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Josh Harrison is an American professional baseball second baseman with the Pittsburgh Pirates of Major League Baseball. Harrison has also played third base and outfield for the Pirates.

Today is a sad day for the Padres organization. Jerry Coleman passed away earlier today. A former baseball player, Marine and Padres broadcaster Jerry accomplished the American dream. Jerry, you will be missed. You can hang a star in the heavens tonight Jerry! RIP. #padres, #yankees #lajolla #sandiego #baseballlegend #dv82u #baseballhalloffame #padreshalloffame

 

Denmark

Red Sox Secondbaseman Dustin Pedroia prepares to bat against the A's.

Great American Ball Park

Cincinnati, OH

Ted Lepcio played in 729 major league games. He was a Secondbaseman-Thirdbaseman-Shortstop. He played for the Boston Red Sox, Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago White Sox, and Minnesota Twins. Mr. Lepcio was kind enough to give me this photo.

Bain News Service,, publisher.

 

[Eddie Collins, Philadelphia, AL (baseball)]

 

[1911]

 

1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

 

Notes:

Original data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards: Collins, Phila. Baseball.

Corrected title and date based on research by the Pictorial History Committee, Society for American Baseball Research, 2006.

Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

 

Subjects:

Baseball

 

Format: Glass negatives.

 

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

 

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

 

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

 

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.09142

 

Call Number: LC-B2- 2191-4

  

All rights reserved. (C) 2009 kandidz (T.M.Achonti-shanise)

Jason Christian finds out. Kevin Cislo is #19 in the foreground, and I think that's Brad Roblin in the back. I do not know the name of the slightly amused groundskeeper.

Don Lee Blasingame (b: March 16, 1932 – d: April 13, 2005 at age 73) was a second baseman in MLB who played with the St. Louis Cardinals (1955–1959), San Francisco Giants (1960–1961), Cincinnati Reds (1961–1963), Washington Senators (1963–1966) and Kansas City Athletics (1966).

 

Blasingame was a .258 career hitter with 21 home runs and 308 RBI in 1444 games. A classic line drive hitter, Blasingame was also a skilled bunter and a fast and smart runner -- he hit into fewer double plays (one in every 123 at-bats) than anyone in major league history except Don Buford.

 

Blasingame enjoyed his best season in 1957, when he hit .271 and posted career-highs in home runs (8), RBI (58), runs (101), hits (176) and stolen bases (21). In 1958, he followed with .274, 19 doubles, 10 triples and 20 steals, and also was named to the National League All-Star team. In 1959, Blasingame hit .289 with 26 doubles, both career highs.

 

He finished his major league career at the end of the 1966 season.

 

MLB statistics:

Batting average - .258

Home runs - 21

RBI - 308

 

Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/517/col/1/yea/0/Don-...

"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives"

Jack Roosevelt Robinson

1919 - 1972

 

This statue of Jackie Robinson, sculpted by Susan Wagner, was dedicated on February 26, 1998 in Journal Square.

 

On April 18, 1946, Robinson, a 26-year-old secondbaseman, took the field for the Montreal Royals against the Jersey City Giants, a Class AAA affiliate of the New York Giants, for Opening Day of the International League baseball season, to become the first African American player in the modern era of organized professional baseball. The game took place, appropriately, on a field known as Roosevelt Stadium, which was at the foot of Danforth Avenue at Route 440 in Jersey City, at a spot then known as Droyer's Point. The Giants sold 52,000 tickets for that game--more than double the stadium's seating capacity of 23,000. Booed mercilessly during his first plate appearance, Robinson went on to have four hits including a 3-run homer, with 4 RBI, 4 runs scored, and 2 stolen bases in Montreal's 14-1 rout. A year later, Jackie Robinson would break Major League Baseball's color line, when he debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.

Antonio Nemesio (Sanchez) Taylor (b: December 19, 1935 in Central Alara, Cuba) is a former second baseman in MLB. From 1958 through 1976, Taylor played for the Chicago Cubs (1958–60), Philadelphia Phillies (1960–71 and 1974–76) and Detroit Tigers (1971–73).

