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A beautiful tulip about ready to bloom. The warm lighting and just the touch of red on the tips caught my attention as if the flower was begging to have me take a photo of it. I have added a texture to add a touch of drama along with a painterly feel to the image.

It is believed the first tulips in the United States were grown near Spring Pond at the Fay Estate in Lynn and Salem, Massachusetts. From 1847 to 1865, Richard Sullivan Fay, Esq., one of Lynn's wealthiest men, settled on 500 acres (2.0 km2) located partly in present-day Lynn and partly in present-day Salem. Mr. Fay imported many different trees and plants from all parts of the world and planted them among the meadows of the Fay Estate.

Eine vorösterliche Kanne Ostertee.... genau das Richtige bei diesem gar nicht frühlingshaften Wetter.

 

A cup of Easter Tea Blend. A wee bit early, but very good and warming under the actual weather conditions.

Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw59amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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594 The American Florist. April 12, soil is made firm s.round the roots first and then the top firmed down. The same thing happens in transplanting; where the loose soil is thrown around between the plant and the pot and the top then firmed down. A Utt'e soil should be firs", thrown in the bottom of the pot and the plant placed in this then a little soil around the plant, which should be firmed down, then a little more soil, which can be, pressed down from the top. This will take longer, but the plant will live and grow enough better lo pay for the ex- tra pains. Peonies. As soon as the frost is out of the ground the poeny beds should be forked over and the manure mulch that was placed or, them last fall should be forked or spaded in, but let this be done by a careful man, or at least not by help that knows nothing about thrs work. The young growths start very early and are very tender, so it is best not to fork too close to the crowns, but loosen up all the soil around the plants. It is also well to leave the stems covered as deep as they have been all winter, for a sharp frost may injure a stem that has. been protected through the severe winter and then subjected to sharp cold. But the loosening of the soil to good depth will conserve the moisture and allow the air to get into the soil. If the plants were not mulched with manure in the fall, it is well to spread some old manure, not fresh, on the beds be- fore spading and fork it in. Al- though the fall is the best time to transplant peonies, yet if not done and it is desired or necessary to move them, they can be transplanted early in the spring, but this must be done before the growths are above the sur- face of the ground and as much soil left .about the roots as possible. These plants make their young roots in the fall, and if any attempt is made to shake the soil off, the roots will be broken doing +his. Divisions must therefore be carefully made, so as to disturb the roots as little as possible. The dry roots that are purchased at this time are much better planted in pots or boxes until the roots are form- ed in the soil and later transplanted to the ground. It cannot be excected that plants of this kind will produce any flowers this year, for it will only be possible to get them eitiblished in their new location the first season. Haste Makes Waste. Reports from Ohio that millions of tons of coal are on fire on lake port docks from spontaneous combustion in- dicates we are reaping one of the fruits of war hurry. An industrial coal ex- pert explains that during the war everything was coal, the good, bad, and worse, and as such was dumped in- discriminately at lake ports. In this way much coal with high sulphur con- tent was dumped in big piles. Action of water on the sulphur in the coal piles forms crude sulphuric acid. Tliis. in turn, generates heat and causes com- bustion. Water, except in great quan- tity, is useless in fighting coal fires. Going to the heart with a steam shovel alone settles the question. IjAN.stno, Mlcn.-—The business of the Alph:i. Floral Co. has been purchased by G B. Smith. He has taken his brother into partnership, and will con- duct the estalilishment imder the name of the Smith Floral Co. THE RETAIL TRADE Conducted by Robt. Klft, Phlla., Pa. Next Week in the Flower Shop. The coming week sees the culmina- tion of all the hard preparatory work that has been going on for the past two months, to get the shop and stock in or- der for the busiest period of the year. It is well to at once go over the different departments of the business, iind see ihut nothing has been neglec- ted. If the line of plant stock does not seem to be complete, or there is un- certainty as to the condition of some of the stocks ordered, a quick run around the growers, a last minute call, should be made and these matters straightened out. It is a great help to the grower if the order given is divided, to be delivered on different days of the week; so many roses, lilies, hydrangeas, genistas, spirieas, etc., for Monday, and so on throughout the week. With a copy of this in the store, to be checked up as the various lots arrive, a glance will show at any time, what there is in re- serve, and when to expect it. The man is in luck who can secure an empty shop close by, or in the same block, to which reserve stocks may be delivered and carried later to the store. This avoids the confusion of wagon or truck loads of stock being de- livered when there are crowds of c\is- tomers about, who are apt to wait and see it arranged, so as to have a bet- ter selection. This annex can also be used for deliveries, the plants as sold being placed in sections marked off for the days to'be delivered, and later for segregating into up and down town and east and west side routes. Be sure to have a good stock of pot saucers, either clay or fibre, for all sized pots or tubs. They are very es- sential to the prolonged life of the plants in the house. Do not forget to attach- watering directions or cards to each plant; they cost but a trifJe, and carry the firm name into the houses of many lovers of flowers. This publicity feature should be made the most of, as these cards will be allowed to remain on the plant, and are likely to be no- ticed by many visitors. If for any reason the stock of made up plant baskets has not been ar- ranged, a day can yet be given to this work to good advantage. It is much better to do this at the greenhouse on Sunday, or even as late as Monday, than at the store on the busy rush days and nights later in the week. There is not much demand for these before Wednesday or Thursday, and then com- ing fresh and bright from the green- house, they are much more salable than the hurriedly filled baskets of the night before. The time of the expert hands is then free to do otlier impor- tant work. The regulation of the work hours, so that all shall get a reasonable amount of sleep is absolutely necessary; forty- eight hours continuously at it, is not impossible, or even longer, but it is now conceeded that such long rush periods do not pay, no matter how much the necessity appears to require it. The man, refreshed by a few hours' sleep in bed (not crouched up in a chair or under the counter in a draughty store or basement), will be able to work faster and much more effectively than the man without rest. In many stores, the entire force is taken to a hotel on Thursday and Fri- day nights, and after breakfast, are back on the job at 6 a. m., a force full of new life and energy. It is worth while to speak again of the neat appearance of the store and keeping the various plant stocks in good condition at all times. Keeping each variety in blocks together is a great time saver and helps in their sale. The baby ramblers, the Tau- sendschon, Dorothy Perkins and the pot tea roses, will give good color effects with each kind arranged to- gether. The blue hydrangeas, the pinks, spiraeas, azaleas, etc., will all make a better showing if displayed in sections, than if scattered throughout the store stock. When spaces appear, plants should be drawn closer together, so that the block looks complete. The featuring or decoration of all choice stock sliotild not be neglected; a few pussy willow sprays, a garden figure or bird stick, and a bow of chiffon, will attract attention and often be the means of selling something that has stood for quite a long time. When, late on Saturday, there ap- pears to be a few choice items of stock

