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Belem, Berardo Collection, Centro Cultural de Belem, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Material : Oil on canvas

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  

Amédée Ozenfant (15 April 1886 – 4 May 1966) was a French cubist painter and writer. Together with Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (later known as Le Corbusier) he founded the Purist movement.

 

EDUCATION

 

Ozenfant was born into a bourgeois family in Saint-Quentin, Aisne and was educated at Dominican colleges in Saint-Sébastien.[1] After completing his education he returned to Saint-Quentin and began painting in watercolour and pastels.[1]

 

In 1904 he attended a drawing course run by Jules-Alexandre Patrouillard Degrave at the Ecole Municipale de Dessin Quentin Delatour in Saint-Quentin. In 1905 he bagan training in decorative arts in Paris, where his teachers were Maurice Pillard Verneuil and later Charles Cottet. By 1907 he had enrolled in the Académie de La Palette, where he studied under Jacques-Emile Blanche. He befriended Roger de La Fresnaye and André Dunoyer de Segonzac, who were his fellow students.[1] In 1908 he began exhibiting at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, and two years later began exhibiting at the Salon d'Automne.

 

COLLABORATION WITH LE CORBUSIER AND DEVELOPMENT OF PURISM

 

L'Esprit Nouveau, No. 1, October 1920. Edited by Paul Dermée and Michel Seuphor, later by Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier) and Amédée Ozenfant. Published by Éditions de l'Esprit Nouveau, Paris

Between 1909 and 1913 he travelled to Russia, Italy, Belgium, and the Netherlands and attended lectures at the Collège de France in Paris. In 1915, in collaboration with Max Jacob and Guillaume Apollinaire, Ozenfant founded the magazine L’Elan, which he edited until 1916, and his theories of Purism began to develop. He met the Swiss architect and painter Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier) in 1917, and they jointly expounded the doctrines of Purism in their book Après le cubisme. Its publication coincided with the first Purist exhibition, held at the Galerie Thomas in Paris in 1917, in which Ozenfant exhibited. There was a further collaboration between them on the journal L’Esprit nouveau, which was published from 1920 to 1925.

 

A second Purist exhibition was held at the Galerie Druet, Paris, in 1921 in which Ozenfant again exhibited. In 1924 he opened a free studio in Paris with Fernand Léger, where they both taught with Aleksandra Ekster and Marie Laurencin.[1] Ozenfant and Le Corbusier wrote La Peinture moderne in 1925[3] and in 1928 Ozenfant published Art. This was subsequently published in English as The Foundations of Modern Art in 1931. In this he fully expounds his theory of Purism, and it is remarkable for its idiosyncratic and aphoristic style.

 

HIS INFLUENCE ON THE USE OF COLOUR IN ENGLAND

 

Amédée Ozenfant, 1921, Nature morte au verre de vin rouge (Still Life with Glass of Red Wine), oil on canvas, 50.6 x 61.2 cm, Kunstmuseum Basel

He later founded his own atelier, l’Académie Ozenfant, in the residence and studio that Le Corbusier had designed for him. He moved to London in 1936, where he set up the Ozenfant Academy of Fine Arts in May of that year, before moving to New York some two years later.[4] His students in London included Leonora Carrington, Sari Dienes, Stella Snead and the Egyptian artist Hamed Saeed.

 

In the early Purist manifestos, colour was deemed secondary to form, and this could be seen in the careful placing of colour to reinforce discrete architectural elements by Le Corbusier in his work of the mid-1920s. However, by the time he was in England, Ozenfant had refined his ideas about colour and outlined many of these in the six articles on the subject that he wrote for the Architectural Review. Colour was now regarded as an essential element of architecture, rather than something considered by the architect while his work was being erected. Colour always modifies the form of the building and should receive more careful attention.

 

We must endeavour to introduce a little order into this business, or at least sense into a great deal of it. But what is sense without order? We must try to find some method of arriving at some sort of order—one that will at least enable us to escape from this vagueness in the design of colour.[5]

 

Ozenfant’s revised thoughts on the importance of colour were partly due to the influence of the artist Paul Signac and his theories on Divisionism. Signac maintained that the Neo-Impressionist technique of applying brushstrokes obtained the maximum brightness, colour, and harmony.[6] Unlike the techniques used by the earlier Impressionists, patches of colours remained distinct, blending when viewed at a distance. In this instance, when no fusion of the colours takes place, the interaction is called “simultaneous contrast”, a condition in which colours merely influence one another by proximity. This technique prevents the muddiness or darkening that result when patches of colour actually run into each other. It was an extension of this technique that was recommended by Ozenfant for achieving “colour solidity” in architecture, altering colours visually by contrast to create the illusion of solidity.[7]

 

This notion of “solidity” increasingly became an issue as the nature of modern construction changed, especially when dealing with such things as the lightweight partition and the glass curtain wall.

