing in the Broadway theater district share among them over eighty years of American theatrical history. In the early years of the century, when American theater was still heavily influenced by Europe, the theaters played host to such great international stars as Sarah Bernhardt, Eleonora Duse, and Mrs. Patrick Campbell, and to adaptations of such European successes as The Merry Widow and Floradora.

 

It was in the Broadway theaters that the beginnings of a distinctly American drama could be seen in the Western melodramas of David Belasco, the social comedies of Clyde Fitch and Langdon Mitchell, and the problem plays of Edward Sheldon and Eugene Walter. With the rise of the "little theater" movement in the second decade of the century, it seemed that theatrical leadership had passed from Broadway to such experimental "art" theaters as the Provincetown Playhouse and the Neighborhood Playhouse. Before long, however, the innovations of the little theaters infused Broadway with new life. Beginning with the production of Eugene O'Neill's first full-length play, Beyond the Horizon, on Broadway in 1920, the playhouses of Broadway presented the work of a new generation of playwrights, including, in addition to O'Neill, Maxwell Anderson, Philip Barry, S.N. Behrman, Rachel Crothers, Sidney Howard, George S. Kaufman, George Kelly and Elmer Rice.

 

The Depression of the 1930s brought with it a new concern with political and social issues, and the dramas presented in the Broadway playhouses reflected that concern. Commercial producers gave us plays by Lillian Hellman, Robert E. Sherwood, and Thornton Wilder, whle the Group Theater and other new organizations introduced such writers as Clifford Odets and Sidney Kingsley. The Broadway theaters continued to house

 

challenging plays during the 1940s and 1950s, when new talents such as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Killer, and William Inge first began writing for the theater.

 

Meanwhile, musical comedy had blossomed from the adaptations and imitations of European operetta popular at the turn of the century to a uniquely American art form. By the 1940s and 1950s the works of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, and many others, were being exported from the stages of Broadway to theaters around the world.

 

The 1960s and 1970s were decades of ferment and change, both in and out of the theater. As in the 1920s, the impetus for theatrical experimentation came from outside of Broadway, and as in the 1920s, the experimentation helped to revitalize the Broadway theater. Today, the playhouses of Broadway are showcases for the best plays of the Off- and Off-Off Broadway theaters, as well as for exciting productions from theatrical workshops, regional theaters, and outstanding foreign companies.

 

Having moved gradually northward all during the 19th century, New York's theater district finally came to rest at Times Square, where it has remained for almost ninety years. The economic Depression of the 1930s discouraged speculative ventures such as the construction of new theaters, while after prosperity returned in the wake of World War II, the cost of renting land and constructing a theater was prohibitively high. The northward movement of the theater district may also have been discouraged for a number of years by the existence of the Sixth Avenue Elevated Railway, which crossed from Sixth to Ninth Avenues 53rd Street, thereby providing a natural northern boundary for the theater district.

 

The Music Box Theater, as one of the Broadway playhouses surviving today in the theater district, contributes to the totality of the district's history by virtue of its participation in that history.

 

Irving Berlin and Sam H. Harris

 

The Music Box was built for Sam Harris and Irving Berlin, legendary Broadway figures who each played an important role in shaping the history of American theater entertainment. Sam Harris was a soft-spoken, behind-the-scenes genius whose percentage of hits is still one of the highest in Broadway history.^ Irving Berlin is one of the great American

 

songwriters of this century. Together they created the Music Box Theater and made it what one writer called "the home of the hits!"

 

Sam Harris, a native New Yorker, was born February 3, 1872, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. He left school at the age of fourteen, and by the age of seventeen was organizing local holiday entertainment and athletic exhibitions. Harris also raised thoroughbred racing horses and promoted prize fighters, including the featherweight champion of 1897, "Terrible Terry" McGovern. The enterprising Harris figured "Terrible Terry" could do more than just box in the ring, so beginning in 1898 he had McGovern delivering punch lines on the stage, first in The Bowery After Dark, a financial success which went on to tour the country, and then in The Gay Morning Glories, not nearly as popular.

 

In 1904, Sam Harris began a lengthy collaboration with composer George M. Cohan. Their first great success was Little Johnnie Jones. It was Cohan's show; he acted in it and wrote the music, including the songs "Give My Regards to Broadway." Harris, however, knew better than anyone the

 

business end of good popular entertainment; together Cohan and Harris are still regarded as one of the most successful teams in Broadway history.

 

Harris also controlled several theaters with Cohan: in 1913, they built the Bronx Opera House on East 149th Street and Third Avenue (extant), and together they took control of the Cohan and Harris Theater. Their personal lives were linked through their marriages to sisters, Alice Nolan (Harris's first wife), and Agnes Nolan (Cohan's wife). Their partnership eventually dissolved over a disagreement during the actors' strike which preceded the formation of Actors' Equity in 1920. Despite their feud, Cohan and Harris remained good friends and even revived their partnership in 1937 to produce one more show, Fulton of Oak FalIs.

 

When Harris parted with Cohan, he joined Irving Berlin in the Music Box Theater project. In addition to Berlin, Harris went on to collaborate with George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart on a number of productions, including Once In a Lifetime, Dinner At Eight, and The Man Who Came To Dinner. Three of his productions won Pulitzer Prizes: Icebound in 1923, Of Thee I Sing in 1932, and You Can't Take It With You in 1937. Harris died in 1941, a successful and respected stage figure whose name, Max Gordon once said, "stood for impeccable taste and something called for lack of a better word, 'class.'"

 

Irving Berlin, still alive today at the age of 99, has been one of the most versatile and popular songwriters of the twentieth century. Born May 11, 1888, in Eastern Russia, Israel Baline immigrated to the United States with his family in 1892 when he was only four years old."* His first published song (1907) was "Mario From Sunny Italy." A printer's error on the cover spelled his name I. Berlin, and he kept the name. Unable to read music and without any formal training, Berlin nonetheless has had over 1500 songs published, many of them internationally known. He can play the piano only in the key of F-sharp, and even has a special instrument furnished with a clutch that enables him to switch automatically to any key.

 

At the beginning of his career, Irving Berlin was a "Tin Pan Alley" pioneer, helping to win wide acceptance for ragtime jazz and the accompanying dance craze. His first great musical success, "Alexander's Ragtime Band," became an international hit when vaudeville star Emma Carus introduced its syncopated march rhythms to Chicago audienpes in 1911. By 1915, the song had sold over two million sheet copies and Berlin had become identified in the public mind with ragtime.

 

In 1914 Berlin wrote his first complete score for the Vernon and Irene Castle revue Watch Your Step that popularized "Play a Simple Melody." At that time he was also performing in vaudeville, appearing at such theaters as the London Hippodrome, where he was billed as the "king of ragtime." Drafted into the army in 1918, Berlin wrote and starred in Yip-Yip Yaphank, a service musical in which he first introduced "I Hate to Get Up in the Morning."

 

In 1919, the songwriter formed his own musical publishing company, Irving Berlin, Inc. During the 1920s Berlin wrote for a number of revues including the Ziegfeld Follies of 1920 and 1927 and his own Music Box Revues of 1921-24. In 1925, he scored his first musical comedy, The Cocoanuts, for the Marx Brothers. His work took on a more sober tone in

 

the early 1930s with two political satires, Face the Music (1932) and As Thousands Cheer (1933), the latter featuring his holiday classic, "Easter Parade." In 1935 Berlin began writing for the movies. Bing Crosby, Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland owed some of their greatest hits to him. Top Hat (1935) featured Rogers and Astaire dancing to "Isn't This a Lovely Day" and "Cheek to Cheek," Crosby introduced "White Christmas" in Holiday Inn (1942), and Garland and Astaire walked up the avenue in Easter Parade (1948). On Broadway, Berlin was particularly identified with Ethel Merman who starred in his greatest hit Annie Get Your Gun (1944) and later spoofed Perle Mesta in Call Me Madam (1950).

 

In 1954 Berlin went into retirement. He returned to Broadway in 1962 with the score for Mr. President, a great popular success despite a lukewarm reception from the critics. In 1955, President Eisenhower presented Berlin with a gold medal "in recognition of his services in composing warm patriotic songs," the most famous of these being "God Bless America."

 

(PD, GH)

 

C. Howard Crane and E. George Kiehler

 

During a career that spanned almost fifty years, Charles Howard Crane designed more than two hundred theaters in the United States and some 125 more in Canada and Great Britain. Among the most widely publicized of these were his only two Broadway playhouses, the Music Box (1921) and the Guild (later the ANTA, currently the Virginia; 1924-25). Quite different from each other in appearance - - the GuiId is mode 1 ed on a Tuscan villa while the Music Box is severely Palladian in style -- both theaters display Crane's academically correct eclecticism. Crane believed that

 

theaters ought to exemplify architecture as an art of dramatization. Unlike many other theater architects of the time, who blended various historical elements into a personal style, Crane never developed a "signature" in his work.

 

Born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1885, Crane began his career in that city in 1904. He moved to Detroit in 1905 where he apprenticed himself to Albert Kahn. Only a year later he had become the chief draftsman for the firm of Field, Hynchman & Smith, and by 1909 he had established his own practice. His expertise in theater design and construction, and specifically in acoustics, gained him a solid reputation and kept his services in constant demand, particularly during the 1920s. At one time he employed fifty-three draftsmen who assisted him with projects in almost every major American city. In Detroit alone, he designed almost fifty theaters, the most heralded two being the Majestic (1917) and Orchestra Hall (1919).

 

Crane employed two senior associates: Ben A. Dore, chief designer in the Detroit office, who collaborated on, or was in charge of, many mid-western projects' and Kenneth Franzheim (1891-1959), who ran Crane's New York City office. Two well publicized examples of Crane and Franzheim's collaboration were the twin Selwyn and Harris Theaters in Chicago. Archie and Edgar Selwyn, both prominent New York producers, commissioned one; and Sam Harris, impressed with his architect's 1921 Music Box design, commissioned Crane to build the other. The two separate but adjoining structures were roughly the same size and consisted of similarly fashioned Renaissance style facades. Another Crane and Franzheim collaboration was the Capitol Theater and Office Building in Boston in 1926. This elaborate design incorporated a two-story Ionic colonnaded facade into a standard fourteen-story office tower with an extremely plush and decorative interior. E. George Kiehler was also a collaborator on some of Crane's theater projects, including the Music Box, but his specific contributions are not known.

 

At the height of Crane's career, shortly before the Depression, many American film studios and theater corporations had attained their greatest financial and popular success. Individual theaters and theater chains became one part of an expanding entertainment empire. Beginning in 1925, for example, the Fox Theater Corporation embarked on a campaign to build or acquire what would amount to 800 theaters by the year 1929. Crane alone was commissioned by Fox to design twenty-five new theaters. Two of them, the Detroit Fox and the St. Louis Fox, both completed in 1928, were among the largest theaters in the country. Typically for Crane, the style of the Detroit Fox blended East Indian, Byzantine and Baroque motifs. Another similar theater in the Fox chain, the Brooklyn Fox, also by Crane in 1928, had a seating capacity of 4,305, and became a famous showcase for first-run motion pictures.

 

United Artists took advantage of Crane's talents too in 1927 when they commissioned him to design the Spanish Gothic style United Artists Theater in Los Angeles. With a lobby that resembled a vaulted Spanish cathedral, the theater also featured intricate tracery and a mirrored auditorium ceiling.^

 

In 1932, one of the worst years of the Depression, Crane moved to Europe, first to Milan where he designed Italy's first skyscraper, then to London where he settled permanently. Although his reasons for leaving the United States remain unclear, Crane continued to build theaters in England and maintained his office in Detroit. Perhaps his greatest architectural challenge, and certainly his finest engineering accomplishment, resulted in 1937 in his Earl's Court Exhibition Hall, sports and amusement center. Faced with a triangular twelve-acre site above a network of railway tracks, Crane created a modern curvilinear structure with a 118-foot high arena and five exhibition halls which could be opened into one vast amphitheater seating 30,000. It also featured an Olympic-sized swimming pool which could be raised, frozen for skating, or used as a stage or playing field. All this, it Is said, was erected without stopping a single train below the construction.

 

During and after World War II, Crane rechanneled his efforts into industrial design while working on the rebuilding of London factories and the modernization of other British plants. He continued to visit the United States frequently to lecture, but resided in London until his death there in 1952.

 

(PD, FD)

 

The Music Box Theater

 

According to one account, Sam Harris first mentioned his interest in building a theater to Irving Berlin in 1919. Berlin responded, "If you ever do, I have a great title for you." "A title for a song?" asked Harris. "No, a title for a theater, the Music Box," replied Berlin.

 

The following year Harris joined with Berlin to build the Music Box Theater, shortly after the termination of Harris's partnership with George M. Coh an. Harris built the Music Box Theater specifically to house Berlin's Music Box Revues. (Harris and Berlin were joined in the venture by a mutual friend, motion picture magnate Joseph Schenck, who soon after the theater's completion sold his interest to the Shubert Organization.) A site on 45th Street was purchased from the Astor Realty Co., and on September 22, 1921 the Music Box Theater opened with an extravaganza Berlin wrote especially for the new house. The property cost $400,000, the building $600,000, and more than $240,000 was spent for Hassard Short to produce and stage the first show. Theatre Magazine's reviewer obviously thought the expense well worthwhile, for he proclaimed Berlin's Music Box Revue and the Music Box theater "a wonderful new show in a superlatively beautiful new theatre.""*

 

For another reviewer the theater and show were "the most eye-filling and appealing combination of play and playhouse that local playgoers accustomed as they are to things gorgeous theatrically -- have ever been treated to." "Say It With Music" became Berlin's theme song for the theater and for his Music Box Revues of 1921, 1922, 1923, and 1924.

 

The Music Box was one of the small number of theaters built in the 1920s for an individual producer, rather than for a large organization like the Shuberts or the Chanins. Harris and Berlin turned to C. Howard Crane for an unusual and individual design that would mark the theater as the home of Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues.

 

Crane's design for the Music Box combined Palladian and Adamesque motifs from an architectural tradition that was essentially English and neo-Georgian. Its most prominent feature was a delicate limestone Ionic

 

colonnade screening the gallery, with pedimented doorways and finely designed lanterns. The bays on either side were framed by double pilasters and punctuated by Palladian windows on the second level, and a single window on the third. The theater was then crowned by a mansard roof with four dormer windows and a decorative wrought-iron balustrade running the length of the 100 foot theater. As described by the contemporary architectural press:

 

The delicate limestone colonnade and gallery with its finely designed doorways and lanterns is the central feature. Pylon like at the sides the structural masses give strength and proportion to the design and the mansard roof with its dormer windows and balustrades is decidedly a crowning feature. The freedom of the front from the blatant electric advertising sign is a relief. Two signs of small size designed and proportioned in keeping with the whole scheme proclaim the purpose of the building and the marquise-a concession to the needs of a stormy night-is so submerged as not to obtrude to the detriment of the composition.

 

The overall effect of Crane's design for the Music Box was distinctly domestic. The combination of Palladian and neo-Georgian elements was suggestive of a grand country house. Such an approach was not new to the

 

theater district; a number of earlier theaters built as headquarters/homes for theatrical impresarios followed similar themes. David Belasco's Stuyvesant Theater (today the Belasco) used a neo-Georgian facade to suggest an Intimate, if luxurious, 1ivingroom housing his productions. Winthrop Ames's Little Theater used a similarly styled facade to suggest a domestic home for his intimate "little theater" productions, and his architects, Ingalls & Hoffman, did something similar for Henry Miller's Theater a few years later. Contemporary with the Music Box was the Theater Guild's home (also designed by Crane), whose Italian pa1azzo-inspired facade deliberately evoked the homes of the Renaissance princes who patronized the theatrical arts. This connection between neo-Georgian architecture and intimate theater appears to have been generally understood at the time, and a contemporary architectural periodical noted of the Music Box:

 

This small theatre seats one thousand and is designed for the so-called "intimate" production. This idea is well carried into the design by the use of the style of the Georgian period following the delicacy of domestic architecture more than the monumental.

 

From the first the Broadway critics were impressed with the beauty and refinement of the Music Box's design. Jack Lait of Variety called it "the daintiest theatre in America," and the Evening Telegram's reviewer dubbed it "a theatre unparalleled....so beautiful and so satisfying that its like is not to be found here or even on the continent.." For the Herald's reviewer the Music Box's facade provided a welcome contrast to the more mundane theater buildings then going up in the Broadway area:

 

The audience which gathered to witness the brilliant opening of the Music Box last night had its first surprise on approaching the building. The new theater actually has a front -- it even deserves to be called a facade -- Vith pillars and other dignified architectural decorations....

 

The architectural press was equally enthusiastic, though perhaps less colorful in its praise. A number of journals published photos, plans, and descriptions of the Music Box. The American Architect-Architectural Review devoted eight pages to Crane's playhouse in the February 1, 1922, issue, calling it one of the most "artistic additions to New York's large number of theaters." The journal added "how remarkable" the Music Box was "for the quiet dignity of its desien and in its plan for those elements of comfort and luxurious ease____"

 

A few years later in the American Spirit in Architecture, Talbot Hamlin ranked the Music Box "among the most beautiful of modern theaters" saying:

 

It is in a modernized Adam style, and borrows much from our own native tradition in its quiet wall and roof surfaces and its delicately proportioned loggia. Proportion, detail, atmosphere make its facade a true ornament to the city, and prove that gayety is quite compatible with repose and dignity.

 

Berlin presented a Music Box Revue in each of the next four years. He moved on to other creative projects after 1925 but maintained his controlling interest with Sam Harris in the Music Box Theater. Their careful supervision of outside productions using the theater gave the Music Box an outstanding performance record: in its first twenty-five years only three shows ran less than 100 performances.

 

Today Irving Berlin retains a share in the ownership of the Music Box Theater -- "What the hell does a songwriter want with a theater?" he said in 1971. "I've sold real estate, but I've held on to the Music Box. It's a sentimental interest." The Music Box remains remarkably intact inside and out, its facade largely unaltered from the day it was built.

 

The Music Box as a Playhouse^

 

Irving Berlin's Music Box Revues occupied the Music Box Theater for its first four years. The Mail called the Revue of 1922 "four hours of jazz, girls, gorgeous costuming, spectacles that at times were dazzling, dancing acrobatics, arui all the hurly-burly of color movement associated with its predecessor."

 

The first straight play produced at the Music Box following Berlin's Revues was The Cradle Snatchers (1925), whose cast included the young Humphrey Bogart. Two more hit comedies followed, Chicago with Charles Bickford and Francine Larrimore in 1926 and Philip Barry's Paris Bound with Hope Williams in 1927. Music returned to the theater in 1928 with Cole Porter's Paris starring the glamorous Irene Bordoni. The following year Clifton Webb, Fred Allen and Libby Holman appeared in the Little Show revue. In 1931, the third edition of this series also appeared at the Music Box featuring Bea Lillie's rendition of Noel Coward's "Mad Dogs and Englishmen." For the most part, however, during the 'thirties the Music Box was given over to the the works of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart who either together or in collaboration with others supplied the house with one hit after another. The decade opened with Kaufman and Hart's first joint effort,

 

Once in a Lifetime, a Hollywood satire with Jean Dixon that convulsed audiences for 410 performances. Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind collaborated on the Music Box's next production, the Gershwin musical Of Thee Sing, which ran 446 performances in 1931-32 and won the first Pulitzer Prize awarded to a musical. Subsequent productions involving Kaufman or Hart included Dinner at Eight (1932, Kaufman and Edna Ferber), As Thousands Cheer (1933, book by Hart), Merrily We Roll Along (19 34, Kaufman and Hart), First Lady (1935, Kaufman and Katherine Dayton), Stage Door (19 36, Kaufman and Ferber) and The Man Who Came to Dinner (19 39, Kaufman and Hart). Kaufman also directed all of the above productions as well as John Steinbeck's dramatization of his novel Of Mice and Men which won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award in 1938.

 

Following the death of Sam Harris in 1941 the Music Box was leased to independent producers on a show-by-show basis. Continuing to attract strong productions, it retained its reputation as one of the most successful theaters on Broadway. Contributing to this success was Mike Todd's Star and Garter, a rowdy revue starring Gypsy Rose Lee that racked up an impressive 605 performances in 1942-43. Rodgers and Hammerstein's productions of John Van Druten's I Remember Mama also enjoyed great success with 714 performances in 1944-45. The young Marlon Brando made his Broadway debut in this production which also starred Mady Christians and Oscar Homolka. Other notable productions from the forties included Tennessee Williams' Summer and Smoke (1948) and the Maxwell Anderson-Kurt Weill musical Lost in the Stars (1949).