 

In 1963, Taylor hit .281 and collected career-highs in runs (102) and hits (182), and the next season, he made the defensive play that saved Jim Bunning’s perfect game. In 1970, he hit a career-high .301 average with 26 doubles, 9 triples and 9 homers.

 

Following his retirement as a player, Taylor coached for the Phillies and Marlins. One of the most popular Phillies ever, he was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame in 2002.

 

Career statistics:

Batting average - .261

Hits - 2,007

Home runs - 75

RBI - 598

 

Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/5793/col/1/yea/0/Ton...

Staten Island Yankees second baseman Ty McFarland bats against the Vermont Lake Monsters.

"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives"

Jack Roosevelt Robinson

1919 - 1972

 

This statue of Jackie Robinson, sculpted by Susan Wagner, was dedicated on February 26, 1998 in Journal Square.

 

On April 18, 1946, Robinson, a 26-year-old secondbaseman, took the field for the Montreal Royals against the Jersey City Giants, a Class AAA affiliate of the New York Giants, for Opening Day of the International League baseball season, to become the first African American player in the modern era of organized professional baseball. The game took place, appropriately, on a field known as Roosevelt Stadium, which was at the foot of Danforth Avenue at Route 440 in Jersey City, at a spot then known as Droyer's Point. The Giants sold 52,000 tickets for that game--more than double the stadium's seating capacity of 23,000. Booed mercilessly during his first plate appearance, Robinson went on to have four hits including a 3-run homer, with 4 RBI, 4 runs scored, and 2 stolen bases in Montreal's 14-1 rout. A year later, Jackie Robinson would break Major League Baseball's color line, when he debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.

Mill Woods vs. East Park

Boston second baseman Dustin Pedroia during a rehab start with the Pawtucket Red Sox.

Staten Island Yankees second baseman Ty McFarland bats against the Vermont Lake Monsters.

Identifier: stnicholasserial392dodg

Title: St. Nicholas [serial]

Year: 1873 (1870s)

Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905

Subjects: Children's literature

Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.]

Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

e-runner glued to his sack,and scolded him for not, apparently, making anyreal effort to get the runner? And then haveyou cheered mightily when the catcher threw tothe first baseman, who caught the runner off withneatness and despatch? Oh, you may have said, that catcher knowshis business, at any rate ! Nothing weak abouthis throwing down to first! The pitcher couldhave done it a dozen times ! He must be lazy.But, my! how that catcher did line that balldown ! He s playing some ball, all right! Of course you have ! And, in so doing, youmay have shown that you do not always recog-nize strategy and generalship when you see it,and have demonstrated one of the reasons a ball-player cares so little for either the cheers or thejeers of the stands. He knows they cheer onlyat the obvious, and jeer when there is nothing tojeer at—so he just does nt care. What actually happened may have been some-thing like this: the batter gets a short single-perhaps the first his side has had in four or five

 

Text Appearing After Image:

THE HIT-AND-RUN, WHEN IT WORKS. Pitcher delivers ball — runner on first starts with the throw. Secondbaseman, seeing runner start, covers second base. But batter hits theball through second basemans position. He would field it if he wasthere, but he is covering second to take the catchers throw in case bat-ter fails to hit. As batter does make base-hit, runner, with flying start,continues to third, beats the throw in from outfield by a slide, and takestwo bases on a single. Batter, of course, is safe at first. Note: If short-stop covers bag, of course second baseman would fieldball. But, then, if batter hits through short-stops position, the sameconditions obtain. innings. The coacher seems crazy. The manageris elated. The stands cheer. The pitcher andcatcher approach each other. Tell him all about it now, yell the fans. Tease him a bit,—he s anxious, is what thecatcher says. So the pitcher pretends to be very watchful in-deed, but throws rather lazily to first. The firstbaseman,

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Buster Posey, Ryan Theriot & Hunter Pence

Miller Huggins, second baseman, St. Louis Cardinals. Photograph by William H. Trefts, Jr, 1912. Missouri History Museum Photographs and Prints Collections. William Trefts Collection. n29445.

Alberto Gonzalez (x4)

IP (In-Person)

Petco Park 9/4/11

Padres vs. Rockies

 

Denmark

2012 World Championship Parade

Staten Island Yankees second baseman Ty McFarland bats against the Vermont Lake Monsters.