 

In 1937 Ozenfant had said:

 

I believe that an immense service would be done to architects, decorators, house-painters etc., if a chart especially adapted to their particular requirements were established. This chart might contain about a hundred hues.[8]

 

Ozenfant’s articles on colour were read with interest, particularly by:

 

…the students at the Architectural Association (AA), for example, but even for David Medd, a student at the AA who later authored the color standards for British schools, Ozenfant had already gone to the United States by the time he inquired about the course at the Academy.[9]

 

The effect of his words can be seen in a number of articles on colour published in England shortly after the Second World War. Indeed, we are told in 1956 that they had a direct influence on the decoration of some of the early post-war schools.[10]

 

FINAL YEARS

 

The Ozenfant School of Fine Arts in New York was in operation from 1939 until 1955. He became a US citizen in 1944. Ozenfant taught and lectured widely in the United States until 1955, when he returned to France, where he was renaturalized in 1953.[1] He remained there for the rest of his life and died in Cannes in 1966.

 

COLLECTIONS

 

The Guggenheim Museum (New York City), the Hermitage Museum, the Honolulu Museum of Art, Kunstmuseum Basel (Switzerland), the Louvre, the Museum of Modern Art (New York City), Muzeum Sztuki (Lodz, Poland), the National Gallery of Australia (Canberra), the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Tate Gallery (London) and the Walker Art Center (Minnesota) are among the public collections holding works by Amédée Ozenfant.

Die Narzisse kennen die meisten als Osterglocke aus dem Vorgarten oder auch als Schnittblume aus dem Handel. Wie es ist, wenn die Narzisse als wild wachsende Art Bachtäler mit ihrer gelben Blüte verzaubert, kann sich kaum jemand vorstellen. Denn als Wildpflanze ist die Narzisse in ihren Beständen stark bedroht und daher streng geschützt. In den südwestlich gelegenen Bachtälern des Nationalparks Eifel liegt eines der bedeutendsten letzten Refugien der Gelben Wildnarzisse, wo sie alljährlich zwischen April und Mai mit über zehn Millionen Blüten ein besonderes Naturschauspiel bietet.

 

Die Gelben Wildnarzisse zählt zur Familie der Amaryllisgewächse. Sie ist kleiner als die Osterglocke aus dem heimischen Garten. Markant sind ihre sechs gelben Blütenblätter und ihrer Glocke in der Mitte. Die dunkelgrünen Blätter sind hart und spitz. So können sie sich im Frühjahr selbst durch harte, gefrorene Böden stoßen.

 

Ursprünglich hatte die Wildnarzisse im westlichen Mitteleuropa ihr Verbreitungsgebiet. In Deutschland kommt sie heute nur noch in der Eifel und im Hunsrück vor. In der Eifel stößt sie an ihr östlichstes Verbreitungsgebiet. In Belgien kommt die Narzisse noch häufiger vor. Ihr natürlicher Lebensraum sind kalkarme, magere Feuchtwiesen.

 

Die Verbreitung ihrer großen Samen findet über den Wassertransport und durch Ameisen statt.

Im Nationalpark Eifel kommt die Wildnarzisse in verschiedenen Bachtälern vor. Sie fühlt sich dort am Rand von Erlen- und Birkenbruchwäldern wohl. Über 600 Jahre lang wurden die Wiesenflächen dort für die Heugewinnung genutzt. Zur jährlichen Düngung der Wiesen legten die Bauern so genannte Flüxgraben hangparallel an und bewässerten die Flächen mit schwebstoffhaltigem Bachwasser. So gediehen blumenreiche Feucht- und Sumpfwiesen mit Bärwurz und gelben Narzissen. Mit dem Einsatz des Kunstdüngers nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg lohnte sich die Bewirtschaftung der Wiesenflächen nicht mehr. Daher wurden die Bachtäler mit Fichten aufgeforstet oder intensiv als Grünland genutzt. Die dichten Fichtenwälder ließen der Gelbe Wildnarzisse keinen Lebensraum.