 

The fifties were marked by a happy association between the Music Box and playwright William Inge who supplied the theater with three hits: the Pulitzer Prize winning Picnic (1953), Bus Stop (1954), and Dark at the Top £f the Stairs (1958). Other highlights of the 'fifties included Separate Tables which featured a Tony Award-winning performance by actress Margaret Leighton, and Five Finger Excercise which won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for best foreign play of the 1959/60 season.

 

During the 1960s the Music Box housed a number of distinguished dramas, inc luding A Far Country (1961) with Steven Hill and Kim Stanley, and The Homecoming (1967) with Ian Holm and Vivien Merchant. Its most popular attraction, however, was a romantic comedy Any Wednesday (1964) which ran 983 performances and and garnered paeans of praise from the critics for actress Sandy Dennis.

 

Two thrillers dominated the 1970s, Anthony Shaffer's Sleuth (1970), a British import with Anthony Quayle and Keith Baxter, and Ira Levin's Deathtrap (1978), the Music Box's longest running play to date. In addition there was another long running comedy with Sandy Dennis, Absurd Person Singular (1974), and a revue of songs by Stephen Sondheim, Side by Side by Sondheim (1977), with Millicent Martin and Julie McKenzie. In recent years the Music Box has housed the stark drama Agnes of God (1983) with Elizabeth Ashley, Geraldine Page and Amanda Plummer, a charming revival of Noel Coward's Hay Fever (1985) with Rosemary Harris and Roy Dotrice, and a critically acclaimed production by the Royal Shakespeare Company of Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1987).

 

The success of the Music Box as a theater may be best summarized in the words of Moss Hart:

 

The Music Box is everybody's dream of a theatre. If there is such a thing as a theatre's making a subtle contribution to the play being given on its stage, the Music Box is that theatre. Except for the Haymarket Theatre in London, I know of no other that possesses so strong an atmosphere of its own, as living and as personal, as the Music Box. Even in broad daylight, as we stepped inside its doors and into its darkened auditorium, there was an undefinable sense that here the theatre was always at its best.

 

Description

 

The Music Box Theater has a symmetrically-organized facade which is wider than it is high. The ground floor, which is of stone (with concrete infill and patches) is dominated by its doorways. Four pairs of original bronze and glass doors adorned with curvilinear motifs, lead into the ticket lobby at the right (east). These are flanked by original bronze -painted wood and glass signboards, framed by colonnettes with grotesques and crowned by stylized pediments (of sheetmetal over wood) composed of waves f 1 ank ing lyres in wreath surrounds. A modern marquee extends out over the entrance doors. Three pairs of original bronze and gl ass exit doors from the auditorium are flanked by similar s ignboards of bronze -painted iron, and doorways, that to the east with a single door, and that to the west with a decorative painted wrought - iron gate at the foot of the fire stairs. Decorative iron railings flank the two granite steps leading from the gate. Two large original iron signboards are placed on the wall adjacent to the recessed paired bronze stage doors.

 

A single bronze stage door in an iron frame is at the western end. These two stage door openings flank a single original sign board. The ground floor is surmounted by a cornice with a wide Adamesque frieze containing vertical ribs, urns, and swags. The major portion of the facade, rising from the ground floor base, is faced with stone and is organized into a colonnaded center section with flanking end bays. Double-height fluted columns with stylized Corinthian capitals are linked by wrought-iron railings with cast-iron panels which shield a recessed portion of the facade. The gallery thus created serves as the exit for a set of fire stairs at the east and for the three doorways from the balcony level of the auditorium. These doorways have pane led doors and are surmounted by entablatures with urn- and swag-adorned friezes supporting triangular pediments (at the outer doors) and a scrol led broken pediment with pineapple finial (at the center door). Three wrought-iron and glass lanterns are suspended from the ceiling of the gallery. The end bays are flanked by pilasters with stylized Corinthian capitals.

 

A Palladianesque window with fan-filled tympanum is placed at the second floor of each bay. The windows have multi-paned casement sash. At the third floor of each bay is a window with a simple molded surround. The sash are mul ti-paned casements. A vertical sign projects from the wall of the eastern bay. An entablature with rosette-adorned frieze, dentils, and modi 11ioned cornice spans the facade. This is surmounted by a slate -covered sloping roof punctuated by round-arched sheetmetal dormers with multi-paned sash. Wrought - and cast - iron railings are placed above the cornice and at the roofline.

 

- From the 1987 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

The Sydney Opera House is a multi-venue performing arts centre in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Situated on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour, close to the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the facility is adjacent to the Sydney central business district and the Royal Botanic Gardens, between Sydney and Farm Coves.

 

Designed by Danish architect Jørn Utzon, the facility formally opened on 20 October 1973 after a gestation beginning with Utzon's 1957 selection as winner of an international design competition. The Government of New South Wales, led by the premier, Joseph Cahill, authorised work to begin in 1958 with Utzon directing construction. The government's decision to build Utzon's design is often overshadowed by circumstances that followed, including cost and scheduling overruns as well as the architect's ultimate resignation.

 

Though its name suggests a single venue, the project comprises multiple performance venues which together are among the busiest performing arts centres in the world — hosting over 1,500 performances each year attended by some 1.2 million people. The venues produce and present a wide range of in-house productions and accommodate numerous performing arts companies, including four key resident companies: Opera Australia, The Australian Ballet, the Sydney Theatre Company and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. As one of the most popular visitor attractions in Australia, more than seven million people visit the site each year, with 300,000 people participating annually in a guided tour of the facility.

 

Identified as one of the 20th century's most distinctive buildings and one of the most famous performing arts centres in the world, the facility is managed by the Sydney Opera House Trust, under the auspices of the New South Wales Ministry of the Arts. The Sydney Opera House became a UNESCO World Heritage Site on 28 June 2007.

 

The facility features a modern expressionist design, with a series of large precast concrete "shells", each composed of sections of a sphere of 75.2 metres (246 ft 8.6 in) radius,[12] forming the roofs of the structure, set on a monumental podium. The building covers 1.8 hectares (4.4 acres) of land and is 183 m (600 ft) long and 120 m (394 ft) wide at its widest point. It is supported on 588 concrete piers sunk as much as 25 m (82 ft) below sea level.

 

Although the roof structures are commonly referred to as "shells" (as in this article), they are precast concrete panels supported by precast concrete ribs, not shells in a strictly structural sense. Though the shells appear uniformly white from a distance, they actually feature a subtle chevron pattern composed of 1,056,006 tiles in two colours: glossy white as well as matte cream. The tiles were manufactured by the Swedish company Höganäs AB which generally produced stoneware tiles for the paper-mill industry.

 

Apart from the tile of the shells and the Bradfield Highway. Significant interior surface treatments also include off-form concrete, Australian white birch plywood supplied from Wauchope in northern New South Wales, and brush box glulam.

 

Of the two larger spaces, the Concert Hall is in the western group of shells, the Joan Sutherland Theatre in the eastern group. The scale of the shells was chosen to reflect the internal height requirements, with low entrance spaces, rising over the seating areas up to the high stage towers. The smaller venues (the Drama Theatre, the Playhouse and the Studio) are within the podium, beneath the Concert Hall. A smaller group of shells set to the western side of the Monumental Steps houses the Bennelong Restaurant. The podium is surrounded by substantial open public spaces, and the large stone-paved forecourt area with the adjacent monumental steps is regularly used as a performance space.

 

The Sydney Opera House includes a number of performance venues:

 

Concert Hall: With 2,679 seats, the home of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and used by a large number of other concert presenters. It contains the Sydney Opera House Grand Organ, the largest mechanical tracker action organ in the world, with over 10,000 pipes.[citation needed]

Joan Sutherland Theatre: A proscenium theatre with 1,507 seats,[17] the Sydney home of Opera Australia and The Australian Ballet. Until 16 October 2012 it was known as the Opera Theatre.

Drama Theatre: A proscenium theatre with 544 seats, used by the Sydney Theatre Company and other dance and theatrical presenters.

Playhouse: An end-stage theatre with 398 seats.

Studio: A flexible space with a maximum capacity of 400, depending on configuration.

Utzon Room: A small multi-purpose venue, seating up to 210.

Recording Studio

Outdoor Forecourt: A flexible open-air venue with a wide range of configuration options, including the possibility of utilising the Monumental Steps as audience seating, used for a range of community events and major outdoor performances. The Forecourt will be closed to visitors and performances in 2011–2014 to construct a new entrance tunnel to a rebuilt loading dock for the Joan Sutherland Theatre.

 

Other areas (for example the northern and western foyers) are also used for performances on an occasional basis. Venues are also used for conferences, ceremonies and social functions.

 

The building also houses a recording studio, cafes, restaurants, bars and retail outlets. Guided tours are available, including a frequent tour of the front-of-house spaces, and a daily backstage tour that takes visitors backstage to see areas normally reserved for performers and crew members.

 

Planning began in the late 1940s, when Eugene Goossens, the Director of the NSW State Conservatorium of Music, lobbied for a suitable venue for large theatrical productions. The normal venue for such productions, the Sydney Town Hall, was not considered large enough. By 1954, Goossens succeeded in gaining the support of NSW Premier Joseph Cahill, who called for designs for a dedicated opera house. It was also Goossens who insisted that Bennelong Point be the site: Cahill had wanted it to be on or near Wynyard Railway Station in the northwest of the CBD.

 

An international design competition was launched by Cahill on 13 September 1955 and received 233 entries, representing architects from 32 countries. The criteria specified a large hall seating 3,000 and a small hall for 1,200 people, each to be designed for different uses, including full-scale operas, orchestral and choral concerts, mass meetings, lectures, ballet performances and other presentations.

 

The winner, announced in 1957, was Jørn Utzon, a Danish architect. According to legend the Utzon design was rescued from a final cut of 30 "rejects" by the noted Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen. The prize was £5,000. Utzon visited Sydney in 1957 to help supervise the project. His office moved to Palm Beach, Sydney in February 1963.

 

Utzon received the Pritzker Architecture Prize, architecture's highest honour, in 2003. The Pritzker Prize citation read:

 

There is no doubt that the Sydney Opera House is his masterpiece. It is one of the great iconic buildings of the 20th century, an image of great beauty that has become known throughout the world – a symbol for not only a city, but a whole country and continent.

  

The Sydney Opera House was formally opened by Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, on 20 October 1973. A large crowd attended. Utzon was not invited to the ceremony, nor was his name mentioned. The opening was televised and included fireworks and a performance of Beethoven's Symphony No. 9

 

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of Sydney, and Australia. The bridge is nicknamed "The Coathanger" because of its arch-based design. Furthermore, the bridge is ubiquitously known to Sydneysiders simply as "the Bridge".

 

Under the direction of Dr J.J.C. Bradfield of the NSW Department of Public Works, the bridge was designed and built by British firm Dorman Long and Co Ltd of Middlesbrough and opened in 1932. The bridge's design was influenced by the Hell Gate Bridge in New York City.[5] It is the sixth longest spanning-arch bridge in the world and the tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 134 m (440 ft) from top to water level. It was also the world's widest long-span bridge, at 48.8 m (160 ft) wide, until construction of the new Port Mann Bridge in Vancouver was completed in 2012.

 

The southern (CBD) end of the bridge is located at Millers Point in The Rocks area, and the northern end at Milsons Point in the lower North Shore area. There are six original lanes of road traffic through the main roadway, plus an additional two lanes of road traffic on its eastern side, using lanes that were formerly tram tracks. Adjacent to the road traffic, a path for pedestrian use runs along the eastern side of the bridge, whilst a dedicated path for bicycle use only runs along the western side. Finally, between the main roadway and the western bicycle path are two lanes used for railway tracks, servicing the T1 North Shore Line for Sydney Trains.

 

The main roadway across the bridge is known as the Bradfield Highway and is about 2.4 km (1.5 mi) long, making it one of the shortest highways in Australia.

 

The building of the bridge was under the management of Bradfield. Three other people heavily involved in the bridge's design and construction were Lawrence Ennis, Edward Judge, and Sir Ralph Freeman. Ennis was the engineer-in-charge at Dorman Long and Co and the main on-site supervisor (Bradfield visited occasionally throughout the project and, in particular, at many key stages of the project, to inspect progress and make managerial decisions), Judge was chief technical engineer of Dorman Long, and Freeman was hired by the company to design the accepted model in further detail. Later a bitter disagreement broke out between Bradfield and Freeman as to who actually designed the bridge. Another name connected with the bridge's design is that of Arthur Plunkett.

 

Even during its construction, the bridge was such a prominent feature of Sydney that it would attract tourist interest. One of the ongoing tourist attractions of the bridge has been the south-east pylon, which is accessed via the pedestrian walkway across the bridge, and then a climb to the top of the pylon of about 200 steps.

 

Not long after the bridge's opening, commencing in 1934, Archer Whitford first converted this pylon into a tourist destination. He installed a number of attractions, including a café, a camera obscura, an Aboriginal museum, a "Mother's Nook" where visitors could write letters, and a "pashometer". The main attraction was the viewing platform, where "charming attendants" assisted visitors to use the telescopes available, and a copper cladding (still present) over the granite guard rails identified the suburbs and landmarks of Sydney at the time.

 

The outbreak of World War II in 1939 saw tourist activities on the bridge cease, as the military took over the four pylons and modified them to include parapets and anti-aircraft guns.

 

In 1948 Yvonne Rentoul opened the "All Australian Exhibition" in the pylon. This contained dioramas, and displays about Australian perspectives on subjects such as farming, sport, transport, mining, and the armed forces. An orientation table was installed at the viewing platform, along with a wall guide and binoculars. The owner kept several white cats in a rooftop cattery, which also served as an attraction, and there was a souvenir shop and postal outlet.[48] Rentoul's lease expired in 1971, and the pylon and its lookout remained closed to the public for over a decade.

 

The pylon was reopened in 1982, with a new exhibition celebrating the bridge's 50th anniversary. In 1987 a "Bicentennial Exhibition" was opened to mark the 200th anniversary of European settlement in Australia in 1988.[51]

 

The pylon was closed from April to November 2000 for the Roads & Traffic Authority and BridgeClimb to create a new exhibition called "Proud Arch". The exhibition focussed on Bradfield, and included a glass direction finder on the observation level, and various important heritage items.

 

The pylon again closed for four weeks in 2003 for the installation of an exhibit called "Dangerous Works", highlighting the dangerous conditions experienced by the original construction workers on the bridge, and two stained glass feature windows in memory of the workers.

  

Enterprise@Lincoln part of the campus of University of Lincoln, Lincoln, Lincolnshire.

 

The University of Lincoln developed from a number of educational institutions in Hull including the Hull School of Art (1861), the Hull Technical Institute (1893), the Roman Catholic teacher-training Endsleigh College (1905), the Hull Central College of Commerce (1930), and Kingston upon Hull College of Education (1913). These institutions merged in 1976 to form Hull College of Higher Education, with a change of name to Humberside College of Higher Education in 1983 when it absorbed several courses in fishing, food and manufacturing based in Grimsby.

 

In 1992 it was one of the many institutions in the UK to become full universities as, briefly, the University of Humberside, growing to 13,000 students by 1993.

 

The cathedral city of Lincoln was without its own university, so the University of Humberside was approached to develop a new campus to the south west of the city centre, overlooking the Brayford Pool. The University was renamed the University of Lincolnshire and Humberside in January 1996, taking in its first 500 Lincoln students in September 1996, intending to grow to about 4,000 Lincoln based students within four years.

 

Opened by Queen Elizabeth II, the University's main campus in Lincoln was the first new city centre campus to be built in the UK for decades. More than £150 million has been invested in the Brayford Pool campus, transforming a city centre brownfield site, revitalising the area and attracting investment from the retail, leisure and property sectors. Economists estimate that the University has created at least 3,000 new jobs within Lincoln and that it generates more than £250 million every year for the local economy – doubling previous local economic growth rates.

 

The consolidation involved the University acquiring Leicester-based De Montfort University's schools in Lincolnshire: the Lincoln School of Art and Design in uphill Lincoln, and the Lincolnshire School of Agriculture's sites at Riseholme, Caythorpe and Holbeach. Caythorpe was later closed permanently and its activities moved to Riseholme. Courses held in Grimsby were also moved to Lincoln around this time.

 

In 2012 all Further Education provision was transferred from Riseholme College to Bishop Burton College. Bishop Burton College are now responsible for the Riseholme College to the north of the city.

 

Throughout the late-1990s, the University's sites in Hull were considerably scaled down as the focus shifted towards Lincoln. In 2001 this process was taken a step further when the decision was made to move the administrative headquarters and management to Lincoln and to sell the Cottingham Road campus in Hull, the former main campus, to its neighbour, the University of Hull; the site is now the home of the Hull York Medical School. Until 2012 the University maintained a smaller campus, the Derek Crothall Building, in Hull city centre. A smaller campus and student halls on Beverley Road, Hull, were also sold for redevelopment.

 

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YOUNG HOMELESS MAN | SAN FRANCISCO | DECEMBER 29, 2007.

 

the crowd is crushing and oppressive. joyful tidings of retail cheer. the clouds hover just beyond reach. the rain patters lightly; an incessant timepiece. and a figure rests like a stone beneath; drawn to the earth but apart from it. ground down.

 

it was acid that started the trip. dropped at 16. a welcoming introduction. a young "cole" no more. and texas couldn't hold his burn for long. nor jails dampen it. at 21 he flew; but was wanted. he made it to california, but would serve again and more in texas before he was 25. and elsewhere after.

 

but his love stood by him. a drifter who got a job and apartment to support and console him in jail. and thirteen years later they would be together; drifting homeless or shacked in $35 hotels.

 

no one's ever done more. certainly not the woman who carried him in her womb; but no further. perhaps her father did as much, caring for the child alone; but he died when an eight year old needs more. and adoption was a hollow thing at best.

 

yes, this drifter stood by him unlike the others.

 

but then, again, no more. a month or more alone. and counting.

 

yet he's here for heroin more than anything else. or anyone. the city has endless supply and sale pricing. so he has that.

 

and the dope was good for christmas. though he missed extra company. he struggles with recent memories; but is sure of both these.

 

so he's looking for someone new. that's really on his mind. but john is equally in his head.

 

because he still cares for him. and he still keeps up with him. and watches out for him.

 

he wants to be sure john doesn't get burned too hard by the new flame.

 

"sometimes you deserve it. and sometimes you want it; it's fun for a while."

 

but it can go too far and get too deep.

 

so he's keeping an eye out for his friend.

 

that's all.

 

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www.tomstonegallery.com/

Blurred Restaurant Shop interior Table Counter and seats with People

O'Connell Street - Dublin - Ireland

Shopping online has benefits and drawbacks, much like other activities in everyday life. To be able to increase the positive things about shopping online and lower the not so good things, it is essential which you become knowledgeable around the proper ways of shopping by doing this. These piece will provide you with suggestions to make online shopping more effective.

 

Before doing online shopping, be certain your antivirus is current. There are lots of rogue websites available lurking to get online shoppers. You will find individuals that produce online shop sites just there to damage your pc. Be sure to protect yourself prior to visiting a web-based store, even when it appears quite reputable.

 

Usually do not give your SSN while shopping online. Not one site needs your social security number. In case you are requested it, you might be being scammed. Back from websites like these without creating any commitments and do your shopping elsewhere.

 

When searching for online savings, look for upcoming sales starting on Wednesdays. Online retailers list their sales mid-week because real life stores normally have weekend sales. Therefore, it really is easy to find incredible mid-week deals by doing a bit of research.

 

Lots of online retails offer big saving with discount codes. In the event you go into the name of the desired manufacturer or website and "promotion code" into the search engines, you will find codes to provide you with a whole lot. You can snag a portion off, free delivery, or perhaps a free additional product just for a couple of minutes of the times.

 

Consider upgrading to premium accounts on your own favorite online retailers. This membership only costs $79 annually, and you receive a lot for the investment. Free two-day shipping, discounts on following day shipping as well as promotions on items. Additionally, this membership gives you a great movie library where one can stream movies totally free. This enables you to save a great deal overall!

