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Excerpt from rom.on.ca:

 

Look beyond fashion and explore the endless possibilities that come from interweaving design, art, and technology in Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion.

 

The exhibition explores the extraordinary designs of Dutch couturier, Iris van Herpen, through her 2008-2015 collections that push the boundaries of traditional fashion and craftsmanship.

 

Excerpt from irisvanherpen.com:

 

HYBRID HOLISM – The project Hylozoic Ground by the Canadian architect and artist Philip Beesley provided the inspiration for this collection. Hylozoic refers to Hylozoism, the ancient belief that all matter is in some sense alive.

Beesley created a responsive architectural system that uses hylozoism in a quite specific way, that is, “we are working with subtle materials, electricity and chemistry, weaving together interactions that at first create an architecture that simulates life but increasingly these interactions are starting to act like life, like some of the ingredients of life”. His environment breathes, shifts and moves in relationship to people walking through it, touching it, and sensing it. Microprocessors invest that environment with a primitive or insect-like intelligence like a coral reef or a great swarm.Iris van Herpen is intrigued by these kinds of possibilities for a future of fashion that might take on quite unimaginable shapes. Fashion that might be partly alive and growing, and, therefore, existing partly independent from us, which in turn allows for a new treatment by humans: instead of discarding the fashion after use, we cherish, value, and maintain it in its abilities to change constantly. Van Herpen’s translated this future vision in a collection that is highly complex and incredibly diverse in terms of shape, structure, and material. For one design, the ‘cathedral dress’ Van Herpen introduced a technique referred to as mammoth stereolithography which refers to a 3D printing method. This 3D printed process is built slice by slice from bottom to top, in a vessel of polymer that hardens when struck by a laser beam.

Phlip Beesley Workshop October 2015 with CITAstudio

 

The installation DISSIPATIVE ARCHITECTURES explores the idea of a dynamic responsive architecture. The installation has been constructed during our recent CITAstudio workshop with Philip Beesley.

 

The opening of the linked exhibition is on Friday 4th at 15.00h in the KADK library: Danneskiold-Samsøes Allé 50 DK 1434 København K.

 

More www.facebook.com/citacph/

Phlip Beesley Workshop October 2015 with CITAstudio

 

The installation DISSIPATIVE ARCHITECTURES explores the idea of a dynamic responsive architecture. The installation has been constructed during our recent CITAstudio workshop with Philip Beesley.

 

The opening of the linked exhibition is on Friday 4th at 15.00h in the KADK library: Danneskiold-Samsøes Allé 50 DK 1434 København K.

 

More www.facebook.com/citacph/

Phlip Beesley Workshop October 2015 with CITAstudio

 

The installation DISSIPATIVE ARCHITECTURES explores the idea of a dynamic responsive architecture. The installation has been constructed during our recent CITAstudio workshop with Philip Beesley.

 

The opening of the linked exhibition is on Friday 4th at 15.00h in the KADK library: Danneskiold-Samsøes Allé 50 DK 1434 København K.

 

More www.facebook.com/citacph/

Phlip Beesley Workshop October 2015 with CITAstudio

 

The installation DISSIPATIVE ARCHITECTURES explores the idea of a dynamic responsive architecture. The installation has been constructed during our recent CITAstudio workshop with Philip Beesley.

 

The opening of the linked exhibition is on Friday 4th at 15.00h in the KADK library: Danneskiold-Samsøes Allé 50 DK 1434 København K.

 

More www.facebook.com/citacph/

Phlip Beesley Workshop October 2015 with CITAstudio

 

The installation DISSIPATIVE ARCHITECTURES explores the idea of a dynamic responsive architecture. The installation has been constructed during our recent CITAstudio workshop with Philip Beesley.

 

The opening of the linked exhibition is on Friday 4th at 15.00h in the KADK library: Danneskiold-Samsøes Allé 50 DK 1434 København K.

 

More www.facebook.com/citacph/

Pavilion Sufi is a performance-responsive architecture, designed to capture, reflect, and embody the organic nature of live performance. Inspired by the Sufi Whirling Dervishes of Istanbul, the pavilion is built from an array of suspended fabric disks that spin to reveal oscillating waveforms and space-altering behaviors. Using crowd/performer energy as an input to drive the rotational speed of the fabric disks, Pavilion Sufi is a living, breathing architectural response to the unique energy generated within every performance.

