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Ceramic Poppies at The Tower of London, London, England.

A man pauses to remember the fallen at the Tower of London poppies.

 

To view & purchase my best images please visit my website at www.jasonwells.co.uk.

On our way to France in the summer we stopped overnight in Folkestone. We had a walk along The Lees and came across a number of the Folkestone Artworks, this one was extremely moving and I took a few photos, a while later I noticed a little clump of poppies standing tall in the early evening sun.

In Remembrance of those who died ....and for those who still serve to defend us ...

THANK YOU -EXPLORED at 494 briefly !

Rememberance Sunday 11th Nov is here again.

Each year I remember the servicemen and women who gave their lives for our freedom.

This year I visited Madingley American WW2 Military Cemetery in Cambridgeshire.

This is just one of the photos I took of this beautiful tranquil place.

I can not imagine a more peaceful and beautiful resting place for the thousands of servicemen buried here and as a monument to those honoured it is indeed a fitting tribute to to these brave and gallant heroes who paid the ultimate price in defence of freedom and liberty.....

We thank you...

INTO THY HANDS O`LORD

 

Captured a few weeks ago as the ceramic poppies were building up.

 

To view & purchase my best images please visit my website at www.jasonwells.co.uk.

As today, Remembrance Sunday is an important day here in the United Kingdom I thought that I would post a shot I took off the Spitfire I show with a group of friends throughout the UK where we raise money for a memorial in my home town, Lytham St Annes.

 

Rememberance Sunday is the Sunday nearest to 11 November Armistice Day, the anniversary of the end of hostilities in the First World War at 11 a.m. in 1918. Remembrance Sunday is held "to commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military and civilian servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts".

In the United Kingdom, Remembrance Sunday is marked by ceremonies at local war memorials in most cities, towns and villages, attended by civic dignitaries, ex-servicemen and -women (principally members of the Royal British Legion), members of local armed forces regular and reserve units (Royal Navy and Royal Naval Reserve, Royal Marines and Royal Marines Reserve, Army and Territorial Army, Royal Air Force and Royal Auxiliary Air Force), military cadet forces (Sea Cadet Corps, Army Cadet Force and Air Training Corps as well as the Combined Cadet Force) and youth organisations (e.g. Scouts and Guides and Brownies). Wreaths of remembrance poppies are laid on the memorials and two minutes silence is held at 11 a.m.

 

For more details on the Lytham St Annes Spitfire goto our Facebook page.

 

Ni heneiddiant hwy fel yr heneiddiwn ni;

Ni Flinir hwy gan henaint,

Ac ni gollfarnir hwy gan y blynyddoedd.

Pan fachluda'r haul ac yn y bore, ni a'i cofiwn hwy.

 

They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old;

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning,

We will remember them.

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My parents have come up for a few days and my mum was wearing her poppy for Remembrance Sunday. (11th November, also her birthday). I loved the red of her coat and the poppy.

Seen at the Service of Remembrance at The Cenotaph, St George's Hall, Liverpool.

 

To view & purchase my best images please visit my website at www.jasonwells.co.uk

terratorial army medic, parading on poppy day in swinton, manchester.

This is part of a series of photographs of the Pots and Pans Memorial view. The memorial was built in 1923 to commemorate the soldiers who gave their lives in the First World War 1914-1919. The losses sustained by the surrounding villages were so great that entire villages were left with no men to continue in the local communities and as a result left the areas after the war almost deserted. Rememberance Sunday here is a very special occasion and usually falls on a very hardy and cold day.

 

Why is it called "Pots and Pans" ?

Pots and Pots is named after the rock that stands before the memorial obelisk as the rock has holes eroded in the top surface that resemble A Pot and A Pan. it is said that the Druids of old used this hill and rock for ceremonies and also for a fire beacon. The view from here on a clear day is almost 35 miles.

 

View On Black

Taken today at the War Memorial at Bradgate Park, Leicestershire.

Poppy taken at RHS Harlow Carr summer 2014.

A tribute on Remembrance Sunday to those who gave their lives for us at war. The red ribbon signifies the blood that was shed. I went to the Tate Modern where there are lots of very closely planted silver birch trees which I think are beautiful. I then wrapped the red ribbon around the trunks of the trees in a grid like formation. Loads of people asked me what I was doing. I told them that it was a piece of art in commemoration of Rememberence Sunday and they all seemed pretty happy with that. Everyone seemed to like it including a nice security guard from the Tate Modern who asked me if it was an art project and said I should take lots of photos. I overheard one man though, walking along with his wife saying “No dear, it’s to stop people walking through the trees…. well, I suppose it could be art!” A lot of people assumed I’d been commissioned by the Tate Modern I think! Maybe one day, but for now I’m happy to have some art work at least in the grounds of the Tate Modern! I wonder how long it will stay there?