 

Equipped with this information, you are able to go forth and revel in bargains. Just make use of the excellent advice provided here to assist you cut costs. You'll be amazed at the money it can save you. Your friends and family will wonder the way you get it done. fastdiscountfinder.com/hot-new-releases/

In an effort to improve its overall shopping experience, Oakbrook Center has undergone the largest renovation in its history; enhancing its common areas and expanding them to accommodate special events and social gatherings.

 

One of the Center’s noteworthy additions is a new vortex inspired water feature located at one of the complex’s main entrances. The fountain’s innovative design creates multiple effects with a single jet. The basin alternatively drains and fills, building up to form a bubbling pool before gradually ebbing away, revealing brightly illuminated columns of water arranged within the spiral. Over 50 of Crystal’s nozzles and LED lights entertain shoppers throughout the day.

Singapore Zoo

Coordinates: [show location on an interactive map] 1°24?15.9?N 103°47?28.1?E? / ?1.404417°N 103.791139°E? / 1.404417; 103.791139

Date opened 23 June 1973

Location Singapore

Land area 28 hectares

Number of animals 2530

Number of species 315

The Singapore Zoo (Chinese: ?????? ; Malay: 'Taman Haiwan Singapura'; Tamil: ??????????? ????????? ????????????), formerly known as the Singapore Zoological Gardens and commonly known locally as the Mandai Zoo, occupies 28 hectares (0.28 km?) of land on the margins of Upper Seletar Reservoir within Singapore's heavily forested central catchment area. The zoo was built at a cost of S$9m granted by the government of Singapore and opened on 23 June 1973. It is operated by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, who also manage the neighbouring Night Safari and the Jurong BirdPark. There are about 315 species of animal in the zoo, of which some 16% are considered threatened species. The zoo attracts about 1.4 million visitors a year.

 

From the beginning, Singapore Zoo followed the modern trend of displaying animals in naturalistic, 'open' exhibits, i.e. with hidden barriers, behind moats and shrubbery etc. It also houses the largest captive colony of orangutans in the world. In 1977, primatologist Dr Francine Neago lived inside a cage with eighteen orangutans for six months to study their behavior and communication.

1 History

2 Present

o 2.1 Education and conservation

o 2.2 Rides

o 2.3 Friends of the Zoo

o 2.4 Organizing events

* 3 Incidents

* 4 Trivia

* 5 Awards

* 6 Gallery

* 7 See also

* 8 References

* 9 Notes

* 10 External links

* 11 Public Bus Services

 

History

Hamadryas baboons by a waterfall

The conception of the Singapore Zoo dates from 1969. At the time, the Public Utilities Board (PUB) decided to use some of its land holdings around reservoirs for parks and open recreational facilities. The then Executive Chairman of PUB, Dr Ong Swee Law, set aside 88 hectares of land for the construction of a zoological garden.

 

In 1970, consultants and staff were hired, and in 1971, the construction of the basic 50 enclosures started. Animals were collected from dealers and donated by sponsors. The Director of the Colombo Zoo in Sri Lanka, Lyn de Alwis, was hired as a special consultant to work out problems inherent in tropical zoos.

 

On 23 June 1973, the Singapore Zoo opened its gates for the first time with a collection of 270 animals from over 72 species, and a staff of 130. By 1990, 1,600 animals from more than 160 species lived in social groups, housed in 65 landscaped exhibits with boundaries conceived to look as natural as possible.

Present

A pair of white tigers

Today, the zoo is a model of the 'open zoo' concept. The animals are kept in spacious, landscaped enclosures, separated from the visitors by either dry or wet moats. The moats are concealed with vegetation or dropped below the line of vision. In the case of dangerous animals which can climb very well, moat barriers are not used. Instead, these animals are housed in landscaped glass-fronted enclosures.

The zoo has not expanded beyond the original 28 hectares. However, 40 hectares of secondary forest were later developed into the Night Safari. The remaining undeveloped land has been kept as wooded land. This and the waters of Upper Seletar Reservoir contribute to the Zoo, giving it a sense of natural, unrestricted space.

Among various attractions that the zoo offers,one highlight is the "Breakfast with an Orangutan" programme that allows visitors to meet and interact closely with the orangutans in the zoo, amongst which includes the famous primate matriarch Ah Meng, (died on February 8, 2008) who was an icon of the Singapore tourism industry. Animal shows, as well as token feedings coupled with live commentaries by keepers, are also the daily staple in the Singapore zoo.

 

Education and conservation

The Wildlife Healthcare & Research Centre was opened in March 2006 as part of the zoo's efforts in wildlife conservation. The centre further underscores Singapore Zoo and Night Safari’s commitment to conservation research, providing the infrastructure for the parks and overseas zoological partners to better execute their research programmes.

The zoo also embarked on various rescue and conservation efforts to protect wildlife.

Rides

White rhinos

The zoo also offers various modes of rides available within the premises: trams, animals, boat, pony and horse carriage rides. Additional modes of transportation which can only be rented include: strollers, wagon and wheelchairs.

Friends of the Zoo

The zoo also has a "friends of the zoo" programme, where people can sign up for a yearly pass which grants them special privileges such as:

* Free and unlimited entry to Singapore Zoo for whole year

* Free Zoo tram rides and parking

* A free quarterly "Wildlife wonders" magazine

* 10% discount at some participating retail outlets

Organizing events

Elephant show and the trainers

There are three event venues available in the zoo, Forest Lodge, Pavilion-By-the-Lake and Garden Pavilion. There are also three cocktail venues, Elephants of Asia, Tiger Trek and Treetops Trail. The Singapore Zoo also facilitates birthday parties and weddings.

 

Incidents

On 13 November 2008, two of three white Bengal tigers mauled a zoo cleaner to death after the man jumped into a moat surrounding their enclosure.[2]

Trivia

Lists of miscellaneous information should be avoided. Please relocate any relevant information into appropriate sections or articles. (September 2008)

* In 2002, teams of The Amazing Race 3 also came to the Singapore Zoological Gardens as part of a detour.

* Steve Irwin, the animal activist and conservationalist known as "The Crocodile Hunter", admired the Singapore Zoo greatly, adopting it as the 'sister zoo' to the Australia Zoo. He was at the Singapore Zoo in 2006 to officiate the opening of the Australian outback exhibit.

* The Singapore Zoo is the first zoo in the world to breed a polar bear in the tropics. Inuka was conceived on 26 December 1990.

via

 

Move over Don Draper, the modern day agency marketer needs to be more of a Renaissance (wo)man.

 

Sure, they need to be creative enough to craft a compelling pitch.

 

But they also need to be data-driven. They need to be well versed in analytics and the latest MarTech trends. And when budgets get tight, agency marketers need to be able to convince their clients to not cut out conversion rate optimization.

 

Few people know this better than Mitch Joel, president of Mirum, a global digital marketing agency operating in 20 different countries. Mitch is a best-selling business author, international speaker and agency thought leader. But he’s also a full-stack marketer who has been doing display advertising for longer than Google itself.

 

Mitch Joel, president of global digital agency Mirum and author of Six Pixels of Separation and CTRL ALT Delete.Image source.

 

Since Mitch entered the digital marketing world, a helluvalot has changed — and not just in agencyland. As technology evolves, so too are consumers and the way they interact with our brands. At the Call to Action Conference in June, Mitch’s keynote, Algorhythm: How Technology Connects Consumers To Brands Like Never Before, will dive into how to future-proof your brand and embrace disruption to become a digital leader.

 

PSST. Hey blog reader, we like the cut of your jib. Get 15% off Call to Action Conference tickets by using discount code “blogsentme” at checkout. Offer expires May 12th.

 

Ugh, why can’t it be June already?

 

To tide you over, here’s a fascinating interview with Mitch from the Call to Action Podcast. Unbounce Director of Content Dan Levy sat down with Mitch to discuss:

 

How the agency world has evolved over the past 15 years.

 

Mitch’s experience selling his independent agency to the largest holding company in the world.

 

How everything from search results to PPC and even the talent you hire for your agency are all extensions of your brand.

 

Check out some highlights from the interview below. (This transcript has been edited for length. Listen to the full episode on iTunes.)

 

Dan Levy: You’re known as a bestselling business author, speaker and agency thought leader, but you got your start in the online marketing trenches doing ad sales and even PPC marketing for a site called Mamma.com. Can you take us back to that time? What did the online marketing landscape look like and what did you learn from that experience?

 

Mitch Joel: Actually, yes, I did do that. But my start in digital came much earlier when I was publishing music magazines in the late 80s and early 90s. I actually was tangentially at the same time very engaged in digital media: first web browser, BBSs, stuff like that. And I actually put those magazines on the “internet” — like air quote internet — because back then, there wasn’t even really an internet.

 

I remember one of the cover stories for my alternative, cool, fun publication was called, “The Net.” The innovation at that time was hyperlinks. I literally was posting things on the internet from the magazine that couldn’t have hyperlinks. You couldn’t link from one page to the other. That really kept me on the trajectory where eventually I helped launch the sales channel of what at the time was one of the largest meta search engines on the internet. And again, it’s hard to imagine a world before Google. But this was pre-Google. And so the meta search engine would basically grab search results from engines like Yahoo, AOL, Lycos, and create a meta — or a better — search result that we could actually aggregate faster.

 

My role back then was selling sponsorships on the homepage, it was selling banner advertising. And it was also very early days of selling — literally the first time of being able to take a search result and having a banner that’s related to the search show up in the search result. And to tell you how early and nascent it was, I had to physically go into the code of the search engine to code the banner in. I don’t recommend that in this day in age. Like I don’t think anyone at Google is going into the master code to embed a search result. But that’s how early the times were back then.

 

DL: Wow. What did you learn from that experience that you brought forth?

 

MJ: Well I learned to take chances. I can tell you that when they approached me about the opportunity, my first question was, “What’s online advertising?” I mean, we are talking about a time when that first banner ad on HotWired — which became Wired — had just run.

 

The first banner ad, ever. Image source: Wired.

 

I didn’t even know what it looked like, what it felt like, what it could be. I think my pedigree in selling traditional print ads and having a construct of what it means to run a media company is what pushed me there. So it was — to this day, it was a great move. And I’m so grateful, I still have a lot of friends in my life now who came from there. A lot of people who’ve become — who’ve ascended in this industry to run major, major web initiatives are people that I hired. People that I brought into the industry. So I have a lot of pride in that.

 

And I also learned that — again, when I think about it, I don’t know why I took the job. All logic would dictate that at the time, I should not have taken that job. But I took the job and it wound up being great for me because it brought together what I was doing professionally on one side. And on the other side, it brought together my passion for digital. I often say that I was very early into many things. And when we started Mirum, which back then was Twist Image in 2000 (I joined in 2002). At that point in my career I said, even though I might be a little early in this space, I’m going to ride it out.

 

DL: Performance marketing and brand marketing are often seen as being on different sides of the digital marketing spectrum. Do you think that’s true? Do you see those two disciplines as coming closer together in an age where Facebook has gone from a social media network to just another performance marketing channel?

 

MJ: I think you’re right. The evolution — and by the way, Google structured themselves — for a long while, and they may still — around brand and performance. And that’s common. Where I think the confusion comes from is that within real behavioral performance-based marketing, there are heavy and hefty living around brand and experience that we often dismiss because we think that performance is still about getting the right search word, getting them to the right page.

 

But actually if you step back from that, the meta message is that it has to be a very relevant and cohesive brand experience. And I was somebody who wasn’t just buying generic brand keywords back in the day, to just keep that going. I actually believe that — a saying I’ve used since the early 2000s is that the first page of search results is a brand experience.

 

You can’t separate PPC & brand marketing. The 1st page of search is part of your brand experience.Click To Tweet

 

So there’s that. That sort of dismisses the idea that performance is not about branding. And you’re right — fast forwarding to today, a lot of my clients and a lot of people I meet when I do speaking events will say that social media is primarily a paid channel, because of what Facebook has done to throttle the content and have you pay against reach. Which I think by the way is a great model and clearly the market would agree with that idea.

 

But you can’t have any results — whether you’re paying for it or it’s organic — unless it’s a really good experience.

 

Whether or not that’s through a search result, an email marketing initiative, a great landing page *hint hint wink wink* to you guys, or a good old piece of content. I really don’t care. I’m actually agnostic to that.

 

DL: Where do performance channels like PPC and landing page optimization and conversion rate optimization come into the picture with the kinds of big brands that you work with? Are those things part of your offer? Do you factor them into how you pitch and bill clients?

 

MJ: Well it depends on whether someone’s going full bore with us or not. Like any other agency, we work on specific campaigns, specific projects, longer initiatives and then full-on mandates. And even the full-on mandates have sort of splits and fits and starts.

 

The way we started our company, we only wanted to work with large national and multinational brands and we’ve stuck to that model for what’s coming up onto 17 years. Because of that, being of startup size back in the early 2000s, most brands already had large media companies at play. And those media companies even back then were feeling very threatened by digital and would make those offerings.

 

So we would come in and grab pieces and parts of it and really focus on the behavioral side. Let us handle the drive to optimization, landing page, unique spaces, unique experience while the media companies were really checking boxes around “online video,” “search,” affiliate marketing” and stuff like that. So from my pedigree, I stand very firmly and aligned with what performance can do in terms of optimizations and moving things forward. I feel like I’m banging against the wall when everyone says, “Well we do that.” I think people do do that, but they don’t really do it.

 

I still really believe that a lot of the work we see is what I call “rearview mirror.” You know, we did it, we’re running these keywords to a landing page, and let’s see how it did. Post. I believe, and I know that Mirum as an agency believes it, all of that optimization, all of that data, all of that opportunity is now in the passenger seat. When you do it well and you actually are optimizing and driving and creating unique experiences on landing pages and stuff like that, you’ve moved it from the rearview mirror to the passenger’s seat and you can fix it and go so that there always is a positive result, not a result that says, “Oh, that campaign just didn’t work.” I can’t believe we still use that language in business today!

 

DL: Right, as if a campaign or an experience is a success or a failure — only if it meets your hypothesis. And the learnings aren’t a factor or don’t have anything to do with it at all.

 

MJ: Right and it’s frustrating for me because I feel like we often lose business or can’t grab the business because there’s a sentiment that we already have someone doing that work. But when you dig into what that work is, you see that there actually isn’t a lot of that stuff that we’re really talking about. They say they do that, it’s on their decks, and it’s on their site. But — and I don’t know if it’s a failure of the brand or a failure of the agency. I’m not sure where it happens. But there is a vast majority of very powerful brands really not doing enough.

 

DL: Do you think the problem is that optimization is seen as a discipline or a branch of marketing instead of just a mindset?

 

MJ: Yeah. One of my close friends is Bryan Eisenberg, who I really believe is one of the forefathers of this optimization space. He’s written books about it, “Waiting For Your Cat to Bark?” and intent and scent and all that.

 

My relationship with Bryan is going on for close to 20 years at this point. And he would often say things like, “You know, here we are talking about all this stuff. And the first thing a brand will cut on a budget is the optimization. Hands down.”

 

And it’s mind-numbing and it’s mind-blowing to both of us — and years later it still remains the same — because that’s actually where you make money. And I don’t know why brands, agencies don’t get it. I don’t get how they don’t get it.

 

DL: Can you talk about the role content played in getting Twist on the map? I imagine that your book and your blog and your podcast were all part of ultimately attracting the attention of WPP and making that acquisition happen.

 

MJ: It’s a yes and no story.

 

It’s a yes story in the sense that it’s very interesting when they’re doing financial and product assessments to see an agency that has been so consistent for a decade. Creating the blog, the podcast, Six Pixels of Separation, that lead to 50-60 paid speaking events a year. That lead to two best selling books — and I’m not trying to toot my own horn, but represented by a major New York literary agent, onto a major — largest book publisher in the world, onto the global deal. And other things that come from media appearances and stuff like that.

 

DL: Yeah, I think that from my perspective, Twist Image and Mitch Joel were kind of one and the same.

 

MJ: Totally. And we built it that way. We always saw from day one, back in 2003ish, when we started the blog, that Twist Image (at the time — now Mirum) would be managing three brands:

 

that Mirum brand,

 

Six Pixels of Separation (which we sort of considered the sort of “content engine” — so blog, podcast, articles, speaking, books)

 

and then Mitch Joel, this media face. This warm, hopefully friendly and personable face to an agency, which again, now seems very obvious.

 

But if you go back 10+ years, nobody was really doing that. They didn’t really have that. So the fact that we were sharing content, having conversations with people who just didn’t have a voice before — you know, we were having hour-long conversations with business or marketing thought leaders. That you didn’t get an hour with. You’d be lucky if you had one famous enough to get 10 minutes on Charlie Rose. Suddenly, someone is spending an hour with them, having a conversation like they would over a coffee, and publishing it to the world.

 

There were these assets there that were built over time, and again, I do know that when it came to the opportunity for us to be acquired, one of the metrics was the fact that there is revenue generation that comes out of the content engine. That doesn’t just create media attention and a level of fame, whatever that might be. But that there actually was revenue behind this thing. And that was very surprising and shocking to them.

 

DL: Meaning what? It gets clients in the door?

 

MJ: I mean, yeah, think about it. You pitch for business development, you spend weeks, months pitching. And business development is a cost center. It costs every agency a lot of money to business develop. You don’t win every pitch. It’s a very small percentage. And you hope that the ones you win make up for all the money you spent. When you’re offsetting that cost with speaking gigs, book deals, article writing and stuff like that, it’s really interesting that you’re creating this voice and building a platform and it actually is driving business, it’s driving revenue — both in terms of client and raw revenue. We get dollars to speak and write books. It’s not vanity.

 

It was always about creating equity in the brand, that would have one of two roles. That one day, we would be acquired. Or if we’re never acquired, we’re running this business in a way where all of the top players would want to acquire it. And there would be extreme value in the brand.

 

I like building businesses that build equity as they grow. And this channel of speaking, writing, etc — it wasn’t a core component of what we were acquired for, but it was definitely on the list.

 

DL: It reminds me of the Rolling Stones model, where you’re the front man, but ultimately, you share those profits evenly. I know they’ve credited that as their longevity for them as a band. It sounds like the same thing for the longevity of Twist, and now Mirum.

 

MJ: Yeah, and I try to not have it be ego-driven. I look at it like — my job, as a media entity, is to be extremely personable. And to know that I’m managing Mirum, Six Pixels and Mitch Joel. And I conduct myself accordingly. If you look me up on Facebook, there isn’t a ton of personal stuff. There’s a ton of personable stuff.

 

DL: If you had to give agencies who are looking to set themselves apart from the crowd and spur growth for both their clients and their own business one piece of advice, what would it be?

 

MJ: I really think it is much like a great book. A great book works not because the topic is unique. I feel like more often than not you’re reading a topic that somebody else covered in one shape or form.

 

It’s the voice. I don’t see that much in terms of agencies having that unique voice. Do I think we achieved it? Partially. And I think it’s because it’s a journey — you’re constantly changing it, moving it along. But if I were to go across — and we did this exercise when we were trying to figure out the branding for Mirum, Twist Image — I would jokingly tell people, “You could take the website of all our biggest competitors, take off the logos, throw them in the air, and whatever website they fall on, you’d still be pretty much right.” The services, types of case studies, type of work we do. And still to this day, I think that story rings true.

 

The ones that stand out, though, are the ones that have a unique voice. It could be a unique individual — I’m thinking of people like Bob Greenberg at R/GA. It could just be a unique story to tell. So if you look at an agency like WK, the fact that they’ve been large and independent, the type of work that they’ve done it’s like the voice of the agency is the work that they do. That type of thing is the only component of your business that you can have that is the defendable against a competitor. It’s how you express yourself, tell your stories, the type of team members you bring in, the type of work that you do, the stories you tell in the marketplace, where you network, what you attend. That’s the big one.

 

The secondary one is get involved in your industry. What drove this business at Mirum was the fact that we got involved in places like Shop.org, the National Retail Federation, Canadian Marketing Association, Interactive Advertising — I could go on and on. And we didn’t just join and become members. We got involved. In fact, we just had a conversation at lunch about an association that I’m super interested in. And the answer we all came to was: “Not unless we can get deeply involved.” So, what you find out is that by giving (because you love this industry and you want it to be better), you do wind up in some way receiving. We don’t get involved to get results. By getting involved and being active, it just happens.

