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Explore #232 September 17, 2008

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

So bitty, so aggressive! Maybe the second season can introduce a new captain every episode! I just found out that the Star Trek Online video game portrays the Shenzhou being recovered and put back into service. That warms my heart. All this time I've been thinking of her adrift on the edge of Federation space, just waiting for some greasy Klingon to get their hands on it. :(

 

You'll note the high budget special effects. That is indeed the fabric of space/time.

 

Here's a 3D view

www.etsy.com/shop/Paulygons

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

Hello FlickrWorld! Hello FlickrWorld! I glanced at this image and thought it was a peacock feather, but it's another great story about space-related cancer research has appeared on the International Space Station Research site: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/tackling... Happy and hopeful Friday to all!

 

Caption:Thyroid cancer cell line FTC-133 after four hours of exposure to simulated microgravity. Nuclei are stained blue, components of the cytoskeleton stained green and red. (Image credit: Team Daniela Grimm)

 

In space, things don’t always behave the way we expect them to. In the case of cancer, researchers have found that this is a good thing: some tumors seem to be much less aggressive in the microgravity environment of space compared to their behavior on Earth. This observation, reported in research published in February by the Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Journal, could help scientists understand the mechanism involved and develop drugs targeting tumors that don’t respond to current treatments. This work is the latest in a large body of evidence on how space exploration benefits those of us on Earth.

 

Research in the weightlessness of space offers unique insight into genetic and cellular processes that simply can’t be duplicated on Earth, even in simulated microgravity. “Microgravity can be approximated on Earth, but we know from the literature that simulated microgravity isn’t the same as the real thing,” says Daniela Gabriele Grimm, M.D., a researcher with the Department of Biomedicine, Pharmacology at Aarhus University in Aarhus, Denmark, and an author of the FASEB paper.

 

True weightlessness affects human cells in a number of ways. For one thing, cells grown in space arrange themselves into three-dimensional groupings, or aggregates, that more closely resemble what happens in the body. “Without gravitational pull, cells form three-dimensional aggregates, or spheroids,” Grimm explains. “Spheroids from cancer cells share many similarities with metastases, the cancer cells which spread throughout the body.” Determining the molecular mechanisms behind spheroid formation might therefore improve our understanding of how cancer spreads.

 

The FASEB paper resulted from an investigation in the Science in Microgravity Box (SIMBOX) facility aboard Shenzhou-8, launched in 2011. Cells grown in space and in simulated microgravity on the ground were analyzed for changes in gene expression and secretion profiles, with the results suggesting decreased expression of genes that indicate high malignancy in cancer cells.

 

The work was funded by a grant from the German Space Life Sciences program, managed by the German space agency, DLR, in collaboration with Chinese partners.

 

Grimm and her colleagues are following up with additional research, a Nanoracks Cellbox investigation called “Effect of microgravity on human thyroid carcinoma cells,” scheduled to launch in March on SpaceX's third commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. Another follow-up investigation, “Spheroids,” is planned in 2015. The overall goal is to find as many genes and proteins as possible that are affected by microgravity and to identify the cellular activities they influence. Researchers can then use this information to develop new strategies for cancer research.

 

In a recent paper published in Nature Reviews Cancer, Jeanne Becker, Ph.D., a cell biologist at Nano3D Biosciences in Houston and principal investigator for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System (CBOSS) 1-Ovarian study, examined nearly 200 papers on cell biology research in microgravity during four decades. This body of work shows that not only does the architecture of cells change in microgravity, but the immune system also is suppressed. Other studies in addition to Grimm’s have shown microgravity-induced changes in gene expression. The key variable, Becker concluded, is gravity. And the only way to really mitigate gravity is to go into space.

 

Read entire story:

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/tackling...

 

More about space station research:

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

 

_____________________________________________

These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin...

  

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

The smallest version I can make and still recognize it. This ship is so fun. The bottom mounted bridge felt strange in the show's scenes but I love it.

 

Here's a 3D view

www.etsy.com/shop/Paulygons

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

72.5 x 60.5 cm.

 

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

via

 

Hong Kong (CNN)The search for alien life just got bigger. A lot bigger.

 

The world’s largest telescope will be completed this week in China and it has scientists very, very excited.

 

With a whopping 1,640 feet (500 meter) wide dish the size of 30 football fields, the telescope will able to detect radio signals — and potentially signs of life — from distant planets.

 

“China’s latest telescope will be able to look faster and further than past searches for extraterrestrial intelligence,” says Douglas Vakoch, president of METI International, an organization dedicated to detecting alien intelligence.

 

Cradled in a karst hollow in the mountainous landscape of southwest China, the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, or FAST, starts operation September 25.

 

It’s a process known by astronomers as “first light” — when a telescope opens its eyes and takes its first pictures of the universe.

 

And FAST is wide eyed: its field of vision is almost twice as big as the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico that has been the world’s biggest single aperture telescope for the past 53 years.

 

Russia’s RATAN-600 telescope is larger than FAST by diameter with panels arranged in a 576 meter wide ring — but it’s not one single dish and its collection area is much smaller than FAST and Arecibo.

 

Decade to find right location

 

Construction of the $185 million mega project began in 2011, with the last of the 4,450 triangular panels that form the dish painstakingly lowered into place in July this year.

 

While the structure itself is too big to move, each of the panels can be adjusted.

 

“You can control the surface to point at certain points in the sky. A mesh of steel ropes allows a hydraulic push and pull mechanism,” says Andreas Wicenec, professor of Data Intensive Research at the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research in Australia.

 

Its remote location in China’s Guizhou province was one of 400 places scientists surveyed over 10 years. The egg-cup shaped valley is perfectly sized and the surrounding mountains provide a shield against radio frequency interference.

 

It was once home to “Green Water Village” a remote settlement of 12 families that had no electricity. The 65 villagers are among 9,110 that authorities uprooted in order to help improve the telescope’s listening capabilities.

 

“I never thought the first time I would move would be to make way for a telescope,” former villager Yang Chaolan, 62 told Xinhua, China’s official news agency.

