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Denver Botanic Gardens

I dug back for this one

Twisted and broken by the elements, a juniper clings to a small knoll and reaches into the storm filled sky that partially veils West Mitten in the distance of Monument Valley, Arizona.

♬ Lyrical Dialogue...

 

NEW from -:ZK:-

SYA @ Exclusive UBER Event start 25TH MARCH until 22TH APRIL https://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Uber/195/194/19 In the mainstore after this date : maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/ZK Store/205/129/22 Bodies : Maitreya, Legacy & Belleza Freya

 

NEW GROUP GIFT from KUNGLERS

ILaria pearl set - earrings and necklace with texture change hud

Main store...

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Accidentally%20Inlove/166/...

 

ChicChica - Chamomile bouquet

 

On location @ Lost Lagoon

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Emerald%20Bay/211/202/302

New York during the Covid-19

While some plants are withering, others are starting a new cycle. Have a wonderful Tuesday.

__________________________

◤ C R E D I T S ◢

 

Skin: PUMEC @ Kustom9

Nika

 

Jumper & Skirt: Kitja @ Uber

Bianka

 

Pose: Go&See

Delicious, Pose 15

  

Hair: Stealthic

Jewelry: Mandala

 

In around 970, the Eastern Franconian nobleman Reinger founded the Parish of Detwang in the Tauber Valley, just below the eventual site of the town of Rothenburg. The Parish Church of St. Peter and Paul was the parent church of the later town church of St. James.

Around 1080, the Counts of Komburg built a fortress on the so-called “Vinegar Jug” (next to the Infirmary). In 1116 the family endowed its largesse on the Convent of Komburg (near Schwäbisch Hall) and the Monastery of Neumünster in Würzburg.

Rothenburg only started to recover when, in 1873, it was connected to the German railway network. Prior to this, the city had been “rediscovered” by artists, writers and academics and was presented to a broader national and international public as the epitome of “old German” urban architecture. Tourism began to play a key role in the town’s economic life. Industrialization also made its mark, albeit at a modest level, the population increased and the town prospered.

 

From 1871 onwards, a small Jewish community settled in Rothenburg once again. The expulsion of this group in 1938 was a black day in the history of the town, which was glorified by the Third Reich as a perfect example of German culture from 1933 onwards. Another black day came in the shape of an American air raid during the last weeks of World War II, when around 45 per cent of the old walled town was destroyed. The successful rebuilding of the town in the post-war period is the most significant achievement in Rothenburg’s recent history.

A true medieval gem, Rothenburg ob der Tauber (meaning ‘above the Tauber River’) is a top tourist stop along the Romantic Road. With its web of cobbled lanes, higgledy-piggledy houses and towered walls, the town is the archetypal fairy-tale Germany. Urban conservation orders here are the strictest in Germany – and at times it feels like a medieval theme park – but all’s forgiven in the evenings, when the lamplight casts its spell long after the last tour buses have left.

 

A lone Hawthorn tree, captured at Went Hill, Birling Gap.

Special thanks to Edd Allen for directions....and thanks for viewing :-)

Thank you to everyone for your very kind emails and messages over the past few weeks. Hospital is as you can imagine now a very different place than it was at the beginning of the year and we’ve all had to rapidly adapt to our new lives. Working in full PPE with FFP3 masks, visors and gowns has taken a little getting used to - after a few hours inside our boil in the bag suits, things become kind of warm and it’s quite hard not to inadvertently touch or adjust the facial protection. Which of course is a no-no. But this is our new norm and it's remarkable just how resilient the human spirit is in difficult times.

 

On the plus side, my downtime from work involves far more exercise than usual. Now that I can longer go and find rusty old tat to photograph, I'm running and cycling far more than I was before. Sure, I could take up something like macro- and some of you have done this and made incredible images- but I don't really have the patience for that. And I really don't like bugs, so they're off the photographic menu too. Which leaves wine and exercise- both of which I like in equal measure. But only one is really socially acceptable before 9am.

 

In fact, the only real concern with my rekindled exercise regime is the cycling part. Sure, we can only do a maximum of one hour a day but last night I was looking at lycra shorts on the internet. And believe me, you'd rather pour salt in your eyes than see that.