 

Credit: Sarah Lever

The Cox Discovery Center turns a century of company history into a gathering place that expresses Cox’s core values and purpose and creates a living conversation driven by employee contributions.

 

Bold architectural forms deliver dynamic content that reacts to presence and motion, revealing new layers of information the closer you get.

 

Large Beacons frame the entry, filling the space with gorgeous reactive animations. A reactive media wall showcases Cox’s impact across the globe and reveals key moments in company history. The Story Booth captures employee voices and faces and makes them part of the story and space, creating an ongoing conversation between the past, present, and future of the brand.

 

archive.secondstory.com/project/cox

The Cox Discovery Center turns a century of company history into a gathering place that expresses Cox’s core values and purpose and creates a living conversation driven by employee contributions.

 

Bold architectural forms deliver dynamic content that reacts to presence and motion, revealing new layers of information the closer you get.

 

Large Beacons frame the entry, filling the space with gorgeous reactive animations. A reactive media wall showcases Cox’s impact across the globe and reveals key moments in company history. The Story Booth captures employee voices and faces and makes them part of the story and space, creating an ongoing conversation between the past, present, and future of the brand.

 

archive.secondstory.com/project/cox

The Cox Discovery Center turns a century of company history into a gathering place that expresses Cox’s core values and purpose and creates a living conversation driven by employee contributions.

 

Bold architectural forms deliver dynamic content that reacts to presence and motion, revealing new layers of information the closer you get.

 

Large Beacons frame the entry, filling the space with gorgeous reactive animations. A reactive media wall showcases Cox’s impact across the globe and reveals key moments in company history. The Story Booth captures employee voices and faces and makes them part of the story and space, creating an ongoing conversation between the past, present, and future of the brand.

 

archive.secondstory.com/project/cox

The Cox Discovery Center turns a century of company history into a gathering place that expresses Cox’s core values and purpose and creates a living conversation driven by employee contributions.

 

Bold architectural forms deliver dynamic content that reacts to presence and motion, revealing new layers of information the closer you get.

 

Large Beacons frame the entry, filling the space with gorgeous reactive animations. A reactive media wall showcases Cox’s impact across the globe and reveals key moments in company history. The Story Booth captures employee voices and faces and makes them part of the story and space, creating an ongoing conversation between the past, present, and future of the brand.

 

archive.secondstory.com/project/cox

The Cox Discovery Center turns a century of company history into a gathering place that expresses Cox’s core values and purpose and creates a living conversation driven by employee contributions.

 

Bold architectural forms deliver dynamic content that reacts to presence and motion, revealing new layers of information the closer you get.

 

Large Beacons frame the entry, filling the space with gorgeous reactive animations. A reactive media wall showcases Cox’s impact across the globe and reveals key moments in company history. The Story Booth captures employee voices and faces and makes them part of the story and space, creating an ongoing conversation between the past, present, and future of the brand.

 

archive.secondstory.com/project/cox

The Cox Discovery Center turns a century of company history into a gathering place that expresses Cox’s core values and purpose and creates a living conversation driven by employee contributions.

 

Bold architectural forms deliver dynamic content that reacts to presence and motion, revealing new layers of information the closer you get.

 

Large Beacons frame the entry, filling the space with gorgeous reactive animations. A reactive media wall showcases Cox’s impact across the globe and reveals key moments in company history. The Story Booth captures employee voices and faces and makes them part of the story and space, creating an ongoing conversation between the past, present, and future of the brand.

 

archive.secondstory.com/project/cox

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Ocean will create a turbulent primal environment in the Rotunda of City Hall. A constantly-changing canopy of recycled textiles induces vast, unstable forces where brilliant bursts of light alternate with dark, surging movements and intense waves of hypnotic sound. A chorus of cries and whispers echoes within rising waves.

 

This dense aggregation of raw recycled textiles from H&M's Garment Collecting Initiative is transformed into an intricate and undulating mass, evoking the emergence of life in the ocean environment from unconscious realms into living form. This deeply immersive installation questions the hardened boundaries of traditional architecture and evokes self-generation, renewal and adaptation.

 

The work has been developed with Waterloo’s Living Architecture System Group and sound designer Salvador Breed.