 

Her son plans to open a restaurant in the town they have been relocated to in the hope the feat of engineering will bring tourists to the poor region.

 

But for many people, the most exciting goal is the search for extraterrestrial life.

 

The recent discovery of three life-friendly planets outside our solar system has rekindled discussion of whether intelligent life is unique to Earth.

 

FAST’s sensitivity will be capable of detecting exoplanets like these in ways that other telescopes cannot.

 

“FAST’s potential to discover an alien civilization will be five to 10 (times) that of current equipment, as it can see farther and darker planets,” Peng Bo, director of the NAO Radio Astronomy Technology Laboratory, told Xinhua.

 

Ambitions space program

 

FAST also underpins China’s bold space program, which is kicking into high gear.

 

Last week, Beijing launched the Tiangong-2 space lab — a precursor to a 20 ton space station. It’s also set for its longest crewed mission in October aboard the Shenzhou-11 spacecraft.

 

China’s ‘Cape Canaveral’

 

Next space superpower?

 

Moon’s dark side to be explored

 

Top astronaut wants cooperation

 

China plans Mars rover

 

Photos show moon’s surface

 

China’s space race

 

How astronauts prepare

 

Longer term goals include putting a man on the moon and sending a robotic probe to Mars.

 

The telescope could help track some of these missions, says Wicenec.

 

However, there are limitations on what the telescope can do. It’s unable to project the trajectories of comets or asteroids for example.

 

“FAST may help explain the origin of the universe and the structure of the cosmos, but it won’t provide warning of Earth-bound asteroids that could destroy human civilization,” says Vakoch.

 

China has long been secretive about its military-linked space program, but the scientists CNN spoke to for this piece expected Beijing to be open to international cooperation.

 

Chinese astronomers are expected to receive priority on the telescope for the two to three years and then it will be opened to scientists worldwide.

 

“It’s a prestige project but astronomy is very international. China is no exception,” says Wicenec.

 

Read more: edition.cnn.com/

 

The post China’s giant space telescope starts search for alien life appeared first on AlienVirals.com - Latest Alien & UFO News.

 

www.alienvirals.com/chinas-giant-space-telescope-starts-s...

Oil on paper; 25 x 31.5 cm.

 

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

   

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 152.4 x 62,9 cm.

 

Shen Zhou (Chinese: 沈周; pinyin: Shěn Zhōu, 1427–1509), courtesy name Qinan (启南), was a Chinese painter in the Ming dynasty. Shen Zhou was born into a wealthy family in Xiangcheng, near the thriving city of Suzhou, in the Jiangsu province, China. His genealogy traces his family’s wealth to the late Yuan period, but only as far as Shen’s paternal great-grandfather, Shen Liang-ch’en, who became a wealthy landowner following the dissolution of Mongol rule. After the collapse of the Yuan and the emergence of the new Ming dynasty, the position of tax collector was assigned to the head of the Shen family, under the Hongwu emperor’s new lijia system. This steadily and amply increased the family’s wealth, while freeing Shen Liang-ch’en’s male descendants from obligatory careers as Ming officials, and allowing them to live the majority of their lives as retired scholar-artists. Upon the death of his father, Shen Heng-chi, Shen Zhou decided to forgo official examinations and devote his life to the care of his widowed mother, Chang Su-wan. It is probable that he never intended to become an official, but refrained from making this obvious until his father had died. He thus renounced the life of official service while still preserving his reputation in an enduring act of filial piety. In this way, he was able to live a reclusive life, free of responsibility (except that of caring for his mother), and devote his time to artwork, socializing, and monastic contemplation of the natural world around him.

 

Shen Zhou lived at a pivotal point in the history of Chinese painting, and contributed greatly to the artistic tradition of China, founding the new Wu School in Suzhou. Under the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), painters had practiced with relative freedom, cultivating a more “individualist,” innovative approach to art that deviated noticeably from the more superficial style of the Song masters who preceded them. However, at the outset of the Ming, the Hongwu emperor (reg 1368-1398) decided to import the existing master painters to his court in Nanjing, where he had the ability to cultivate their styles to conform to the paintings of the Song masters. As Hongwu was notorious for his attempts to marginalize and persecute the scholar class, this was seen as an attempt to banish the gentry’s influence from the arts. The dominant style of the Ming court painters was called the Zhe School. However, following the ascension of the Yongle emperor (reg 1403-1424), the capital was moved from Nanjing to Beijing, putting a large distance between imperial influence and the city of Suzhou. These new conditions led to the rise of the Wu School of painting, a somewhat subversive style that revived the ideal of the inspired scholar-painter in Ming China.

 

Shen Zhou’s scholarly upbringing and artistic training had instilled in him a reverence for China’s historical tradition that influenced both his life and his art from an early age. He was accomplished in history and the classics, and his paintings reveal a disciplined obedience to the styles of the Yuan dynasty, to China’s history, and to the orthodox Confucianism that he embodied in his filial life. He is most famous for his landscapes and for his “boneless” renderings of flowers, which are meticulously created in the style of the Yuan masters. However, he did not always paint within strict boundaries. His inherited prosperity afforded him the luxury of painting independently of patrons, and he did so in a way that, while revealing his historical influence, was uniquely his own. Shen possessed a large collection of paintings from the late Yuan and early Ming, which he and his scholar-painter colleagues used as models in forging the revivalist approach of the Wu style. He frequently combined experimental elements with the more rigid styles of the Yuan masters. Much of his work was done in collaboration with others, combining painting, poetry, and calligraphy at gatherings with his literati friends. It was upon these ideals that his Wu School was founded. For Wu painters, painting was a meditation, rather than an occupation. Shen Zhou never coveted his paintings, although they were frequently coveted and imitated by others. Through Shen Zhou’s eyes, a painting was not a commodity, but the very extension of the painter himself.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Zhou

 

 

Most Dramatic Space Missions of 2016 ( The Journey of Space Missions in 2016 )

 

It's been a busy year of transition around the solar system. Some spacecraft crashed on distant planets, while others were found after we thought they were lost. And some cool stuff began to happen with new missions, such as exploring Jupiter and figuring out how useful inflatable structures will be in space. Here are some of the mission transitions of 2016.