 

Im Jahre1976 wurden die Flächen als Naturschutzgebiet ausgewiesen, um die Bachtäler der Wildnarzissen zu schützen. Das Land NRW hat über 50 Hektar gekauft und ließ sie anschließend renaturieren. Es wurden die Fichten großflächig entfernt und der Artenreichtum konnte so mit den Jahren wieder zurück kehren. Die Wilde Narzisse zu pflücken oder gar auszugraben ist verboten.

 

Die Flächen werden sich aber nun nicht selbst überlassen, da sonst wieder eine natürliche Verbuschung und Waldwuchs das aus der Narzissen bedeuten würde. Narzissenwiesen benötigen wie Orchideenwiesen und ähnliche Wiesen intensive Pflege und regelmäßigen Schnitt zu bestimmten Jahreszeiten. Diese Arbeiten werden in der Regel zwischen Ende Juli und Anfang August durchgeführt, da sie sonst auch durch einwuchernde hohe Stauden und Gehölze bedroht sind.

 

The daffodil know most as daffodil from the garden or as a cut flower from the market. As if the daffodil as wild nature enchanted stream valleys with its yellow flower, is hardly anyone can imagine. Because as a wild plant the daffodil is seriously threatened in their stocks and therefore strictly protected. In the south-west to stream valleys of the Eifel National Park is one of the most important last refuges of Yellow Wild daffodil, where they face more than ten million flowers offers a special natural spectacle every year from April to May

 

The Yellow Wild daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) belongs to the family of Amaryllis plants. It is smaller than the daffodil from the home garden. Strikingly their six yellow petals and its bell in the middle. The dark green leaves are hard and sharp. So they may encounter in the spring even through hard, frozen ground.

 

Originally, the wild daffodil in western central Europe had their range. In Germany today is found only in the Eifel and the Hunsrück. In the Eifel she pushes her easternmost area of ​​distribution. In Belgium, the daffodil occurs more frequently. Its natural habitat is poor in lime, lean wetlands.

The distribution of their large seeds takes place via water transport and by ants.

 

In the Eifel National Park, the wild daffodil is found in various river valleys. She feels there at the edge of alder and birch swamp forests probably. Over 600 years the lawns were used there for hay production. For annual fertilization of meadows, the farmers put so-called Flüxgraben to hang parallel and irrigated the land with schwebstoffhaltigem creek water. So thrived flowery humid and marshy meadows with Bärwurz and yellow daffodils. With the use of chemical fertilizers after the Second World War, the management of meadows was not worth more. Therefore, the stream valleys were afforested with spruce or intensively used as grassland. The dense pine forests were the Yellow Wild daffodil no habitat.

 

In Jahre1976 the areas have been designated as a nature reserve to protect the stream valleys of wild daffodils. The state of NRW has purchased about 50 hectares and let them renaturalize then. There the spruces were removed over a large area and species richness was so over the years again return. to pick The Wild daffodil or even dig prohibited.

 

The surfaces are, however, not even now left, otherwise again a natural bush encroachment and forest growth would mean from the daffodils. Daffodil meadows need as orchid meadows and pastures like intensive care and regular cutting at certain seasons. This work is carried out is usually between late July and early August, as they are otherwise threatened by high einwuchernde Bushes and shrubs.

 

Vielen Dank für den Besuch, für die zahlreichen Kommentare und Favoriten.

 

Thank you for the visit, for the numerous comments and favorites.

 

© Alle meine Bilder unterliegen internationalen Urheberrechtsgesetzen und dürfen ohne meine ausdrückliche schriftliche Genehmigung nicht heruntergeladen, reproduziert, kopiert, übertragen oder manipuliert werden. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Bitte kontaktieren Sie mich unter naturfoto-karbe@gmx.de, wenn Sie beabsichtigen meine Bilder zu kaufen oder zu verwenden.

 

© All my images are subject to international copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transferred or manipulated without my express written permission. All rights reserved. Please contact me at naturfoto-karbe@gmx.de if you intend to buy or use my pictures.

River Sava between Šentjakob and Brinje, Slovenia, shot from a kite in cloudy weather and bad light conditions, just before 5 pm.

 

There is a nice story behind the 'notch' in the left riverbank. It was created in 2010 when a truly exceptional flow of this barely tamed river destroyed almost 600 m of the channel, reclaiming and 'renaturalizing' the left bank.