 

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DAISY (BELLIS) PAN FOR EASTER.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_18_1

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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2\2 The Weekly Florists' Review* JUXE 14. 1006. and sizes, permit of frequent rearrange- ment of the store. The lighting is from covered incandescents in the ceiling. At the left, as shown in the view from the street, the entrance being in the center of the picture of the interior of the store, is a conservatory, without which any retail florist suffers more or less handicap, according to the character of the business he undertakes to do. In this case the conservatory is 25x52 feet, set back eight feet from the build- ing line and one of the most attractive architectural features of the place. The house ordinarily shelters the large palms needed for decorations, much of this class of work being done, but at Christ- mas and Easter it is invaluable for han- dling the business in flowering plants. The Workrooms. At the right at the rear of the sales- room is the oflBee, a handsomely fur- nished room in which the accounts are handled, with wide mahogany roll-top desk for the proprietor, a big safe, filing cases and a brass railing behind which sits the cashier, A rear door leads to the room where orders are put up. At the left of the office is the cut flower case, which is iced from the rear, and then comes the telephone room for cus- tomers. Most of the store talk is done In the middle of the room is the zinc- covered table, with drawers beneath for wire, thread, tinfoil, toothpicks, etc., a handy place for everything, and every- thing in its place. On a low shelf under the table are made-up boxes ready for use. The stock of boxes is in the cab- inet at the left, with the crepe paper, Porto Eican matting and similar arti- cles. Another cabinet holds vases. Near the door to the flower case is an iron pan for hardy cut ferns. The order clips, twine, tags, wrapping paper, etc., are shown in the picture. The sphag- num moss, wire frames and similar ar- ticles are in the basement, 30x60, cool enough to serve for storage of cut flowers and often used for holding back lilies, etc. A sink at the rear of the workroom affords a convenient place to ' procure and dispose of water. Counters supply places for packages prepared for delivery. Not an unnecessary step need be taken. Perfect order and absolute cleanliness are the rules. There is nothing extrava- gant, but it is hard to see how another dollar might have been expended and a hundred cents' worth realized. A neat gold sign over the door has been added since the photograph was taken, as it seemed to be the one omission. Neat window displays always are the

 

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John T. Mttir. on a phone in the office. Between the telephone room and the cut flower case is a passage to the workroom, from which access is had to the lavatories. The workroom, as shown in the pic- ture, is about the handiest place possi- ble to imagine. There are four en- trances, from the area in the rear, from the conservatory, from the store and from the office. Numerous windows afford good light. rule. A May window was composed of a high bank of marguerites in pots, at the base of which was a slope of Bos- ton ferns interspersed with a few S. A. Nutt geraniums, the bright trusses of which were very effective among the green. Mr. Muir says it was really surpris- ing how many marguerites were sold as the result of that inexpensive window display, the plants being of his own growing. A Bit of History. The Muir establishment is the second oldest in Chicago, the business having been founded in 1865, by Samuel Muir, himself the son of a Scotch gardener. The first location was at Thirty-third street and South Park avenue, then called Kankakee avenue. Greenhouses and a residence occupied this site, then well outside the city, and here John T. Muir was born, IWarch 26, 1869. In the early days, Samuel Muir had a retaU store at 121 Lake street, being burned out in the big fire of 1871, The store was re-established on Congress street, between Michigan and Wabash, where the Auditorium now stands, the Inter Ocean building then occupying the cor- ner of "Wabash and Congress. This stand also was destroyed by fire. The next location was on Wabash, but subsequent- ly the store was removed to 2205 Mich- igan. In the meantime the South Park avenue property had been sold and the greenhouses located at Fifty-fifth and Center. The store at 2205 Michigan was sold to J. T. Anthony, who con- ducted it a number of years in connec- tion with greenhouses at Thirty-fourth and Prairie. It was in 1883 that Samuel Muir lo- cated at 3530 Michigan avenue, within a few blocks of his first stand. Here he continued until the day of his death, January 12, 1895. In the fololwing year the son, John T., took charge of the estate. The old place on Michigan avenue is still operated, and is doing a steadily icreasing trade in spite of the natural withdarwal of patronage by those living nearer the new and more attractive store. It is a circumstance which speaks well for the general proa* perity of the retail trade in Chicago. It is worthy of note that every move of the Muirs, who have until now occu- pied leased stores, was in a southerly direction in direct line with the growth of that section of the city, which now stretches miles beyond the new location, of itself nearly two miles south of the site on the outskirts chosen forty years ago. The greenhouses have never been used for the extensive production of cut flowers, but rather for bedding stock and other plants for retail sales. There was a time when Muir sold 4-inch gera- niums at $2.50 and even $3 a dozen, and it didn't cost as much then as now to grow them, but nowadays so many more are sold that at less than half the price the profits amount to a greater sum. Mr. Muir is devoting his whole energies to the business and finds it a consider- able task to conduct both places. He figures on eventually taking one of the offers he frequently receives for the old store and greenhouses, and concentrating his business at Forty-seventh street, where there is, or might easily be made, all that a man need ask for in the retail florists' line. SPRINKLING CUT FLOWERS. Is it best to sprinkle flowers for ship- ping, or funeral designs, with water be- fore leaving the store? Or is it a wiser plan to omit it? G. F, C. This question cannot be answered too dogmatically. It is a matter of expe- rience and judgment. For instance, if your design contained camellias, garden- ias, or orchids it would be unwise to sprinkle them, especially heavily. Neither do carnations or sweet peas relish a sprinkling. Eoses are refreshed and re-

