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On Torgallmenningen, Bergen´s main-street mall.

 

Bergens Tidende is Norway's fifth-largest newspaper, and the country's largest newspaper outside Oslo.

 

Bergens Tidende is owned by the public company Schibsted ASA.[1] Norwegian owners held a mere 42% of the shares in Schibsted at the end of 2015.[2] Bergens Tidende is thus foreign-owned.

Contents

 

Founded in 1868, Bergens Tidende is based in Bergen. The newspaper is published in two sections. Section one contains op-eds, general news, sports, and weather. Section two contains culture, views, local news, and television listings. The feature magazine BTMagasinet is published on Saturdays.

 

Bergens Tidende is owned by the public company Schibsted, which also owns Aftenposten, Stavanger Aftenblad, and Fædrelandsvennen.[3] At least 30% of the shares of Schibsted are owned by foreign investment banks and insurance companies, such as Goldman Sachs.[4] The paper began to be published in tabloid format in 2006.[5]

 

The paper was awarded the European Newspaper of the Year in the regional newspaper category by the European Newspapers Congress in 2011.[6]

 

In 2005 Bergens Tidende reached about 260,000 readers every day, mainly in the counties of Hordaland and Sogn og Fjordane.[7] Circulation numbers peaked at 100,000 copies in 1988. Its circulation was about 87,000 copies in 2007.[8] In 2008 the paper had a circulation of 85,825 copies, and later dropped to 70,220 copies by 2015.[9]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bergens_Tidende

Here's Google translate's slightly fractured version of the Norwegian architectural-history page about this building:

=======================================================

Architecture and History in Oslo:

 

Ila Guest House, Waldemar Thranes Street 70.

 

This corner building at Uelands gate was built in 1919 for the municipality of Kristiania [now Oslo], by the architects Morgenstierne & Eide, assisted by engineer Olaf Knoph. The building was completed in 1921 . . .

 

Ila Guest House was opened on October 18, 1921, and was used as a female house for women. The requirement for the residents was that they should be "self-employed women, both of the working class and of the business situation." Building costs amounted to DKK. 2,500,000.

 

The guest house is built in a tiled brick and has a two-part composition.

 

The main facade of Waldemar Thranes gate has four full floors below that high-pitched mansard roof.

 

The composition is symmetrical, with an elevated center gap and an octogonal roof rack tower with loop tiles as distinctive elements in the center roof. On the first floor there are business and reception rooms with large windows.

 

The second floor windows are flanked by shutters. The anchor of the facade forms the letters "ILAPENSJONAT," and the gabled tympanone field is adorned by the municipality's arms and the year 1921.

 

The wing towards Uelands gate is lower, and subordinate to the composition.

 

The corner is rounded, and the lower floors mark the large roundabouts of the window sacks.

 

On the right flank, an exterior staircase leads up to a forward entrance. The protrusion, and the end wall around the corner, is dominated by coarse-stone stones.

 

On the short wall there is also a round outwalk for stairs, reminiscent of a castle tower. The two wings are bound together by the front, rounded building section of the main entrance, with a column-mounted balcony in front. The style expression is Nordic Nybarokk [New Baroque].

 

Much of the original interior is preserved.

 

The restaurant was established by the private limited company Kristiania Folkerestauranter, later Oslo Folkerestauranter. In 1957, the trolley customers entered the entrance directly from the street, adjacent to one of the large windows facing the street.

 

In 1963 a larger outdoor area was established here, with extensive use of flower arrangements, an outdoor environment that became premier.

 

In 1972, the company was taken over by the company Dampkjøkkenet, which renamed the establishment Alexanderstuen, following its location at Alexander Kielland's place. In 1984, the name Tranen was restored.

 

The venue has been known for its informal style, as well as its musical events. Among the artists was the gangster Arnie "Skiffle Joe" Norse most famous.

  

sources:

Per Erling Johnsen: Brown cafes - Oslo's weird venues, Schibsted, 2005

Leif Kåre Solberg: Architecture in Oslo, Knowledge Agency, 1999.

Planning and Building Agency Building Saw Archives

Byantikvaren: Statement of Protective Values, Feb. 7th. 2012

Registration Center for Historical Data (University of Tromsø)

   

Tittel / Title: Scene fra "Over Ævne”

Motiv / Motif: Nationaltheatret. Fra venstre: August Oddvar som Elias, Aagot Didriksen som Rakel, Halfdan Christensen som Sang, Agnethe Schibsted-Hansson som Hanna Roberts og Johanne Dybwad som Klara Sang

Dato / Date: 1918

Fotograf / Photographer: ukjent / unknown

Sted / Place: Oslo

Eier / Owner Institution: Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway

Lenke / Link: nb.no/bjornson/lyd-og-bilde/galleri

Bildesignatur / Image Number: bldsa_BB1027

  

Bla i digital utgave av manuskriptet til "Over Ævne"

 

Les Over ævne . Første stykke (Gyldendal , 1883) i fulltekst i NBdigital.