 

In the early spring of 2011 some birds, European sand martins (Riparia riparia, a type of swallow) arrived from Africa and found the new bank perfect for their nests - they dig deep and narrow burrows in the sand of the vertical riverbanks to avoid predators.

 

The notch in the riverbank was growing and eating away more and more of the fertile soil, so a team came with the heavy equipment to restore the river channel. But by then over 80 pairs of sand martins were nesting there - and sand martins are a strictly protected species in Slovenia!

 

So they had to compromise: a retaining wall was built upstream to divert the power of Sava away from the dent and prevent further erosion, and the sand martins got to stay!

 

Their burrows are currently waiting for the birds to come home sometime in March - and as the kite is a quiet beast, we shall try to approach stealthily from above and get some pictures of sand martin families :-) ...

 

Shot with Nikon 1 J1 on a Rokkaku kite.

Elnya peatland in Belarus

 

Project: Renaturalization and sustainable management of peatlands in Belarus to combat land degradation, ensure conservation of globally valuable biodiversity and mitigate climate change (2005-2010).

 

Implemented by UNDP and the Ministry of Forestry, the project worked with the peat industry to develop and demonstrate new approaches to post-extraction rehabilitation, and to transform the practical experience into policies for regulating the extraction sector.

 

Photo by Alexander Kozulin

Read our publication about biodiversity and check out our blog

The last visible remnant of an MGB track to the NEAT tunnel construction site in Sedrun. Everything was dismantled and renaturalized, including a 155 m long tunnel that I had documented at the last minute. Switzerland, Oct 18, 2017.

 

MGB: Matterhorn Gotthard Railway

NEAT: New Trans-Alpine Railway (Gotthard Base Tunnel)

Renaturalization

 

Alter Stuhl. Ehem. Heilanstalten Hohenlychen.

Leichte Sepiatönung + Textur

 

Old chair. Former 'Heilanstalten Hohenlychen'.

Light sepia tone + texture

From the Mission Creek Greenway between Gordon and Casorso

From the Mission Creek Greenway between Gordon and Casorso

Abandoned Gotthard Line section of about 2.5 km. View from Erstfeld towards Altdorf. On 28 February 2016 the last train ran on this section. Most of the catenaries are already dismantled. An unusual sight of a Swiss double-track line. It will soon be history. Everything will be removed and renaturalized. Switzerland, March 10, 2016.

Renaturalized 'Birs' just before the reunion with the Rhine at Birsfelden (Switzerland)

 

for 117 Pictures in 2017: 32. Essential

  

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

Die Narzisse kennen die meisten als Osterglocke aus dem Vorgarten oder auch als Schnittblume aus dem Handel. Wie es ist, wenn die Narzisse als wild wachsende Art Bachtäler mit ihrer gelben Blüte verzaubert, kann sich kaum jemand vorstellen. Denn als Wildpflanze ist die Narzisse in ihren Beständen stark bedroht und daher streng geschützt. In den südwestlich gelegenen Bachtälern des Nationalparks Eifel liegt eines der bedeutendsten letzten Refugien der Gelben Wildnarzisse, wo sie alljährlich zwischen April und Mai mit über zehn Millionen Blüten ein besonderes Naturschauspiel bietet.

Die Gelben Wildnarzisse zählt zur Familie der Amaryllisgewächse. Sie ist kleiner als die Osterglocke aus dem heimischen Garten. Markant sind ihre sechs gelben Blütenblätter und ihrer Glocke in der Mitte. Die dunkelgrünen Blätter sind hart und spitz. So können sie sich im Frühjahr selbst durch harte, gefrorene Böden stoßen.

 

Ursprünglich hatte die Wildnarzisse im westlichen Mitteleuropa ihr Verbreitungsgebiet. In Deutschland kommt sie heute nur noch in der Eifel und im Hunsrück vor. In der Eifel stößt sie an ihr östlichstes Verbreitungsgebiet. In Belgien kommt die Narzisse noch häufiger vor. Ihr natürlicher Lebensraum sind kalkarme, magere Feuchtwiesen.

 

Die Verbreitung ihrer großen Samen findet über den Wassertransport und durch Ameisen statt.