  

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Nice colours refreshing the grey day.

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_15_2

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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Mcntton The ReTlexr when yon write. Florists' Qab. Although the Easter preparatory rush kept some away from the meeting of the Gardeners' and Florists' Club on April 18, there was, neverthehss, a first-class attendance. Although there was no reg- ular essayist, much business was trans- acted. Several new members were elect- ed. It was announced that a field day would be held at the pot manufactory ol A. H. Hews & Co., Cambridge, on April 29. An interesting discussion took place on the following question: "In view of the rapid deterioration of roses, carna- tions and other florists' flowers, by prop- agation from plants grown under forced conditions, would it not be well to con- sider the matter of procuring stock for forcing from plants grown under natural conditions, such as would be obtained further south, where the climate would permit open ground culture all the year around? It would saem that many varie- ties, valuable to.the traue, are too soon rendered useless and that hybridization, too, is adversely affected by the above cause and that a remedy should be found.'' It was decided to hold a picnic about June 20, ladies to be included. The en- tertainment committee reported a bal- ance of over $100 after paying all ex- penses in connection with the late rose convention banquet. Various Notes. "Williams & Willard, at the Taunton Greenhouses, have a thousand pots of longiflorum liliss in prime condition for Easter, also a fine lot of spiraeas, bulb- ous stock, genistas and other plants. Farquhar & Co. have imported a quan- tity of standard H. P. roses worked on rugosa stock, which they think will be adapted better for the New England cli- mate than any tried heretofors. H. M. Eobinson & Co. are doing a heavy business in southern smilax and wreathing for Easter. Their dagger and other ferns are now of fine quality. Killarney rose seems likely to be grown largely outdoors in this section for bedding purposes this season. Its popularity is also tsmpting some to try it indoors. Among those who are sending in fine flowering plants to the stores or markets are T>iomas Eoland, W. W. Edgar, A. Leuthy & Co., Farquhar & Co., Mann Bros., E. Sutermeister, B. Washington, Anderson & WiUiams and J. T. Butter- worth. E. N. Peirce & Co.'s immense stock of longiflorum lilies is in grand condition for Easter. The plants are very stocky and show hardly a trace of disease. W. N. C. ST. LOUIS. The Market The past week was another very un- satisfactory one. Business came in spots. Stock is still plentiful and cheap, especially bulbous stock. Jonquils and Narcissus poeticus from the south are a big glut. Every wholesaler is loaded up with them at prices from 25 to 50 cents per hundred. Harrisii, callas, Dutch hya- cinths and tulips are too many for the demand. Roses in all grades are still plentiful, especially in white and pink. Fancy long Beauties are becoming some- what scarce and demand better. Shorts are enough for all. Carnations are also coming in heavi- ly, quality very good. White has the call over the colored stock. The price went up a little on fancy stock. Com- mons are still very cheap, with few buy- ers. Sweet peas sell well. Home-grown lilac is abundant, with slow sales. Smi- lax and other greens are in plenty with some demand. All reports indicate a brisk and satis- factory trade for Easter, also that stock of all kinds will be plentiful and rea- sonable in price. A great many fine plants have already been sold for Easter delivery and we hope to be able to make a good report of the Easter trade in St. Louis. Florists' Club. The club meeting on April 13 was well attended considering the very busy times with the growers. The meeting opened at 2 o'clock with eighteen members pres- ent. President Juengel and Vice-presi- dent Pilcher were absent and ex-Presi- dent Beneke opened the meeting. The building and show committees reported progress. Then Chairman Koenig, of the committee on constitution, read the different sections, which were adopted after a discussion which occupied two hours. Applications for membership were received from C. H. Foreman, of Louis- iana, Mo.; H. F. W. Aue, of St. Louis, both growers, and George Angermueller, wholesale florist. It was decided that the eighteenth anniversary of the club will take place in September and the trustees were in- structed to prepare an entertainment at which the members and their families (;an take part. The regular September meeting will take place at H. Weber & Sons, as per invitation. The next meeting will take place Thursday afternoon, May 11. Various Notes. Edwin Loydt opened his floral estab- lishment on April 13, at 918 North Kings highway, with music and refresh- ments, which drew quite a gathering of people to that neighborhood during the day. Mrs. Quinn, wife of the late Pat Quinn, has advertised her place for sale. Henry Berning has recovered from his recent illness and is again attending to business. Carl Beyer is out again and looks none the worse from his ten days' confine- ment. Prof. Trelease, of the Missouri Botan- ic Gardens, has returned from his trip to Mexico, and is back at his post look- ing the picture of health. Mayor Wells was inaugurated to his second term of oflSce on Tuesday of last week. The council chamber was adorned with large bunches of American Beauties and a fine decoration of plants. Other officers also received a number of fine floral designs from friends. The Plant and Cut Flower Growers' Association met in Louisiana Hall April 19. ^ Wm. Bouche, landscape gardener for the Park View Eealty Co., of Richmond Heights, reports that he will draw plana for Judge Laughlin's place in the coun- try. No expense will be spared to make these the finest grounds around St. Louis. The Engelmann Botanical Club held a field meeting at Allentown, Mo., on Saturday. A special car left Tower Grove station early in the morning filled with young botanists. Prof. H. C. Irishj of the Missouri Botanic Gardens, was in charge. John Burke and family left for Cali- fornia last week to spend the summer.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_47_4