 

A professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo, Philip Beesley is widely known as a pioneer in responsive architecture and sculpture. His Toronto practice Beesley Pucher Seifert is an interdisciplinary design firm that combines public buildings with international art installations. Beesley's work was selected to represent Canada at the 2010 Venice Biennale for Architecture. His distinctions include the Prix de Rome in Architecture, ACADIA Award for Research, Architizer A+ and Azure AZ Award.

Responsive Architectural Facade | Aedas

Copyright PS ©

 

Travel non-fiction. 1500 words.

  

Skyline Stone and Stucco.

  

Ancient communities of France’s Alpes-Maritimes perch high in rugged mountains. Their stone-nests intimately match rock faces while expressing generations of village life. But what can we still find today?

 

Come exploring with me.

 

A rattler of a rail-car, the Train des Pignes negotiates back streets of Nice, then through tunnels into the great Var valley. We head into deep defiles, yet against the sky ancient Roquette-sur-Var and spur-perched Bonson — medieval lookouts — remind of the river's historic role as boundary. On into the steep-stone mountains — scree, scrapes, and scars.

 

Against the skyline I suddenly recognise the silhouette of a pinnacle-peaking citadel hard-angled in defiance of time — key defence of Entrevaux, and its landscape marker. Across the entry-controlling bridge takes us into the ancient town. I still have my eye on that citadel hanging above, and the zig-zag stonework, graphic drama leading up to it. A compulsive, exhausting climb, but as we puff, the tile-roof tumble of Entrevaux recedes below, bound and protected by the river-edge, sharp in the sun, and garnished with spring green. For centuries this was the border between Provence and Italy.

 

Then back down past the battlements to explore the town, a network of alleys and little piazzas. Locals have gathered for natter in friendly corners. Maybe broken here and there, but these places are so human in scale, interactive between people and place.

 

Apparently it’s the end of school holidays and visiting class groups are enjoying an informal history lesson. I find the kids have better English than their parents and we share lively chat.

 

From Entrevaux the train waggles us through the gorges to Touët-sur-Var where we jump off again. It hangs like a Tibetan balcony on vertical cliff faces. Well, upper Touët is much more organic, more lively, than a Tibetan monastery. I guess the vertical rock-wall behind the narrow ledge-of-life once gave a sense of protection in the Middle Ages with fear of Saracen raids. I think those invaders never reached this far into the mountains; just the fear counted for centuries.

 

So up the steep access into Haut Touët — a perched cluttering of incidents, clutching dwellings, and quirky corners in the sun — strung high above the river. An opportunistic community with incredible sense of place still lived in today.

 

At one end perches the landmark church with steeple campanile, and even a village terrace hanging on. A cascade drops down the stone cliffs at this end, with the church straddling it. Rumour has it that there is a view below into the cascade from within the church, so time for photographic proving of a legendary undercroft. I lift a small trap in centre of the floor and sure enough look down into the cascade cleft. Click goes that button thingy on the camera.

 

Along the one-line village, old stonework, tile-roofing and balconies, together with burrowing alleys and stairways, knit into physical expression of long life. Every corner a discovery, ledges for food supplies, steps and supports, striving to hold in place. An experience, a vision, to long savour after descent.

 

Then to dramatically-set Peillon in the mountains north of Nice. Teetering on its high rock pinnacle, there's no transport; but one train each morning heading for northern Italy stops in the valley floor a distance away. And no train back to Nice, just one in the early afternoon to Ventimiglia. From the station, Peillon is a distant skyline apparition. A stiff climb; steeper and steeper. By narrow road of 'lacets' zig-zagging up the faces, or more direct track of stairs and angle-runnels, up through olive groves, broom scree, and bedrock faces. Wonderful Peillon hovers in the sky above. At this early-spring time of year that startling apparition, that community in Place, that responsive architectural form, are worth all the trouble.

 

Next day, Saorge! Well, years ago I’d been driving from the south of France, up the Roya valley deep in the Alps, to northern Italy. Suddenly I’d braked to a stop. Unbelievable, there was a town desperately clinging onto vertical mountain-face high above me. It was the first of these hanging stone nests I’d ever seen and it became a favourite. I’ve explored it several times since, only approached by car. We can’t visit the Alpes-Maritimes area again without Saorge! This time we find there’s one train a day to the lost station of Fontan at bottom of the gulch. From there we set off on a hike angled up the mountain-side, through a long tunnel, and are delighted to find entry to the town labyrinth through a gap in the pinnacled rocks. The sun celebrates too.