Today was a cake day at work. My next meal after this was at 8 pm.

Work is almost like the Seinfeld episode The Frogger.

Aftonbladet is a Swedish tabloid founded by Lars Johan Hierta in 1830 during the modernization of Sweden. It is one of the larger daily newspapers in the Nordic countries. Aftonbladet is owned by the Swedish Trade Union Confederation (LO) and Norwegian media group Schibsted, and its editorial page describes it as an "independent social-democratic newspaper". In 2006 the paper had 1,425,000 daily readers, circa 15% of the Swedish population. (Source: Wikipedia).

 

The Ministry of the Environment (Swedish: Miljödepartementet) is a government ministry in Sweden responsible for environmental issues and construction. The ministry also has the overall responsibility for coordinating the government's work on sustainable development. The ministry offices are located at this building at the Tegelbacken 2 in central Stockholm. (Source: Google).

 

Public Clock Photography by Arjan Richter

Grand Café, Oslo 01/2014 |

Maleri av Per Krohg (1928) |

Hjalle Lie, Christian Michelet, Christian Fritzner, Frits Thaulow, Kalle Løchen, Hans Jæger, Edvard Munch, Christian Friele, Amandus Schibsted, Olaf Mørch Hansson, Johan Selmer, Oda Krohg, Alexandra Thaulow,Christian Krohg, Edvard Diriks, Lars Holst, Amund Helland, Gerhard Munthe, Jørgen Brunchorst, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, Oscar Preuthun, Carl Thaulow, Mathias Skeibrok, Ludvig Skramstad, Ivar Aasen, Thorvald Meyer, Bille Aubert, Sigfried Løvenskiold, Ludvig Bergh, Sigbjørn Obstfelder, Henrik Ibsen

Identifier: canadiannurse1939cana

Title: The Canadian nurse

Year: 1905 (1900s)

Authors: Canadian Nurses' Association

Subjects: Nurses Nursing and Nursing Management Periodicals

Publisher: [Ottawa, etc. Canadian Nurses' Association]

Contributing Library: University of Ottawa

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

oston an institution which to-day isknown as the Directory for MothersMilk, Inc. Under the auspices of thisorganization a miniature dairy with allmodern appliances is operated, and herethe method of preserving breast milkby the quick-freezing process was de- 15 16 THE CANADIAN NURSE veloped, between the years 1930 and1932, by Dr. Washington Piatt andDr. H. Schibsted of the Borden Re-search Laboratory, Syracuse, N. Y.This process was clinically tested by Dr.Paul W. Emerson, of Boston. Up tothe present time, twelve other citieshave developed similar organizations,two of which are in Canada namely theHospital for Sick Children in Toronto,and the Royal Victoria Montreal Ma-ternity Hospital, the latter being de-scribed in this article. A brief period of observation wasfirst spent in Boston at the Directoryfor Mothers Milk where we receiveda most cordial welcome and, on ourreturn to Montreal, we proceeded toadapt the methods employed in Bostonto suit the situation existing in our ownClinic.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Watching the Wafers Freeze Four different stages of developmentrequire consideration:(1 ) The collection of the milk. (2) The pooling and homogenizationof the milk. (3) The boiling of the milk for threeminutes. (4) The quick-freezing process. A staff nurse, who is a graduate ofthe course in Public Health Nursing,given at the School of Nursing, McGillUniversity, is responsible for visiting thepatient each day and collecting the milk.By this means it is possible to make surethat both mother and baby are in goodcondition. Many of our clients are patients whohave had a surplus of milk while inhospital. They must, of course, be cleanhealthy mothers, free from tuberculosisand having a negative Wasserman test.The nurse makes the first contact be-fore the patient is discharged from hos-pital, and the next day visits the patientin her home, lends her the necessaryequipment and instructs her in the tech-nique of collecting and saving her miik.Sterile containers are left daily for ea.chpumping a

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Foto: Jacob Mørch, UKEN Foto

The Abel Monument

 

The economic growth Norway enjoyed at the beginning of the twentieth century speeded up old and new plans to erect memorials to famous personages.

 

In collaboration with the University Senate a committee of artists had approved the placement of a standing or seated portrait statue of Abel next to the steps outside the University’s central building. In connection with the centenary in 1902 a competition was announced on 26 April, with the delivery date set at 1 October the same year. A photograph of the only portrait of Abel, done by Johan Gørbitz in 1826, was sent to all participants.