 

Stay safe everyone.

 

While buildings within the walled city reflect the city's medieval history, this part of the city is in many ways a normal, modern German town with some concession to the tourist trade. Many stores and hotels catering to tourists are clustered around the Town Hall Square and along several major streets (such as Herrngasse, Schmiedgasse). Also in the town is a Criminal Museum, containing various punishment and torture devices used during the Middle Ages. A staple pastry of Rothenburg ob der Tauber is the Schneeball, deep-fried dough shaped like a snowball and covered in either confectioner's sugar or chocolate.

Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a town in the district of Ansbach of Mittelfranken (Middle Franconia), the Franconia region of Bavaria, Germany. It is well known for its well-preserved medieval old town, a destination for tourists from around the world. It is part of the popular Romantic Road through southern Germany. The name "Rothenburg ob der Tauber" is German for "Red fortress above the Tauber". This is so because the town is located on a plateau overlooking the Tauber River. As to the name "Rothenburg", some say it comes from the German words rot (red) and burg (burgh, medieval fortified settlement), referring to the red colour of the roofs of the houses which overlook the river. The name may also refer to the process of retting ("rotten" in German) flax for linen production.

Rothenburg is one of the best preserved medieval villages in Germany and is also probably one the most touristy! I was lucky enough to visit May 04-05 so was on the early shoulder season and had some room to shoot picture without tripping over people. The city has parking outside the old walls for tourists and it is definitely less hassle than trying to drive around in this compact lovely place. This city gate scene was taken walking on my way to the Hotel Zum Breiterle to check in with my D750 and my trusty Tamron SP 24-70mm 2.8 G2.

Dans un taillis enneigé ...une surprise. (in a coppice full of snow, a surprise)

Morillon, Haute Savoie, France

At the beginning of the Modern Era, several events occurred that decisively changed the public life and the legal, social and religious structure of the town in the subsequent period. The members of the town’s once thriving and influential Jewish community had all been driven out by 1521. Social unrest and entanglement in the Peasant’s Revolt weakened the town in 1525.

 

In 1544, Rothenburg broke its old church ties by embracing the Lutheran Protestant Reformation. The two convents were dissolved. The town lost much of its political significance but, thanks to its rich agricultural hinterland, remained an important economic factor in the region.

One of my favorite flowers in the garden...

As a Protestant town, Rothenburg not only suffered from a permanent conflict of loyalties with the Catholic Lord of the town, the Habsburg Emperor, but was also condemned to economic ruin by passing armies, billeted soldiery, contributions obtained through coercion, and pillage. It was captured several times by the military (1631, 1645), and it population was decimated by plague.

Rothenburg still retained its Imperial credentials for a further one hundred and fifty years. This finally came to an end in 1802 and 1803, when the town fell to the Kingdom of Bavaria as part of Napoleon’s reallocation of lands. In addition, the western part of its former territories was ceded to Württemberg in 1810.

In around 970, the Eastern Franconian nobleman Reinger founded the Parish of Detwang in the Tauber Valley, just below the eventual site of the town of Rothenburg. The Parish Church of St. Peter and Paul was the parent church of the later town church of St. James.

Around 1080, the Counts of Komburg built a fortress on the so-called “Vinegar Jug” (next to the Infirmary). In 1116 the family endowed its largesse on the Convent of Komburg (near Schwäbisch Hall) and the Monastery of Neumünster in Würzburg.

Birds Hill Provincial Park

Manitoba, Canada

“Le sens de la vie supprimé, il reste encore la vie.”

Albert Camus - L'Homme révolté

This is a re-edit. The improvements are seen mostly in the detail of the sand and grass, and in the crop.

 

Muskegon State Park, Muskegon, Michigan

 

www.leslievictor.com

Rothenburg ob der Tauber (or Rothenburg odT or just Rothenburg) is a town on the Romantic Road in Bavaria, Germany, about halfway in between Frankfurt and Munich. It is known for its medieval center (Altstadt), seemingly untouched by the passage of time, encircled by the undamaged 14th century town wall. In the Middle Ages, Rothenburg was a free imperial city, reaching its apex of prosperity under Bürgermeister Heinrich Toppler in the 15th century with a large population of 6,000 - much larger than Frankfurt and Munich at that time. Now Rothenburg is a small town and a big tourist attraction.