 

1. Philae

2. Schiaparelli

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT)

5. Falcon 9 rocket + Amos-6

6. Tiangong-1

7. Juno

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

9. BEAM (International Space Station)

10. International Space Station one-year mission

11. Cassini

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle

 

Here you go:

 

1. Philae had quite the ride after separating from its parent spacecraft, Rosetta, in November 2014. The little lander bounced on its first contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and flew for an incredible two hours, finally coming to rest in a spot too shady to charge its solar-powered self. Philae did a few dozen hours of science, went into hibernation, and only gave a few peeps in the months afterwards until the European Space Agency gave up trying to contact it.Philae was found in one of the suspected landing zones.

 

www.seeker.com/philae-found-rosetta-spies-dead-comet-land...

 

2. STEREO-B : One of the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO-B) stopped transmitting in October 2014, then, this August, NASA's Deep Space Network finally locked on to the spacecraft.Unfortunately, NASA couldn't recover the spacecraft because it was uncontrolled and far away from Earth, at about two Earth-sun distances. With the limited data the agency had, it tried to stabilize the spacecraft,but failed.

 

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/behind_status.shtml

 

3. Schiaparelli : Schiaparelli separated from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and made its descent as planned on Oct. 19, but something happened along the way and it crashed. What exactly happened is still being figured out by an investigation board

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiapar...

 

4. Hitomi/ASTRO-H/New X-ray Telescope (NeXT) : Hitomi was an X-ray astronomy satellite from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, which was supposed to look at high-energy processs across the universe. The spacecraft made it into space as planned on Feb. 17, but controllers lost contact with it permanently on March 26.

 

5. Falcon 9 rocket and Amos-6 : On Sept. 1, a Falcon 9 rocket by SpaceX was on the pad undergoing a standard static fire test, before launching Amos-6 — an Israeli communications satellite. The rocket exploded and took the satellite with it, luckily causing no injuries at Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40.

 

www.seeker.com/spacex-elon-musk-falcon-rocket-explosion-l...

 

6. Tiangong-1 : Tiangong-1 was China's first space station — not a full station, but a small prototype to expand its space program in the future. It launched as a one-piece station in September 2011 and was visited by three spacecraft: Shenzhou 8 (uncrewed), Shenzhou 9 (crewed) and Shenzhou 10 (crewed)

 

7. Juno : Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4 and has been making scientific observations for the past few months.More detailed findings will come after Juno has been active for a while.

 

www.seeker.com/computer-glitch-nixes-juno-science-run-at-...

 

8. ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter : The new Trace Gas Orbiter, which arrived at Mars in October, is designed to look at trace gases in the Red Planet's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the major force on Mars, but there are smaller portions of the atmosphere that are less understood. One famous example is methane, which has been measured in different abundances by different telescopes, orbiters and even NASA's Curiosity rover.

 

TGO is highly elliptical right now, but over time it will use aerobraking — skimming through the thinnest part of Mars' atmosphere — to lower itself into a science orbit about 400 kilometers from the surface.

 

www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/How_TGO_...

 

9. ISS BEAM : BEAM was inflated on May 26, but the attempt was called off because there was more air pressure than expected inside the module (possibly caused by fabric layers sticking together). A second attempt on May 28 was successful. Astronauts have entered BEAM a few times since to collect air samples and do some other routine monitoring, but for the most part it just sits by itself, attached to the Tranquility node.

The International Space Station is an excellent location to do long-term research in everything from plants to human physiology. It's also a great spot for companies to test out new processes and ideas. One recent one is the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM. Bigelow has two inflatable mini-space stations that have been in orbit for several years to test how inflatables behave in low-Earth orbit. The next step for the company was to install an inflatable module to the ISS.

 

www.seeker.com/space-station-now-has-inflatable-digs-1832...

 

10. ISS one-year mission : While a lot of astronauts have spent six months on the station, NASA hopes to have longer missions to prepare for a possible journey to Mars in the coming decades. In 2015, Mikhail Kornienko (Roscosmos) and Scott Kelly (NASA) blasted off to spend nearly a year on the orbiting complex. It was the first time humans had spent so long in space since the Mir space station era of the 1990s. The two arrived safely on Earth again in March.

 

Kelly got most of the press in the United States — he's a twin, a great photographer and was charmingly laconic and funny on Twitter. Kelly's twin brother, Mark, was also an astronaut and volunteered to take part in the same genetic studies so that investigators could take advantage of a unique opportunity. It will take years for all the data to be processed and analyzed, but Kelly's and Kornienko's flight is expected to help scientists learn more about the effects of space on the human body.

 

11.Cassini : The Cassini spacecraft has provided an incredible perspective on Saturn and its system for the past 12 years. We've seen water jets from Enceladus, lakes on Titan and strange vertical structures in Saturn's rings. The spacecraft is now low on fuel after exploring the solar system since 1997, however, and investigators want to steer Cassini into Saturn so it doesn't accidentally hit a potentially habitable moon.

 

Cassini will gradually move between Saturn and its rings — a first in space exploration — to better understand some of the structures of the particles that make up Saturn's crown. In September 2017, it will make a last swan dive into Saturn, taking atmospheric measurements as long as possible so that investigators can learn more about the planet's interior structure.

 

12. Russia's Progress resupply vehicle : On Dec. 1, Russia lost contact with its unmanned Progress space station resupply vehicle shortly after launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The cargo ship was carrying 2.4 tons of food, supplies and equipment and officials confirmed that it failed to reach its proper orbit, ultimately succumbing to gravity and burning up in the atmosphere. Though obviously a huge setback for the Russian space agency and space station operations, the orbiting outpost had a good level of supplies in reserve. This was the second failed Progress launch in less than two years. The failure of the April 2015 Progress mission was blamed on a problem with the Soyuz launch system.

 

www.seeker.com/russia-progress-spacecraft-launch-fails-bu...

 

This is End !!!