Im Nationalpark Eifel kommt die Wildnarzisse in verschiedenen Bachtälern vor. Sie fühlt sich dort am Rand von Erlen- und Birkenbruchwäldern wohl. Über 600 Jahre lang wurden die Wiesenflächen dort für die Heugewinnung genutzt. Zur jährlichen Düngung der Wiesen legten die Bauern so genannte Flüxgraben hangparallel an und bewässerten die Flächen mit schwebstoffhaltigem Bachwasser. So gediehen blumenreiche Feucht- und Sumpfwiesen mit Bärwurz und gelben Narzissen. Mit dem Einsatz des Kunstdüngers nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg lohnte sich die Bewirtschaftung der Wiesenflächen nicht mehr. Daher wurden die Bachtäler mit Fichten aufgeforstet oder intensiv als Grünland genutzt. Die dichten Fichtenwälder ließen der Gelbe Wildnarzisse keinen Lebensraum.

 

Im Jahre1976 wurden die Flächen als Naturschutzgebiet ausgewiesen, um die Bachtäler der Wildnarzissen zu schützen. Das Land NRW hat über 50 Hektar gekauft und ließ sie anschließend renaturieren. Es wurden die Fichten großflächig entfernt und der Artenreichtum konnte so mit den Jahren wieder zurück kehren. Die Wilde Narzisse zu pflücken oder gar auszugraben ist verboten.

 

Die Flächen werden sich aber nun nicht selbst überlassen, da sonst wieder eine natürliche Verbuschung und Waldwuchs das aus der Narzissen bedeuten würde. Narzissenwiesen benötigen wie Orchideenwiesen und ähnliche Wiesen intensive Pflege und regelmäßigen Schnitt zu bestimmten Jahreszeiten. Diese Arbeiten werden in der Regel zwischen Ende Juli und Anfang August durchgeführt, da sie sonst auch durch einwuchernde hohe Stauden und Gehölze bedroht sind.

  

The daffodil know most as daffodil from the garden or as a cut flower from the market. As if the daffodil as wild nature enchanted stream valleys with its yellow flower, is hardly anyone can imagine. Because as a wild plant the daffodil is seriously threatened in their stocks and therefore strictly protected. In the south-west to stream valleys of the Eifel National Park is one of the most important last refuges of Yellow Wild daffodil, where they face more than ten million flowers offers a special natural spectacle every year from April to May

 

The Yellow Wild daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) belongs to the family of Amaryllis plants. It is smaller than the daffodil from the home garden. Strikingly their six yellow petals and its bell in the middle. The dark green leaves are hard and sharp. So they may encounter in the spring even through hard, frozen ground.

 

Originally, the wild daffodil in western central Europe had their range. In Germany today is found only in the Eifel and the Hunsrück. In the Eifel she pushes her easternmost area of ​​distribution. In Belgium, the daffodil occurs more frequently. Its natural habitat is poor in lime, lean wetlands.

The distribution of their large seeds takes place via water transport and by ants.

 

In the Eifel National Park, the wild daffodil is found in various river valleys. She feels there at the edge of alder and birch swamp forests probably. Over 600 years the lawns were used there for hay production. For annual fertilization of meadows, the farmers put so-called Flüxgraben to hang parallel and irrigated the land with schwebstoffhaltigem creek water. So thrived flowery humid and marshy meadows with Bärwurz and yellow daffodils. With the use of chemical fertilizers after the Second World War, the management of meadows was not worth more. Therefore, the stream valleys were afforested with spruce or intensively used as grassland. The dense pine forests were the Yellow Wild daffodil no habitat.

 

In Jahre1976 the areas have been designated as a nature reserve to protect the stream valleys of wild daffodils. The state of NRW has purchased about 50 hectares and let them renaturalize then. There the spruces were removed over a large area and species richness was so over the years again return. to pick The Wild daffodil or even dig prohibited.

 

The surfaces are, however, not even now left, otherwise again a natural bush encroachment and forest growth would mean from the daffodils. Daffodil meadows need as orchid meadows and pastures like intensive care and regular cutting at certain seasons. This work is carried out is usually between late July and early August, as they are otherwise threatened by high einwuchernde Bushes and shrubs.

 

Vielen Dank für den Besuch, für die zahlreichen Kommentare und Favoriten.

 

Thank you for the visit, for the numerous comments and favorites.

 

© Alle meine Bilder unterliegen internationalen Urheberrechtsgesetzen und dürfen ohne meine ausdrückliche schriftliche Genehmigung nicht heruntergeladen, reproduziert, kopiert, übertragen oder manipuliert werden. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Bitte kontaktieren Sie mich unter naturfoto-karbe@gmx.de, wenn Sie beabsichtigen meine Bilder zu kaufen oder zu verwenden.