 

DL: Well Mitch, it’s always a real treat to talk shop with you. Thank you so much for taking the time.

 

MJ: My pleasure! Thanks for having me.

 

This transcript has been edited for length. Listen to the full episode on iTunes.

 

unbounce.com/call-to-action/mitch-joel-interview/

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Midtown, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

 

240 Central Park South Apartments, built in 1939-40 to the design of Mayer & Whittlesey, is a significant and innovative complex that represents the transition between 1930s Art Deco style apartment towers with courtyards (characteristic of Central Park West) and post-World War II “modernist" apartment houses. It is notable for its modernist near-lack of applied ornament and sophisticated planning. As stated by Architectural Forum in 1941, “the architectural character of these buildings stems directly from the plans... and the fenestration.’' Constructed by the Mayer family's J.H. Taylor Construction Co. for the J.H. Taylor Management Corp.. it was one of Manhattan’s largest luxury apartment projects of its day.

 

The architects were particularly skillful in adapting their plan to a highly prominent and complex site, with frontages along Central Park South. Columbus Circle. Broadway and West 58th Street. The complex consists of a 20-story. C-shaped-in-plan building (with an 8-story tower), facing Central Park, connected by ground-story lobbies and rounded shopfronts (following the diagonal of Broadway) to a 15-story building to the south. Covering only about half of the lot. the buildings provided a maximum amount of light, air. quiet, and corner apartments, which featured cantilevered balconies and views (many of Central Park). Landscaped open space included the entrance court, centra! courtyard and adjacent shops' rooftops, and roof terraces atop both buildings. Clad in an orangish-coiored brick, the buildings were detailed with broad steel-casement windows and the contrasting concrete of the balcony slabs. Amedee Ozenfanf s mosaic “The Quiet City" decorates the front entrance, while rooftop vertical architectural elements enliven the skyline. 240 Central Park South Apartments was marketed with an explicit suburban appeal, and the slogan "Where the Park is Part of the Plan." at a time when Manhattan was losing population to the outer boroughs and suburbs.

 

Lewis Mumford. in The New Yorker in 1940. praised its “ingenious” planning solution, while Architectural Forum called it "one of the best apartment buildings vet produced." Mayer & Whittlesey, founded in 1935 (Mayer, Whittlesey & Glass after 1945). was noted for planning and apartment housing, such as Manhattan Housed 950-51, with Skidmore, Owings& Merrill).

 

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

 

The Mavcr Family and J.H. Tavlor Construction Co./J.H Taylor Management Corp. 1

 

By the late 1930s, the J.H Taylor Construction Co. and J.H. Taylor Management Corp. had built, owned, and managed a number of large apartment buildings in New York City. Associated with these firms were members of the prominent German-Jewish Mayer family, who individually and collectively had a long involvement in New York real estate through their activities in architecture, engineering, construction, management, investment, and ownership through various corporate entities. Bernhard Mayer (1852-1929), son of Mayer and Fannie Mayer, was bom in Altdorf, Germany, and immigrated to the United States in 1872. He became a principal in the real estate firm of [LazarusJ Weil & Mayer, with his brother-in-law. Mayer left an estate worth over $2.5 million which, after charitable donations, was left to family members, principally his widow' Sophia Buttenwieser Mayer (1860-1945) and their six children.

 

All three male Mayer siblings were active in real estate and construction, while two sisters also achieved prominence.2 Joseph L.B. Mayer (1885-1939), a real estate agent specializing in Park Avenue properties, w'as an officer and director of the Gruenstein & Mayer Corp., and an officer of the corporations for 875. 1040, and 1069 Park Avenue and 205 East 69lh Street.3 Charles Mayer (1888-1980). a graduate of Columbia University with a degree in civil engineering and a master's degree in engineering (1909). became chief engineer in the construction of apartment and office buildings through his J.H. Taylor Construction Co. (founded 1913),4 as well as a consulting engineer on such projects as Lewisohn Stadium (1915. Arnold W. Brunner; demolished). City College. He also served as president of the J.H Taylor Management Corp. (formed in 1931). Albert Mayer (1897-1981) received a degree in civil engineering from M.I.T. (1919), worked for Charles (1919-35) and was a principal partner in the J.H. Taylor Construction Co. He was one of the architects of the 240 Central Park South Apartments [see belowl. Their sister. Fannie Mayer, married William Kom (1884-1972). who became president of the J.H Taylor Management Corp. and J.H. Taylor Construction Co. Among the J.H. Taylor Construction Co.'s projects were the Jewish Hospital addition (1922-23). Brooklyn; 40 Central Park South Apartments (1941); Lebanon Hospital (1942), the Bronx; and the office building at 1407 Broadway (1950. Kahn & Jacobs).

 

Clara Woollie Mayer (1895-1988). a graduate of Barnard College (1915). did graduate work at Columbia University in 1915-19. and became a student at the New School for Social Research in 1919. She helped to organize a student committee in 1922 to raise funds to assist the school’s then precarious financial situation. A

 

history of the New School states that she Urecruited her mother and several brothers and sisters to the school’s cause. Over the next fifty years only [director] Alvin Johnson played a more important part in the life of the New School.Clara Mayer was appointed a trustee on the school’s board of directors (1924-30), was secretary to the board (1931-46), assistant director of the New School (1931-36), associate director (1937-43), dean of the School of Philosophy and Liberal Arts (1943-60), vice president (1950-62), and dean of the New School (1960-62). The Mayer family contributed $100,000 towards the new building for the New School (1929-31, Joseph Urban). Her brothers’ J.H. Taylor Construction Co. was recruited to construct the building at low cost, and Charles and Albert have been credited with recommending Urban as architect.6 The famous New School auditorium was originally dedicated to the memory of their father. Bernhard Mayer.7 In 1956-59. the Mayer family contributed to the expansion of the New' School, which was designed by Albert Mayer's firm.8

 

Mayer & Whittlesey. Architects

 

Albert Mayer, after working for his brother Charles in construction and engineering, became a registered architect and in 1935 established the firm of Mayer & [Julian H.J Whittlesey, which specialized in the design of apartment buildings. Mayer was well known as a planner and housing consultant in the United States and abroad from the 1930s on. He was a member of the Regional Planning Association of America (1930-33) which influenced the creation of the Greenbelt towns project, and was a founder, with Henry Wright and Lewis Mumford. of the Housing Study Guild (1933) which made recommendations on public housing and advocated large, planned projects, leading to the creation of the U.S. Housing Authonty in 1937. Mayer received the apartment house award from the New York Chapter, American Institute of Architects (A.I.A) in 1941 for Thomeycroft Homes, Forest Hills, Queens, and participated in the design of the Ft. Greene Houses (1942-44. w'ith Clarence Stein, Rosario Candela, Wallace K. Harrison, Ely Jacques Kahn, Andre Fouilhoux, etc.), Brooklyn, for the New York City Housing Authonty. During World War 11, Mayer served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the construction of airfields, and his meeting of Jawaharlal Nehru led to a number of commissions in India, including a pilot development project for rural villages (1947 on) and the original master plan for Chandigarh, India (1950, with Matthew Nowicki).10 Mayer was an advocate for the rational planning of new towns, which included Kitimat, British Columbia (1951-56, with Clarence Stein). He retired from active architectural practice in 1961, but continued work as a housing consultant and as a professor, and was author of The Urgent Future (1967), in which he discussed his planning philosophies.

 

Julian Hill Whittlesey (1905-1995), bom in Greenwich, Connecticut, was educated in architecture and civil engineering at Yale University, and studied at the Fontainebleau School of Fine Arts, France, and the American School of Classical Studies. Athens. Like Mayer, he was interested in housing issues, and he worked as a consultant to the Resettlement Administration in the 1930s, as an advisor to the U.S. Public Housing Administration, and during World War II designed offices and housing for the military. Whittlesey participated in the design of the James Weldon Johnson Houses (1947-48, with Harry M. Prince and Robert J. Reiley), Park Avenue and East 112,h-1151’' Streets, and the Colonial Park Houses (1951. with Prince and Reiley). He also served as a consultant to the Baltimore and Yonkers Housing Authorities. In the 1960s. he worked as an archaeologist.

 

Mayer & Whittlesey and its successor firms were responsible for the design of a number of notable New York City apartment houses. The innovative 240 Central Park South Apartments (1939-40), an early commission, was built by the J.H. Taylor Construction Co. for the J.H. Taylor Management Corp. It was followed by the 22-story 40 Central Park South Apartments (1941), built by J.H. Taylor Construction Co. for Mayer family relative L. V ictor Weil. In 1945, Mayer & Whittlesey became Mayer, Whittlesey & IM. Milton] Glass. Glass (1906-1993), educated at City College, Columbia and New York Universities, and the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design, worked as a draftsman in a number of architectural offices prior to joining Mayer & Whittlesey, where he was head draftsman in 1940-45. Mayer. Whittlesey & Glass designed the noted 20-story Manhattan House (1950-51, with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill), 200 East 66tM Street, lor the New York Life Insurance Co., which employed the innovations and amenities of 240 Central Park South Apartments on a full-block scale. William J. Conklin (b. 1923) joined Mayer, Whittlesey & Glass in 1951 and became associate partner in charge of design in 1958. The firm was also joined by James S. Rossant. Mayer, Whittlesey & Glass received the medal of honor for large-scale housing and city planning, and an apartment house award, from the New York Chapter, A.I.A. in 1952. The firm designed 220 Central Park South Apartments (1954); New School for Social Research additions (Kaplan and List Buildings)( 1956-59, Conklin in charge of design), 66 West 12lh Street; Butterfield House (1959-62. Conklin and Rossant in charge of design), 37 West 12lh Street;11 Painting Industry Welfare Building (1960. Conklin in charge of design), 45 West 14"’ Street, featunng a glass curtain wall overlaid with a bronze screen; Gala East Harlem Plaza (1960) at the Jefferson Houses. First Avenue and 112th-115U| Streets; and the Premier (1960-63, Conklin in charge of design), 333 East 69th Street. Mayer. Whittlesey & Glass was dissolved in 1961.

 

The firm of Whittlesey & Conklin was formed in 1961 (Whittlesey, Conklin & Rossant after 1965); it developed the master plan for the new town of Reston, Virginia (1962-69). Conklin & Rossant, its successor firm, was established in 1967. Milton Glass began his own firm in 1961 that became Glass & (Elliott M.] Glass in 1966.

 

Columbus Circle and Central Park South

 

Columbus Circle was created at junction of Broadway, Eighth Avenue/Central Park West and West 59th Street (Central Park South). In 1868-71. Broadway had been widened and planted north of 59th Street, becoming known as “the Boulevard,” and by 1870, land was acquired for grander southern comer entrances to Central Park (designed in 1858 by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux).n The Plaza was created at Fifth Avenue and “the Circle" was established at Eighth Avenue. Maps of Central Park from this period indicate that the Circle was intended to have a sculptural focus. The Ladies Pavilion (1871, Vaux & Mould) was originally located at the park's southwest comer at the Circle. “Columbus Circle” came into being in 1892 w>hen the Columbus monument (Gaetano Russo, sculptor) was installed. The Ladies Pavilion was moved into the park and the comer came to be dominated by the Maine Monument (1901-13, Attilio Piccirilli, sculptor; A. Van Buren Magonigle, architect).

 

Central Park South has someli mes been referred to as a “gold coast" of Manhattan due to its advantageous location, facing the south end of Central Park, and the presence of luxurious hotels and apartment houses. In the early 1870s, town houses and mansions for New York's elite began to be constructed along Fifth Avenue and the adjacent blocks of the West 50s. Nearby West 57th Street, between Sixth Avenue and Broadway, has had a distinguished history as a center of the arts and music for over a century. Central Park South, first fully developed in the 1870s-80s, has from the beginning attracted a mix of hotels, residential structures, and institutions, as indicated on Robinson’s A tlas of the City of New York of 1885. Among the more notable were the Fifth Avenue Plaza Hotel (begun by Fife & Campbell; 1888-91, McKim, Mead & White), No. 2; the Hawthorne (1883, Hubert & Pirsson), No. 128; and Central Park Apartments (“Spanish Flats” or “the Navarro”) (1881-83, Hubert & Pirsson), a complex of eight buildings at Nos. 150-180 (all now demolished).

 

In 1885, a law was enacted to limit the height of all new residential construction in New York City to a height of 80 feet (six stones), but hotels and residential hotels were exempted because they were considered commercial properties. Central Park South thus continued to attract such structures. New buildings and institutions along the street at the turn of the century, some by prestigious architects, included the Plaza Hotel (1905-07, Henry J. Hardenbergh), No. 2, one of the world’s great luxury hotels; New York Athletic Club (1899, William A. Cable; demolished), No. 56; Deutscher Verein (German Club)( 1839-91. McKim, Mead & White; demolis' i), No. 112; Catholic Club (1891-92, William Schickt i Co.; demolished), No. 120; and Gainsborough Studios (1907-08, Charles W. Buckham), No. 222, which provided studios and apartments for artists.

 

During the period between the two world wars, many new hotels and apartments were constructed: No. 100 (1916-18, Schwartz & Gross); Plaza Hotel addition (1921, Warren & Wetmore); No. 126-130(1924-25, Schwartz & Gross); the Navarro (1925, J.E.R. Carpenter), No. 112; New York Athletic Club (1927-29, York & Sawyer), No. 180; Barbizon Plaza (1928-30, Lawrence Emmons, with Murgatroyd & Ogden), No. 106; Hampshire House (1927-29; 1931-38. Caughey & Evans), No. 150; Essex House (1929-30, Frank Grad). No. 160-170; Hotel St. Moritz (1929-30. Emery Roth), No. 56; No. 226-230 (1937-38, J.M. Felson); 240 Central Park South Apartments (1939-40); No. 40 (1941); and No. 120 (1941. H.l. Feldman).

 

240 Central Park South Apartments

 

In May 1939, a nearly one-acre site at one of the most visible locations in Manhattan, the entire blockfront along Broadway and Columbus Circle between West 58th and 59"' Streets (across from the southwest comer of Central Park), was purchased by 240 Central Park South. Inc., an entity of the J.H Taylor Management Corp. This site, once seventeen lots, had been assembled between 1881 and 1908 by George Ehret (1835-1927), a German-born brewer. An immigrant to the United States in 1857, Ehret had worked in the Roemelt & Co. (later Hupfel's) Brewery, becoming foreman, prior to establishing his own Hell Gate Brewery in 186 His enormous profits, which were invested in real estate led the New York Times to comment at his death that he “was said at one time to be the largest holder of real estate in New York City” after the Estate of John Jacob Astor. This property, one of only two vacant blockfronts along Broadway between Times Square and Columbus Circle.17 was transferred to the George Ehret Columbus Circle Corp. in April 1927. Apparently initially intended for a roadhouse or hotel it was developed with a large U-shaped, two-story Mission Revival style building that was used for used for automobile-related businesses (with large advertising signs on top).19 The building that had formerly housed Fire Engine Co. No. 23 (by 1885). 233 West 58"' Street, was next-door and aiso part of the assembled site.

 

Mayer & Whittlesey filed plans for an apartment building, expected to cost $1.6 million, in July 1939. According to the Real Estate Record & Guide. 240 Central Park South Apartments was intended as “a permanent headliner of the J.H Taylor Management Corporation's service, and not as a speculative venture.”20 Construction began in September and was completed, in just over a year, in September 1940. The final cost was $4.5 million.21 As built, the project, culled by the New York Herald Tribune “the largest [apartment house] now in construction in Manhattan.”22 was actually two buildings, joined at the ground story, that overlooked a central landscaped courtyard and covered only about half the site. The Real Estate Record commented that “this is probably the lowest land coverage in the city for an apartment project of this size. By sacrificing ground coverage, the builders have been able to incorporate a maximum number of comer suites.”23 The northern building facing Central Park is twenty stories in height, with an eight-story (plus tank house) tower, and is roughly C-shaped in plan around an entrance court. The southern building is fifteen stories. The architects were particularly skillful in adapting their plan to the highly prominent and complex site, and incorporated shops along Columbus Circle/Broadway into the project.

 

The architects said of the design process, “We had what amounted to a design board consisting of the architects, the owner, operating manager, the rental agent and the builder, together with such engineers as might have to be called in from time to time,”24 whose viewpoints and expertise were merged into “agreed decisions" which aimed to take into account factors of economy, progressive planning, and civic-minded architecture. After several schemes were proposed, the two-building solution was adopted and the building heights determined in large part due to elevator requirements. The Multiple Dwelling Law of 1929 had permitted the mechanical venting of public spaces, bathrooms, and kitchens in apartment buildings, resulting in the creation of a new apartment house type in Manhattan that combined the planning aspects of earlier mid-rise courtyard apartment buildings with tall towers. Examples of this type are the San Remo (1929-30, Emery Roth), the Majestic (1930-31. Irwin S. Chanin). and the Century (1931. Chanin). at 145-146. 115. and 25 Central Park West,25 and River House (1931-32. Bottomley, Wagner & White), 435 East 52nd Street. Architect-historian Robert A.M. Stem has stated that “after the collapse of the real-estate market in the Depression, the type was never again seriously pursued, except at 240 Central Park South, which despite the limitations of its courtyard remains a paradigm of the contextually responsible high-rise apartment in Manhattan.”

 

The buildings, clad in an orangish-colored brick, were constructed with steel-skeleton framing (produced by the Bethlehem Steel Corp.) set on reinforced concrete footings, with concrete-slab floors set between fireproofed steel beams. The open space of the complex, called by Buildings & Building Management “one of the most ingenious landscaping programs ever seen in New York.” was done under the supervision of landscape architects Cynthia Wiley and Eleanor Robertson Paepcke. Included in the overall landscaped open space scheme were the northern entrance court; off-street loading area and planting bed along 58th Street; gardens on the ground-story shops’ roofs and central court; a ground-floor conservatory, with a curved glass wall, connecting the lobbies of the two buildings and overlooking the interior gardens; a roof garden on the purposely-lower southern building; and roof terraces on the 2011' story of the northern building.

 

In terms of exterior architectural expression, 240 Central Park South Apartments represents a transition between the usage of the Art Deco, Art Modeme, and Modem Classical styles for New York apartments houses throughout the 1930s and post-World War II “modernism.” According to the New York Herald Tribune, “the architects conceived the idea while studying architecture in Stockholm, Amsterdam, and Vienna.”29 Albert Mayer was quoted on the project's modernist and functionalist aspects:

 

This building will introduce the philosophy of modern architecture, allowing the purpose of the structure and its location to dictate its style. New York has seen great strides in the design of business buildings, where such requirements as entire floors of space have dictated broad bands of windows, but until now little progress has been made in letting the comforts and requirements of the private home guide us in planning large apartment buildings. 30 Architectural Forum further stated on its modernism that The architectural character of these buildings stems directly from the plans as developed on different levels, and the fenestration. There is no applied “architecture. ” The exterior walls are flush, of a brick somewhat darker than the white concrete balcony slabs, whose sharp alternation of light and shadow constitutes the main decorative element of the exterior. 31 While there had been examples of fully modernist apartment buildings in Manhattan, such as the Beaux-Arts Apartments (1929-30. Kenneth M. Murchison and Raymond Hood), 307 and 310 East 44m Street, and Rockefeller Apartments (1935-37, Harrison & Fouilhoux). 17 West 54’" Street and 24 West 55"' Street,32 the modernist architectural approach was more typically seen during this period in public housing projects, garden apartments, and larger planned developments throughout the city.33 240 Central Park South Apartments is an unusual and innovative highrise luxury apartment complex in Manhattan, notable for its architecture, planning, and response to its urban site.

 

The retail shops along the Columbus Circle/Broadway side of the complcx include rounded storefronts staggered along the diagonal property line, adding a nearly Art Moderne style touch to the complex. According to Mayer “in this manner a new maximum in display value will be achieved through architectural beauty instead of at the expense of it. Each shop will enjoy many of the advantages of a comer location.” The main entrance court and Central Park South facade were embellished by a number of features: a glass-fronted lobby and entrance; a blue-grey extruded terra-cotta-block wall along the western side of the court: and the work of “collaborating artists,” according to Architectural Forum,35 apparently a reference to both the abstract mosaic mural entitled “The Quiet City” by Amedee Ozenfant3{l and ceramic plaques (no longer extant) on the Central Park South restaurant facade to the east of the court. An orange extruded terra-cotta-block entrance enframement and green tile inset planter decorate the 58U| Street facade of the southern building. Rooftop vertical architectural elements, such as water tower enclosure, chimneys, and wing walls, enliven the skyline.