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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Mabch 8, 1921 The Florists^ Review 111 ROSES The Spring Cut is now on. Fine Russell, Columbia, Ophelia and Hadley at much lower prices. VIOLETS Are now at their best. We have an ample supply. SPRING FLOWERS Of all kinds are plentiful. DARWIN TULIPS and SPANISH IRIS We have the largest supply in this locality. Ready about March 15. Best stock, skillfully packed, at the right prices. J. A. AXELL, !!!!!!! San Francisco, Cal. ]Ve Close Sundays Wholesale Commission 463 BUSH STREET

 

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Oor Winter Orchid- Flowering Sweet Peas are flow ^own by over 8000 commercial flo- rists. Tbev have noeaual. Send for list. Anton C. Zvolanek & Sons, ^^^^^l?*"' Mention Th* Bcrlcw when yon write. Tliese mats were especially imported for the Easter trade and are in delicate spring colors, including pink, red, green and yellow in various shades. Some also are white. J. Capurro, manager of the MacRoric- McLaren Co., states that Sunday closing has caused Monday morning to be most strenuous. Last Monday he was almost swamped with funeral decorations, but the staff, refreshed by a day's rest, worked zealously and completed the orders on time. Podesta & Baldocchi, in addition to table decorations, have had a run on corsage bouquets. Washington's birth- day brought a large order for them from the University of California. The California Floral Co. was busy with the bouquets for two weddings, all being in white roses and lilies of the valley. Avansino Bros, have been partici- pating in the recent rush of funeral Heather out of Thumb Pots Erica Melanthera, $15.00 per 100; $125.00 per 1000 SPECIAL PRICES ON LARGE QUANTITIES We have also the following varieties to offer out of thumb pots, interested, write for quotations. If Erica Arborea Erica Blanda Erica Charlesyana Erica Codonodes Veitchii Erica Felix Faure Erica Gracilis Pyramidalis Erica President Carnot Erica Wilmoreana Erica Erica King Edward Erica Mediterranea Erica Mediterranea Hybrida Erica Menzeisii Erica Persoluta Alba Erica Persoluta Rosea Erica Reg^erminans Ovata Erica Vagans Vagans Alba FOR MAY DELIVERY Begfonia Glory of Cincinnati Begronia Agatha Strong young plants, $"25.00 per ICO HacRorie-NcLaren Co., 141 Powell St., San Francisco work, one large pall being composed of orchids and lilies of the valley. Milton Avansino is the proud father of a baby boy. Frank D. Pelicano, of Pelicano, Eossi & Co., is recovering from a recent ill- ness, but is still confined to his home. Fred Bertrand, of the Palace Hotel Flower Shopj decorated the hotel tables on Olive day, using sprays of olive leaves with green olives on the stem. As a result of increasing business, the Palace Flower Shop is about to be re- modeled and enlarged. Mrs. Darbee reports a large local, as well as eastern demand for acacias and other flowering sprays. Many tourists are now flocking to San

  

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Title: Cranberries; : the national cranberry magazine

Identifier: cranberriesnatio7476port

Year: 1936 (1930s)

Authors:

Subjects: Cranberries

Publisher: Portland, CT [etc. ] : Taylor Pub. Co. [etc. ]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

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Cranberry Glazed Lamb Leads the Easter Parade for Fine Dining Easter heralds the sweetness of spring, and brings with it a hope for new life that is eloquently seen in the beauty of the delicate blossoms and greenery that surrounds us once again. Lamb is a favorite choice for an Easter Sunday celebration dinner, and a most elegant and special way to serve lamb is ''Cranberry Glazed Crown of Lamb. " This dish is not only delectable, but it is a magnificent sight to set before your family and guests. The fine flavoring of lamb is enhanced by a piquant glaze created with a mixture of cranberry apple drink, jellied cranberry sauce, mint leaves, and lemon. The center of the lamb is stuffed with a tasteful dressing combining brown rice, onion, celery, tomatoes, cranberry-orange relish and seasonings. When the lamb is placed on a platter, it can be colorfully surrounded by mushrooms, carrots, asparagus, and broccoli. As a special Easter treat to be served as an hors d'ouevre, consider preparing "Berry Pink Marbleized Eggs" with a pleasing spicy "Cran Dip." These colorful eggs are easy to make by boiling them in a liquid mix of cranberry juice cocktail and tea. Not just for decoration, these edible eggs are particularly delicious when dipped into a mixture of jellied cranberry sauce, chopped onion, sour cream and minced celery. For a special drink on Easter day to be served as an aperitif or to toast along with your lamb, "Cranapple Rosy Vino" is a refreshing and tasteful treasure. It combines jellied cranberry sauce, cranberry apple drink, ginger ale, and a red or rose wine. Serve your drink in wine glasses with or without ice, or if you wish to make a large quantity double the ingredients for a punch bowl, pitchers or pour into large carafes. BERRY PINK MARBLEIZED EGGS 12 eggs Cranberry cups 1 tea bag (Makes 12) juice cocktail, about 3 Cover eggs with water in a sauce- pan. Simmer gently for 10 minutes. Let eggs cool in water. Drain eggs and tap shells on a hard surface until shells are crazed and cracked all over. Do not remove shells. Replace eggs in saucepan and cover with cranberry juice. Add tea bag. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove tea bag. Add 1 tablespoon salt and chill eggs in juice. Drain eggs and rinse with cold water. Remove shells. Juice will have penetrated cracks and colored eggs underneath. Egg will have a marbleized appearance. Serve garnished with fresh young spinach leaves. Serve with a spicy "Cran Dip." 18 CRAN DIP (Makes 2 cups) 1 cup jellied cranberry sauce 1 small onion, chopped 1 cup (1/2 pint) sour cream 1/4 cup minced celery Mash sauce until smooth. Stir in remaining ingredients. Spoon mix- ture into individual small bowls so each person can have his own bowl of dip.