 

© All my images are subject to international copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transferred or manipulated without my express written permission. All rights reserved. Please contact me at naturfoto-karbe@gmx.de if you intend to buy or use my pictures.

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

Die Narzisse kennen die meisten als Osterglocke aus dem Vorgarten oder auch als Schnittblume aus dem Handel. Wie es ist, wenn die Narzisse als wild wachsende Art Bachtäler mit ihrer gelben Blüte verzaubert, kann sich kaum jemand vorstellen. Denn als Wildpflanze ist die Narzisse in ihren Beständen stark bedroht und daher streng geschützt. In den südwestlich gelegenen Bachtälern des Nationalparks Eifel liegt eines der bedeutendsten letzten Refugien der Gelben Wildnarzisse, wo sie alljährlich zwischen April und Mai mit über zehn Millionen Blüten ein besonderes Naturschauspiel bietet.

 

Die Gelben Wildnarzisse zählt zur Familie der Amaryllisgewächse. Sie ist kleiner als die Osterglocke aus dem heimischen Garten. Markant sind ihre sechs gelben Blütenblätter und ihrer Glocke in der Mitte. Die dunkelgrünen Blätter sind hart und spitz. So können sie sich im Frühjahr selbst durch harte, gefrorene Böden stoßen.

 

Ursprünglich hatte die Wildnarzisse im westlichen Mitteleuropa ihr Verbreitungsgebiet. In Deutschland kommt sie heute nur noch in der Eifel und im Hunsrück vor. In der Eifel stößt sie an ihr östlichstes Verbreitungsgebiet. In Belgien kommt die Narzisse noch häufiger vor. Ihr natürlicher Lebensraum sind kalkarme, magere Feuchtwiesen.

 

Die Verbreitung ihrer großen Samen findet über den Wassertransport und durch Ameisen statt.

Im Nationalpark Eifel kommt die Wildnarzisse in verschiedenen Bachtälern vor. Sie fühlt sich dort am Rand von Erlen- und Birkenbruchwäldern wohl. Über 600 Jahre lang wurden die Wiesenflächen dort für die Heugewinnung genutzt. Zur jährlichen Düngung der Wiesen legten die Bauern so genannte Flüxgraben hangparallel an und bewässerten die Flächen mit schwebstoffhaltigem Bachwasser. So gediehen blumenreiche Feucht- und Sumpfwiesen mit Bärwurz und gelben Narzissen. Mit dem Einsatz des Kunstdüngers nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg lohnte sich die Bewirtschaftung der Wiesenflächen nicht mehr. Daher wurden die Bachtäler mit Fichten aufgeforstet oder intensiv als Grünland genutzt. Die dichten Fichtenwälder ließen der Gelbe Wildnarzisse keinen Lebensraum.

 

Im Jahre1976 wurden die Flächen als Naturschutzgebiet ausgewiesen, um die Bachtäler der Wildnarzissen zu schützen. Das Land NRW hat über 50 Hektar gekauft und ließ sie anschließend renaturieren. Es wurden die Fichten großflächig entfernt und der Artenreichtum konnte so mit den Jahren wieder zurück kehren. Die Wilde Narzisse zu pflücken oder gar auszugraben ist verboten.

 

Die Flächen werden sich aber nun nicht selbst überlassen, da sonst wieder eine natürliche Verbuschung und Waldwuchs das aus der Narzissen bedeuten würde. Narzissenwiesen benötigen wie Orchideenwiesen und ähnliche Wiesen intensive Pflege und regelmäßigen Schnitt zu bestimmten Jahreszeiten. Diese Arbeiten werden in der Regel zwischen Ende Juli und Anfang August durchgeführt, da sie sonst auch durch einwuchernde hohe Stauden und Gehölze bedroht sind.

 

The daffodil know most as daffodil from the garden or as a cut flower from the market. As if the daffodil as wild nature enchanted stream valleys with its yellow flower, is hardly anyone can imagine. Because as a wild plant the daffodil is seriously threatened in their stocks and therefore strictly protected. In the south-west to stream valleys of the Eifel National Park is one of the most important last refuges of Yellow Wild daffodil, where they face more than ten million flowers offers a special natural spectacle every year from April to May

 

The Yellow Wild daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) belongs to the family of Amaryllis plants. It is smaller than the daffodil from the home garden. Strikingly their six yellow petals and its bell in the middle. The dark green leaves are hard and sharp. So they may encounter in the spring even through hard, frozen ground.