 

240 Central Park South Apartments was planned with 326 apartments, ranging in size from one to four rooms. A large number of the apartments face Central Park, while the rest also have views due to the overall layout of the complex. The amenities offered were a mixture of those found in a traditional apartment house with those of an apartment hotel. A restaurant was located on the ground floor facing onto the entrance court. There was interior lobby access to the shops. An off-street loading area along 58Ul Street, partially covered by a roof, allowed for the transfer of goods by a hand truck ramp leading directly into the basement.

 

There were four passenger and two service elevators. Cantilevered balconies (averaging eight feet square) were provided for about 100 apartments above the seventh story facing Central Park and above the tenth or twelfth story in the southern sections of the project. Cantilevered comer windows and wide steel casement windows (in many locations the width of the room) allowed for a maximum of light and air. Most apartments above the sixth story had wood-burning fireplaces. Maid service was available and servants’ lavatories and separate service halls were located on each floor; workrooms, storage rooms, and laundry facilities were provided in the basement. A solarium/recreation room was located on the 20dl story of the northern building. Construction included special sound insulation (including elevators) and insulation against heat from boilers, etc. An independent generating plant provided power for the complex, while a hot water heating system was “the first plant of this type ever introduced in a tower apartment house.”37

 

The marketing appeal of 240 Central Park South Apartments was explicitly suburban. Buildings & Building Management pointed out that the J.H. Taylor Management Corp. was well aware that Manhattan had lost a population of 650,000 over the preceding two-and-a-half decades to the outer boroughs and suburbs.38 In its prospectus and advertising, J.H. Taylor used the slogan “Where the Park is Part of the Plan” in recognition of its site facing Central Park, the project’s own landscaped open space, and the prospective residents’ “wide-spread enthusiasm for out-of-doors life, fresh air, sunshine and vistas of green lawns and trees.”39 Architectural Forum commented that

 

The architects... had formulated certain ideas -and actual plans — as to how people might live and would want to live, if they preferred to live in the inner city, rather than in the suburbs, or if they could be convinced that the city had something less stony and court-yardy to offer than the inner cores of our cities have generally known. Their ideas... included the romantic vistas that our cities afford, but usually give only to the top few floors of their tallest buildings. They included a pattern of gardens, of open-air dining, of solariums, not only for the few fantastically pricedpent-houses and terraces, but for all who decided to live in their buildings. And also an intimation of these, a sense of greenery and openness and refreshment even to passers-by. 40

 

A special mail campaign and newspaper advertisements were particularly successful in attracting tenants. The building was over twenty-five percent rented by May 1940, and was seventy percent rented by August. Starting rents were about $550 a room.

 

Critical Response

 

240 Central Park South Apartments, though not widely noted in the architectural press at the time of its construction (possibly due to the timing between the end of the Depression and World War II), was featured in three notable publications. Lewis Mumford, in The New Yorker in December 1940, opined that

 

The new apartment house... shows that in single projects... the architectural imagination has not gone stale. This one seems to me, at least in form, the finest in its class that has been put up since the Rockefeller apartments, and its interior plan is, I think, superior to theirs. ... The architects... had a very teasing problem. The plot is irregular... Their solution was an ingenious one, which gives the living quarters of their buildings the maximum possible light, air, and quiet. ... the ingenuity of the solution lies in the fact that only the western flanks of these two buildings abut on noisy, raucous Broadway. 41 Mumford additionally admired the “very pleasant orangey back” of the buildings, the breadth of the apartment windows, the extensive use of balconies, the openness of the glass-fronted main entrance, and the Broadway shopfronts, and wrote that “in the difficult matter of terminating a high building, the architects again, by the simplest means, have scored a real success.” The apartment complex was included in the Museum of Modem Art’s Guide to Modern Architecture of 1940 which called it “a conscientious restudying of the apartment house problem, with particular attention to light, air, and view.”43 It was also praised in May 1941 in Architectural Forum:

 

It show s a host of improvements which taken together add up to one of the best apartment buildings yet produced. ... the plan... shows an admirably worked out scheme fora difficult site.

 

The solution is notable for the skill with which a maximum number of rooms have been given a view of the park, and for the flexibility with which various types of living units have been fitted into a standardized structural layout. 44 The complex has been singled out in more recent criticism. Architectural critic Paul Goldberger in the New York Times in 1977 listed the building among “The City's Top 10 [Luxury] Apartment Buildings,” stating that this often-overlooked building at the edge of Columbus Circle contains not only good apartments, but also some splendid urban lessons. ... The apartment house is thoughtful, intelligent, and unpretentious throughout - one of the last pieces of luxury housing in New York about which that can be said. 45 Goldberger further lauded the building in The City Observed: New York (1979):

 

[Central Park South’s j last building is one of its very finest, No. 240... Here, urbanistic concerns were paramount... a complex form consisting of a pair of towers atop a zigzag, garden-topped base was used. The base brings variety to storefronts and rhythm to the building's Columbus Circle facade; the overall massing emphasizes park views and brings individuality to apartment layouts. It is a remarkably sophisticated design, substantially ahead of its time in its knowing response to a difficult urban site. 4(1

 

Robert A.M. Stem wrote in an article in 1980 that 240 Central Park South comes at the point when the transition between traditional and modernist styles strongly affected American practice and produced a number of interesting buildings which, because of the ideological positions the shift forced architects and critics alike to take, have been largely overlooked. 47 Stem later observed in New York 1930 (1987) that It was not its bland facades that lent 240 Central Park South distinction but rather the shaping of the two towers, particularly the northern one, in response to the complex perimeter of the site. Aspects of the courtyard apartment building were combined with those of the skyscraper apartment building to establish both a horizontal and vertical reflection of the city's composition. Terraces began only above the

 

level of the trees in Central Park (high enough to be free of the fumes of the street); roofs were set back not only to conform to zoning requirements but also in consideration of solar orientation and views; and chimneys and mechanical equipment combined with the penthouse suites to produce a lively skyline. At the street level the building respected the varied nature of its locale: a deep, planted courtyard on Central Park South created an elegant pocket of shade, while a vigorous one-story commercial strip along Broadway used curved corners to define the diagonal of the street. The building succeeded... as an exemplar of humane values applied to the problem of high-density city living and as a finely tuned instrument of urbanism. 4S

 

Later History' of 240 Central Park South 49

 

240 Central Park South. Inc., original owner of the property, sold it in May 1976 to Central Park South Associates, an entity of Sarah Korein, a New York real estate mogul known for choice Manhattan properties. Sarah Rabinowitz (c. 1905-1998). born in Germany and raised in Palestine, married Isidor Korein, a Hungarian engineer, and immigrated to New York City in 1923. After the purchase of two apartment buildings in Brooklyn in 1931 and 1941, she entered the Manhattan real estate market after the war with the purchase of 715 Park Avenue. She later bought and sold the Osborne Apartments, the Beresford. Croyden Hotel, Fifth Avenue Hotel, and Schwab House Apartments, and owned the land and/or buildings at Lever House, Equitable Building. 1 Penn Plaza. Delmonico Hotel, Swiss Center, and 220 and 240 Central Park South Apartments.

 

Among the building’s many residents over the years have been Antoine de Saint-Exupery {1941-). later author of The Little Prince (1943); actress Sylvia Miles (since 1968); Albert Mayer (c. 1975 to his death in 1981); Claru Mayer (c. 1975-86); and the fictive Lois Lane in the movie Superman (1978). Directories list an office of the J.H. Taylor Management Corp. here from 1940 to the 1980s.

 

Description

 

240 Central Park South Apartments consists of two buildings, connected at the ground story, overlooking a central landscaped courtyard. The northern building along Centra! Park South is roughly C-shaped in plan around a planted entrance court and is twenty stones in height with an eight-story (plus tank house) lower. The southern building along West 58th Street is fifteen stories. Both buildings are steel-skeleton-framed and faced in orangish Belden Stark brick, with slate sills and concrete cantilevered balconies with original metal railings. A restaurant has been located in the ground-story space east of the entrance court. Retail shops are located on the west

 

side of the entrance court and on the Columbus Circle/Broadway side of the buildings, some with rounded storefronts staggered along the diagonal of the property line. The shops' roofs comprise part of the central courtyard and entrance court. The majority of the original Fenwrought steel casement windows (cantilevered at the comers) survive, mainly in two configurations: 1) central fixed single pane, flanked by casements with upper and lower fixed panes 2) casements with upper and lower fixed panes. Some windows have been replaced. There are also some smaller one- and two-pane windows. Brick replacement, repair, and coating in recent years has resulted in a variety of brick colors.

 

Central Park South Building The northern building of the complex is twenty stones in height, with an eight* story (plus tank house) tower, and is roughly C-shaped in plan around an entrance court [see below'], with a southern wing. A restaurant has been located in the ground-story space cast of the entrance court. Histonc bnck window enframements (with slightly recessed brick) survive, though original ceramic decorative plaques have been removed from the piers. There were originally four bays of windows along Central Park South (with tripartite windows with tripartite transoms, except that at the eastern end. which was bipartite); the comer by the entrance court was originally a glass-fronted inset restaurant entrance with a terra-cotta comer column supporting a slightly projecting shelf canopy. There are currently four large non-historic, single-pane windows with metal surrounds set within the historic enframements and altered former restaurant entrance comer; an entrance with non-historic revolving door and metal-and-glass door was inserted in the second bay from the eastern end (it has a non-histonc canopy). The windows have non-historic awnings. The retail shops located on the west side of the building begin at the west side of the entrance court [see below].

 

There is brick patterning on the lower portions (second to fourth stories) of the northern facades of the two wings. An abstract mosaic mural (“The Quiet City.” by Amedee Ozenfant) is located over the entrance, in two panels above and below the third story. Cantilevered balconies are placed above the seventh story on comers facing Central Park, and above the twelfth story on comers of the southern facade. There are comer windows where there are not balconies, except on the southern wing. The eastern wall of the building is set back from the side lot line above the ground story (which is surmounted by a terrace with its original metal railing); the wall is pierced by window's.

 

The 20“' story has penthouses, the original solan urn/recreation room, and three roof terraces (including one to the south), the eastern one having a pergola. The tower (2P‘ to 28"‘ stones plus tank house) has balconies on the 22"d to 26ll‘ stones of the northern

 

facade; comer terraces on the 27th story of the northern facade; and tank house surmounted by a roofed terrace (now enclosed). The northern facade of the tank house portion of the lower has windows divided by pilasters clad in blue-gray extruded terra-cotta blocks (the lower portion of the east pilaster has been replaced by bntt.). Roofs have chimneys, wing walls, bulkheads, and stairs. Entrance Court The entrance court has a concrete sidewalk leading to the entrance with low retaining walls with aggregate concrete coping, one stone-clad entrance post, tile and flagstone paving to the east with a tree pit and small planting beds, and a planting bed to the west. The original iron railing (lined on the interior with a planting strip) borders the court along the Central Park South sidewalk and is set on a base (now clad in flagstone); the railing originally ended at the entrance area leading to the restaurant, but now extends to the east. A long non-historic entrance canopy extending to the Central Park South sidewalk and non-historic lamp standards have been placed in the court.

 

The original curved one-story bnck-clad entrance pavilion has large fixed panes with transoms and an inset entrance with non-historic double aluminum and glass doors, surmounted by a projecting roof that extends to the east as a canopy, which is supported by a pole. The west wall of the entrance court is clad in blue-gray extruded terra-cotta blocks ( by Atlantic Terra Cotta Co.); this wall was later pierced by two windows. This wall enclosed a one-story shop to the west; the shop is surmounted by a terrace that is bordered on the east and north by the original metal railing. The east wall of the court currently has three non-historic single-pane windows with awnings and an historic three-pane window with tripartite transom at the southeast comer of the court.

 

Shopfronts: Central Park South and Columbus Circle/Broadway Retail shops are located on the western side of the complex, beginning at the comer of Central Park South and continuing along the Columbus Circle/Broadway side of the buildings. Four one-story bays have rounded storefronts staggered along the diagonal of the property line. All of the shopfronts originally had a continuous black signband above a continuous metal band above black-painted glass signbands in the transoms of the shopfronts. The shops' roofs comprised part of the landscaped central courtyard. From north to south:

 

1)The shop on the west side of the entrance court was originally entered through the lobby interior. It was later combined with two shops to the west. The shop at the comer of Central Park South and Columbus Circle has a recessed inset comer entrance (with the building cantilevered over it). Recent shopfront alterations include new brick facing and (in bays east to west on Central Park South): a louver and a metal door with parged transom area: two double-pane windows with anodized aluminum framing; and two triple-pane windows with anodized

 

aluminum framing. The comer entrance has anodized aluminum and glass double doors with a transom and sidelights. The recent brick facing continues on the staggered Columbus Circle/Broadway side, which has multi-pane winaows with anodized aluminum framing. A non-historic awning extends around the comer.

 

2)The shop in the center of the Central Park South building has an inset entrance with a painted metal and glass door and transom, flanked on the north by a glass comer shopfront window and on the south by a projecting glass shopfront window with painted metal framing (both without transoms) set above a brick-and-glassblock bulkhead, and a black glass signband,.

 

3)The shop in the south end of the Central Park South building has an inset entrance with an aluminum and glass door and transom, flanked by projecting glass shopfronts with aluminum framing (without transoms) set above a granite bulkhead. It has a non-historic awning.

 

4)The rounded shopfront has metal window framing (in its original configuration but without a transom) set above its historic brick bulkhead (now painted) with its original openings (formerly windows, now vents), and a non-histonc aluminum door and awning. The shopfront originally had a metal railing above slate coping; there is currently a metal-spike security fence.

 

5)The rounded shopfront has later metal window frami ng (without a transom) set above its historic brick bulkhead with original openings (formerly windows, now vents; the southern one is covered), and a non-histonc aluminum and glass door, awning, and rolldown gates. The shopfront originally had a metal railing above slate coping; there is currently a metal-spike security fence.

 

6)The two northern bays of the southernmost shop are rounded shopfronts with original metal window framing with transoms set above their historic brick bulkheads with original openings (formerly windows, now vents and covered by signs). The portion of the shop in the 58Ul Street building has an angled shopfront with metal framing in its original configuration with transoms set above its historic bnck bulkhead with signs placed in original window openings, and has anodized aluminum and glass entrance doors and transom. The southern piers are covered with painted sheet metal. The rounded bays originally had a metal railing above slate coping; there is currently a metal-spike security fence. The entire shopfront has a continuous non-historic awning.

 

West 58th Street Building The southern building of the complex is fifteen stories in height and is a slightly irregular slab in form. The lobby entrance on 58lh Street has an enframement of orange extruded terra-cotta blocks (by the Atlantic Terra Cotta Co.) (a portion to the east of the entrance has been pierced by an air conditioner, with a brick surround); original signage “235 W 58" and “240 CPS”; and non-historic anodized aluminum and glass doors and box awning. To the west of the lobby entrance is an original glazed green tile inset planter; a doctors’ sign plaque above the planter (in its historic location); and a row of small single-pane windows. To the east of the lobby entrance, multi-pane windows flank an inset office entrance, with a wood and glass door, brick steps, and non-historic iron gate. The ground story is capped by brick patterning.

 

Cantilevered balconies are placed above the tenth story. There are comer windows where there are not balconies. The roof has a garden, a pergola at the west end, and bulkheads.

 

Central Courtyard The central courtyard consists of the area between the Central Park South and 58th Street buildings, as well as the roofs of the one-story shops along Columbus Circle/Broadway. Atop the shops there were originally three raised planting beds, with brick retaining walls. The curved glass wall of the ground-story conservatory (connecting the lobbies of the two buildings) overlooks the courtyard on the west side. The eastern portion of the courtyard is divided by the submerged (zigzag in plan) hand truck ramp (bordered by brick walls) leading to the basement from the off-street loading area on 58"’ Street. To the east of the ramp is a planting bed. and to the west was originally a roughly T-shaped planting bed and two small circular planting beds, both raised with bnck retaining walls. Paths had gravel paving. Portions of the original landscaping scheme survive.

 

58th Street Off-Street Loading Area, Service Entrance, and Planting Bed Off of 58lh Street are a number of original features: a loading area for two trucks, paved with concrete and partially covered by a canopy roof enclosed on the north by a brick wall with metal gates; a brick post at the east end of the loading area at the sidewalk; a service entrance sidewalk with two brick entrance posts of different heights at the street end; and an L-shaped raised planting bed bordered by a brick retaining wall. There was originally a planting strip between the retaining wall and the street sidewalk. Original sidewalk and loading area gates have been removed. This entire area is currently enclosed by non-historic rolldown gates and chainlink fencing; there is also chainlink fencing along the east side of the service entrance sidewalk and above the loading area canopy roof.

 

- From the 2002 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

An empty retail space in the largest mall in America.

 

0168

Dun Laoghaire has changed a lot since I took these photographs and there are many changes on the way especially along George’s Street.

 

I was employed by Ericsson and based in Dun Laoghaire at the Adelphi Centre from 2001 to 2010 and I really liked the town even though the place was going through a period of urban decline and depression.

 

When I was there we were based in George’s Street which was going down hill at a rapid pace and the company decision to move from the town must have had a huge impact on the town and especially on the restaurants on the main street.

 

Before I joined Ericsson I worked for two different companies with offices at Haigh Terrace which became a no-go area at night because of anti-social behaviour related to drug-dealing. Because of the new library complex and the removal of the pond in Moran Park the anti-social problem in the immediate area is no longer an issue even if some locals dislike the library building.

 

According to a recent report Georges Street is too long as a main street in order to support viable retailing. Therefore, it is proposed that the street be demarcated into distinct quarters: an Interiors Quarter on Lower Georges Street from Cumberland Street to St Michael’s Hospital; the Core Retail Quarter from Bloomfields Shopping Centre to Haigh Terrace; the Commercial & Residential Quarter from Haigh Terrace to Adelphi House; and the Artesian Quarter on Upper Georges Street from Mellifont Avenue to the People’s Park.

 

Several interventions at street level are required to change the appearance of each quarter and communicate a distinct proposition for each quarter to shoppers and visitors. These interventions will range from the establishment of new town squares; to the creative use of paving, seating, flowerbeds and lighting; to the introduction of new canopies and shading; to the erection of new sculpted features and signage.

 

It is envisaged that as the development of the retail quarters gain momentum, the demand for retail space will increase. The new mechanisms such as the Property Forum and Retail Forum will be vehicles to focus new retail businesses into clusters for example food and fashion specialty shops in the Artesian Quarter.

Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw20amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

/goo. The American Florist. 883 all times expected to show something unusual in that special line and he never disappoints. Not much but carnations are grown in his large range of houses. Several of his houses are not quite No. 1 but the others make up what these lack. A house of Ethel Crocker is a marvel and proves that the claims for this variety have not been overdrawn. His extensive propagating houses are models and the long benches of carnation cuttings set one to wondering what he will do with them; but then he seldom has enough to supply the demand. He ships nearly all he produces. Lancaster, with its wealth and about 40,000 population, is a poor market for fine flowers. The large growers, and even the small ones, ship the greater part of their crops. The "Cabbage Hill" ele- ment somewhat pervades the town and prefers the aroma of sauerkraut to that of violets or American Beauties. Here as in other cities some of the wealthiest have greenhouses on their own grounds and are in the main satisfied with what they produce. M. The Matter of Credits. The question of credits is a very important one to every wholesale florist and it assumes particular prominence in the establishment where cut flowers are wholesaled on c.immission. The wholesale florists have for years been discussing this problem of giving credit and several plans have been broached for making the evil less acute, but conditions do not yet seem to be ripe for such an organization as is required. Eventually the wholesale florists should have a co-operative credit agency of their own, which should publish for its mem- bers a list of credits, it being one of the rules of the organization that the moment a buyer is reported as a bad risk, he must pay cash to all. A number of features might be added to broaden the work and secure all the wholesalers as members, but the general advantage of such a mutual benefit experience list should be sufficient to bring in every dealer of consequence. And the advantages would not be all on one side. The responsible retail- ers would secure even greater benefit. How often you hear a retailer com- plain that a certain competitor is selling at less than the complainant can buy for. That is easy of explanation. One dealer pays cash; the other owes the wholesaler and will owe him as long as he will "stand for it"; then something will happen to make an item for the press and probably a case for the bank- ruptcy lawyers. Retailers have repeat- edly found it difficult to compete with those who do not intend to pay. To day, when no two firms agree on the credit of anyone, each wholesaler has to rely on his individual judgment and a great many people secure credit who are not entitled to it and who abuse it. Then, too, if you ask a new buyer for references it hurts him, even if he promptly produces references enough to fill a book; and if he happens to be aman without credit, a "dead one," he puts up a most awful "roar" and promptly does his cash buying elsewhere. The cut flower business ought to be spot cash. For the commission man of to-day to keep up with the times be must have a bank account large enough to carry any buyers that are good, an occasional one that isn't, and still pay the producer on demand. E. E. PiKSER.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

PURE WHITE CYCLAMEN GROWN R. ROTHE, GLENSIDE, PA. Boston. PROSPERITY ATTENDS THE CLOSE OF THE SOCIAL SEASON.—PRICES STIFFEN —SOME GOOD ROSES.—BULBOUS STOCK IS POPU- LAR.—VARIOUS lOTTING AND PERSONAL NOTES. The flower trade seems to have gath- ered itself together for the final winding up of the season, before Lent takes pos- session. The past week has been gener- ally satisfactory and there remains but a week more. While lacking in sensational features and unusually quiet on the sur- face, yet the season is believed to have been a fairly good one and as profitable, all together, to growers, dealers and retailers, as any in recent years. All prices have stiffenedupconsiderably within the past few days. Roses have done well and the returns, for those growers who grade correctly, have been pleasant reading. The dissatisfaction, where any exists, is confined to those who grade according to their own ideas rather than to the generally adopted market scale and then howl because their receipts do not agree with published price quotations. And their race will never become extinct. No better roses have ever been seen in this market than those being sent to Welch Bros, by S. J. Renter. The highest grades of his cut are bringing $25 per hundred and his carnations are of an equally high order. Fred King's scarlet carnation, named after himself, is very popular and a great keeper. Warren Ewell reports the trade in flowering bulbs in pans as excellent. The quality of his stock this year is superior to anything in the past and it seems to be generally in demand—as popular, almost, as Warren himself; and this is saying much. The annual scrimmage over the gypsy moth appropriation is on at the State House All kinds of charges and counter charges are being made, some going so far as to accuse the moth hunters of planting colonies of the pest to perpetu- ate their occupation. E. M. Wood has just got back from the salubrious Florida coast, full of entertaining stories of that favored land and looking greatly refreshed after his much needed vacation. S. A. F. matters and CO-operative purchase will now begin to hum. Lothrop & Higgins,of Bridgewater, are making arrangements to put up a mam- moth display of dahlias at the Paris exposition. Herman, Mr. Edgar's driver, was badly injured while unloading some plants from his wagon on Tremont street Tuesday morning, by being struck by a runaway team. Long & Marshall have taken posses- sion of the Thorndike flower store and an appearance of progressive prosperity is unmistakable. A. T. Boddington, of New York, is in town; also R. H. Dunbar, of Bristol, R, L New York. STATE OF THE MARKET.—THE FAVORITES BRING GOOD PRICES.—THE VIOLET SITUA- TION.—MARKET DEPENDS UPON THE WEATHER.—STORY OF THE SPECIALTIES. —NOTES. The leaders for the past week in the cut flower market have been Beauties, top grade Bridesmaids, good carnations and lilacs. Beauties are in larger supply than one year ago but are averaging more money and have held up well in price, bringing 60 cents for the best. Extra quality Bridesmaids are just about equal to the demand, the best running up to 15 cents. Brides are not so easily sold and bring lower values on the average. Brunners have arrived but the number coming in is small as yet, the price ranging from 20 cents to 50 cents. The daily supply of violetsisenormous. Thus far they have been cleaned up at fair figures except when rainy weather or a snow storm like that of last Satur- day interferes, in which case it taxes the cellars of the wholesalers to store them. With no other flower is the sale so dependent upon the weather. On account of their short-lived perfume it is an invari-

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Fashion interaction, content creation and social participation.

 

Schway are specialists in design, development and build of digital dressing-room apps. virtual closets, outfit builders, configurators, online fitting rooms and try-on technology.

 

Cross-platform engagement for multichannel fashion retail, marketers, publishers, affiliates, agencies and bloggers!

 

Schway – digital dressing everywhere - from womenswear to sportswear, menswear to maternity, streetwear to schoolwear!

Dun Laoghaire has changed a lot since I took these photographs and there are many changes on the way especially along George’s Street.

 

I was employed by Ericsson and based in Dun Laoghaire at the Adelphi Centre from 2001 to 2010 and I really liked the town even though the place was going through a period of urban decline and depression.

 

When I was there we were based in George’s Street which was going down hill at a rapid pace and the company decision to move from the town must have had a huge impact on the town and especially on the restaurants on the main street.

 

Before I joined Ericsson I worked for two different companies with offices at Haigh Terrace which became a no-go area at night because of anti-social behaviour related to drug-dealing. Because of the new library complex and the removal of the pond in Moran Park the anti-social problem in the immediate area is no longer an issue even if some locals dislike the library building.

 

According to a recent report Georges Street is too long as a main street in order to support viable retailing. Therefore, it is proposed that the street be demarcated into distinct quarters: an Interiors Quarter on Lower Georges Street from Cumberland Street to St Michael’s Hospital; the Core Retail Quarter from Bloomfields Shopping Centre to Haigh Terrace; the Commercial & Residential Quarter from Haigh Terrace to Adelphi House; and the Artesian Quarter on Upper Georges Street from Mellifont Avenue to the People’s Park.

 

Several interventions at street level are required to change the appearance of each quarter and communicate a distinct proposition for each quarter to shoppers and visitors. These interventions will range from the establishment of new town squares; to the creative use of paving, seating, flowerbeds and lighting; to the introduction of new canopies and shading; to the erection of new sculpted features and signage.

 

It is envisaged that as the development of the retail quarters gain momentum, the demand for retail space will increase. The new mechanisms such as the Property Forum and Retail Forum will be vehicles to focus new retail businesses into clusters for example food and fashion specialty shops in the Artesian Quarter.

PERSHING SQUARE/TITLE is a site-specific visual and sound installation by artist Renee Petropoulos. This project continues Renee Petropoulos' exploration of the relationship between the architectural and social culture of LA. The starting point for this project is the original function of the building which housed the Title Guarantee and Trust Co., a business comprised of holding the deeds to LA properties. The work consists of a series of audio commentaries by various voices (people) revealing their points of view on different LA locations. Both amateur and authoritative voices are included and the often poetic, emotional nature of the language of these perceptions reveals unexpected passions for the historic and the current elements of the city. Descriptions of hospital rooms, immigration offices, cinema locations and palatial pink factories serve to illuminate our cumulative and collective response to LA. The fusion of the public and private perceptions of the city furthers ideas about architecture, ownership and individual interior reflection.

  

The project will be in constant evolution reflecting a changing situation through both audio and visual encounters. The audio component of the interviews will be broadcast from the building being available at street level, and through your car radio (106.9fm) when traveling in the vicinity and via the PhantomGalleriesLA.com website, excerpts made of vinyl lettering, culled from the interviews will be added one sentence at a time on a weekly basis to the Title Guarantee Building Art Space Windows.

 

“PERSHING SQUARE/TITLE” at the Art Deco/ Zigzag Moderne LA Historic-Cultural Monument on Pershing Square, presents a compelling urban street experience of encountering diverse perspectives of LA. The Pershing Square area is central to Downtown LA’s extraordinary urban transformation as a vital place to work, live and visit. It is a resonant place to consider the issues raised by this public art work.

 

RENEE PETROPOULOS

“PERSHING SQUARE/TITLE”

Curated by Susan Horowitz- Independent Curator for Phantom Galleries LA

  

PERSHING SQUARE/ TITLE GUARANTEE BUILDING LOFTS

1929-31 JOHN & DONALD PARKINSON ARCHITECTS

CITY OF LA HISTORIC-CULTURAL MONUMENT- DESIGNATED 1984

411 West 5th Street Los Angeles, 90013

car radio (106.9 fm) when traveling in the vicinity

 

Exhibit runs: April 22- June 30, 2008.

Pedestrian viewing 24/7

    

PERSHING SQUARE/TITLE is a site-specific visual and sound installation by artist Renee Petropoulos. This project continues Renee Petropoulos' exploration of the relationship between the architectural and social culture of LA. The starting point for this project is the original function of the building which housed the Title Guarantee and Trust Co., a business comprised of holding the deeds to LA properties. The work consists of a series of audio commentaries by various voices (people) revealing their points of view on different LA locations. Both amateur and authoritative voices are included and the often poetic, emotional nature of the language of these perceptions reveals unexpected passions for the historic and the current elements of the city. Descriptions of hospital rooms, immigration offices, cinema locations and palatial pink factories serve to illuminate our cumulative and collective response to LA. The fusion of the public and private perceptions of the city furthers ideas about architecture, ownership and individual interior reflection.

  

The project will be in constant evolution reflecting a changing situation through both audio and visual encounters. The audio component of the interviews will be broadcast from the building being available at street level, and through your car radio (106.9fm) when traveling in the vicinity and via the PhantomGalleriesLA.com website, excerpts made of vinyl lettering, culled from the interviews will be added one sentence at a time on a weekly basis to the Title Guarantee Building Art Space Windows.

 

“PERSHING SQUARE/TITLE” at the Art Deco/ Zigzag Moderne LA Historic-Cultural Monument on Pershing Square, presents a compelling urban street experience of encountering diverse perspectives of LA. The Pershing Square area is central to Downtown LA’s extraordinary urban transformation as a vital place to work, live and visit. It is a resonant place to consider the issues raised by this public art work.

 

Media contact Phantom Galleries LA:

Liza Simone

213.626.2854

Liza@PhantomGalleriesLA.com

www.phantomGalleriesLA.com

   

Upcoming Title Guarantee Building Art Space Exhibits:

 

July curated by Dangerous Curve DangerousCurve.org

August curated by LACDA lacda.com

September curated by Edgar Varela Fine Art EdgarVarelaFineArts.com

 

LA artist Renee Petropoulos has produced permanent public art here including her mural in the rotunda of the LA Central Library, installations in Culver City and the Metro Green Line in El Segundo. She has exhibited her work extensively and produced temporary and permanent installations internationally. Her recent 2007 exhibition, Social Arrangements, featured five related ongoing projects encompassing painting, sculpture and audio. She is represented here by the Rosamund Felsen Gallery (rosamundfelsen.com/petropoulos/index.php). and is currently a professor in the graduate division of the Otis College of Art and Design.

 

Susan Horowitz is an independent curator and artist. She is working with Phantom Galleries LA to curate exhibits that illuminate contemporary urban issues. Her photo/text art work focuses on an exploration of the complex relationship between the individual, nature, and architecture of the urban West. Her current exhibition LA CONTINUUM, a collaboration with Carol Bishop, is a collection of glimpses of the flux of urban land, development and architecture. Hennessey and Ingalls Art and Architecture Books in Santa Monica (hennesseyingalls.com).

WEBSITE - susanhorowitz-laprojects.com

    

Phantom Galleries LA is a Los Angeles County based organization that transforms properties in transition into 24/7 public art galleries. Each installation is a unique relationship between the participating Artist, Curator, and Property Owner. Exhibits are curated by local Arts Organizations, Galleries, Independent Curators, and Artists. The project gives local artists an opportunity to exhibit their work, while fostering economic development by drawing attention to available retail space. PGLA promotes the creative communities of Los Angeles to a broader audience and encourages the appreciation and participation in the arts among community members and organizations creating a win/ win situation that benefits the entire community as a whole. Art is a necessary part of everyday life.

 

Title Guarantee Building Lofts

While the exterior architecture has qualified the building for inclusion on the Nation Historic Register, the completely reconstructed interiors are perfect for today’s modern living. Experience the excitement of the new Downtown Los Angeles and live in a landmark. For further information about The Title Guarantee Building Lofts contact 213. 627.3939 or titleguaranteebuilding.com

  

For further information about this exhibit contact - susanhorowitzproject@mac.com

For further information about Phantom Galleries LA contact Liza@PhantomGalleriesLA.com www.PHANTOMGALLERIESLA.COM

 

INSTALLATION IMAGES + STREAMING AUDIO ON PHANTOMGALLERIESLA.com

   

Phantom Galleries LA is proud to announce their invitation to curate and oversee exhibits showcasing the Art and Culture of Downtown Los Angeles at the new Title Guarantee Building Public Art Window Space. Exhibits are curated by Downtown LA Arts Organizations, Galleries, Independent Curators, and Artists and/or focus on topics about Downtown Los Angeles.

O'Connell Street - Dublin - Ireland

Top 12 Free Light & Flowing Paper Shopping Bag Mockup0.0Overall ScoreReader Rating 0 VotesHave you ever decided to come to a coffee shop or restaurant and try its service when you saw a very nice picture of this place? With the popularity of social network, everyone tends to take the beautiful...

 

www.psdmockups.net/16-fresh-mind-blowing-storefront-mockup/

branding, coffee shop, decoration, design, Logo 3D, logo mockup, mockup, mockup template, package, photo, psd, restaurant, retail logo, signage, store, storefront, window mockup

Dun Laoghaire has changed a lot since I took these photographs and there are many changes on the way especially along George’s Street.

 

I was employed by Ericsson and based in Dun Laoghaire at the Adelphi Centre from 2001 to 2010 and I really liked the town even though the place was going through a period of urban decline and depression.

 

When I was there we were based in George’s Street which was going down hill at a rapid pace and the company decision to move from the town must have had a huge impact on the town and especially on the restaurants on the main street.

 

Before I joined Ericsson I worked for two different companies with offices at Haigh Terrace which became a no-go area at night because of anti-social behaviour related to drug-dealing. Because of the new library complex and the removal of the pond in Moran Park the anti-social problem in the immediate area is no longer an issue even if some locals dislike the library building.

 

According to a recent report Georges Street is too long as a main street in order to support viable retailing. Therefore, it is proposed that the street be demarcated into distinct quarters: an Interiors Quarter on Lower Georges Street from Cumberland Street to St Michael’s Hospital; the Core Retail Quarter from Bloomfields Shopping Centre to Haigh Terrace; the Commercial & Residential Quarter from Haigh Terrace to Adelphi House; and the Artesian Quarter on Upper Georges Street from Mellifont Avenue to the People’s Park.

 

Several interventions at street level are required to change the appearance of each quarter and communicate a distinct proposition for each quarter to shoppers and visitors. These interventions will range from the establishment of new town squares; to the creative use of paving, seating, flowerbeds and lighting; to the introduction of new canopies and shading; to the erection of new sculpted features and signage.

 

It is envisaged that as the development of the retail quarters gain momentum, the demand for retail space will increase. The new mechanisms such as the Property Forum and Retail Forum will be vehicles to focus new retail businesses into clusters for example food and fashion specialty shops in the Artesian Quarter.

Visit this location at The Listening Room in Edloe Mountain in Second Life

 

I can breathe again.

I can complete a sentence.

I'm not blowing out gobs of yellow goop every ten minutes.

I'm still not 100%, and I never will be again.

But I'll come close to it.

And that's good enough for me.

 

DEMO

 

I've been scouring Marketplace for "demo tango" and picking up dozens of outfits to try on.

Yeah, the L$ balance has come close to zero several times in the past week.

But I'm happy.

Retail Therapy works.

 

REVIEWS

 

I can't keep all the style guide rules in my head.

And my checklist isn't helping.

I fuck something up in every doc.

More than once.

When I get it to the front of my mental stack.

Something else slides back out.

I feel stupid. And weak. And old. And tired.

 

GAZA

 

Fuck Gaza.

What a fucked-up shithole.

I need to write up a google doc with my thoughts on it.

So I can just shove it down the throats of Hamas-loving, Jew-hating scum and choke them to death on their stupidity, evil, racism, and inhumanity.

Or, better yet...

I'm giving PizzaIDF a pizza.

Much easier.

 

FRIENDS LIST

 

Cleaned it a bit this week. Got rid of some not-really people, and then cut a few folks I don't want to know if they're online or not.

Being reminded this week why I don't have Tish on their, and pondering whether I really want to be social with someone who has the views that Mona has.

Does this make me some kind of hypocrite?

No, someone who just wants to minimize the bs.

Fashion interaction, content creation and social participation.

 

Schway are specialists in design, development and build of digital dressing-room apps. virtual closets, outfit builders, configurators, online fitting rooms and try-on technology.

 

Cross-platform engagement for multichannel fashion retail, marketers, publishers, affiliates, agencies and bloggers!

 

Schway – digital dressing everywhere - from womenswear to sportswear, menswear to maternity, streetwear to schoolwear!

This is an edited version of the original photo, which you can see here. I wanted to reduce the dark shadows on the woman's pants, so you could see more detail there ... but I may have taken away too much of the shadow on her face. I'll let you be the judge...

 

This was taken at the deli/bakery (Georgia's, click here for details) on the southwest corner of 89th & Broadway. This woman was sitting alone, staring into space with a dreamy look on her face, and she would have appeared much more photogenic if I could have moved my camera a little faster and snapped the picture. But then a waiter appeared, bring what turned out to be a glass of ice tea; and he obscured my view of her for a couple moments while he was setting it down. But the time he got out of camera range, she had picked up her cell phone, and was calling someone ... perhaps to report on the arrival of her ice tea...

 

This is an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan -- between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

 

I don't like to intrude on people's privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they're still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what's right in front of me.

 

I've also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting -- literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I've learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture ... after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it's pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

 

For the most part, I've deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don't want to be photographed, and I don't want to feel like I'm taking advantage of them. I'm still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We'll see how it goes ...

 

The only other thing I've noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They're probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I've photographed ... but there was just nothing memorable about them.

 

Note: for some reason, this photo was published as part of the illustrations for a Jun 2009 Squidoo blog titled Foot Tattoo Pics www.squidoo.com/foot-tattoo-pics I have no idea why -- after all, you can't even see this woman's feet! It was also published as part of the illustrations for a Jun 2009 Squidoo blog titled Tattoos of Girls. It was also published in a June 2009 "Istanbul Trails" blog titled "See How Easily You Can Get My Personal Guidance during Your Stay in Istanbul." And it was published in a blog titled "Things to Do During a Heat Wave."

 

Moving into 2010, the photo was published in a May 25, 2010 blog whose title, when translated from the Italian, is "I suspect betrayal: women spy more than men, with the help of new technologies." It was also published in an Oct 27, 2010 blog titled "Top 5 Location-Based Services [Mashable Awards]." And a tightly-cropped version of the photo was published in a Nov 6, 2010 blog titled "Distraction."

 

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in a May 17, 2011 PunchCut blog titled "Uncovering Context With Mobile Diary Studies." And it was published in an Oct 6, 2011 Great Cell Cellphone Circumstance pictures blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written here on this Flickr page. It was also published in an Oct 6, 2011 Tolle Crazy Computer blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written here on this Flickr page. And a tightly cropped version of the photo was published in an Oct 20, 2011 blog titled "Social Networking on Mobile Devices Skyrockets." It was also published in a Nov 17, 2011 Getting a Tattoo blog.

 

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in a Feb 20, 2012 blog titled " [Infographic] More than 50% of Connected Consumers Are Females in Their 40s." It was also published in a Feb 17, 2012 blog titled "Sweet Mobile! Now What? Part 4 — User Context." And a heavily cropped version of the photo (showing only the subject's hand, smartphone, and glass of iced tea) was published in a Mar 13,2012 blog titled "Social Web sollte auch social seine!" It was also published in a Mar 22, 2012 blog titled "Relationships Trump Google." And it was published in a May 29, 2012 blog titled "The Best Apps to Help you Balance Your Home and Work Life." It was also published in a Jun 15, 2012 blog titled "Direct voordeel, vertrouwen en context bepalen succes van mobile marketing." And it was published in a Jun 20, 2012 blog titled "Nice Advantages Of Mobile Marketing Photos."