 

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CRANBERRY GLAZED CROW OF LAMB (Serves 8) 1 crown roast of lamb, about 6 pounds Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 cup chopped celery 2 tomatoes, chopped 1 cup raw brown rice, cooked a drained Ground lamb trimmings 1 cup cranberry-orange relish Glaze: 1 cup cranberry apple drink 1 cup jellied cranberry sauce 1 tablespoon dried mint leaves Juice of 1 lemon (about 3 tab spoons) Cooked vegetables-sauteed halv* large mushrooms, baby wh< carrots, asparagus spears, brc coli spears (Wisconsin-Michigan Growers; ALUMINUM HEADGATES FABRICATED TO YOUR SPECIFICATIONS HAND WHEEL OPERATED GATES ALUMINUM CORRUGATED PIPE INTERNATIONAL POWER UNITS INTERNATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS WARNER & SWASEY EXCAVATORS WALDON LOADERS AND USED EQUIPMENT Milwaukee, Wi« 414-461-5440 Eau Claue, Wis 715-835-5157 Madison, Wis. 608-222-415 1 tscanaba. Mich. 906-786-6920 Green Bay. Wis. 414-435-6676 Iron wood. Mi 906-9 32-02 2I II. INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw28amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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1904. The American Florist. 169 THE RETAIL TRADE A Violet Vase. The illustration herewith shows a pretty little vase of bisque ware, which has been one of Bayersdorfer & Compa- ny's special novelties this season, and has proved a ready seller. The little fellow's robe is violet and gold and the cornu- copias white. It makes a very appro- priate and serviceable holder for violets, primroses or other small flowers. Novel Dinner Decorations. I have seen several fine dinner decora tions the last few weeks. There seems to be a general tendency for customers to use their own vases and silverware for these occasions. At a dinner dance for a large party a plateau five feet across was used. This was filled with Adiantvim Farleyense in pots with a superb silver plate in the center, with one large plant of K. Farleyense. The flowers used were cattleyas and L;Elia anceps. This com- bination was also used on the table cloth. Small tables were furnished for the refresh- ments after the dance, each one being decorated with Liberty roses and Cypri- pedium insigne, arranged in silver cups won by famous horses on the race track or at the horse show. On another similar occasion a center piece of white lilac and giant mignonette was used, a large fern dish being utilized instead of the usual basket, the handsome silver recepticle showing out here and there through the flowers. Asparagus Sprengeri and white sweet peas made the finishing touches, giving a white and green eflect of simple elegance. At another dinner loving cups abounded. These were surrounded by 12inch wreaths of pink carnations and Adian- tum cnneatum, thecups being left empty. The following arrangement was also very effective. In this case vases of hammered copper were used. These were filled with Narsissus Golden Spur, large bows of yellow ribbon being used to finish the effect. Spring flowers are now here in great abundance and are being called for exten- sively for table work. English wall flowers and the orange colored tulips make a beautiful combination for a luncheon. Gold cords and tassels are something new for violets and are espe- cially good tied in with violet ribbon. The Artist. Cbicago. The Lenten season and a decided mod- eration in the weather the latter part of last week made it possible for a large accumulation of stock to find its way into the market. All stock hung fire for a few days and prices took a downward step. The market at the present time is not worthy the name of active. All deal- ers say that the week is one of the poor- est first Lenten weeks in their experience. Roses are coming in in gradually increas- ing quantities, but the calls for them are strong enough to keep well ahead of the receipts. The better grade of roses find no difficulty in passing out of the whole- salers' hands. Prices are low enough to induce the medium grade buyers to order the best. Good Beauty, while not as scarce as formerly, are yet far from plen- tiful. Carnations are in admirable sup- ply and they are moving fairly well. A slight decrease in carnation prices is noted in general with allother lines of cut flower trade. Lilies are being sent in in greatly improved quality. The indica- tions point to a fine supply of both callas and Harrisii for Easter. Bulbous stock continues to be long on quantity. Violets and valley are also inclined to hang fire. Spasmodic rallies in the shipping trade make things interesting for the whole- salers, but this week's business may be described as very quiet, particularly so with the local retail men. Gardeners and florists employed by the park boards and by the county commis- sioners threaten to issue an order for a general strike. The men are aggrieved at the refusal of the county and state officials to grant their demands for an increase in wages. They are particularly incensed at the west park commissioners, as the pay of the park policeman recently was increased. At present the gardeners and florists are receiving $60 a month. They believe that they should be paid $75 a month and their demand is indorsed by the Chicago Federation of

 

