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Sio Sepol Bridge, Isfahan, Iran.

 

Si-o-se Pol Bridge is a stone double-deck arch bridge in Isfahan, Iran. It is also called Siose Bridge (which in Persian means “33 Bridge” or “Bridge of 33 Arches”) or Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge. Si-o-se Pol Bridge is built by the chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze on commission from Shah Abbas whose chancelor he was.

Construction of the bridge began in 1599 and ended 1602. Bridge is long 298 meters and wide 13.75 meters. It has 33 spans from which it gets its name with the longest span of 5.6 meters, crosses Zayandeh River and is located in the southern end of Chahar Bagh Avenue.

It's fantastic to walk down the stone pavement along the Zayandeh river in the morning.

The reflections of historic bridge and winter sky are beautiful in the water as people sit down on the riverside and talked for a long time.

But unfortunately there is no water in the opposite side of the bridge because of water shortage in Isfahan, Iran.

If you turn to the left and cross this Siose bridge, it’s another twenty minutes to the Naghsh-e Jahan Square, where the magnificent architecture and amazing art of Safavid Persia are very much alive.

 

Explore - February 1st, 2015 - Thank you!!

After crossing the Siose bridge and walking two kilometers to the north-east, we arrive to the Naghsh-e Jahan (Picture of the world) square, the must-see historical heritage in ancient capital of Isfahan, central Iran.

Imam (Shah) Mosque standing in the square has a very unique entrance gate whose arch is framed by turquoise ornament and decorated with exquisite stalactite tile work.

If look up from the position of the man standing near the wooden door, you can observe the acme of beauty looks like a galaxy in the infinite cosmos.

Please visit my albums entitled “In a Persian Bazaar” and “Glorious Persia” if you had more time.

Press "L". Iranians do their family photos under Si-o-se Pol Bridge (means "33 Brige" or "Bridge of 33 Arches" or in Persian: سی و سه پل‎,), Esfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran. Built from the year 1599 to 1602. It's a place where often young muslim couples come to meet.

 

Kiev 60, Zodiak-8 30mm f3.5, MACO TP64c, darkroom enlarged Lith print. 100% analog workflow. Drumscanned through PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMTs - no CCD nor CMOS involved in digitizing the image)

 

...::: 4nalog :::...

Siosepol or Siose Bridge [ˈsiː oˈseh ˈpol] (Persian: سی و سه پل‎, which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches) in Esfahan, Iran

The Entrance of "Siose' pol" brg. Esfahan, Iran

【Isfahan, Iran】 Patterns of the Si o Se historical bridge of Isfahan dating from the Safavid times.

  

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The beautiful bridge was built about 400 years back and its still being used. We walked from Siose pol bridge to khajoo bridge which took about 15 minutes and the view was breath taking.People were relaxed and sitting around having a chat.

Siosepol or Siose Bridge [ˈsiː oˈseh ˈpol] (Persian: سی و سه پل‎, which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches) in Esfahan, Iran

 

Built in 1602 a.d.

Press "L". Si-o-Se bridge in Esfahan, Iran.

 

Pentax 67, SMC 200mm f4, Ilford XP2 Super (C41 b&w film), drumscanned.

 

...::: 4nalog :::...

scan from slide -------------- captured 1996..

Siosepol or Siose Bridge which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches, also called the Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge, is one of the eleven bridges of Isfahan, Iran. It is highly ranked as being one of the most famous examples of Safavid bridge design.

Commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I from his chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze, an Iranian ethnic Georgian, it consists of two rows of 33 arches. There is a larger base plank at the start of the bridge where the Zayandeh River flows under it, supporting a tea house.

 

Source: Wikipedia

【Isfahan, Iran】 Lone shadow under one of the 33 arches of the 17th century Si o Se bridge of Isfahan.

  

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Porticoes along the upper level of Si-o-seh bridge

Wish you a beautiful week ahead..........

some more, but nearly the last, of my iranian serie

Hugs

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Siosepol or Siose Bridge (Persian: سی و سه پل‎,[2] which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches), also called the Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge, is one of the eleven bridges of Isfahan, Iran and the longest bridge on Zayandeh River with the total length of 297.76 metres (976.9 ft). It is highly ranked as being one of the most famous examples of Safavid bridge design.

Siose Bridge crossing Zayandeh River in Isfahan, Iran.

The night falls very fast in winter...

Sio Sepol Bridge, Isfahan, Iran.