 

Already in the 1890s, Gustav Vigeland had drawn the preliminary sketches of an Abel Monument, where Abel is portrayed as a “man in an overcoat”. At around the turn of the century Vigeland rejected the earlier sketches in favour of a symbolic portrayal of the genius in the form of a nude young man sailing through space.

 

Vigeland did no fewer than nine studies in clay, several of which were in traditional standing or seated poses. But in the first and last study he repeated the idea from the sketches of a nude man, in the last study held up by two other male figures. Vigeland sought to portray the thinking and imagination of the genius.

 

In all, nineteen studies for the monument were submitted. All the studies submitted were exhibited in a hall in the Historical Museum building. The decision of the jury came down on 23 October. Vigeland’s study was found to have the highest artistic merit, but was deemed ineligible because it did not conform to the competition rules. Ingebrigt Vik won the competition, with Aagot Vangen in second place and Valentin Kielland in third. However, none of the studies was recommended for erection.

 

Vigeland wrote a long letter to the committee giving his reasons for deviating from the rules and proposed erecting the monument elsewhere: “And then I hit upon the original idea Abel symbolized. While working on the study of this group of figures, I imagined it placed where Schweigaard now stands.”

   

Vigeland then launched an intensive campaign to lobby for his monument. To Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, who had written the lyrics to the Abel Cantata, he wrote: “I must say that I would be sorry not to get the commission for this monument. After all, I have had more stipends than other artists; I have been sent abroad repeatedly - and then damn it all, they don’t want my work, when it’s the best I have ever done. And so now I turn to you, Bjørnson. You will be able to speak with authority to the chairman of the Abel Monument Committee, Professor Gustav Storm. And I am certain that it will have an effect.”

 

Bjørnson heeded Vigeland’s request and wrote immediately to Professor Storm, reproducing in his own words Vigeland’s arguments about the impossibility of creating a portrait figure without usable documentation. Bjørnson also wrote a piece in favour of Vigeland’s monument in the 3 March 1903 edition of Aftenposten.

 

The most scathing criticism of the monument came from the painter Christian Krogh. In Verdens Gang on 26 March 1903 he offered a sarcastic analysis of the study including: “If anything, the group of figures gives the impression of a circus jockey astride two horses.” This earned Vigeland’s undying enmity, and Vigeland savaged Krogh on several occasions, both as a person and as an artist.

 

Owing to the prevailing uncertainty surrounding the monument, in January 1903 Ingebrigt Vik started on a life-size version of his statue. Lest he lose the competition, Vigeland did likewise in April of the same year. He was in dire financial straits and could not even afford clay. For that reason he cannibalized a number of clay works, including a contemporary self portrait, and used the clay for the new monument.

   

It is doubtful that Vigeland would have had the financial means to complete the monument, if he had not received support from Sweden. The Swedish art enthusiast Gelly Marcus was a fervent admirer of Vigeland’s work. In 1904 she got a prosperous relative, the Swedish wholesaler Hjalmar Josephson, to commission the Abel Monument in bronze. Josephson made a gift of the sculpture to the National Museum in Stockholm, where it arrived in July 1904. As this event received a lot of press in Sweden, it garnered at lot of attention in Norway. In Aftenposten a newspaper reader wrote: “And the day may come when the disgrace befalls us that Vigeland’s Abel Monument has been erected in every other country than this one, where it rightly belongs.” It had now become a matter of national prestige.

 

Gelly Marcus ensured the sale of yet another replica in bronze to the well-to-do businessman G. A. Hagemann in Copenhagen, which was given to the student union of the Technical University of Denmark and it now stands on the university campus.

 

Another Swede was crucial for the subsequent fate of the monument and thus of Vigeland. The financier and art collector Ernest Thiel had heard about Vigeland through his friend the playwright Gunnar Heiberg. He had also learnt of Vigeland’s works and money troubles from Josephson, who had visited Vigeland’s studio. Thiel thought he might be interested in one of the works and in a letter inquired about Vigeland’s real and immediate needs for funding, which could be considered a down payment on a future purchase. Immediately afterward Thiel sent 2,000 kroner to Vigeland.

 

The most heated discussion regarding the Abel Monument concerned its location. In March 1904 Vigeland proposed placing the monument at the western end of Karl Johans gate. The jury then called on Vigeland to do a study of a pedestal. On 2 November Vigeland wrote to the monument committee and offered them the group of figures cast in bronze for 50,000 kroner excluding the pedestal and installation.