 

Moving into the second half of 2012, the photo was published in a Jul 16, 2012 blog titled "Meaningful Communication in a Disconnected World." It was also published in an Aug 27, 2012 blog titled "Yelp Better: Local Search App To Find Retail Social Enterprises." And it was published in an Oct 16, 2012 blog titled "Best Way to Keep App Users Engaged: Build a Good One." It was also published in a Nov 16, 2012 blog titled "Using Images to Shape Online Identity." And it was published in a Dec 21, 2012 blog titled "僕のブログ更新に利用しているアプリ5選を紹介しましょう!"

 

Moving into 2013, the photo was published in a Jan 7, 2013 blog titled "The mobile world is maturing fast." It was also published in a Jan 14, 2013 blog titled "Crowdfunding options abound – Search Engine Watch." And it was published in a Jan 16, 2013 blog titled "Forrester: Mobile Commerce to Quadruple to $31 Billion in Next 5 Years," as well as a Jan 16, 2013 Mashable blog titled "7 Ways Mobile Apps Are Driving Revenue for Businesses." It was also published in a Jan 24, 2013 blog titled "2012, el año en que la telefonía comenzó a cambiar." And it was published in an undated (early Feb 2013) Mashable blog titled "Job Recruiters Lack Mobile Edge, Study Says." It was also published in a Feb 12, 2013 blog titled "Amazon, Apple, and yes, Victoria’s Secret dominate the mobile shopping satisfaction ratings," as well as a Feb 12, 2013 blog titled "BYOD Roundup: Top 10 BYOD Tips, 4 BYOD Policy No-Nos and Surprising BYOD Stats." And it was published in a Feb 27, 2013 blog titled "A marketing trend to watch out for: Location-based targeting." It was also published in a Mar 4, 2013 blog titled "These 11 Apps Will Supercharge Your Personal Life," as well as a Mar 7, 2013 blog titled Why retail is moving to live engagement on mobile" and a Mar 7, 2013 blog titled "Ambient Intelligence: Sensing a Future Mobile Revolution." It was also published in an Apr 1, 2013 blog titled "Facebook Offers Brings ‘Shop Now’ and ‘Remind Me’ Options to Mobile," as well as an April 3, 2013 blog titled "7 Reasons Why You Should Be Using Twitter," and an Apr 3, 2013 blog titled "Latest mobile and m-commerce stats." And it was published in a Jul 16, 2013 blog titled "Online customer experience in the post PC age." It was also published in a Sep 24, 2013 blog titled "3 Essentials for Great Mobile SEO." And it was published in a Nov 18, 2013 blog titled "Plugging In and Tuning Out."

 

Moving into 2014, the photo was published in a Jan 7, 2014 blog titled "Écrire sur smartphones ou tablettes ? La moitié des utilisateurs de Wattpad l'a fait." It was also published in a Feb 23, 2014 blog titled "Why Understanding Your Social Media Audience is Important." And it was published in a May 7, 2014 blog titled "How to convert social media followers into customers." It was also published in a Jul 30, 2014 blog titled "A shocking lack of zen/."

 

Moving into 2015, the photo was published in an undated (mid-April) blog titled "How to Reduce Data Usage When Browsing the Web on a Smartphone." It was also published in a Mar 18, 2015 blog titled "How to be Connected but not Addicted to Social Media." And it was published in an Apr 20, 2015 blog titled "http://www.bidgroup.org/blog/" It was also published in an undated (late May 2015) blog titled "Should Parents Use Cell Phones to Monitor Teens?"

"What's Wrong With Cinderella?"

 

I finally came unhinged in the dentist's office -- one of those ritzy pediatric practices tricked out with comic books, DVDs and arcade games -- where I'd taken my 3-year-old daughter for her first exam. Until then, I'd held my tongue. I'd smiled politely every time the supermarket-checkout clerk greeted her with ''Hi, Princess''; ignored the waitress at our local breakfast joint who called the funny-face pancakes she ordered her ''princess meal''; made no comment when the lady at Longs Drugs said, ''I bet I know your favorite color'' and handed her a pink balloon rather than letting her choose for herself. Maybe it was the dentist's Betty Boop inflection that got to me, but when she pointed to the exam chair and said, ''Would you like to sit in my special princess throne so I can sparkle your teeth?'' I lost it.

 

''Oh, for God's sake,'' I snapped. ''Do you have a princess drill, too?''

 

She stared at me as if I were an evil stepmother.

 

''Come on!'' I continued, my voice rising. ''It's 2006, not 1950. This is Berkeley, Calif. Does every little girl really have to be a princess?''

 

My daughter, who was reaching for a Cinderella sticker, looked back and forth between us. ''Why are you so mad, Mama?'' she asked. ''What's wrong with princesses?''

 

Diana may be dead and Masako disgraced, but here in America, we are in the midst of a royal moment. To call princesses a ''trend'' among girls is like calling Harry Potter a book. Sales at Disney Consumer Products, which started the craze six years ago by packaging nine of its female characters under one royal rubric, have shot up to $3 billion, globally, this year, from $300 million in 2001. There are now more than 25,000 Disney Princess items. ''Princess,'' as some Disney execs call it, is not only the fastest-growing brand the company has ever created; they say it is on its way to becoming the largest girls' franchise on the planet.

 

Meanwhile in 2001, Mattel brought out its own ''world of girl'' line of princess Barbie dolls, DVDs, toys, clothing, home décor and myriad other products. At a time when Barbie sales were declining domestically, they became instant best sellers. Shortly before that, Mary Drolet, a Chicago-area mother and former Claire's and Montgomery Ward executive, opened Club Libby Lu, now a chain of mall stores based largely in the suburbs in which girls ages 4 to 12 can shop for ''Princess Phones'' covered in faux fur and attend ''Princess-Makeover Birthday Parties.'' Saks bought Club Libby Lu in 2003 for $12 million and has since expanded it to 87 outlets; by 2005, with only scant local advertising, revenues hovered around the $46 million mark, a 53 percent jump from the previous year. Pink, it seems, is the new gold.

 

Even Dora the Explorer, the intrepid, dirty-kneed adventurer, has ascended to the throne: in 2004, after a two-part episode in which she turns into a ''true princess,'' the Nickelodeon and Viacom consumer-products division released a satin-gowned ''Magic Hair Fairytale Dora,'' with hair that grows or shortens when her crown is touched. Among other phrases the bilingual doll utters: ''Vámonos! Let's go to fairy-tale land!'' and ''Will you brush my hair?''

 

As a feminist mother -- not to mention a nostalgic product of the Grranimals era -- I have been taken by surprise by the princess craze and the girlie-girl culture that has risen around it. What happened to William wanting a doll and not dressing your cat in an apron? Whither Marlo Thomas? I watch my fellow mothers, women who once swore they'd never be dependent on a man, smile indulgently at daughters who warble ''So This Is Love'' or insist on being called Snow White. I wonder if they'd concede so readily to sons who begged for combat fatigues and mock AK-47s.

 

More to the point, when my own girl makes her daily beeline for the dress-up corner of her preschool classroom -- something I'm convinced she does largely to torture me -- I worry about what playing Little Mermaid is teaching her. I've spent much of my career writing about experiences that undermine girls' well-being, warning parents that a preoccupation with body and beauty (encouraged by films, TV, magazines and, yes, toys) is perilous to their daughters' mental and physical health. Am I now supposed to shrug and forget all that? If trafficking in stereotypes doesn't matter at 3, when does it matter? At 6? Eight? Thirteen?

 

On the other hand, maybe I'm still surfing a washed-out second wave of feminism in a third-wave world. Maybe princesses are in fact a sign of progress, an indication that girls can embrace their predilection for pink without compromising strength or ambition; that, at long last, they can ''have it all.'' Or maybe it is even less complex than that: to mangle Freud, maybe a princess is sometimes just a princess. And, as my daughter wants to know, what's wrong with that?

 

The rise of the Disney princesses reads like a fairy tale itself, with Andy Mooney, a former Nike executive, playing the part of prince, riding into the company on a metaphoric white horse in January 2000 to save a consumer-products division whose sales were dropping by as much as 30 percent a year. Both overstretched and underfocused, the division had triggered price wars by granting multiple licenses for core products (say, Winnie-the-Pooh undies) while ignoring the potential of new media. What's more, Disney films like ''A Bug's Life'' in 1998 had yielded few merchandising opportunities -- what child wants to snuggle up with an ant?

 

It was about a month after Mooney's arrival that the magic struck. That's when he flew to Phoenix to check out his first ''Disney on Ice'' show. ''Standing in line in the arena, I was surrounded by little girls dressed head to toe as princesses,'' he told me last summer in his palatial office, then located in Burbank, and speaking in a rolling Scottish burr. ''They weren't even Disney products. They were generic princess products they'd appended to a Halloween costume. And the light bulb went off. Clearly there was latent demand here. So the next morning I said to my team, 'O.K., let's establish standards and a color palette and talk to licensees and get as much product out there as we possibly can that allows these girls to do what they're doing anyway: projecting themselves into the characters from the classic movies.' ''

 

Mooney picked a mix of old and new heroines to wear the Pantone pink No. 241 corona: Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, Ariel, Belle, Jasmine, Mulan and Pocahontas. It was the first time Disney marketed characters separately from a film's release, let alone lumped together those from different stories. To ensure the sanctity of what Mooney called their individual ''mythologies,'' the princesses never make eye contact when they're grouped: each stares off in a slightly different direction as if unaware of the others' presence.

 

It is also worth noting that not all of the ladies are of royal extraction. Part of the genius of ''Princess'' is that its meaning is so broadly constructed that it actually has no meaning. Even Tinker Bell was originally a Princess, though her reign didn't last. ''We'd always debate over whether she was really a part of the Princess mythology,'' Mooney recalled. ''She really wasn't.'' Likewise, Mulan and Pocahontas, arguably the most resourceful of the bunch, are rarely depicted on Princess merchandise, though for a different reason. Their rustic garb has less bling potential than that of old-school heroines like Sleeping Beauty. (When Mulan does appear, she is typically in the kimonolike hanfu, which makes her miserable in the movie, rather than her liberated warrior's gear.)

 

The first Princess items, released with no marketing plan, no focus groups, no advertising, sold as if blessed by a fairy godmother. To this day, Disney conducts little market research on the Princess line, relying instead on the power of its legacy among mothers as well as the instant-read sales barometer of the theme parks and Disney Stores. ''We simply gave girls what they wanted,'' Mooney said of the line's success, ''although I don't think any of us grasped how much they wanted this. I wish I could sit here and take credit for having some grand scheme to develop this, but all we did was envision a little girl's room and think about how she could live out the princess fantasy. The counsel we gave to licensees was: What type of bedding would a princess want to sleep in? What kind of alarm clock would a princess want to wake up to? What type of television would a princess like to see? It's a rare case where you find a girl who has every aspect of her room bedecked in Princess, but if she ends up with three or four of these items, well, then you have a very healthy business.''

 

Every reporter Mooney talks to asks some version of my next question: Aren't the Princesses, who are interested only in clothes, jewelry and cadging the handsome prince, somewhat retrograde role models?

 

''Look,'' he said, ''I have friends whose son went through the Power Rangers phase who castigated themselves over what they must've done wrong. Then they talked to other parents whose kids had gone through it. The boy passes through. The girl passes through. I see girls expanding their imagination through visualizing themselves as princesses, and then they pass through that phase and end up becoming lawyers, doctors, mothers or princesses, whatever the case may be.''

 

Mooney has a point: There are no studies proving that playing princess directly damages girls' self-esteem or dampens other aspirations. On the other hand, there is evidence that young women who hold the most conventionally feminine beliefs -- who avoid conflict and think they should be perpetually nice and pretty -- are more likely to be depressed than others and less likely to use contraception. What's more, the 23 percent decline in girls' participation in sports and other vigorous activity between middle and high school has been linked to their sense that athletics is unfeminine. And in a survey released last October by Girls Inc., school-age girls overwhelmingly reported a paralyzing pressure to be ''perfect'': not only to get straight A's and be the student-body president, editor of the newspaper and captain of the swim team but also to be ''kind and caring,'' ''please everyone, be very thin and dress right.'' Give those girls a pumpkin and a glass slipper and they'd be in business.

 

At the grocery store one day, my daughter noticed a little girl sporting a Cinderella backpack. ''There's that princess you don't like, Mama!'' she shouted.

 

''Um, yeah,'' I said, trying not to meet the other mother's hostile gaze.

 

''Don't you like her blue dress, Mama?''

 

I had to admit, I did.

 

She thought about this. ''Then don't you like her face?''

 

''Her face is all right,'' I said, noncommittally, though I'm not thrilled to have my Japanese-Jewish child in thrall to those Aryan features. (And what the heck are those blue things covering her ears?) ''It's just, honey, Cinderella doesn't really do anything.''

 

Over the next 45 minutes, we ran through that conversation, verbatim, approximately 37 million times, as my daughter pointed out Disney Princess Band-Aids, Disney Princess paper cups, Disney Princess lip balm, Disney Princess pens, Disney Princess crayons and Disney Princess notebooks -- all cleverly displayed at the eye level of a 3-year-old trapped in a shopping cart -- as well as a bouquet of Disney Princess balloons bobbing over the checkout line. The repetition was excessive, even for a preschooler. What was it about my answers that confounded her? What if, instead of realizing: Aha! Cinderella is a symbol of the patriarchal oppression of all women, another example of corporate mind control and power-to-the-people! my 3-year-old was thinking, Mommy doesn't want me to be a girl?

 

According to theories of gender constancy, until they're about 6 or 7, children don't realize that the sex they were born with is immutable. They believe that they have a choice: they can grow up to be either a mommy or a daddy. Some psychologists say that until permanency sets in kids embrace whatever stereotypes our culture presents, whether it's piling on the most spangles or attacking one another with light sabers. What better way to assure that they'll always remain themselves? If that's the case, score one for Mooney. By not buying the Princess Pull-Ups, I may be inadvertently communicating that being female (to the extent that my daughter is able to understand it) is a bad thing.

 

Anyway, you have to give girls some credit. It's true that, according to Mattel, one of the most popular games young girls play is ''bride,'' but Disney found that a groom or prince is incidental to that fantasy, a regrettable necessity at best. Although they keep him around for the climactic kiss, he is otherwise relegated to the bottom of the toy box, which is why you don't see him prominently displayed in stores.

 

What's more, just because they wear the tulle doesn't mean they've drunk the Kool-Aid. Plenty of girls stray from the script, say, by playing basketball in their finery, or casting themselves as the powerful evil stepsister bossing around the sniveling Cinderella. I recall a headline-grabbing 2005 British study that revealed that girls enjoy torturing, decapitating and microwaving their Barbies nearly as much as they like to dress them up for dates. There is spice along with that sugar after all, though why this was news is beyond me: anyone who ever played with the doll knows there's nothing more satisfying than hacking off all her hair and holding her underwater in the bathtub. Princesses can even be a boon to exasperated parents: in our house, for instance, royalty never whines and uses the potty every single time.

 

''Playing princess is not the issue,'' argues Lyn Mikel Brown, an author, with Sharon Lamb, of ''Packaging Girlhood: Rescuing Our Daughters From Marketers' Schemes.'' ''The issue is 25,000 Princess products,'' says Brown, a professor of education and human development at Colby College. ''When one thing is so dominant, then it's no longer a choice: it's a mandate, cannibalizing all other forms of play. There's the illusion of more choices out there for girls, but if you look around, you'll see their choices are steadily narrowing.''

 

It's hard to imagine that girls' options could truly be shrinking when they dominate the honor roll and outnumber boys in college. Then again, have you taken a stroll through a children's store lately? A year ago, when we shopped for ''big girl'' bedding at Pottery Barn Kids, we found the ''girls'' side awash in flowers, hearts and hula dancers; not a soccer player or sailboat in sight. Across the no-fly zone, the ''boys'' territory was all about sports, trains, planes and automobiles. Meanwhile, Baby GAP's boys' onesies were emblazoned with ''Big Man on Campus'' and the girls' with ''Social Butterfly''; guess whose matching shoes were decorated on the soles with hearts and whose sported a ''No. 1'' logo? And at Toys ''R'' Us, aisles of pink baby dolls, kitchens, shopping carts and princesses unfurl a safe distance from the ''Star Wars'' figures, GeoTrax and tool chests. The relentless resegregation of childhood appears to have sneaked up without any further discussion about sex roles, about what it now means to be a boy or to be a girl. Or maybe it has happened in lieu of such discussion because it's easier this way.

 

Easier, that is, unless you want to buy your daughter something that isn't pink. Girls' obsession with that color may seem like something they're born with, like the ability to breathe or talk on the phone for hours on end. But according to Jo Paoletti, an associate professor of American studies at the University of Maryland, it ain't so. When colors were first introduced to the nursery in the early part of the 20th century, pink was considered the more masculine hue, a pastel version of red. Blue, with its intimations of the Virgin Mary, constancy and faithfulness, was thought to be dainty. Why or when that switched is not clear, but as late as the 1930s a significant percentage of adults in one national survey held to that split. Perhaps that's why so many early Disney heroines -- Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Wendy, Alice-in-Wonderland -- are swathed in varying shades of azure. (Purple, incidentally, may be the next color to swap teams: once the realm of kings and N.F.L. players, it is fast becoming the bolder girl's version of pink.)

 

It wasn't until the mid-1980s, when amplifying age and sex differences became a key strategy of children's marketing (recall the emergence of '' 'tween''), that pink became seemingly innate to girls, part of what defined them as female, at least for the first few years. That was also the time that the first of the generation raised during the unisex phase of feminism -- ah, hither Marlo! -- became parents. ''The kids who grew up in the 1970s wanted sharp definitions for their own kids,'' Paoletti told me. ''I can understand that, because the unisex thing denied everything -- you couldn't be this, you couldn't be that, you had to be a neutral nothing.''

 

The infatuation with the girlie girl certainly could, at least in part, be a reaction against the so-called second wave of the women's movement of the 1960s and '70s (the first wave was the fight for suffrage), which fought for reproductive rights and economic, social and legal equality. If nothing else, pink and Princess have resuscitated the fantasy of romance that that era of feminism threatened, the privileges that traditional femininity conferred on women despite its costs -- doors magically opened, dinner checks picked up, Manolo Blahniks. Frippery. Fun. Why should we give up the perks of our sex until we're sure of what we'll get in exchange? Why should we give them up at all? Or maybe it's deeper than that: the freedoms feminism bestowed came with an undercurrent of fear among women themselves -- flowing through ''Ally McBeal,'' ''Bridget Jones's Diary,'' ''Sex and the City'' -- of losing male love, of never marrying, of not having children, of being deprived of something that felt essentially and exclusively female.

 

I mulled that over while flipping through ''The Paper Bag Princess,'' a 1980 picture book hailed as an antidote to Disney. The heroine outwits a dragon who has kidnapped her prince, but not before the beast's fiery breath frizzles her hair and destroys her dress, forcing her to don a paper bag. The ungrateful prince rejects her, telling her to come back when she is ''dressed like a real princess.'' She dumps him and skips off into the sunset, happily ever after, alone.

 

There you have it, ''Thelma and Louise'' all over again. Step out of line, and you end up solo or, worse, sailing crazily over a cliff to your doom. Alternatives like those might send you skittering right back to the castle. And I get that: the fact is, though I want my daughter to do and be whatever she wants as an adult, I still hope she'll find her Prince Charming and have babies, just as I have. I don't want her to be a fish without a bicycle; I want her to be a fish with another fish. Preferably, one who loves and respects her and also does the dishes and half the child care.

 

There had to be a middle ground between compliant and defiant, between petticoats and paper bags. I remembered a video on YouTube, an ad for a Nintendo game called Super Princess Peach. It showed a pack of girls in tiaras, gowns and elbow-length white gloves sliding down a zip line on parasols, navigating an obstacle course of tires in their stilettos, slithering on their bellies under barbed wire, then using their telekinetic powers to make a climbing wall burst into flames. ''If you can stand up to really mean people,'' an announcer intoned, ''maybe you have what it takes to be a princess.''

 

Now here were some girls who had grit as well as grace. I loved Princess Peach even as I recognized that there was no way she could run in those heels, that her peachiness did nothing to upset the apple cart of expectation: she may have been athletic, smart and strong, but she was also adorable. Maybe she's what those once-unisex, postfeminist parents are shooting for: the melding of old and new standards. And perhaps that's a good thing, the ideal solution. But what to make, then, of the young women in the Girls Inc. survey? It doesn't seem to be ''having it all'' that's getting to them; it's the pressure to be it all. In telling our girls they can be anything, we have inadvertently demanded that they be everything. To everyone. All the time. No wonder the report was titled ''The Supergirl Dilemma.''