 

Mars is a tough place to land on — just ask any of the various groups that have tried to send landers over the years, and failed (such as NASA, the former Soviet Union and the European Space Agency). While ESA thought it had learned the lessons of the Beagle 2 failed landing in 2003, it turned out that another landing demonstrator called Schiaparelli didn't make it to the surface.

 

Credit : NASA

So bitty, so aggressive! Maybe the second season can introduce a new captain every episode! I just found out that the Star Trek Online video game portrays the Shenzhou being recovered and put back into service. That warms my heart. All this time I've been thinking of her adrift on the edge of Federation space, just waiting for some greasy Klingon to get their hands on it. :(

 

You'll note the high budget special effects. That is indeed the fabric of space/time.

 

Here's a 3D view

www.etsy.com/shop/Paulygons

Watercolor on paper; 26 x 39.5 cm.

  

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

   

Oil on board; 35 x 24 cm.

 

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

  

When this ship departs from Auckland on Sunday it will be heading out to the remote Pacific to play a front line role in China’s space programme. Yuan Wang 5 – “Long View” - out of Shanghai will help guard two Chinese astronauts to Beijing’s Tiangong II space lab. The Shenzhou XI spacecraft taking the astronauts is due to lift off in mid-October.

The ship, one of seven in the People Liberation Army Navy’s fleet of space tracking vessels, has been a regular visitor to Suva, Fiji, and Auckland.

The Chinese refer to the fleet as "maritime aerospace survey vessels" carrying "transoceanic aerospace observation and control technology." They are used to develop intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarine to shore missile and astronautical technology. The ships trace their origin to Chou Enlai who in 1965 proposed China develop its own ocean-going aerospace measuring ships. Yuan Wang 1 and 2 were launched in 1977 and 1978. The Chinese say the ships have endurance with good seakeeping. With 50 antennae and extensive electronic equipment, one of its main problems has been electromagnetic interference.

Each ship has differences that the PLAN do not disclose. They have an average displacement tonnage of around 21,000 tons when fully loaded, with a crew of about 470 and a length of about 190 metres. Their Sulzer Ltd diesel engine gives a top speed of 37 km/h

A view from space

 

more information

 

Until 2003, astronauts were sponsored and trained exclusively by governments, either by the military, or by civilian space agencies. However, with the first sub-orbital flight of the privately-funded SpaceShipOne in 2004, a new category of astronaut was created: the commercial astronaut. With the rise of space tourism, NASA and the Russian Federal Space Agency agreed to use the term "spaceflight participant" to distinguish those space travelers from astronauts on missions coordinated by those two agencies.

 

The criteria for what constitutes human spaceflight vary. The Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) Sporting Code for astronautics recognizes only flights that exceed an altitude of 100 kilometers (62 mi). However, in the United States, professional, military, and commercial astronauts who travel above an altitude of 80 kilometers (50 mi)[citation needed] are awarded astronaut wings.

 

As of November 14, 2008, a total of 489 humans from 39 countries have reached 100 km or more in altitude, of which 486 reached Low Earth orbit or beyond. Of these, 24 people have traveled beyond Low Earth orbit, to either lunar or trans-lunar orbit or to the surface of the moon; three of the 24 did so twice (Lovell, Young and Cernan).

 

Under the U. S. definition, 496 people qualify as having reached space (above 50 miles (80 km) altitude). Of eight X-15 pilots who reached 50 miles (80 km) or more in altitude, seven reached above 50 miles (80 km) but below 100 kilometers (about 62 miles).Space travelers have spent over 30,400 person-days (or a cumulative total of over 83 years) in space, including over 100 astronaut-days of spacewalks. As of 2008, the man with the longest time in space is Sergei K. Krikalev, who has spent 803 days, 9 hours and 39 minutes, or 2.2 years, in space.Peggy A. Whitson holds the record for most time in space by a woman, 377 days.

  

Terminology

Astronaut ranks and positions

In the United States and many other English-speaking nations, a professional space traveler is called an astronaut. The term derives from the Greek words ástron (ἄστρον), meaning "star", and nautes (ναύτης), meaning "sailor". The first known use of the term "astronaut" in the modern sense was by Neil R. Jones in his short story The Death's Head Meteor in 1930. The word itself had been known earlier. For example, in Percy Greg's 1880 book Across the Zodiac, "astronaut" referred to a spacecraft. In Les Navigateurs de l'Infini (1925) of J.-H. Rosny aîné, the word astronautique (astronautic) was used. The word may have been inspired by "aeronaut", an older term for an air traveler first applied (in 1784) to balloonists.

 

NASA applies the term astronaut to any crew member aboard NASA spacecraft bound for Earth orbit or beyond. NASA also uses the term as a title for those selected to join its Astronaut Corps.

  

Russia

Main article: Soviet space program

 

Yuri Gagarin, first person in space (1961).By convention, an astronaut employed by the Russian Federal Space Agency (or its Soviet predecessor) is called a cosmonaut in English texts. The word is an anglicisation of the Russian word kosmonavt (Russian: космона́вт Russian pronunciation: [kəsmɐˈnaft]), which in turn derives from the Greek words kosmos (κόσμος), meaning "universe", and nautes (ναύτης), meaning "sailor". For the most part, "cosmonaut" and "astronaut" are synonyms in all languages, and the usage of choice is often dictated by political reasons.

 

On March 14, 1995, Norman Thagard became the first American to ride to space on board a Russian launch vehicle, arguably becoming the first "American cosmonaut" in the process.