 

Saorge, as a site, goes back over 2,000 years, but most of its fabric is medieval — a clustering of teetering stonework, step-alleys, narrow terraces, and projecting balconies looking down the gorge from on high. Controlling and defensive, but much more — what a place to live!

 

Far from the coast and its tourism, Saorge remains lived-in today, intact, ongoing, and self-sustained; ancient, and often crumbly, but full of human corners and town-space delights. Compact adjoining dwellings one-room wide but six storeys high fit the steep acclivity; greys, pastel colours, and purplish slate-stone roof-plates. Built from the scarce materials of the site. Balconies suspended in the spectacular view provide narrow outdoor ledges. And under the roofs there’s often an open-air attic for drying figs and olives — large dark-open eyes giving visual punctuation.

 

Yet here and there colourful campaniles spike higher, emphatically exclaiming old churches. One end of the town form is marked by colour-glazed belfries, the other with a seven-storey tower belonging to a 12thC chapel. Its rugged granite bears such affinity with the surrounding rock-face.

 

Historically, sustenance would have been olives and goats, with fruit and vegetables on sunny shelved plots; indeed, on a more-level area behind the monastery an orchard bursts with spring blossom. While nearby, within the town, a focus is the still-used village laundry — traditional floating roof, blue water, and golden stucco, surrounded by gossip space, heart of the community. And it’s said the old people of Saorge have their own dialect — a result of long isolation over history.

 

So after a clambering but fascinating exploration, we have to think of return to civilization. No train back to Nice, but an Italian one in the afternoon to Ventimiglia. This reminds that Saorge, though now on the French side of the border, spent most of its history occupied by Ligurian tribes, before becoming French. And that train, sneaking back and forth across the border, gets us to the Italian coast, and another one to Nice.

 

A busy, confusing, railway-station in the morning (“Platforms will be Anonced at least 20 mins before departure” — piffle! 5 mins for the far platform if lucky, so run). But a modern train heading east along the coast, and we’re soon disembarking at Menton. A quick walk to the coach-station and onto the morning wiggle-bus to Ste Agnès. These little buses are specially made to manoeuvre up zig-zag mountainsides, edging past any opposing cars with skill, spilling stones off the precipitous edge.

 

We’ve climbed high, up into mountain-peak clouds as the coastline drops and disappears far below. Higher still, and a floating, isolated village appears out of the murk, clinging close to the summit. Ste Agnès is proud of being the loftiest “coastal” village in Europe. Well, alpine really.

 

Now there’s plenty of time for meandering and high-reaching tracks before the afternoon bus. Stone alleys, mini-piazzas, tumbled roofs, opportunistic windows, tunnelways, and church bells echoing into valley abyss. And being a Sunday, inhabitants are heading to the church.

 

From the cemetery above we can look down onto the tight-clustered roofscape of orange-tinted Roman tiles, climaxed by colourful scale-clad church-and-clock towers.

 

And from way across the valley we see the whole village hanging on its mountain-face surrounded by shrouding cloud. Heavenly, disconnected.

 

But what a delight! As we make our way back into the village, locals, now out of church, have started a community celebration in the place between the church and village hall — a platform under canopy of planes. Wholly-spontaneous community dancing, singing, and laughter, bursting with joy. And of course, before long, food for all. It’s so natural, such an informal, apparently-regular togetherness; though I admit wondering whether the numbers were much more than we’d seen heading into the church.

 

Our bus arrives, forcing us to leave this scene or spend a night in the mountains. Perhaps as well, as we descend we leave the cloud behind. Menton is brimming with blues, yellows, and sunshine, not only for its promenade.

 

Oh, and a little farther east, between here and the close Italian border, is Garavan with Isola Bella known to Kiwis for its Katherine Mansfield associations. This is an inspiring area; not for its coastal glamour, but for the experience of ancient community high in the mountains — skyline stone and stucco with such a sense of humanity, history, and belonging.

 

Peter Shep ©

  

[Photos link: www.flickr.com/photos/peteshep/sets/72157630755648788/

Click and click again.]

 

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Alameda Field/Hylozoic Series 7 installed at Laboratorio Almeda, Mexico City, Mexico.

 

The Hylozoic Ground experimental architecture series developed by architect Philip Beesley and engineer Rob Gorbet has been expanded and refined by researchers, engineers and designers from around the world. An interactive geotextile mesh that senses human occupants, Hylozoic Ground transforms a static building into a responsive environment, filling it with a kind of mechanical empathy. The space functions like a giant lung that breathes in and out around its occupants in peristaltic waves of lightweight pores.