Resilienza, ovvero la capacità di adattarsi al cambiamento.

 

Resilience, or the ability to adapt to change.

This was changed by the Thirty Years’ War. As a Protestant town, Rothenburg not only suffered from a permanent conflict of loyalties with the Catholic Lord of the town, the Habsburg Emperor, but was also condemned to economic ruin by passing armies, billeted soldiery, contributions obtained through coercion, and pillage. It was captured several times by the military (1631, 1645), and it population was decimated by plague.

Rothenburg still retained its Imperial credentials for a further one hundred and fifty years. This finally came to an end in 1802 and 1803, when the town fell to the Kingdom of Bavaria as part of Napoleon’s reallocation of lands. In addition, the western part of its former territories was ceded to Württemberg in 1810.

I believe this cat was homeless. He was trying to find some food by the water... Sad.

 

~ HMBT ~

This old building has had many lives: a post office, a general store, a feed store. It still stands tall, even in its abandoned state, braving the harsh Winter. Central Illinois

 

You can also follow me at: www.facebook.com/DawnLoehrPhotography

 

I love trees..These trees are along the Mississippi River bank... As the result from flooding and the river receding throughout years the, the soil has eroded and the tree's roots are exposed..

 

Trees are survivors! Look at all they go through and they still thrive!

 

Have a beautiful day everyone!

Thanks to Kerstin Frank for the texture

It's always amazing to come across these old homes and find them still standing. This one was a little south of Hwy. 2 east of Farmer, Washington.

 

Constructive criticism always appreciated.

  

Cayo Las brujas, Villa Clara, Cuba.

At the beginning of the Modern Era, several events occurred that decisively changed the public life and the legal, social and religious structure of the town in the subsequent period. The members of the town’s once thriving and influential Jewish community had all been driven out by 1521. Social unrest and entanglement in the Peasant’s Revolt weakened the town in 1525.

In 1544, Rothenburg broke its old church ties by embracing the Lutheran Protestant Reformation. The two convents were dissolved. The town lost much of its political significance but, thanks to its rich agricultural hinterland, remained an important economic factor in the region.

With its splendid location and charming medieval atmosphere hardly any other town is able to captivate its visitors in quite the same way as Rothenburg ob der Tauber in Bavaria. A walk through this small town is an unforgettable encounter with bygone centuries. The imposing building of the Town Hall, stately towers, massive fortifications, churches and patrician houses are witnesses to a mighty imperial past.

 

An imperial castle dating back to 1142 represents the beginning of the town. Elevated to a Free Imperial City in 1274, Rothenburg became one of the most important city states of the Middle Ages. In 1631, during the Thirty Years War, Rothenburg was taken by imperial troops. Ex-Mayor Nusch saved the town by drinking nearly 13 cups of wine in a single gulp, the so-called "Master draught".

Losing its importance in the following centuries, Rothenburg’s medieval center remained untouched. In the Romantic era, the town was discovered by painters and poets and became a symbol of the Middle Ages in Germany.

Rothenburg ob der Tauber (or Rothenburg odT or just Rothenburg) is a town on the Romantic Road in Bavaria, Germany, about halfway in between Frankfurt and Munich. It is known for its medieval center (Altstadt), seemingly untouched by the passage of time, encircled by the undamaged 14th century town wall. In the Middle Ages, Rothenburg was a free imperial city, reaching its apex of prosperity under Bürgermeister Heinrich Toppler in the 15th century with a large population of 6,000 - much larger than Frankfurt and Munich at that time. Now Rothenburg is a small town and a big tourist attraction.

 

A unique faux brick-sided home located outside of Farmer, Washington south of Hwy. 2.

 

Taken with Rokinon 12mm f/2.0 and Sony a6000.

 

Constructive criticism always appreciated.

You are able to grow and turn difficulties into opportunities ... everything is born, matures and transforms itself

Rothenburg ob der Tauber offers each facet of romanticism: the city itself with its picturesque lanes, sleepy corners and lovingly restored buildings invite a stroll through a long-forgotten time.

A thousand years of history and a fairytale setting mix with cosmopolitan hospitality to create the very special charm of the town.

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