  

China

Main article: Chinese space program

In China, the terms "yǔhángyuán" (宇航员, "sailing personnel in universe") or "hángtiānyuán" (航天员, "sailing personnel in sky") have long been used for astronauts. The phrase "tàikōng rén" (太空人, "spaceman") is often used in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Official English texts issued by the government of the People's Republic of China use astronaut while texts in Russian use космонавт (kosmonavt). The term taikonaut is used by some English-language news media organizations for professional space travelers from China. The word has featured in the Longman and Oxford English dictionaries, the latter of which describes it as "a hybrid of the Chinese term taikong (space) and the Greek naut (traveller), or astronaut"; the term became more common in 2003 when China sent its first astronaut Yang Liwei into space aboard the Shenzhou 5 spacecraft. This is the term used by Xinhua in the English version of the Chinese People's Daily since the advent of the Chinese space program.The origin of the term is unclear; as early as May 1998, Chiew Lee Yih (赵里昱) from Malaysia, used it in newsgroups, while Chen Lan (陈蓝), almost simultaneously, announced it at his "Go Taikonauts!" GeoCities page. List of Chinese astronauts

Other terms

While no nation other than Russia (formerly the Soviet Union), the United States, and China has launched a manned spacecraft, several other nations have sent people into space in cooperation with one of these countries. Inspired partly by these missions, other synonyms for astronaut have entered occasional English usage. For example, the term spationaut (French spelling: spationaute) is sometimes used to describe French space travelers, from the Latin word spatium or "space", and the Malay term angkasawan was used to describe participants in the Angkasawan program.

  

Space travel milestones

Spaceflight records and Timeline of space travel by nationality

 

Neil Armstrong, first person to walk on the moon (1969).The first human in space was Russian Yuri Gagarin, who was launched into space on April 12, 1961 aboard Vostok 1 and orbited around the Earth. There are allegations that Gagarin ejected from landing module after re-entering the atmosphere and parachuted back, due to safety concerns about the craft's landing systems.The first woman in space was Russian Valentina Tereshkova, launched in June 1963 aboard Vostok 6.

 

Alan Shepard became the first American and second person in space on May 5, 1961, while the first American woman in space was Sally Ride, during Space Shuttle Challenger's mission STS-7, on June 18, 1983.

 

The first mission to orbit the moon was Apollo 8, which included William Anders who was born in Hong Kong, making him the first Asian-born astronaut in 1968. In April 1985, Taylor Wang became the first ethnic Chinese person in space.On 15 October 2003, Yang Liwei became China's first astronaut on the Shenzhou 5 spacecraft.

 

The Soviet Union, through its Intercosmos program, allowed people from other socialist countries to fly on its missions. An example is Vladimír Remek, a Czechoslovak, who became the first non-Soviet European in space in 1978 on a Russian Soyuz rocket. On July 23, 1980, Pham Tuan of Vietnam became the first Asian in space when he flew aboard Soyuz 37.Also in 1980, Cuban Arnaldo Tamayo Méndez became the first person of African descent to fly in space (the first person born in Africa to fly in space was Patrick Baudry, in 1985).In 1988, Abdul Ahad Mohmand became the first Afghan to reach space, spending nine days aboard the Mir space station.

 

With the larger number of seats available on the Space Shuttle, the U.S. began taking international astronauts. In 1985, Rodolfo Neri Vela became the first Mexican-born person in space. In 1991, Helen Sharman became the first Briton to fly in space. In 2002, Mark Shuttleworth became the first citizen of an African country to fly in space, as a paying spaceflight participant. In 2003, Ilan Ramon became the first Israeli to fly in space.

 

Age milestones

The youngest person to fly in space is Gherman Titov, who was 25 years old when he flew Vostok 2. (Titov was also the first person to suffer space sickness).The oldest person who has flown in space is John Glenn, who was 77 when he flew on STS-95. The longest stay in space was 438 days, by Russian Valeri Polyakov.As of 2006, the most spaceflights by an individual astronaut is seven, a record held by both Jerry L. Ross and Franklin Chang-Diaz. The furthest distance from Earth an astronaut has traveled was 401,056 km, during the Apollo 13 emergency.

  

Non-government milestones

The first non-governmental space traveler was Byron K. Lichtenberg, a researcher from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who flew on STS-9 in 1983.In December 1990, Toyohiro Akiyama became the first paying space traveler as a reporter for Tokyo Broadcasting System, a visit to Mir as part of an estimated $12 million (USD) deal with a Japanese TV station, although at the time, the term used to refer to Akiyama was "Research Cosmonaut".Akiyama suffered severe space-sickness during his mission, which affected his productivity.

 

The first self-funded space tourist was Dennis Tito onboard the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TM-3 on 28 April 2001.

  

Self-funded travelers

Main article: Space tourist

The first person to fly on an entirely privately-funded mission was Mike Melvill, piloting SpaceShipOne flight 15P on a sub-orbital journey, although he was a test pilot employed by Scaled Composites and not an actual paying space tourist. Six others have paid to fly into space:

 

Dennis Tito (American): April 28 – May 6, 2001

Mark Shuttleworth (South African / British): April 25 – May 5, 2002 (ISS)

Gregory Olsen (American): October 1 – October 11, 2005 (ISS)

Anousheh Ansari (Iranian / American): September 18 – September 29, 2006 (ISS)

Charles Simonyi (Hungarian / American): April 7 – April 21, 2007 (ISS)

Richard Garriott (American): October 12- October 24, 2008 (ISS)

 

Training

Astronaut ranks and positions

The first NASA astronauts were selected in 1959. Early in the space program, military jet test piloting and engineering training were often cited as prerequisites for selection as an astronaut at NASA, although neither John Glenn nor Scott Carpenter (of the Mercury Seven) had any university degree, in engineering or any other discipline at the time of their selection. Selection was initially limited to military pilots.The earliest astronauts for both America and Russia tended to be jet fighter pilots, and were often test pilots.

 

Once selected, NASA astronauts go through 20 months of training in a variety of areas, including training for extra-vehicular activity in a facility such as NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory.Astronauts-in-training may also experience short periods of weightlessness in aircraft called the "vomit comet", the nickname given to a pair of modified KC-135s (retired in 2000 and 2004 respectively, and replaced in 2005 with a C-9) which perform parabolic flights. Astronauts are also required to accumulate a number of flight hours in high-performance jet aircraft. This is mostly done in T-38 jet aircraft out of Ellington Field, due to its proximity to the Johnson Space Center. Ellington Field is also where the Shuttle Training Aircraft is maintained and developed, although most flights of the aircraft are done out of Edwards Air Force Base.

  

NASA candidacy requirements

Be citizens of the United States.