 

Si-o-se Pol Bridge is a stone double-deck arch bridge in Isfahan, Iran. It is also called Siose Bridge (which in Persian means “33 Bridge” or “Bridge of 33 Arches”) or Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge. Si-o-se Pol Bridge is built by the chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze on commission from Shah Abbas whose chancelor he was.

Construction of the bridge began in 1599 and ended 1602. Bridge is long 298 meters and wide 13.75 meters. It has 33 spans from which it gets its name with the longest span of 5.6 meters, crosses Zayandeh River and is located in the southern end of Chahar Bagh Avenue.

Un posto insolito per appartarsi e meditare! Sugli scalini del ponte di Isfahan, proprio a contatto con l'acqua del fiume

Sio Sepol Bridge, Isfahan, Iran.

 

Si-o-se Pol Bridge is a stone double-deck arch bridge in Isfahan, Iran. It is also called Siose Bridge (which in Persian means “33 Bridge” or “Bridge of 33 Arches”) or Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge. Si-o-se Pol Bridge is built by the chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze on commission from Shah Abbas whose chancelor he was.

Construction of the bridge began in 1599 and ended 1602. Bridge is long 298 meters and wide 13.75 meters. It has 33 spans from which it gets its name with the longest span of 5.6 meters, crosses Zayandeh River and is located in the southern end of Chahar Bagh Avenue.

 

Photo credit to our fellow traveller Ake.

All'interno del ponte di cui alla mia precedente foto ci sono posti dove stare al fresco a riposare.

 

Inside the 33 arches bridge : people enjoy taking rest

Siosepol or Siose Bridge (which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches), also called the Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge, is one of the eleven bridges of Isfahan, Iran and the longest bridge on Zayandeh River with the total length of 297.76 metres (976.9 ft). It is highly ranked as being one of the most famous examples of Safavid bridge design. —Wikipedia

Iranian people singing traditional music below that beautiful bridge at Isfahan.

 

A moment to remember.

Sio Sepol Bridge, Isfahan, Iran.

 

Si-o-se Pol Bridge is a stone double-deck arch bridge in Isfahan, Iran. It is also called Siose Bridge (which in Persian means “33 Bridge” or “Bridge of 33 Arches”) or Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge. Si-o-se Pol Bridge is built by the chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze on commission from Shah Abbas whose chancelor he was.

Construction of the bridge began in 1599 and ended 1602. Bridge is long 298 meters and wide 13.75 meters. It has 33 spans from which it gets its name with the longest span of 5.6 meters, crosses Zayandeh River and is located in the southern end of Chahar Bagh Avenue.

Cool passage under SioSe Pol Bridge where river Zayandeh used to flow. These days it's dried out due to a water dam outside city.

Siosepol (or Bridge of 33 Arches), Isfahan

Si-o-se Pol bridge in Isfahan

Si-o-se Pol (Persian: سی وسه پل, pronounced [siː oˈseh pol]), which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches, is one of the historic bridges of Isfahan, Iran. Commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I, it consists of two rows of 33 arches.

There is a larger base plank at the start of the bridge where the Zayandeh River flows under it, supporting a tea house. Si-o-se Pol is highly ranked as being one of the most famous examples of Safavian bridge design. Even though cars are not allowed to pass the bridge (however, it was possible a few years ago), the bridge is still functional.

Esfehan , the 3rd largest city of Iran with a population of 1,583,609 , hosts a considerable number of marvellous historic and pre-historic sites. Even though, in it current presence, Esfehan is a modern city; the history of Esfahan can be traced back to the pre-history period ( Palaeolithic period).

Source: Wikipedia

Khaju Bridge (Persian: پل خواجو ‎ pol-e khajoo) is arguably the finest bridge in the province of Isfahan, Iran.[1] It was built by the Persian Safavid king, Shah Abbas II around 1650 C.E., on the foundations of an older bridge. Serving as both a bridge, and a dam (or a weir), it links the Khaju quarter on the north bank with the Zoroastrian quarter across the Zayandeh River. Although architecturally functioning as a bridge and a weir, it also served a primary function as a building[2] and a place for public meetings. This structure originally was ornated with artistic tile works and paintings serving as a teahouse; In the center of the structure, a pavilion exists inside of which Shah Abbas would have once sat, admiring the views.Today remnants of a stone seat is all that remains of the king's chair. This bridge highlights one of the finest examples of Persian architecture at the height of Safavid cultural influence in Iran. In words of Upham Pope and Jean Chardin, Khaju bridge is "the culminating monument of Persian bridge architecture and one of the most interesting bridges extant...where the whole has rhythm and dignity and combines in the happiest consistency, utility, beauty, and recreation.

Sio Sepol Bridge, Isfahan, Iran.

