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Pelegry method calotype on albumen. Canson Arches 140 single coat. 5x7 Eastman View No. 1

5x7 Pelegry method calotype on Canson Opalux.

This is one of the first times I have stored a sheet for almost a year without the dextrin. I also didn't develop for almost a month. There appears to be some loss in detail and in exposure. More testing would need to be done.

Pelegry method calotype on Opalux 110.

Deardorff V8

Nikon Nikkor M450

EV12 f/9 @ 12 min.

5x7 Pelegry method calotype on Canson Opalux.

5x7 Pelegry method calotype on Canson Opalux.

Pelegry method calotype on Opalux 110.

EV14 f/9 @ 3 min.

Pelegry method on Canson Opalux 110.

5x7 Eastman View No. 1

EV13 f/4 @ 2 min.

Anecdotes, opening up the night's proceedings.

Anecdotes, opening up the night's proceedings.

Anecdotes, opening up the night's proceedings.

My first attempt at artistic nude using the calotype. I have always felt that we have long lost our connection with nature. Once upon a time we lived in nature and relied on it for every aspect of our lives. I wanted to do a series of landscape/nature shots incorporating the nude figure. I didn't want the nude to be the focus of the shot, but only to be part of it, like we used to be. However in this first attempt I think my camera placement was a bit too far. I didn't take into account the soft nature of the calotype along with the even softer nature of the print. I think my model may disappear from the shot in printing. There will be more of this series to come in the future. Anna has agreed to a re-shoot.

Pelegry method calotype on albumen.

Pelegry method calotype on Canson Opalux.

Near the sight of the first Polish settlement in the U.S., Panna Maria, Texas.

Pelegry method calotype on albumen.

Canson XL, 18 Lb. paper.

Ammonium Chloride

Anecdotes, opening up the night's proceedings.

My first attempt at artistic nude using the calotype. I have always felt that we have long lost our connection with nature. Once upon a time we lived in nature and relied on it for every aspect of our lives. I wanted to do a series of landscape/nature shots incorporating the nude figure. I didn't want the nude to be the focus of the shot, but only to be part of it, like we used to be. However in this first attempt I think my camera placement was a bit too far. I didn't take into account the soft nature of the calotype along with the even softer nature of the print. I think my model may disappear from the shot in printing. There will be more of this series to come in the future. Anna has agreed to a re-shoot.

5x7 Pelegry calotype negative.

 

Mission Nuestra Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga, also known as Aranama Mission or Mission La Bahia, was a Roman Catholic mission established by Spain in 1722 in the Viceroyality of New Spain—to convert native Karankawa Indians to Christianity. Together with its nearby military fortress Presidio La Bahia, their purpose was to uphold Spanish territorial claims in the New World against encroachment from France. The third and final location near Goliad, Texas is maintained now as part of Goliad State Park and Historic Site.

5x7 Pelegry method calotype.

 

This is a shot in the old Flaccus cemetery. The town of Flaccus was established back around 1900. Primarily freed slaves from the Mississippi area, they settled in South Texas in a community of about 50 families. The oldest burial in the cemetery was done in the late 1800s and the most recent was 1967. The only trace that the town even existed is this small 2 acre cemetery that has been reclaimed by nature. Although some 40 people are buried here, only a few headstones remain.

My first attempt at artistic nude using the calotype. I have always felt that we have long lost our connection with nature. Once upon a time we lived in nature and relied on it for every aspect of our lives. I wanted to do a series of landscape/nature shots incorporating the nude figure. I didn't want the nude to be the focus of the shot, but only to be part of it, like we used to be. However in this first attempt I think my camera placement was a bit too far. I didn't take into account the soft nature of the calotype along with the even softer nature of the print. I think my model may disappear from the shot in printing. There will be more of this series to come in the future. Anna has agreed to a re-shoot.