 

It would be interesting to know what reactions it would have got if I weren’t in the grounds of a modern art museum. People seemed very open to it being art there but I wonder what people would have thought if I’d done it in Hyde Park? Perhaps art is context dependant!

www.fionalongart.co.uk

This statue is just outside my old primary school – and is a memorial for all who lost their lives in 2 world wars and who attended Aberbanc school in Ceredigon– although our school is very small the amount of names on the monument is surprisingly high and it has been said that in proportion to the size of our school the number of losses is one if not the highest in Wales. My father remembers them as his friends and has many amazing stories to tell about their lives and they live on within these stories.

 

He also has the most amusing stories of him and his friends joining the Home Guard. We had a prisoner of war camp in Henllan which housed Italian and German soldiers and who lived and worked amongst us. Many stayed and are now third and fourth generation. One of the most beautiful things in Henllan village is the little church that the Italian soldiers decorated. During the war our village football team had a German soldier who was the most brilliant player and who went on to play in the world cup some years after the war finished. I can report that the team had the best season they ever had and they might never see a season like it again.

 

I blant Aberbanc a wnaeth golli ei bywydau drosom ni rydem yn eich cofio.

 

I was going to upload this picture two weeks ago on Remembrance Sunday but alas other events took my time and I missed the opportunity. So why not upload it two weeks late, the sentiment should be the same all year round.

 

Every year at the summit of Great Gable there is a remembrance service. On the one time I attended this gathering the summit was suitably surrounded in clag and the service really concentrated your mind. This picture was taken as some of the five hundred attendees made their way back down Styhead Tarn.

Hundreds of thousands of ceramic poppies surround the Tower of London.

 

To view & purchase my best images please visit my website at www.jasonwells.co.uk.

Taken Through My Kitchen Window On Rememberance Sunday Morning.Frost,Sunshine And Shade.

Why the Poppy?

   

The poppy has a long association with Remembrance Day. But how did the distinctive red flower become such a potent symbol of our remembrance of the sacrifices made in past wars?

 

Scarlet corn poppies (popaver rhoeas) grow naturally in conditions of disturbed earth throughout Western Europe. The destruction brought by the Napoleonic wars of the early 19th Century transformed bare land into fields of blood red poppies, growing around the bodies of the fallen soldiers.

 

In late 1914, the fields of Northern France and Flanders were once again ripped open as World War One raged through Europe's heart. Once the conflict was over the poppy was one of the only plants to grow on the otherwise barren battlefields.

 

The significance of the poppy as a lasting memorial symbol to the fallen was realised by the Canadian surgeon John McCrae in his poem In Flanders Fields. The poppy came to represent the immeasurable sacrifice made by his comrades and quickly became a lasting memorial to those who died in World War One and later conflicts. It was adopted by The Royal British Legion as the symbol for their Poppy Appeal, in aid of those serving in the British Armed Forces, after its formation in 1921.

THIS INFO WAS GATHERED FROM B.B.C. WEBSITE...GRATEFUL THANKS TO THEM www.bbc.co.uk/remembrance/how/poppy.shtml

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Every year the young and the old people of Saddleworth make the climb up to Pots and Pans war memorial for Rememberance Sunday. The monument was built here as it is visible from all the villages which make up Saddleworth.

The monument on Pots and Pans is a war memorial constructed in 1923 and is sited so that it is visible from all the seven villages that comprise Saddleworth. It is situated approx 1200 feet above sea level.

 

Every year the young and the old people of Saddleworth make the climb up to Pots and Pans war memorial for Rememberance Sunday.

For #RememberanceSunday. Dedicated to my Great Grandfather Hezekiah Williams 1900 – 1940 Merchant Navy served with SS Marbriton WW2

Seen at the Service of Remembrance at The Cenotaph, St George's Hall, Liverpool.

 

To view & purchase my best images please visit my website at www.jasonwells.co.uk

I was so moved by these individual crosses placed in the grass in front of the war memorial in Rochester. Behind the war memorial stands the Cathedral .

Taken At Eleven Minutes Past Eleven, 11th of November 2010 !

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" They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old,

Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn,

At the going down of the sun and in the morning,

We will remember them !

   

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