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A Unique Violet Vase. Labor. There are only forty-one gar- deners likely to be involved in the strike. Of these twenty are at work in the west park system, nine in Lincoln park, ten in the south parks and two at the county institutions at Dunning. About forty members of the Florists' club with their wives and ladies enjoyed a highly entertaining bowling carnival and turkey supper at McRill's alleys on Michigan avenue, on the evening of Feb- ruary 20. The hosts of the evening were the members of the Roseland Bowling Club and they took care of their guests in royal fashion. The annual convention of the Carna- tion Society of America is but a few days distant. Detroit will be the Mecca of all carnation lovers on March 2 and 3. The Chicago contingent promises to be larger than the delegations heretofore sent to this occasion. Many will leave for the Michigan city on Tuesday afternoon, March 1. George Ball, formerly with Emil Buett- ner and lately foreman of John Brod's place, has taken a three years' lease of the greenhouse of the Harms Park Floral Company. The range consists of six houses, aggregating 12,000 feet of glass. They will be devoted to carnation grow- ing- The splendid rose display shown by Peter Reinberg at the last exhibition of the Florists' Club was sold to the Cc n- sumers' Company immediately after the exhibition. The flowers were shown in the company's windows several days. Johnson & Swan, whose store is located at Forty-seventh street and Lake avenue, incurred a loss of $1,000 on the night of February 23, by smoke and fire in a large flat building adjoining. John Pierson, who has had charge of the George Wittbold Company's store in the Growers' Market, has taken charge of that Company's North Clark Street store. Bassett & Washburn are grafting 100,- 000 roses on manetti. They have so far potted up 35,000 and have not lost one per cent, a most phenomenal record. Chas. McKellar reports a brisk activity in the supply business. He has been handling large quantities of fancy orchids which seem popular sale. E. F. Winterson Company this week received a heavy shipment of good fancy ferns, an item which just at this time appears rather scarce. Adolph Thomann, of Rochester, N. Y., formerly in the employ of the Wm. Roethke Floral Company, is now a resi- dent of Chicago. Peter Reinberg this week shipped a large order of his new Uncle John rose to New York to be used for a large dinner decoration Sweet peas of the Al class are being shipped to E. C. Amling from New Cas- tle, Ind. Poehlniann Brothers Company is cut- ting a remarkably fine lot of Harrisii lilies. L. Coats worth was a business visitor in New Castle, Ind., this week. F. F. Benthey was slightly indisposed the fore part of the week. Bridesmaid roses are seen in fine quality at Weiland & Risch's. Visitors this week and last were Wm. Murphy and Thos. Windram, of Cincin- nati, O ; J. A. Evans, of Richmond, Ind.; H. Weezenaar, representing the De Nijs Brothers, Hillegom, Holland; B. Eschner, of Philadelphia; Mr. Greenlaw, of N. F. McCarthy & Company, Boston; Herm C. Kroseberg, with Wm. Edlefsen, Mil- waukee, Wis. New York. The cut flower market is not materially different from what it was last week, excepting in the case of roses, which are coming rapidly into heavier crop and have taken a considerable drop in value in consequence. Carnations are also growing more plentiful, but are selling better as a rule. Violet receipts are very heavy, but there has been more or less temperate weather and they are disposed of in the street in large quantities, much to the relief of the wholesale market. W. A. Kennedy, of Milwaukee, Wis., is here for a two weeks' stay. Mr. Ken- nedy came to attend the funeral of his father, which occurred last week at New Brunswick, N. J. He is looking over the city in company with bis brother, L. Kennedy, of Yonkers, N. Y., who is gar- dener to Leake & Watts. Gustave C. C. Schrader, of Elmhurst, L. I., who makes a specialty of smilax, asparagus and adiantums, is cutting some extra heavy smilax, for which he gets $3 per dozen. Frank Millang and Bonijot Brothers are his sales agents.