Pass a strict physical examination, and have a near and distant visual acuity correctable to 20/20 (6/6). Blood pressure, while sitting, must be no greater than 140 over 90.

 

Commander and Pilot

A bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics is required, and a graduate degree is desired, although not essential.

At least 1,000 hours flying time as Pilot-in-Command in jet aircraft. Experience as a test pilot is desirable.

Height must be 5 ft 4 in (1.6 m) to 6 ft 4 in (1.9 m).

Distant Visual Acuity must be Correctable to 20/20 Each Eye

The refractive surgical procedures of the eye, PRK and LASIK, are now allowed, providing at least 1 year has passed since the date of the procedure with no permanent adverse after effects. For those applicants under final consideration, an operative report on the surgical procedure will be requested.

 

Mission Specialist

Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics, as well as at least three years of related professional experience.

Applicant's height must be 5 ft 2 in to 6 ft 4 in (1.57 to 1.93 m).

 

Mission Specialist Educator

 

Mission Specialist Educators Lindenberger, Arnold, and Acaba during a parabolic flight.Main article: Educator Astronaut Project

Bachelor's degree with teaching experience, including work at the kindergarten through 12th grade level. Advanced degree not required, but is desired.

Mission Specialist Educators, or "Educator Astronauts", were first selected in 2004, and as of 2007, there are three NASA Educator astronauts: Joseph M. Acaba, Richard R. Arnold, and Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger. Barbara Morgan, selected as back-up teacher to Christa McAuliffe in 1985, is considered to be the first Educator astronaut by the media, but she trained as a mission specialist.The Educator Astronaut program is a successor to the Teacher in Space program from the 1980s.

  

Insignia

At NASA, people who complete astronaut candidate training receive a silver lapel pin. Once they have flown in space, they receive a gold pin. U.S. astronauts who also have active-duty military status receive a special qualification badge, known as the Astronaut Badge, after participation on a spaceflight. The United States Air Force also presents an Astronaut Badge to its pilots who exceed 50 miles (80 km) in altitude.

  

Deaths

Main article: Space accidents and incidents

As of 2008, eighteen astronauts have lost their lives during spaceflight. Thirteen of them were American, three were Russian, one was Ukrainian, and one was Israeli.[citation needed]

 

A memorial at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA, commemorates "24 U.S. astronauts who gave their lives for space exploration."

   

Spaceflight portal

Astronaut Hall of Fame

Commercial Astronaut

List of astronauts by name

List of astronauts by selection

Timeline of astronauts by nationality

List of human spaceflights

List of space travelers by name

List of space travelers by nationality

List of spacewalks and moonwalks

X-15 program

Spaceflight records

Shirley Thomas, author of Men of Space series (1960-1968)

Cosmonautics Day

Yuri's Night

Fallen Astronaut

List of fictional astronauts

Moon Landing

Mercury 13 - A group of 13 women who were tested, but never flew in space.

   

References

^ a b NASA (2006). "Astronaut Fact Book" (PDF). National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Marie MacKay (2005). "Former astronaut visits USU". The Utah Statesman. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ FAI Sporting Code, Section 8, Paragraph 2.12.1

^ Counting Anousheh Ansari as a representative of Iran.

^ Bill Harwood (2008). "STS-126 Quick-Look Data". CBS News. Retrieved on November 14, 2008.

^ Encyclopedia Astronautica (2007). "Women of Space". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA. "NASA's First 100 Human Space Flights". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ a b c d Encyclopedia Astronautica (2007). "Astronaut Statistics - as of 14 November 2008". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2004). "Walking in the Void". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2005). "Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev Biography". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2005). "Krikalev Sets Time-in-Space Record". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA. ""Peggy A. Whitson (Ph.D.)"". Biographical Data. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Retrieved on 2008-05-13.

^ a b Dismukes, Kim - NASA Biography Page Curator (2005-12-15). "Astronaut Biographies". Johnson Space Center,NASA. Retrieved on 2007-03-06.

^ реконмендовать другому. "Chinese embassy in Kazakhstan press-release" (in Russian). fmprc.gov.cn. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ ru.china-embassy.org. "Chinese embassy in Russia press-release" (in Russian). ru.china-embassy.org. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ "Chinese taikonaut dismisses environment worries about new space launch center". China View (2008-01-26). Retrieved on 2008-09-25.

^ ""Taikonauts" a sign of China's growing global influence". China View (2008-09-25). Retrieved on 2008-09-25.

^ Xinhua (2008). "Chinese taikonaut debuts spacewalk". People's Daily Online. Retrieved on September 28, 2008.

^ Chiew, Lee Yih (1998-05-19). "Google search of "taikonaut" sort by date". Usenet posting. Chiew Lee Yih. Retrieved on 2008-09-27.

^ Chiew, Lee Yih (1996-03-10). "Chiew Lee Yih misspelled "taikonaut" 2 years before it first appear". Usenet posting. Chiew Lee Yih. Retrieved on 2008-09-27.

^ Evil, Monkey (2005-01-24). "The earliest use of the term found in Google Groups is on that date.[1 Evil Monkey → Talk 03:07, Jan 24, 2005 (UTC)]". Wikipedia discussion on astronaut. Evil Monkey. Retrieved on 2008-09-27.

^ Chen Lan (1998). "Go Taikonauts!". Chen Lan. Retrieved on 2008-09-28.

^ BBC News | Gagarin | Back to Earth

^ NASA (2006). "Sally K. Ride, Ph.D. Biography". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (1985). "Taylor G. Wang Biography". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Encyclopedia Astronautica (2007). "Taylor Wang". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Encyclopedia Astronautica (2007). "Vladimir Remek Czech Pilot Cosmonaut". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Encyclopedia Astronautica (2007). "Salyut 6 EP-7". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Encyclopedia Astronautica (2007). "Tamayo-Mendez". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Encyclopedia Astronautica (2007). "Baudry". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Joachim Wilhelm Josef Becker and Heinz Hermann Janssen (2007). "Biographies of International Astronauts". Space Facts. Retrieved on August 11, 2007.