 

The Hylozoic Series is an ongoing research exploration at the boundary of art, architecture, and engineering. It is an experimental responsive architectural environment which explores the changing relationship between buildings and their occupants, with a view towards creating a more empathic experience. Relying on a network of dozens of distributed embedded controllers, sensors, and hundreds of specialized, silent shape-memory alloy based actuators distributed among a crystalline meshwork manufactured from laser-cut acrylic, it creates an experience for occupants of the space which is variously described as everything from "gentle and soothing" to "aggressive, creepy and anxiety-making".

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

BIODYNAMIC STRUCTURES

AA Visiting School @ CCA California College of the Art

Monday 12 to Wednesday 21 July, 2010

Biodynamics is the study of the force and energy of dynamic processes on living organisms. Through simple mechanisms embedded within the material logic of natural systems, specific stimuli can activate a particular response. This response occurs in carnivorous plants such as the Venus fly-trap, which uses turgor pressure to trap small insects in order to feed, and worms, which by contracting differently oriented muscles, achieve movement. This ten-day intensive workshop, co-taught by the faculty of the Emergent Technologies and Design Programme at the AA and the faculty of Architecture and MEDIAlab at California College of the Arts, will explore active systems in nature, investigating biomimetic principles in order to analyze, design and fabricate prototypes that respond to electronic and environmental stimuli. Students will work in teams to research specific biological systems, extracting logics of organization, geometry, structure and mathematics. Advanced analysis, simulation, modeling and fabrication tools will be introduced in order to apply this information to the design of both passive and active responsive architectural systems. Investigation and application of robotics, sensors and actuators will be employed for the activation of the material system investigation through the construction of working responsive prototypes.

sanfrancisco.aaschool.ac.uk/

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Pavilion Sufi is a performance-responsive architecture, designed to capture, reflect, and embody the organic nature of live performance. Inspired by the Sufi Whirling Dervishes of Istanbul, the pavilion is built from an array of suspended fabric disks that spin to reveal oscillating waveforms and space-altering behaviors. Using crowd/performer energy as an input to drive the rotational speed of the fabric disks, Pavilion Sufi is a living, breathing architectural response to the unique energy generated within every performance.

 

Credit: vog.photo

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Nuit Blanche, Toronto 2016 © Linda Dawn Hammond / IndyFoto

OBLIVION Curated by Janine Marchessault and Michael Prokopow, you'll find three exhibition projects at Nathan Phillips Square and City Hall.

OBLIVION is about destruction and forgetting. It is about drowning in the pitch-blackness of pure and final absence. And it is about the possibilities of adaptation and unprecedented renewal.

— Janine Marchessault / Michael Prokopow

Three artists explore the elemental aspects of our cosmic existence. An astonishing enactment of the Sun’s death, a spellbinding performance of corporeal transcendence, and a wondrous ocean of recycled textiles invite viewers to ponder profound transformations, celestial and earthly. Location: Nathan Philips Square & in City Hall.

Nathan Phillips Square/City Hall

 

Curatorial Statement

It is well known that there will come a time in the vastly distant future, when the Sun –- the gigantic life-giving molten of hydrogen and helium – will die. Science fiction writers have long spectulated that the earth's primordial ocean might well escape this solar catastrophe as nebulae metamorphose into new life. Three artists – Director X, Floria Sigismondi and Philip Beesley – consider the elemental aspects of our cosmic existence.

  

Philip Beesley - Toronto, Canada

 

Ocean will create a turbulent primal environment in the Rotunda of City Hall. A constantly-changing canopy of recycled textiles induces vast, unstable forces where brilliant bursts of light alternate with dark, surging movements and intense waves of hypnotic sound. A chorus of cries and whispers echoes within rising waves.

 

This dense aggregation of raw recycled textiles from H&M's Garment Collecting Initiative is transformed into an intricate and undulating mass, evoking the emergence of life in the ocean environment from unconscious realms into living form. This deeply immersive installation questions the hardened boundaries of traditional architecture and evokes self-generation, renewal and adaptation.

 

The work has been developed with Waterloo’s Living Architecture System Group and sound designer Salvador Breed.

A professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo, Philip Beesley is widely known as a pioneer in responsive architecture and sculpture. His Toronto practice Beesley Pucher Seifert is an interdisciplinary design firm that combines public buildings with international art installations. Beesley's work was selected to represent Canada at the 2010 Venice Biennale for Architecture. His distinctions include the Prix de Rome in Architecture, ACADIA Award for Research, Architizer A+ and Azure AZ Award.

PBAI is led by experimental sculptor/architect Philip Beesley and architect Rolf Seifert. Current collaborators include Rachel Armstrong, Salvador Breed, Rob Gorbet, Iris van Herpen, and Dana Kulic. The work of the collective has included collaborations with numerous architects, artists, engineers, designers, and scientists.

at Brookfield Place

  

Much better on Black (Press L)

  

www.luminato.com/2011/sargasso

  

A worldwide pioneer in the fast-growing field of responsive architecture, Beesley and his team of collaborators pose the question “could architecture come alive?” In reply he creates spaces that dissolve into forest-like hovering fields, kin to primitive life-forms within dense jungles and ocean reefs. These responsive environments offer bodily immersion and wide-flung perception. In this new installation, Beesley combines visionary design with high-tech digital engineering to turn an everyday public space into a world of wonder.

 

Sargasso refers to the vast, tangled floating masses of living matter and cast-off material that drifts at the centre of the Atlantic. The environment within the sweeping atrium of the Allen Lambert Galleria makes a vast canopy, a sanctuary that slowly shifts and floats above the city. The building is no longer an entity of steel, glass, and stone but a participant in a symbiotic artistic event that shapes the nature of the environment itself.

 

Commissioned by Luminato.

    

Nuit Blanche, Toronto 2016 © Linda Dawn Hammond / IndyFoto

OBLIVION Curated by Janine Marchessault and Michael Prokopow, you'll find three exhibition projects at Nathan Phillips Square and City Hall.

OBLIVION is about destruction and forgetting. It is about drowning in the pitch-blackness of pure and final absence. And it is about the possibilities of adaptation and unprecedented renewal.

— Janine Marchessault / Michael Prokopow

Three artists explore the elemental aspects of our cosmic existence. An astonishing enactment of the Sun’s death, a spellbinding performance of corporeal transcendence, and a wondrous ocean of recycled textiles invite viewers to ponder profound transformations, celestial and earthly. Location: Nathan Philips Square & in City Hall.

Nathan Phillips Square/City Hall

 

Curatorial Statement

It is well known that there will come a time in the vastly distant future, when the Sun –- the gigantic life-giving molten of hydrogen and helium – will die. Science fiction writers have long spectulated that the earth's primordial ocean might well escape this solar catastrophe as nebulae metamorphose into new life. Three artists – Director X, Floria Sigismondi and Philip Beesley – consider the elemental aspects of our cosmic existence.

  

Philip Beesley - Toronto, Canada

 

Ocean will create a turbulent primal environment in the Rotunda of City Hall. A constantly-changing canopy of recycled textiles induces vast, unstable forces where brilliant bursts of light alternate with dark, surging movements and intense waves of hypnotic sound. A chorus of cries and whispers echoes within rising waves.

 

This dense aggregation of raw recycled textiles from H&M's Garment Collecting Initiative is transformed into an intricate and undulating mass, evoking the emergence of life in the ocean environment from unconscious realms into living form. This deeply immersive installation questions the hardened boundaries of traditional architecture and evokes self-generation, renewal and adaptation.

 

The work has been developed with Waterloo’s Living Architecture System Group and sound designer Salvador Breed.

A professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo, Philip Beesley is widely known as a pioneer in responsive architecture and sculpture. His Toronto practice Beesley Pucher Seifert is an interdisciplinary design firm that combines public buildings with international art installations. Beesley's work was selected to represent Canada at the 2010 Venice Biennale for Architecture. His distinctions include the Prix de Rome in Architecture, ACADIA Award for Research, Architizer A+ and Azure AZ Award.

PBAI is led by experimental sculptor/architect Philip Beesley and architect Rolf Seifert. Current collaborators include Rachel Armstrong, Salvador Breed, Rob Gorbet, Iris van Herpen, and Dana Kulic. The work of the collective has included collaborations with numerous architects, artists, engineers, designers, and scientists.

Nuit Blanche, Toronto 2016 © Linda Dawn Hammond / IndyFoto

OBLIVION Curated by Janine Marchessault and Michael Prokopow, you'll find three exhibition projects at Nathan Phillips Square and City Hall.