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw34amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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12 The American Florist. Jan. 21, at $3 per 100.. A few good Aristocrats and Afterglow have attracted much at- tention, the latter, having shown up es- pecially well. Lawson, more plentiful than any other colored variety and a good seller, is closely followed by Mrs. Patten, Fenn, Nelson Fisher, Pink Pat- ten, Helen Goddard and Manley. Vio- lets, over abundant in the middle of the week, shortened towards the end. They sell at $5 and $7.50 per 1,000, with plenty of very good ones at the former price. Excellent Golden Spur jonquils, being brought in in quantity, sell very well at $6 per 100. Tulips, mostly pink, are just beginning to move, bringing $3 per 100. Quantities of freesia are handled by nu- merous growers; the general average is not up to the standard of former years. It is a difficult seller except to a certain class of purchasers who realize the beautiful characteristics of this fragrant flower. Easter lilies are dragging; quantities sell at $8 per 100. NOTES. At the meeting of the Gardeners' and Florists'. Club January 16, the treasurer reported a balance on hand of $241.52. On exhibition were varieties of the new- est carnations, Peter Fisher's Evangeline, and Beacon, and M. A. Patten's Pink Patten attracting most attention. The Beacon, a red seedling, and Pink Patten were awarded certificates of superior merit. Applications for sixteen new memberships were accepted. Welch Brothers are handling an enor- mous amount of first-class lily of the valley. The demand for this flower is larger than ever. Since Christmas there has been a very unusual sale. The Central Greenhouses, West Rox- bury, are dealing in cyclamen of differ- ent colors, and are also cutting their first freesia, with which they had great suc- cess last year. W. H. Elliott, Brighton, has recently been cutting excellent American Beauty roses. Many flowers are larger than often seen on roses of twice the length of stem. Leslie Fellows, Hyde Park, has con- tracted for the building of four houses, Lord and Burnham style. He expects to start on a business trip to Panama this week. William Sim, Lynn, is again cutting an abundance of extra good pink and white peas, the best he has produced this sea-, son. A. A. Reed, Whitman, is just now cut- ting a quantity of excellent cattleyas for which he finds ready sale. H. A. Stevens & Company, Dedham, are meeting with their usually wonderful success with mushrooms. The Willow Hill Greenhouses are now devoting most attention to a very fine grade of freesia. John McFarland, N. Easton, is cut- ting now from a new crop of lily of the valley. H. M. Robinson reports a record breaking trade in southern smilax. B. Pblladelpbia. STOCK scarce; demand GOOD. The feature of the week is the scarcity of American Beauty roses. In spite of the larger area of glass devoted to this variety they jre scarcer than ever for the season. AH the prominent growers appear to have off crops; one dozen specials or at the most two, is about the best they now do for one day's ship- ment. Even this small stock is de- pleted daily. by consignments to other markets to which some of the growers have been sending regularly the entire season. Prices range from $7.50 to $9 per dozen for the best stock, and this is the only grade worth handling, for in the smaller sizes the flowers are very imperfect and almost unsalable. All other varieties of roses are in good de- mand at fair prices. Special Brides- maids and Brides selling for $15. Lib- erty at $15 to $25. Carnations have been somewhat scarcer, the market be- ing entirely bare some days last week. Enchantress moved up a notch or two and sold as high as $6, and other sorts in proportion. There is plenty of bulb- ous stock, tulips now coming in in quantity. The demand is better than last week and more general. NOTES. The opening of S. S. Pennock's new addition was largely attended by all branches of the craft. It was made a gala occasion. There were decorations, music and refreshments. After refresh- ments, George Watson, acting as master of ceremonies, introduced John Westcott, who told of the beginning of the cut flower business in this city, and how it had grown. He con- gratulated Mr. Pennock on his success. Charles Fox spoke in similar vein, predicting that Mr. Pennock's business would soon require another .addition. Robert Kift and Mr. Martin also spoke words of congratulation. The private office occupying the front of the new building, is certainly up to date with its mission furniture and other fixtures. There is now a frontage on Ludlow street of over 100 feet, this with a depth of over fifty feet, opening 5,000 square feet of floor space, not counting the base- ment. Every foot of this room will now be in constant use. In addition to . its space on the first floor the ribbon and supply department now occupies about one-third as much more on the second floor. Twenty-five employees are on the payroll at all seasons and a largely aug- mented force at holiday seasons. A cold storage plant is an advantage of this perhaps the largest and most up to date establishment of the kind in the country. The business was established in 1887. John Burton has conveyed to Robert A. Craig the dwelling and greenhouses on the plot from Forty-ninth to Fiftieth street, and between Market and Chest- nut streets, for $20,000. The land meas- ures 469 by 500 feet, and the assessed valuation is $52,000. Clarence J. Watson, with S. S. Pen- nock, was married to Miss May V. D. Farnee, Westville, N. J., January 24. Ralph Shrigley, with the same concern, was best man. J. J. Habermehl's Sons had one of the busiest weeks of the season, having the charity, the mid-winter and another large ball on succeeding days. Robert Craig, William P. Craig and George C. Watson are attending the carnation convention in Boston. The William Graham Company has purchased and succeeded to the business of the Hugh Graham Company. K. Washington. A BUSY WEEK. Business is satisfactory. There has been a large amount of decorative work; and the exceptionally mild weather of the past week has made shopping so agreeable that the trade in pot plants has had a boom. The deaths of several men prominent in army, navy and civil circles made orders for a large number of expensive designs. American Beauty and Bridesmaid roses

 

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CARNATION ROBERT CRAIG. J. D. Thompson and C. W. Ward.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_22_2

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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OCTOBBB 8, 1008. The Weekly Florists^ Review^ 21 CH RYSANTH EMUMS WHITE, YELLOW, PINK. Very Fine Crop. Price per Dozen, $2.00 to $3.00. BEAUTIES Far dos. Extra long !ltenis • $3.00 Stems 24 incites 2.00 " 18 « 1.50 Per dos. Stems 15 inches iong $1.25 " 12 « « l.OO Good stock in shorter lengths. ROSES Killarne^, Kaiserin, Carnot and Richmond per loo Select $8.00 Long 6.00 Medium $4.00 to 5.00 Short ' 3.00 BRIDE, MAID an4 PKRLE per lOO . Long $6.00 to $8.00 Medium 4.00 to 5.00 Short 3.00 Shorter lengths in lots of 500 $20.00 per 1000 FANCY CARNATIONS, red, white and pink, long stems, good flowers, per 100, $3.00 to $4.00. Complete stock of all Greens. laiy of the Valley, per 100, $3.00 to $4.00. Easter Lilies, per 100, $16.00. Buy Your Flowers Direct of the Grower Bassett & Washburn GBEENHOUSES, ^'^^: nx. Office and Store, 76 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO Mention The Review when you write. will be gala night, with special music; third night, announcements of garden and window-box prizes; fourth night, St. Louis night. The show should this year prove a financial success. J. J. B. DETROIT. The Market Just before the recent spell of cool, dark weather struck Detroit, stock was quite plentiful, but not so now; all kinds of flowers are scarce. The frost last week finished what asters were left. Then, with the advent of more seasonable weather, came an increased demand. Add to this a shortening up of the supply of indoor stock, and you have the answer. Few mums have been seen so far, but a few more days of sunshine will bring them out in large quantities. Carnations are improving slowly; the stems are get- ting longer, but they seem weaker,, for the size of the flowers has also increased somewhat. Probably the first southern smilax han- dled here this season was used by Breit- meyer's at a wedding decoration Monday, Oetober 5. Variotii Notes. Asman & Dunn are at present cutting some fine Harrisii lilies. A Brigji);-Mayor club ha.«^ been prg^- ized h^re,qthe purpose of ,,wMc,^, is./tf further the interests of Philipjpirisitni.ejier for mayor. Most of the florilts^ have al- ready enrolled. Schroeter's staff has been on the jump since fall openings began at the stores. Besides the decorations for Newcomb 's large store, for which over 1,500 Beauties were used this year, in connection with other stuff, several other stores were dec- orated. Robert Rahaley visited the greenhouses of the growers in Greenfield last week. Tom Browne expects to have a fine crop of mums and carnations ready soon. Al- bert Stahelin's mums look unusually promising. Fr^nk Holznagle's place was also visited by Mr. Rahaley. This is one of the model plants in this vicinity. As a carnation, rose and chrysanthemum grower Mr. Holznagle is hard to beat. The Michigan Cut Flower Exchange has had to put on extra help to repack the thousands of ferns being put in cold storage. The Kenneth Anderson Co. reports an exceedingly fine summer trade. While there has not been so much local building, they have increased their business throughout the state. While in Chicago recently the writer had the pleasure of being shown through Wienhoeber's store and greenhouses on Elm street. This is one of the neatest places I ever have ,seen. The most inter- esting part of the place was upstairs over the store. This part of the building was formerly used by Richard Mansfield as his living rooms while in Chicago. Wien- hoeber's now have it fitted out as display rooms for all kinds of baskets, vases, etc., 0^ TyJ)ich they carry a big line. H. S. iiDbnvee, Colo.—The partnership here- tofore existing under the name of the Denver Floral Co., between George Bren- kert, Samuel Wplf, and the late Gordon Wolf, has b^Bn dissQlved. The business will be continued unaer the same name by George Brenkert. NEVYOHK. TheMai^et