 

The princess as superhero is not irrelevant. Some scholars I spoke with say that given its post-9/11 timing, princess mania is a response to a newly dangerous world. ''Historically, princess worship has emerged during periods of uncertainty and profound social change,'' observes Miriam Forman-Brunell, a historian at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Francis Hodgson Burnett's original''Little Princess'' was published at a time of rapid urbanization, immigration and poverty; Shirley Temple's film version was a hit during the Great Depression. ''The original folk tales themselves,'' Forman-Brunell says, ''spring from medieval and early modern European culture that faced all kinds of economic and demographic and social upheaval -- famine, war, disease, terror of wolves. Girls play savior during times of economic crisis and instability.'' That's a heavy burden for little shoulders. Perhaps that's why the magic wand has become an essential part of the princess get-up. In the original stories -- even the Disney versions of them -- it's not the girl herself who's magic; it's the fairy godmother. Now if Forman-Brunell is right, we adults have become the cursed creatures whom girls have the thaumaturgic power to transform.

 

In the 1990s, third-wave feminists rebelled against their dour big sisters, ''reclaiming'' sexual objectification as a woman's right -- provided, of course, that it was on her own terms, that she was the one choosing to strip or wear a shirt that said ''Porn Star'' or make out with her best friend at a frat-house bash. They embraced words like ''bitch'' and ''slut'' as terms of affection and empowerment. That is, when used by the right people, with the right dash of playful irony. But how can you assure that? As Madonna gave way to Britney, whatever self-determination that message contained was watered down and commodified until all that was left was a gaggle of 6-year-old girls in belly-baring T-shirts (which I'm guessing they don't wear as cultural critique). It is no wonder that parents, faced with thongs for 8-year-olds and Bratz dolls' ''passion for fashion,'' fill their daughters' closets with pink sateen; the innocence of Princess feels like a reprieve.

 

''But what does that mean?'' asks Sharon Lamb, a psychology professor at Saint Michael's College. ''There are other ways to express 'innocence' -- girls could play ladybug or caterpillar. What you're really talking about is sexual purity. And there's a trap at the end of that rainbow, because the natural progression from pale, innocent pink is not to other colors. It's to hot, sexy pink -- exactly the kind of sexualization parents are trying to avoid.''

 

Lamb suggested that to see for myself how ''Someday My Prince Will Come'' morphs into ''Oops! I Did It Again,'' I visit Club Libby Lu, the mall shop dedicated to the ''Very Important Princess.''

 

Walking into one of the newest links in the store's chain, in Natick, Mass., last summer, I had to tip my tiara to the founder, Mary Drolet: Libby Lu's design was flawless. Unlike Disney, Drolet depended on focus groups to choose the logo (a crown-topped heart) and the colors (pink, pink, purple and more pink). The displays were scaled to the size of a 10-year-old, though most of the shoppers I saw were several years younger than that. The decals on the walls and dressing rooms -- ''I Love Your Hair,'' ''Hip Chick,'' ''Spoiled'' -- were written in ''girlfriend language.'' The young sales clerks at this ''special secret club for superfabulous girls'' are called ''club counselors'' and come off like your coolest baby sitter, the one who used to let you brush her hair. The malls themselves are chosen based on a company formula called the G.P.I., or ''Girl Power Index,'' which predicts potential sales revenues. Talk about newspeak: ''Girl Power'' has gone from a riot grrrrl anthem to ''I Am Woman, Watch Me Shop.''

 

Inside, the store was divided into several glittery ''shopping zones'' called ''experiences'': Libby's Laboratory, now called Sparkle Spa, where girls concoct their own cosmetics and bath products; Libby's Room; Ear Piercing; Pooch Parlor (where divas in training can pamper stuffed poodles, pugs and Chihuahuas); and the Style Studio, offering ''Libby Du'' makeover choices, including 'Tween Idol, Rock Star, Pop Star and, of course, Priceless Princess. Each look includes hairstyle, makeup, nail polish and sparkly tattoos.

 

As I browsed, I noticed a mother standing in the center of the store holding a price list for makeover birthday parties -- $22.50 to $35 per child. Her name was Anne McAuliffe; her daughters -- Stephanie, 4, and 7-year-old twins Rory and Sarah -- were dashing giddily up and down the aisles.

 

''They've been begging to come to this store for three weeks,'' McAuliffe said. ''I'd never heard of it. So I said they could, but they'd have to spend their own money if they bought anything.'' She looked around. ''Some of this stuff is innocuous,'' she observed, then leaned toward me, eyes wide and stage-whispered: ''But ... a lot of it is horrible. It makes them look like little prostitutes. It's crazy. They're babies!''

 

As we debated the line between frivolous fun and JonBenét, McAuliffe's daughter Rory came dashing up, pigtails haphazard, glasses askew. ''They have the best pocketbooks here,'' she said breathlessly, brandishing a clutch with the words ''Girlie Girl'' stamped on it. ''Please, can I have one? It has sequins!''

 

''You see that?'' McAuliffe asked, gesturing at the bag. ''What am I supposed to say?''

 

On my way out of the mall, I popped into the '' 'tween'' mecca Hot Topic, where a display of Tinker Bell items caught my eye. Tinker Bell, whose image racks up an annual $400 million in retail sales with no particular effort on Disney's part, is poised to wreak vengeance on the Princess line that once expelled her. Last winter, the first chapter book designed to introduce girls to Tink and her Pixie Hollow pals spent 18 weeks on The New York Times children's best-seller list. In a direct-to-DVD now under production, she will speak for the first time, voiced by the actress Brittany Murphy. Next year, Disney Fairies will be rolled out in earnest. Aimed at 6- to 9-year-old girls, the line will catch them just as they outgrow Princess. Their colors will be lavender, green, turquoise -- anything but the Princess's soon-to-be-babyish pink.

 

To appeal to that older child, Disney executives said, the Fairies will have more ''attitude'' and ''sass'' than the Princesses. What, I wondered, did that entail? I'd seen some of the Tinker Bell merchandise that Disney sells at its theme parks: T-shirts reading, ''Spoiled to Perfection,'' ''Mood Subject to Change Without Notice'' and ''Tinker Bell: Prettier Than a Princess.'' At Hot Topic, that edge was even sharper: magnets, clocks, light-switch plates and panties featured ''Dark Tink,'' described as ''the bad girl side of Miss Bell that Walt never saw.''

 

Girl power, indeed.

 

A few days later, I picked my daughter up from preschool. She came tearing over in a full-skirted frock with a gold bodice, a beaded crown perched sideways on her head. ''Look, Mommy, I'm Ariel!'' she crowed. referring to Disney's Little Mermaid. Then she stopped and furrowed her brow. ''Mommy, do you like Ariel?''

 

I considered her for a moment. Maybe Princess is the first salvo in what will become a lifelong struggle over her body image, a Hundred Years' War of dieting, plucking, painting and perpetual dissatisfaction with the results. Or maybe it isn't. I'll never really know. In the end, it's not the Princesses that really bother me anyway. They're just a trigger for the bigger question of how, over the years, I can help my daughter with the contradictions she will inevitably face as a girl, the dissonance that is as endemic as ever to growing up female. Maybe the best I can hope for is that her generation will get a little further with the solutions than we did.

 

For now, I kneeled down on the floor and gave my daughter a hug.

 

She smiled happily. ''But, Mommy?'' she added. ''When I grow up, I'm still going to be a fireman.''

 

- by Peggy Orenstein, for the New York Times Magazine (December 2006)

ift.tt/2iVGjIK - Don't buy My Product Store until you have read this review. My Product Store - my product store review & demo. My Product Store Review Plus Bonuses YouTube Testing 99 Cent Store Products 99 CENT STORE PRODUCT TESTING My Product StoreMy Product Store ReviewMy Product Store BonusMy Product Store ReviewsMy Product Store Demo Stephani Galbraith Armendarez Can you post what's new at the 99 cent store please Download 99 Cent Store Product Testing Video Showing results 1 to 10 of more than 500 results How to add shopify download product How to add digital product shopify Download Lagu Dollar Store Product Testing MP3 Download Full Album Gratis Terbaru 2016 dan Download Video Dollar Store Product Testing how to sell digital products on shopify, how to add a digital product on shopify, shopify digital downloads, shopify digital download tutorial 03:39 · 99 Cent Product Testing 10 products - Dollar Tree Product Testing - complete Dollar Tree information covering product testing results and more - updated daily Video FULL FACE USING ONLY 99 CENTS STORE PRODUCTS, upload by Laura Lee in 26 How to sell digital products on Shopify My Product Store Review If you could watch someone create a Tags: Sourcing Agent | Business Agent · wholesale 99 cent products The chemicals found in Dollar store products tested for in the report included: Phthalates, linked to birth defects, reduced fertility, cancer, learning disabilities, diabetes, and other health issues is already made china made it for me, i just need to find a reliable company to put my product in stores anyone out there know a good marketing company Tags: getting my product into stores, how to get customers, retail social media, ways to get customers Visit My It Works Product Store My Online Product Store Review Will Introduce About The Awesome Software That Creates Your Very Own Online Store In Minutes Of Brett Ingram Product: My Online Product Store In this dollar store haul video I show you some of my favorite organization product finds from Dollar Tree How to sell printables on shopify 99 cents only stores (business operation) Download HD 1080P and mp4 3GP mobile quality Download: How to build a shopify store Shopify 10 day challenge Starting the store Day 1 Part 2 How to Get Started with Shopify# Full face using only liquid lipstick Free Mp3 Download My Product Store Review And Bonus 99 cent store product testing! my product store demo. also make sure you check out for my product store review with awesome my product store bonuses! ask doctor jo product store & dvd promo - ask doctor jo. unboxing a product from my store. 99 cent product store testing! my product store bonus.

...but he is in this one, sitting calmly (almost statuelike!) for a new social media display that invites customers to “smile, snap, share.” I did do two of those, but I don't plan on doing the third ;)

 

(c) 2015 Retail Retell

These places are public so these photos are too, but just as I tell where they came from, I'd appreciate if you'd say who :)

View of model, Rita Fisher, posing for Turners, February 1955 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/13209A).

 

To read a blog about Turners advertising techniques see www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/turners-saved-my-marriage/.

 

Tyne and Wear Archives presents a set of images taken by the Newcastle-based firm Turners (Photography) Ltd. They were taken by the firm on is own account for possible use in their advertising campaigns. Turners frequently hired models to help promote their work and to encourage sales in their shops. Some of the shots are humorous or bizarre while others are quite suggestive.

 

The images are fascinating for what they tell us about the times that produced them – the fashions, the attitudes, the technology … Most of the images are quirky and almost seem to invite comments. If you’d like to suggest alternative captions we’d be delighted to hear them!

 

(Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email info@twarchives.org.uk.

  

Model posing for a Turners publicity shot, August 1958 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/4/1048/1).

 

To read a blog about Turners advertising techniques see www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/turners-saved-my-marriage/.

 

Tyne and Wear Archives presents a set of images taken by the Newcastle-based firm Turners (Photography) Ltd. They were taken by the firm on is own account for possible use in their advertising campaigns. Turners frequently hired models to help promote their work and to encourage sales in their shops. Some of the shots are humorous or bizarre while others are quite suggestive.

 

The images are fascinating for what they tell us about the times that produced them – the fashions, the attitudes, the technology … Most of the images are quirky and almost seem to invite comments. If you’d like to suggest alternative captions we’d be delighted to hear them!

 

(Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email info@twarchives.org.uk.

 

See also video interview with the artist (Flickr HD video).

 

Deadly Sins

 

A new collectible, slated to set the mark as an icon for the 22nd Century - collect all Seven Deadly Sins. Due out by December in an exclusive limited edition set.

 

Pure Products USA | Ligorano/Reese Collaboration in Art

 

Towards a Surreal Politik…

 

In 1992, we began Pure Products of America as a series of multiple editions focusing on the impact of marketing on politics. Over the past 17 years, the series has expanded and now includes 14 pieces running the gamut from snow globes to underwear (our underwear was the first to pack a political message), to happy meals.

 

Each object is signed and numbered in various sized editions. When we introduce Pure Products, we send some of them as gifts to government officials. Presidents Obama, Bush, and Clinton, members of the Supreme Court and various Senators and Congressional representatives have all received a pure product at one time or another.

 

Pure Products also function as discreet elements in installations. The installations The Bible Belt, Pillars of the Clean Order, and Steel Nipples incorporated them in sculptural settings with video and other media. In 2001, we expanded on this idea with the inauguration of an online retail website as part of the project.

 

Each piece is grounded within a framework that satirizes political values and, often, lampoons morality. Some pure products, like Line Up and Contract with America underwear, became media sensations, reported in the press, on television and radio. The commentary surrounding the artwork is a mixture of absurdity and culture jamming, amplifying how much the media interprets and misinterprets contemporary art and blurs the connections between art, activism and commerce.

 

ligoranoreese.net/pure-products-usa

 

Bio

 

NORA LIGORANO and MARSHALL REESE have collaborated together as Ligorano/Reese since the early 80’s. They use collaboration to blend diverse talents into a singular voice and vision. In the process of creating their work, their individual contributions cross and criss-cross between each other from brainstorming to realizing and making the art on location or in the studio.

 

They use unusual materials and industrial processes to make their limited edition multiples, videos, sculptures and installations, moving easily from dish towels, underwear, and snow globes, to electronic art and computer controlled interactive installations.

 

They take and manipulate images, audio and text from old media: print, television, radio and combine that with the new: internet and mobile telecommunications. Their pursuit is an ongoing investigation into the impact of technology on culture and the associations and meanings that the media brings to images, language and speech in politics.

 

They have an interest with using open forms to involve community interaction, like their drawing contests, Crater Bay Area for the 01 Festival in San Jose and Crater New York at Location1. Installations that combine sculpture with public participation in drawing, within the context of a contest that is also streamed on the internet and in Second Life. Their ice sculptures, “Main Street Meltdown” and “The State of Things” share that same sense of open possibility, fusing natural processes of erosion and decay as flexible durations and markers to determine the experience of the work.

 

Many of their sculptures and installations reinterpret and reexamine older forms of technology - using objects that signify truth, authority and manifest cultural historicity. Ligorano/Reese use mirrors, clocks, metronomes and medieval codex bindings and combine them with video screens. They have invented micro-projection systems to display films on the head of a pin or the counterweight of a metronome.

 

Since 2004, they’ve investigated portraiture as a construct of social representation. Line Up (2004-5), their series of portraits of Bush administration officials in mug shot, acknowledges that the mug shot is the preeminent form of portraiture now that more people are incarcerated in the U.S. than any other country in the world. In December, 2007, the exhibition of these photos at the New York Public Library caused a firestorm of controversy with heavy rotation on FoxNews, DrudgeReport’s homepage and many, many other publications.

 

In 2001, they launched www.pureproductsusa.com, the online retail website for their infamous political art series the Pure Products of America. Since 1992, Ligorano/Reese have made 11 multiples in signed editions of 3 to 100. They are best selling editions at Printed Matter, artbook@ps1 and the New Museum store and have prompted, at least on one occasion, the RNC to threaten them with copyright infringement.

 

For more information see “The Joy of Collaborating: recipes for time-based art.

 

ligoranoreese.net/about

  

Eyebeam Open Studios: Fall 2009

 

eyebeam.org/events/open-studios-fall-2009

 

Eyebeam is pleased to host Open Studios for its 2009 Senior Fellows, Resident Artists, and Student Residents at Eyebeam’s state-of-the-art design, research, and fabrication studio; showcasing video performance, wearable technologies, code and humor, party technology, and sustainablity design.

 

///////////////

 

Eyebeam is the leading not-for-profit art and technology center in the United States.

 

Founded in 1996 and incorporated in 1997, Eyebeam was conceived as a non-profit art and technology center dedicated to exposing broad and diverse audiences to new technologies and media arts, while simultaneously establishing and demonstrating new media as a significant genre of cultural production.

 

Since then, Eyebeam has supported more than 130 fellowships and residencies for artists and creative technologists; we've run an active education program for youth, artists' professional development and community outreach; and have mounted an extensive series of public programs, over recent years approximately 4 exhibitions and 40 workshops, performances and events annually.

 

Today, Eyebeam offers residencies and fellowships for artists and technologists working in a wide range of media. At any given time, there are up to 20 resident artists and fellows onsite at Eyebeam's 15,000-square foot Chelsea offices and Labs, developing new projects and creating work for open dissemination through online, primarily open-source, publication as well as a robust calendar of public programming that includes free exhibitions, lectures and panels, participatory workshops, live performances and educational series.

 

eyebeam.org

 

Wise retail is a company which develops software solutions for different companies. It offers services like vendor management system, pos software, crm software etc and helps to grow your business.

Did you know around 400 commercial village shops close each year? This often has drastic impacts for social wellbeing and the local economy. Community shops offer a vital source of retail provision within rural communities and are recognised as helping to reduce rural social isolation and loneliness. They are sustainable, co-operative businesses that respond directly to local needs and help residents take control over the future of their communities and secure the provision of essential services.

 

Use them or loose them !

 

ift.tt/2iVGjIK - Don't buy My Product Store until you have read this review. My Product Store - my product store review & demo. My Product Store Review Plus Bonuses YouTube Testing 99 Cent Store Products 99 CENT STORE PRODUCT TESTING My Product StoreMy Product Store ReviewMy Product Store BonusMy Product Store ReviewsMy Product Store Demo Stephani Galbraith Armendarez Can you post what's new at the 99 cent store please Download 99 Cent Store Product Testing Video Showing results 1 to 10 of more than 500 results How to add shopify download product How to add digital product shopify Download Lagu Dollar Store Product Testing MP3 Download Full Album Gratis Terbaru 2016 dan Download Video Dollar Store Product Testing how to sell digital products on shopify, how to add a digital product on shopify, shopify digital downloads, shopify digital download tutorial 03:39 · 99 Cent Product Testing 10 products - Dollar Tree Product Testing - complete Dollar Tree information covering product testing results and more - updated daily Video FULL FACE USING ONLY 99 CENTS STORE PRODUCTS, upload by Laura Lee in 26 How to sell digital products on Shopify My Product Store Review If you could watch someone create a Tags: Sourcing Agent | Business Agent · wholesale 99 cent products The chemicals found in Dollar store products tested for in the report included: Phthalates, linked to birth defects, reduced fertility, cancer, learning disabilities, diabetes, and other health issues is already made china made it for me, i just need to find a reliable company to put my product in stores anyone out there know a good marketing company Tags: getting my product into stores, how to get customers, retail social media, ways to get customers Visit My It Works Product Store My Online Product Store Review Will Introduce About The Awesome Software That Creates Your Very Own Online Store In Minutes Of Brett Ingram Product: My Online Product Store In this dollar store haul video I show you some of my favorite organization product finds from Dollar Tree How to sell printables on shopify 99 cents only stores (business operation) Download HD 1080P and mp4 3GP mobile quality Download: How to build a shopify store Shopify 10 day challenge Starting the store Day 1 Part 2 How to Get Started with Shopify# Full face using only liquid lipstick Free Mp3 Download My Product Store Review And Bonus 99 cent store product testing! my product store demo. also make sure you check out for my product store review with awesome my product store bonuses! ask doctor jo product store & dvd promo - ask doctor jo. unboxing a product from my store. 99 cent product store testing! my product store bonus.

A bored husband stares at his television screen (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/28465G).

 

You can read a blog relating to these images here www.twmuseums.org.uk/engage/blog/turners-saved-my-marriage/.

 

Tyne & Wear Archives is very fortunate to hold the photographic negatives of the firm Turners (Photography) Ltd. The collection contains many remarkable images commissioned by local firms during the second half of the Twentieth Century. The Turners collection also includes images taken by the firm to promote their own business and this set shows a short series of images taken in March 1962 to promote the sale of cameras in their shops.

 

They tell the story of a bored husband, his mind numbed by television, and his worried wife. Looking for inspiration, the man passes by a Turners shop window and discovers the wonder of photography. At once his happiness returns and matrimonial harmony is restored.

 

We’ve no record of the captions used by Turners to accompany these images so we’ve used a bit of artistic licence and created our own. Maybe you can suggest alternatives.

 

(Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

  

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