OBLIVION is about destruction and forgetting. It is about drowning in the pitch-blackness of pure and final absence. And it is about the possibilities of adaptation and unprecedented renewal.

— Janine Marchessault / Michael Prokopow

Three artists explore the elemental aspects of our cosmic existence. An astonishing enactment of the Sun’s death, a spellbinding performance of corporeal transcendence, and a wondrous ocean of recycled textiles invite viewers to ponder profound transformations, celestial and earthly. Location: Nathan Philips Square & in City Hall.

Nathan Phillips Square/City Hall

 

Curatorial Statement

It is well known that there will come a time in the vastly distant future, when the Sun –- the gigantic life-giving molten of hydrogen and helium – will die. Science fiction writers have long spectulated that the earth's primordial ocean might well escape this solar catastrophe as nebulae metamorphose into new life. Three artists – Director X, Floria Sigismondi and Philip Beesley – consider the elemental aspects of our cosmic existence.

  

Philip Beesley - Toronto, Canada

 

Ocean will create a turbulent primal environment in the Rotunda of City Hall. A constantly-changing canopy of recycled textiles induces vast, unstable forces where brilliant bursts of light alternate with dark, surging movements and intense waves of hypnotic sound. A chorus of cries and whispers echoes within rising waves.

 

This dense aggregation of raw recycled textiles from H&M's Garment Collecting Initiative is transformed into an intricate and undulating mass, evoking the emergence of life in the ocean environment from unconscious realms into living form. This deeply immersive installation questions the hardened boundaries of traditional architecture and evokes self-generation, renewal and adaptation.

 

The work has been developed with Waterloo’s Living Architecture System Group and sound designer Salvador Breed.

A professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo, Philip Beesley is widely known as a pioneer in responsive architecture and sculpture. His Toronto practice Beesley Pucher Seifert is an interdisciplinary design firm that combines public buildings with international art installations. Beesley's work was selected to represent Canada at the 2010 Venice Biennale for Architecture. His distinctions include the Prix de Rome in Architecture, ACADIA Award for Research, Architizer A+ and Azure AZ Award.

PBAI is led by experimental sculptor/architect Philip Beesley and architect Rolf Seifert. Current collaborators include Rachel Armstrong, Salvador Breed, Rob Gorbet, Iris van Herpen, and Dana Kulic. The work of the collective has included collaborations with numerous architects, artists, engineers, designers, and scientists.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Master of Architecture Thesis Project titled Soft Ecology. Undertaken as part of the MArch 2 at Cardiff University, the project attempts to create a comprehensive understanding of a fragile ever-changing landscape and its flora and fauna to create a responsive Architecture that can work with the natural ecology to help sustain the landscape for future generations and the existing functions operation.

Pavilion Sufi is a performance-responsive architecture, designed to capture, reflect, and embody the organic nature of live performance. Inspired by the Sufi Whirling Dervishes of Istanbul, the pavilion is built from an array of suspended fabric disks that spin to reveal oscillating waveforms and space-altering behaviors. Using crowd/performer energy as an input to drive the rotational speed of the fabric disks, Pavilion Sufi is a living, breathing architectural response to the unique energy generated within every performance.

 

Photo showing Oliver Townsend

 

Credit: vog.photo

Visionary architectural pioneer, Philip Beesley, commissioned by Luminato Festival to create a responsive landscape to infuse one of downtown's busiest spaces with astonishing new life. June 8-18, 2011. Allen Lambert Galleria, Brookfield Place

181 Bay Street, Toronto.

 

A worldwide pioneer in the fast-growing field of responsive architecture, Beesley and his team of collaborators pose the question "could architecture come alive?" In reply he creates spaces that dissolve into forest-like hovering fields, kin to primitive life-forms within dense jungles and ocean reefs. These responsive environments offer bodily immersion and wide-flung perception. In this new installation, Beesley combines visionary design with high-tech digital engineering to turn an everyday public space into a world of wonder.

 

Sargasso refers to the vast, tangled floating masses of living matter and cast-off material that drifts at the centre of the Atlantic. The environment within the sweeping atrium of the Allen Lambert Galleria makes a vast canopy, a sanctuary that slowly shifts and floats above the city. The building is no longer an entity of steel, glass, and stone but a participant in a symbiotic artistic event that shapes the nature of the environment itself.

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