"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives"

Jack Roosevelt Robinson

1919 - 1972

 

This statue of Jackie Robinson, sculpted by Susan Wagner, was dedicated on February 26, 1998 in Journal Square.

 

On April 18, 1946, Robinson, a 26-year-old secondbaseman, took the field for the Montreal Royals against the Jersey City Giants, a Class AAA affiliate of the New York Giants, for Opening Day of the International League baseball season, to become the first African American player in the modern era of organized professional baseball. The game took place, appropriately, on a field known as Roosevelt Stadium, which was at the foot of Danforth Avenue at Route 440 in Jersey City, at a spot then known as Droyer's Point. The Giants sold 52,000 tickets for that game--more than double the stadium's seating capacity of 23,000. Booed mercilessly during his first plate appearance, Robinson went on to have four hits including a 3-run homer, with 4 RBI, 4 runs scored, and 2 stolen bases in Montreal's 14-1 rout. A year later, Jackie Robinson would break Major League Baseball's color line, when he debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.

Mr. Pesky played in 1270 major league games. He played for the Boston Red Sox, Detroit Tigers, and Washington Senators. He was an shortstop-thirdbaseman-secondbaseman. Mr. Pesky was nice enough to give me this free of charge.

 

Trenton Thunder second baseman, Corban Joseph.

After getting OSU 4 Ronnie Dawson out at second, Illinois 6 leaped into the air to avoid the collision, and then fired the ball off to get the batter out at second.

"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives"

Jack Roosevelt Robinson

1919 - 1972

 

This statue of Jackie Robinson, sculpted by Susan Wagner, was dedicated on February 26, 1998 in Journal Square.

 

On April 18, 1946, Robinson, a 26-year-old secondbaseman, took the field for the Montreal Royals against the Jersey City Giants, a Class AAA affiliate of the New York Giants, for Opening Day of the International League baseball season, to become the first African American player in the modern era of organized professional baseball. The game took place, appropriately, on a field known as Roosevelt Stadium, which was at the foot of Danforth Avenue at Route 440 in Jersey City, at a spot then known as Droyer's Point. The Giants sold 52,000 tickets for that game--more than double the stadium's seating capacity of 23,000. Booed mercilessly during his first plate appearance, Robinson went on to have four hits including a 3-run homer, with 4 RBI, 4 runs scored, and 2 stolen bases in Montreal's 14-1 rout. A year later, Jackie Robinson would break Major League Baseball's color line, when he debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.

From left to right, Hank Blalock wiping his nose, Michael Young, Ian Kinsler, and Mark Teixeira with his big goofy grin.

All rights reserved. (C) 2009 kandidz (T.M.Achonti-shanise)

"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives"

Jack Roosevelt Robinson

1919 - 1972

 

This statue of Jackie Robinson, sculpted by Susan Wagner, was dedicated on February 26, 1998 in Journal Square.

 

On April 18, 1946, Robinson, a 26-year-old secondbaseman, took the field for the Montreal Royals against the Jersey City Giants, a Class AAA affiliate of the New York Giants, for Opening Day of the International League baseball season, to become the first African American player in the modern era of organized professional baseball. The game took place, appropriately, on a field known as Roosevelt Stadium, which was at the foot of Danforth Avenue at Route 440 in Jersey City, at a spot then known as Droyer's Point. The Giants sold 52,000 tickets for that game--more than double the stadium's seating capacity of 23,000. Booed mercilessly during his first plate appearance, Robinson went on to have four hits including a 3-run homer, with 4 RBI, 4 runs scored, and 2 stolen bases in Montreal's 14-1 rout. A year later, Jackie Robinson would break Major League Baseball's color line, when he debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.

© 2010, by D.L. Polonsky. Colored pencil on Bristol board. A print of this drawing is in the collection of Dustin Pedroia. Another signed print is on display at T. Anthony's Restaurant, Brookline, Mass.

Identifier: gleaner7117stud

Title: The Gleaner

Year: 1917 (1910s)

Authors: The Students of The National Farm School

Subjects: National Farm School (Doylestown, Pa.)--Students--Miscellaneous writings.