^ NASA (1985). "Rodolfo Neri Vela (Ph.D.) Biography". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ BBC News (2005). "1991: Sharman becomes first Briton in space". BBC News. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ africaninspace.com (2002). "First African in Space". HBD. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ BBC News (2007). "1961: Russian cosmonaut spends day in space". BBC News. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Anatoly Zak (2000). "Russia Cosmonaut Gherman Titov Dies". Space.com. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2007). "John Herschel Glenn, Jr. (Colonel, USMC, Ret.) NASA Astronaut". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2002). "Byron K. Lichtenberg Biography". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum (2007). "Paying for a Ride". Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ a b BBC News (1990). "Mir Space Station 1986-2001". BBC News. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Spacefacts (1990). "Akiyama". Spacefacts. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Leonard David (2004). "Pilot Announced on Eve of Private Space Mission". Space.com. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Royce Carlton Inc. (2007). "Michael Melvill, First Civilian Astronaut, SpaceShipOne". Royce Carlton Inc.. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.[dead link]

^ a b c NASA (2006). "Astronaut Candidate Training". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.[dead link]

^ a b NASA (1995). "Selection and Training of Astronauts". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.[dead link]

^ Nolen, Stephanie (2002). Promised The Moon: The Untold Story of the First Women in the Space Race. Toronto: Penguin Canada. p. 235. ISBN 0-14-301347-5.

^ NASA (2007). "Astronaut Candidate Program". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2007). "NASA Opens Applications for New Astronaut Class". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2004). "'Next Generation of Explorers' Named". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2004). "NASA's New Astronauts Meet The Press". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2007). "Barbara Radding Morgan - NASA Astronaut biography". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Tariq Malik (2007). "NASA Assures That Teachers Will Fly in Space". Space.com. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ NASA (2005). "Educator Astronaut Program". NASA. Retrieved on October 4, 2007.

^ Astronaut Memorials - Space Memorial for Apollo 1 and Space Shuttle Challenger and Columbia : Kennedy Space Center

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

中国长征-2F运载火箭和神舟号飞船

China CZ-2F freight rocket & Shenzhou space ship

This is my attempt at the Shenzhou using what I think of as "Star Trek Dish" scale.

 

The parts are on the way! Now to see if it works.

 

www.mecabricks.com/en/user/paulygon

www.etsy.com/shop/Paulygons

Baywatch lifeguard station, origins unknown, surrounded by seismometers

Western Sinus Meridiani / Martian Sea

 

Last known Taikonaut transmission, circa November 2023

红色龙 Mars Mission / Shenzhou-17

China National Space Administration Archives

  

.

Shénzōu (Barco divino)

So aggressively small! If you squint and engage your imagination drive, you can clearly see Michael Burnham through the battle ruptured hull, trapped behind a brig force field. She's trying to sweet talk the ship's computer into a totally legit explosive decompression.

 

mecabricks.com/en/user/paulygon

www.etsy.com/shop/Paulygons

This is my attempt at the Shenzhou using what I think of as "Star Trek Dish" scale.

 

The parts are on the way! Now to see if it works.

 

www.mecabricks.com/en/user/paulygon

www.etsy.com/shop/Paulygons

China's new space station, "Tiangong 2", had its first visitors earlier today when the Shenzhou 11 spacecraft docked carrying Chinese astronauts Jing Haipeng and Chen Dong on a 30 day mission.

 

A few hours after docking, the two spacecraft passed over Brisbane during our evening twilight. I captured them as a streak in this 12 second exposure.

Shen Zhou (Chinese: 沈周; pinyin: Shěn Zhōu, 1427–1509), courtesy name Qinan (启南), was a Chinese painter in the Ming dynasty. Shen Zhou was born into a wealthy family in Xiangcheng, near the thriving city of Suzhou, in the Jiangsu province, China. His genealogy traces his family’s wealth to the late Yuan period, but only as far as Shen’s paternal great-grandfather, Shen Liang-ch’en, who became a wealthy landowner following the dissolution of Mongol rule. After the collapse of the Yuan and the emergence of the new Ming dynasty, the position of tax collector was assigned to the head of the Shen family, under the Hongwu emperor’s new lijia system. This steadily and amply increased the family’s wealth, while freeing Shen Liang-ch’en’s male descendants from obligatory careers as Ming officials, and allowing them to live the majority of their lives as retired scholar-artists. Upon the death of his father, Shen Heng-chi, Shen Zhou decided to forgo official examinations and devote his life to the care of his widowed mother, Chang Su-wan. It is probable that he never intended to become an official, but refrained from making this obvious until his father had died. He thus renounced the life of official service while still preserving his reputation in an enduring act of filial piety. In this way, he was able to live a reclusive life, free of responsibility (except that of caring for his mother), and devote his time to artwork, socializing, and monastic contemplation of the natural world around him.

 

Shen Zhou lived at a pivotal point in the history of Chinese painting, and contributed greatly to the artistic tradition of China, founding the new Wu School in Suzhou. Under the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), painters had practiced with relative freedom, cultivating a more “individualist,” innovative approach to art that deviated noticeably from the more superficial style of the Song masters who preceded them. However, at the outset of the Ming, the Hongwu emperor (reg 1368-1398) decided to import the existing master painters to his court in Nanjing, where he had the ability to cultivate their styles to conform to the paintings of the Song masters. As Hongwu was notorious for his attempts to marginalize and persecute the scholar class, this was seen as an attempt to banish the gentry’s influence from the arts. The dominant style of the Ming court painters was called the Zhe School. However, following the ascension of the Yongle emperor (reg 1403-1424), the capital was moved from Nanjing to Beijing, putting a large distance between imperial influence and the city of Suzhou. These new conditions led to the rise of the Wu School of painting, a somewhat subversive style that revived the ideal of the inspired scholar-painter in Ming China.