My first attempt at artistic nude using the calotype. I have always felt that we have long lost our connection with nature. Once upon a time we lived in nature and relied on it for every aspect of our lives. I wanted to do a series of landscape/nature shots incorporating the nude figure. I didn't want the nude to be the focus of the shot, but only to be part of it, like we used to be. However in this first attempt I think my camera placement was a bit too far. I didn't take into account the soft nature of the calotype along with the even softer nature of the print. I think my model may disappear from the shot in printing. There will be more of this series to come in the future. Anna has agreed to a re-shoot.

Pelegry method calotype on Canson Opalux.

Now abandoned, the old Poth mill sits in downtown Poth, Texas.

Pelegry method calotype. Overcast, cloudy, windy day, but I can't remember my exposures. I know it was in the developer for over an hour. Based on that, I was a bit under exposed. Those brown blotches started to appear after about an hour which is usually what happens when I'm underexposed and the image starts to blackout in the developer.

Pelegry method calotype on albumen.

Canson XL, 18 Lb. paper.

Ammonium Chloride

James How process.

Once again, another James How process test. All the information for this one is the same as for Leaning Tree with the exception that is was closer to EV11. The print was pulled after 2.5 hours in the developer but could have probably gone a bit longer. I'm still having trouble getting my hypo to clear all of the unused silver from the negatives. This negative sat in 15% hypo for over 1/2 an hour and still has traces of the yellow in it.

Finally getting around to a bit more printing. It seems my salt paper is a bit hit or miss with the discoloration in the sky area. I'm thinking something is going wrong during one of the several washes. I need to do some more reading.

 

The Presidio Nuestra Señora de Loreto de la Bahía, known more commonly as Presidio La Bahia, or simply La Bahia is a fort constructed by the Spanish Army that became the nucleus of the modern-day city of Goliad, Texas, United States. Originally founded in 1721 on the ruins of the failed French Fort Saint Louis, the presidio was moved to a location on the Guadalupe River in 1726. In 1747, the presidio and its mission were moved to their current location on the San Antonio River. By 1771, the presidio had been rebuilt in stone and had become "the only Spanish fortress for the entire Gulf Coast from the mouth of the Rio Grande to the Mississippi River".[3] The civilian settlement, later named Goliad, sprang up around the presidio in the late 18th century; the area was one of the three most important in Spanish Texas.

 

The presidio was captured by insurgents twice during the Mexican War of Independence, by the Republican Army of the North in 1813 and by the Long Expedition in 1821. Each time the insurgents were later defeated by Spanish troops. By the end of 1821, Texas became part of the newly formed United Mexican States. La Bahía was one of the two major garrisons in Mexican Texas and lay halfway between San Antonio de Béxar (the political center of Spanish Texas) and Copano, the then major port in Texas. In October 1835, days after the beginning of the Texas Revolution, a group of Texian insurgents marched on La Bahía. After a 30-minute battle, the Mexican garrison surrendered and the Texians gained control of the presidio, which they soon renamed Fort Defiance.

 

During the siege of the Alamo, Texian commander William B. Travis several times asked La Bahía commander James Fannin to bring reinforcements. Although Fannin and his men attempted a relief mission, they abandoned the attempt the following day. After the fall of the Alamo, General Sam Houston ordered Fannin to abandon La Bahía. He did so on March 19, 1836, but took a leisurely path. Following the Battle of Coleto, the La Bahía garrison was captured and imprisoned in the Presidio. On March 27, 1836, the Texian captives were marched outside the presidio walls and executed, an event known as the Goliad Massacre. From Wiki.

 

La Bahía, for its esthetically augmented architectural reproduction was ranked among the most attractive Spanish presidio sites in the United States.

 

Pelegry method on albumen. This negative was a bit dark but it seems to have printed up quite nicely.

 

Mission Nuestra Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga, also known as Aranama Mission or Mission La Bahia, was a Roman Catholic mission established by Spain in 1722 in the Viceroyality of New Spain—to convert native Karankawa Indians to Christianity. Together with its nearby military fortress Presidio La Bahia, their purpose was to uphold Spanish territorial claims in the New World against encroachment from France. The third and final location near Goliad, Texas is maintained now as part of Goliad State Park and Historic Site.

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