 

Si-o-se Pol Bridge is a stone double-deck arch bridge in Isfahan, Iran. It is also called Siose Bridge (which in Persian means “33 Bridge” or “Bridge of 33 Arches”) or Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge. Si-o-se Pol Bridge is built by the chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze on commission from Shah Abbas whose chancelor he was.

Construction of the bridge began in 1599 and ended 1602. Bridge is long 298 meters and wide 13.75 meters. It has 33 spans from which it gets its name with the longest span of 5.6 meters, crosses Zayandeh River and is located in the southern end of Chahar Bagh Avenue.

An Iranian woman enjoying lovely afternoon on Si O Se Pol, a beautiful and historical bridge over Zayandeh river.

@Esfahan, Iran.

Isfahan: il Siose Pol (il Ponte dalle 33 arcate, costruito nel 1008) è uno degli splendidi ponti che attraversano il fiume Zayande Rud. Purtroppo da diversi anni l'acqua viene deviata e così il letto del fiume è praticamente asciutto.

da Wikipedia:

Khaju Bridge (Persian: پل خواجو ‎ pol-e khajoo) is arguably the finest bridge in the province of Isfahan, Iran.[1] It was built by the Persian Safavid king, Shah Abbas II around 1650 C.E., on the foundations of an older bridge. Serving as both a bridge, and a dam (or a weir), it links the Khaju quarter on the north bank with the Zoroastrian quarter across the Zayandeh River. Although architecturally functioning as a bridge and a weir, it also served a primary function as a building[2] and a place for public meetings. This structure originally was ornated with artistic tile works and paintings serving as a teahouse; In the center of the structure, a pavilion exists inside of which Shah Abbas would have once sat, admiring the views. Today remnants of a stone seat is all that remains of the king's chair. This bridge highlights one of the finest examples of Persian architecture at the height of Safavid cultural influence in Iran. In words of Upham Pope and Jean Chardin, Khaju bridge is "the culminating monument of Persian bridge architecture and one of the most interesting bridges extant...where the whole has rhythm and dignity and combines in the happiest consistency, utility, beauty, and recreation.

Press "L". Under Si-o-Se bridge, Esfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran. Here young muslim couples come to meet.

 

Kiev 60, Arsat 80mm f2.8, MACO TP64c, darkroom enlarged Lith print. 100% analog workflow. The final print drumscanned through PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMTs - no CCD nor CMOS involved in digitizing the image)

 

...::: 4nalog :::...

Built in 1602 by Shah Abbas I, Si-o-seh Pol literally means bridge of thirty three arches. It spans the Zayandeh Rud river that traverses Esfahan. Due to its simple elegance It suffers a bit like Manhattan Bridge from having a more famous rival a few hundred meters down river, in Khaju and Brooklyn bridges respectively. Khaju bridge had the benfit of being built after Si-o-Se bridge.

 

* This photo is blogged at AsiaViaje (English)

 

The Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge was commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I. It is also called Si-o-Se Pol(thirty-three bridges) because it's lower level is made of thirty-three arches.

 

The whole set of "Iran Sketchbook" :

 

www.flickr.com/photos/hltam/sets/72157629238332280/with/7...

The Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge was commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I. It is also called Si-o-Se Pol(thirty-three bridges) because it's lower level is made of thirty-three arches.

 

The whole set of "Iran Sketchbook" :

 

www.flickr.com/photos/hltam/sets/72157629238332280/with/7...

The Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge was commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I. It is also called Si-o-Se Pol(thirty-three bridges) because it's lower level is made of thirty-three arches.

 

The whole set of "Iran Sketchbook" :

 

www.flickr.com/photos/hltam/sets/72157629238332280/with/7...

Teenage boys leap from one pillar to another inside the Si-o-se bridge.

 

The Si-o-se Pol,which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches, is one of the eleven bridges of Esfahan, Iran. It is highly ranked as being one of the most famous examples of Safavid bridge design.

 

Commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I from his chancellor Allahverdi Khan Undiladze, an Iranian ethnic Georgian, it consists of two rows of 33 arches. There is a larger base plank at the start of the bridge where the Zayandeh River flows under it, supporting a tea house.

Mesmo cansada, liguei para saber notícias do meu pessoal em casa e soube que a nossa querida Mary sofreu um contratempo. Nós de Nikiti, que gostamos muito de voce desejamos que não tenha sido nada demais e mandamos um monte de beijinhos, ronrons e lambeijos.

 

Boa noite para mim, boa tarde para voces todos.

siose pol

Isfahan, IRAN

 

سی وسه پل

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