 

On 31 January 1905 the monument committee met anew and voted unanimously to commission the group of figures. However, the amount available was only 25,000 kroner, so another fund-raising effort was necessary. Aftenposten’s owner, Amandus Schibsted, led the effort and on 14 November 1906 was able to wire Wexelsen the chairman that his task was completed: “With the help of subscriptions for contributions from citizens to the Abel Monument, my promise to you and Consul Heiberg has now been fulfilled. The last 5,000 was subscribed for by Stang of Fredrikshald.”

 

The statue’s final location had not yet been determined, but in 1907 there was agreement to erect the monument in the south-east corner of Slottsparken (the palace grounds), since then called Abelhaugen.

   

On 17 October 1908 Vigeland’s Abel Monument, atop an eight-metre-high granite pedestal, was unveiled: Total height is 12.10 metres. Vigeland was not present, as he had quietly left the country to travel.

 

In 1905 Professor Dietrichson 1905 asked Vigeland to give a more detailed account of what his intention had been with the Abel Monument. Vigeland’s initial reply was: “I don’t know.” But fearing what the public might think about an artist who did not know what he was doing, he immediately asked Dietrichson not to quote him directly on this. The Abel Monument, wrote Vigeland, was not conceived with any particular “force” or “power” in mind. “Rather, I was thinking of the intuitive launch of genius into space.”

 

Gustav Vigeland would later propose moving the Abel Monument to Nisseberget to make room for his monumental fountain. Nothing ever came of this, and the fountain was later erected in Vigeland Park.

   

Not until 1966-69 were bronze casts made of Ingebrigt Vik’s winning study, two of them, in fact: one now on display in the Vik Museum in Øystese, and the other outside Nils Henrik Abels hus on the Blindern campus of the University of Oslo.

 

HomeNews ArchiveCalendar Editor: Anne Marie Astad The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters E-mail: dnva@onl

Foto: Fredrik Geving Bedsvaag, UKEN Foto

Kalle Jungkvist, Principal Consultant, WAN-IFRA & Senior Advisor, Schibsted, Sweden on stage at Driving Digital Revenue

 

Paul Schultz, Zach Dando-Thompson, Maria Cox, Penny Schibsted, Patti Haaheim

President Paul Zingg, Lori Hoffman, Provost Belle W. Y. Wei, Leslie Schibsted and Willie the Wildcat (left to right) during the Faculty and Staff Retirement Brunch at Warren’s Reception Center Thursday, August 14, 2014 in Chico, Calif.

(Jason Halley/University Photographer)

 

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Rolv Erik Ryssdal, konsernsjef Schibsted Media Group

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

70th World News Media Congress, Estoril, Cascais, Portugal, 7 June, 2018 -Tina Stiegler, EVP people and Strategy, Schibsted Media Group, Norway, speaks at Keynotes: Leadership for Changing Times.

 

( Ricardo Lopes / WAN-IFRA )

"WORLD RECORD LEFSE"

This 9 foot 8 inch slab represents the size of the World Record Lefse baked on this site July 1, 1983, the year of Starbuck's centennial.

 

To commemorate the area's Scandinavian heritage, the Starbuck Chamber of Commerce initiated the novel idea of baking a huge lefse.

 

The Starbuck Lions Club accepted this challenge. The baking team members were: Maurice Amundson, John Gorder, Tilford Jergenson, Luverne Jorgenson, Larry Kittelson, Earl Larson, Chuck Wahlquist, and Maurice Walline.

 

The feat is recorded in Norway's Schibsted Book of Records.

70th World News Media Congress, Estoril, Cascais, Portugal, 7 June, 2018 - Atelach Alemu Argaw, Head of Data and Privacy at Schibsted Media Group, Sweden, speaks at AI is Here. It Should Be Your Secret Weapon!

 

( Ricardo Lopes / WAN-IFRA )

Medvirkende: Rian Liebenberg fra Schibsted

Foto: Freddy Foss, Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Rolv Erik Ryssdal, konsernsjef Schibsted Media Group

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Toys laid out before the Schibsted London office summer party.

Medvirkende: Rolv Erik Ryssdal, konsernsjef Schibsted Media Group

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Foto: Fredrik Geving Bedsvaag, UKEN Foto

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

Medvirkende: Rolv Erik Ryssdal, konsernsjef Schibsted Media Group

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

The panel: Michiel Kotting

Accel Partners; Fredrik Cassel, Creandum; Miriam Grut Norrby, Schibsted; and Daniel Waterhouse, Wellington Partners

Medvirkende: Mathias Fischer (Bergens Tidende), Bernt Olufsen (Schibsted Media Group), Jette F. Christensen (Ap), Ib Thomsen (FrP), Frank Aarebrot (UiB).

 

Moderator: Arill Riise

 

Foto: Nordiske Mediedager

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