 

Shen Zhou’s scholarly upbringing and artistic training had instilled in him a reverence for China’s historical tradition that influenced both his life and his art from an early age. He was accomplished in history and the classics, and his paintings reveal a disciplined obedience to the styles of the Yuan dynasty, to China’s history, and to the orthodox Confucianism that he embodied in his filial life. He is most famous for his landscapes and for his “boneless” renderings of flowers, which are meticulously created in the style of the Yuan masters. However, he did not always paint within strict boundaries. His inherited prosperity afforded him the luxury of painting independently of patrons, and he did so in a way that, while revealing his historical influence, was uniquely his own. Shen possessed a large collection of paintings from the late Yuan and early Ming, which he and his scholar-painter colleagues used as models in forging the revivalist approach of the Wu style. He frequently combined experimental elements with the more rigid styles of the Yuan masters. Much of his work was done in collaboration with others, combining painting, poetry, and calligraphy at gatherings with his literati friends. It was upon these ideals that his Wu School was founded. For Wu painters, painting was a meditation, rather than an occupation. Shen Zhou never coveted his paintings, although they were frequently coveted and imitated by others. Through Shen Zhou’s eyes, a painting was not a commodity, but the very extension of the painter himself.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Zhou

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

Handscroll; ink on paper; 29.2 x 453.1 cm.

  

Shen Zhou (Chinese: 沈周; pinyin: Shěn Zhōu, 1427–1509), courtesy name Qinan (启南), was a Chinese painter in the Ming dynasty. Shen Zhou was born into a wealthy family in Xiangcheng, near the thriving city of Suzhou, in the Jiangsu province, China. His genealogy traces his family’s wealth to the late Yuan period, but only as far as Shen’s paternal great-grandfather, Shen Liang-ch’en, who became a wealthy landowner following the dissolution of Mongol rule. After the collapse of the Yuan and the emergence of the new Ming dynasty, the position of tax collector was assigned to the head of the Shen family, under the Hongwu emperor’s new lijia system. This steadily and amply increased the family’s wealth, while freeing Shen Liang-ch’en’s male descendants from obligatory careers as Ming officials, and allowing them to live the majority of their lives as retired scholar-artists. Upon the death of his father, Shen Heng-chi, Shen Zhou decided to forgo official examinations and devote his life to the care of his widowed mother, Chang Su-wan. It is probable that he never intended to become an official, but refrained from making this obvious until his father had died. He thus renounced the life of official service while still preserving his reputation in an enduring act of filial piety. In this way, he was able to live a reclusive life, free of responsibility (except that of caring for his mother), and devote his time to artwork, socializing, and monastic contemplation of the natural world around him.

 

Shen Zhou lived at a pivotal point in the history of Chinese painting, and contributed greatly to the artistic tradition of China, founding the new Wu School in Suzhou. Under the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), painters had practiced with relative freedom, cultivating a more “individualist,” innovative approach to art that deviated noticeably from the more superficial style of the Song masters who preceded them. However, at the outset of the Ming, the Hongwu emperor (reg 1368-1398) decided to import the existing master painters to his court in Nanjing, where he had the ability to cultivate their styles to conform to the paintings of the Song masters. As Hongwu was notorious for his attempts to marginalize and persecute the scholar class, this was seen as an attempt to banish the gentry’s influence from the arts. The dominant style of the Ming court painters was called the Zhe School. However, following the ascension of the Yongle emperor (reg 1403-1424), the capital was moved from Nanjing to Beijing, putting a large distance between imperial influence and the city of Suzhou. These new conditions led to the rise of the Wu School of painting, a somewhat subversive style that revived the ideal of the inspired scholar-painter in Ming China.

 

Shen Zhou’s scholarly upbringing and artistic training had instilled in him a reverence for China’s historical tradition that influenced both his life and his art from an early age. He was accomplished in history and the classics, and his paintings reveal a disciplined obedience to the styles of the Yuan dynasty, to China’s history, and to the orthodox Confucianism that he embodied in his filial life. He is most famous for his landscapes and for his “boneless” renderings of flowers, which are meticulously created in the style of the Yuan masters. However, he did not always paint within strict boundaries. His inherited prosperity afforded him the luxury of painting independently of patrons, and he did so in a way that, while revealing his historical influence, was uniquely his own. Shen possessed a large collection of paintings from the late Yuan and early Ming, which he and his scholar-painter colleagues used as models in forging the revivalist approach of the Wu style. He frequently combined experimental elements with the more rigid styles of the Yuan masters. Much of his work was done in collaboration with others, combining painting, poetry, and calligraphy at gatherings with his literati friends. It was upon these ideals that his Wu School was founded. For Wu painters, painting was a meditation, rather than an occupation. Shen Zhou never coveted his paintings, although they were frequently coveted and imitated by others. Through Shen Zhou’s eyes, a painting was not a commodity, but the very extension of the painter himself.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Zhou

 

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Samantha Cristoforetti joined 16 Chinese astronauts in August 2017 for nine days of sea survival training off China’s coastal city of Yantai. The course was organised by the Astronaut Center of China in cooperation with the Ministry of Transport’s Beihai Rescue Bureau.

 

Returning from space, astronauts need to be prepared for any eventuality – including landing in water. Sea survival is a staple of all astronaut training but this is the first time with non-Chinese participants.

 

The group donned pressure suits and entered a mock capsule of a Shenzhou spacecraft that was then released into the sea. The astronauts had to swap their flightwear for insulation and buoyancy suits before jumping from the capsule into inflatable boats. They then practised rescue procedures with both a ship and a helicopter.

 

ESA signed an agreement in 2015 to boost collaboration with the China National Space Administration, with the goal of flying a European astronaut on the Chinese space station in the future.

 

Credit: ESA–Stephane Corvaja, 2017

 

The unmanned landing on the far side of the moon is not the only thing they are doing in space. They have a whole array of new manned and unmanned spacecraft in planning stages.

The Shenzhou is being replaced with a more modern Apollo type capsule. A truly monster Long March 9 rocket is planned.

They also have ambition for a moon base at the lunar south pole it looks like.

One of the things I am intrigued by is the little spacecraft with solar panels that seems to be a free flying telescope. You could periodically dock with it to repair it or retrieve data. It has a docking port and you could service it without a spacewalk. That's brilliant.

The spaceplanes look like they were downloaded straight off of NASA technical reports server but hey, it saves a ton on R&D.

 

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