 

Originally, the wild daffodil in western central Europe had their range. In Germany today is found only in the Eifel and the Hunsrück. In the Eifel she pushes her easternmost area of ​​distribution. In Belgium, the daffodil occurs more frequently. Its natural habitat is poor in lime, lean wetlands.

The distribution of their large seeds takes place via water transport and by ants.

 

In the Eifel National Park, the wild daffodil is found in various river valleys. She feels there at the edge of alder and birch swamp forests probably. Over 600 years the lawns were used there for hay production. For annual fertilization of meadows, the farmers put so-called Flüxgraben to hang parallel and irrigated the land with schwebstoffhaltigem creek water. So thrived flowery humid and marshy meadows with Bärwurz and yellow daffodils. With the use of chemical fertilizers after the Second World War, the management of meadows was not worth more. Therefore, the stream valleys were afforested with spruce or intensively used as grassland. The dense pine forests were the Yellow Wild daffodil no habitat.

 

In Jahre1976 the areas have been designated as a nature reserve to protect the stream valleys of wild daffodils. The state of NRW has purchased about 50 hectares and let them renaturalize then. There the spruces were removed over a large area and species richness was so over the years again return. to pick The Wild daffodil or even dig prohibited.

 

The surfaces are, however, not even now left, otherwise again a natural bush encroachment and forest growth would mean from the daffodils. Daffodil meadows need as orchid meadows and pastures like intensive care and regular cutting at certain seasons. This work is carried out is usually between late July and early August, as they are otherwise threatened by high einwuchernde Bushes and shrubs.

 

Vielen Dank für den Besuch, für die zahlreichen Kommentare und Favoriten.

 

Thank you for the visit, for the numerous comments and favorites.

 

© Alle meine Bilder unterliegen internationalen Urheberrechtsgesetzen und dürfen ohne meine ausdrückliche schriftliche Genehmigung nicht heruntergeladen, reproduziert, kopiert, übertragen oder manipuliert werden. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Bitte kontaktieren Sie mich unter naturfoto-karbe@gmx.de, wenn Sie beabsichtigen meine Bilder zu kaufen oder zu verwenden.

 

© All my images are subject to international copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transferred or manipulated without my express written permission. All rights reserved. Please contact me at naturfoto-karbe@gmx.de if you intend to buy or use my pictures.

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

This seems to be part of some sort of shoreline stabilization and or renaturalization effort

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

I moved back to this places - the Ruhr-Area - after 20 years of living in Hamburg. I had no expectations about this place - thought it was boring when i left. I see it with a stereo-pair of new eyes today. It has changed so much - and my point of view has chaged too....

After quiting smoking i started to move around here with a bike. I try to get back some fitness after not wasting a thought about it for almost 30 years. It feels great after a few days of sweating - how good could it be after some weeks. And this place - former heavy industry place with less than 50 feet to look forward is changing to a renaturalized landscape, which is may be better than a lot of other countryside regions in Germany. I found out: 3D photography is a different thing for me.... it should be well organized and staged. I decided to do 2D snapshots for exploring my "new" neighbourhood - but will be out for some 3D photography organized after the original exploring trips. I hope you will enjoy anyway.

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

*

Djupavik -

Tilvist fortìðarinnar -

The Presence of the Past -

Die Gegenwart der Vergangenheit *

(Photo-Set)

www.flickr.com/photos/sterneck/sets/72157631753172827

 

"Djúpavík is a sheltered bay in the Strandir district of northwest Iceland.

It is a remote region, largely untouched by modern developments where silence reigns and nature continues to shape a rugged, mountainous landscape.

 

Djúpavík leapt to fame in the 1930s when a group of businessmen built a herring factory in the bay. The factory operated until the early 1950s and now contains an exhibition recalling those exciting and prosperous days.

 

Djúpavík Hotel is a building that was formerly the living quarters for women working in a herring processing factory that was built in the bay but fell into disuse many years ago."

 

www.djupavik.com

 

Photos by Claus and Wolfgang Sterneck, 2012.

 

Takk fyrir Eva, Ásbjörn og Claus

 

- * -

 

Claus in Iceland

www.claus-in-iceland.com

 

Wolfgang Sterneck:

In the Cracks of the World

Photo-Reports:

www.flickr.com/sterneck/sets

Articles (german / english):

www.sterneck.net

 

- * -

 

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