Publisher: Farm School, Pa.: National Farm School

Contributing Library: Delaware Valley College, Joseph Krauskopf Memorial Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

y ruin a goodthing? The girls all agree that JackMiller is a great man for tellingthem nice things. Yes, well admit he is good on (the bouquets. But why wait un-til the girls are leaving? After a great deal of thoughton the part of some of the girls,they decided that they likedManfred Krauskopf for himselfand net because he owned aFord. (Love my Ford loveme.) Hannah Engeberg asked Mr.Toor if he bought a Buick so hecould chase the chickens bet-ter. Its a long lane that hides no \lovers during camping season. Since his struggles to keepthe campers peaceful and quietduring their short stay. Mr.Ostrolenk has often felt thatGod made the world—and restedGod made man—and rested.God made woman—but since then , Neither Gor nor man has rested. For the benefit of Miss Pau-line Rosenberg, who we aretold, is suffering from the fatalmalady, Love is misery, sweet- {ened with imagination, saltedwith tears, spiced with doubt,flavored with novelty and swal-lowed with the eyes shut. THE GLEANER 17

 

Text Appearing After Image:

DAVID ROVIN, Editor Faculty-Student Game One of the main features ofthe first annual picnic of theN. F. S. was a base ball gamebetween the Faculty and stu-dents. It lasted but three inn-ings, being short but sweet. Itwas hotly contested throughoutand was marked by spectacularplaying on the part of PopBishop and Shnitz Schuff-man, who were easily thehighlights of the day. Whenthe smoke of the melee wascleared away, the students hadtriumphed by the score of 5 to 4. Doc Ostrolenk, the Facultypitcher, started off like a houseafire, but was soon consumed. The Young A. C. will soon bewith us, for Professor Younghas decided that base ball is awonderful game (he almostcaught a ball in the left field,but couldnt quite cover theforty yards still remaining be-tween him and the ball.) A speedy rival, to Eddie Col- lins has been discovered in theWilds of Farm School in theform of Pop Bishop, a secondbaseman with the pep. FOOTBALL HERE AGAIN Football is in the air; August26 marked the first real pr

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

AUBL night game in Miami, FL

Bain News Service,, publisher.

 

[Paddy Baumann, New York AL (baseball)]

 

[1915]

 

1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

 

Notes:

Original data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards: Bauman -- Yanks.

Corrected title and date based on research by the Pictorial History Committee, Society for American Baseball Research, 2006.

Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

 

Format: Glass negatives.

 

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

 

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

 

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

 

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.19544

 

Call Number: LC-B2- 3547-6

  

David Adams (23, U. Virginia) and Michael Fisher (17, Georgia Tech) look to slap hands with teammates while returning to their dugout between innings.

Carlos Guillen hikes up his pants and spits all over the place.

A bokeh second baseman completes the play to first.

 

Hope you see the ball. :)

April 5, 2011

Great American Ball Park

Cincinnati, OH

Prince Fielder tosses to (the unseen) Fister, while Danny Worth watches. Adrian Gonzalez was out to finally end the inning.

"A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives"

Jack Roosevelt Robinson

1919 - 1972

 

This statue of Jackie Robinson, sculpted by Susan Wagner, was dedicated on February 26, 1998 in Journal Square.

 

On April 18, 1946, Robinson, a 26-year-old secondbaseman, took the field for the Montreal Royals against the Jersey City Giants, a Class AAA affiliate of the New York Giants, for Opening Day of the International League baseball season, to become the first African American player in the modern era of organized professional baseball. The game took place, appropriately, on a field known as Roosevelt Stadium, which was at the foot of Danforth Avenue at Route 440 in Jersey City, at a spot then known as Droyer's Point. The Giants sold 52,000 tickets for that game--more than double the stadium's seating capacity of 23,000. Booed mercilessly during his first plate appearance, Robinson went on to have four hits including a 3-run homer, with 4 RBI, 4 runs scored, and 2 stolen bases in Montreal's 14-1 rout. A year later, Jackie Robinson would break Major League Baseball's color line, when he debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947.

Ian Kinsler signs autographs before an exhibition game against the Frisco Roughriders.

Canadian LL Championships 2012 - NDG Lynx vs. Lethbridge SW

Trenton Thunder second baseman, Corban Joseph.

Not bad for about 40 or 45 rows up, and across the infield.

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