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A wash of intense color in a January sunset.

 

Thanks, as always, for stopping by and for all of your kind comments -- I appreciate them all.

 

:copyright: Melissa Post 2015

 

All rights reserved. Please respect my copyright and do not copy, modify or download this image to blogs or other websites without obtaining my explicit written permission.

On San Francisco Bay near Alcatraz. And we did have a bit of rain from those clouds :-))

 

Thanks, as always, for stopping by and for all of your kind comments -- I appreciate them all.

 

:copyright: Melissa Post 2014

 

All rights reserved. Please respect my copyright and do not copy, modify or download this image to blogs or other websites without obtaining my explicit written permission.

Market Street is an important thoroughfare in San Francisco, California. It begins at The Embarcadero in front of the Ferry Building at the northeastern edge of the city and runs southwest through downtown, passing the Civic Center and the Castro District, to the intersection with Corbett Avenue in the Twin Peaks neighborhood. Beyond this point, the roadway continues as Portola Drive into the southwestern quadrant of San Francisco. Portola Drive extends south to the intersection of St. Francis Boulevard and Sloat Boulevard, where it continues as Junipero Serra Boulevard.

 

Market Street is the boundary of two street grids. Streets on its southeast side are parallel or perpendicular to Market Street, while those on the northwest are nine degrees off from the cardinal directions.

 

Market Street is a major transit artery for the city of San Francisco, and has carried in turn horse-drawn streetcars, cable cars, electric streetcars, electric trolleybuses, and diesel buses. Today Muni's buses, trolleybuses, and heritage streetcars (on the F Market line) share the street, while below the street the two-level Market Street Subway carries Muni Metro and BART. While cable cars no longer operate on Market Street, the surviving cable car lines terminate to the side of the street at its intersections with California Street and Powell Street.

 

Construction

 

Market Street cuts across the city for three miles (5 km) from the waterfront to the hills of Twin Peaks. It was laid out originally by Jasper O'Farrell, a 26-year old trained civil engineer who emigrated to Yerba Buena, as the town was then known. The town was renamed San Francisco in 1847 after it was captured by Americans during the Mexican-American War. O'Farrell first repaired the original layout of the settlement around Portsmouth Square and then established Market Street as the widest street in town, 120 feet between property lines. (Van Ness now beats it with 125 feet.) It was described at the time as an arrow aimed straight at "Los Pechos de la Chola" (the Breasts of the Maiden), now called Twin Peaks. Writing in Forgotten Pioneers.

Mallard Lake, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco CA

Lands End Trail, San Francisco, California

I don't know if they caught anything other than a great view. The seagulls got their picnic dinner. Full moon at Fort Baker,CA and looking into San Francisco.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryF9p-nqsWw&feature=kp

 

... in San Francisco

High on a hill, it calls to me

To be where little cable cars climb halfway to the stars

The morning fog may chill the air, I don't care..

  

Taken in 3 Embarcadero Center, San Francisco

Mallard Lake, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco CA

The Bay Bridge spans across to San Francisco. Finding a comfortable spot to shoot the sunset can be a bit challenging.

Vertorama

ISO200

f9.0

1/320

Tendencia -1Ev y +0,67 la superior

Focal 14mm con un Nikon 14-24mm f2,8

 

© Gregorio López

glopez_madrid@telefonica.net

that is not what ships are built for.

--William Shedd

 

It is always great to enjoy cloud formations, many people were stopping to take photos. Happy cloud hunting. :D

another version of the paraglider in San Francisco; thanks to triplejohnny for the background texture.

From a series of morning bridge shots back home from travels. It follows several days of very hot weather, warm, moist air hitting cold ocean to produce this thick fog. #6 on Explore.

Hercules, a 1907 built steam powered tug built for ocean towing.

Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, California.

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