 

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Refreshing rains, but not enough; a cold snap, but no frost, and here we are again with delightful Indian sum- mer weather. The outdoor flowers are practically over. Hydrangeas, asters, gladioli and dahlias have passed, and, except goldenrod and autumn leaves, there are no real competitors against the roses, carnations and chrysanthemums. Bpfore the end of the week the chrysan- themum again will be king. Orchids are in a class by themselves, with gar- denias. Roses start the week slowly and prices wabble. Beauties, with the rest of them, have found a lower level. There is an abundance of all varieties, and the com- njon and mildewed stock is almost worth- less. ■ Carnations are doing better and grow- ing piore perfect every day. All the growers are shipping heavily, and the quality is fully up to that of any sea- son at this date. Violets are going begging at $2.50 per thousand for the best. It will be a hard task to boost them to their throne again. Various Notes. Next Monday the Florists' Club will hold its Odpiher meeting. The canna ex- pert, Antome Wintzer, who will lecture, deserves a big audience. Will Riekards will not disappoint the inner man, and there will undoubtedly be some interest- ing exhibits. ,p^ Some fine palm stock from the Bilt- more Nursery, Asheville, was disposed of

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw40amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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130G The American Florist. My 24, Pelargoniums. There is ;i eertaiu lUgree ot i-ipi'iiess or hardness in the growth ot pelar- Koniums tliat is well known to ex- perienced growers as the proper stage lor cuttings back the plants and in- serting the cuttings. Green and soft as they come from the houses after tlowering they are not as good, while on the other hand they must not be dried too much or the cuttings will take longer to root. It is not easy to describe this but the base of the new growth should be a light brown, firm, yet not hard and woody. Although we are aware that many growers do not agree with us on this point we- have always found that pelargoniums root more freely and surely from this class of wood outdoors in the full sun than anywhere else. They should be inserted in flats, labeled and thor- oughly soaked with water and kept wet until rooted. If they are allowed to get dry they will not be satisfac- tory but keep them always wet and practically every cutting will root. The old plants must be kept on the dry side after being cut back and in the full sun and air. They must re- main in the pots until new growth starts when they should be shaken clear of the soil, the strongest roots cut back and repotted into smaller pots. Cyclamens. The time for sowing cyclamen seed will soon be here again and growers should obtain it if not already in stock. Although cyclamen seed is comparatively high priced, nothing is gained by pui-chasing or using a cheaper article for so much depends upon getting good varieties. These are now offered separately and in mixture and a reputable seed house should be chosen for although the cyclamen has been greatly improved of late years there is still a lot of rubbish on the market and it is best to be on the safe side and not waste a season. The old plants saved from last season are now making a fine growth in the frames and those that were shaken out and repotted in small pots will soon be ready to again go into their flowering pots. The young stock too is growing freely and must be encouraged. A shady frame or house with ample air at all times are the conditions for cyclamens now and any plants that are ready for re- potting should have attention. The routine work consists of damping freely between the pots and watering with care at the roots. Keep a close watch for thrips and other insects and give several light fumigations if any appear. Avoid sprinkling the plants overhead much but always maintain a moist atmosphere. THE RETAIL TRADE Sweet Peas In Engrland. These are indeed late; looking round the grounds of R. H. Bath. Ltd., Wis- bech, on July 3, only the first one or two trusses were in bloom. These are well done by this fli-m, a new quarter each year. Owing to the rains more weeds than is usual were to be seen, but the men with the hand hoe were busy. Between each row were cauliflowers, this firm doing a very ex- tensive trade for pickling. The sweet peas are grown between wire netting, no sticks. . S. Any arrangement in which water, and plenty ot it, is used in the win- dow is sure to be attractive these hot days. KlSKi" the store cool and avoid heav- ily scented flowers as much as possible. White and green are the coolest and most refreshing colors. Sprinkling Rotes and Carnations. Ed. American Florist ;— Is it best to sprinkle roses and car- nations in an icebox? AN Old Subscriber. Roses may be sprinkled with advan- tage but never sprinkle carnations. Ctaurcli Wedding Decorations. SEE SUPPLEMENT WITH THIS ISSUE Church weddings provide great scope for ingenuity and taste on the part of the decorator. The noble yet simple style of architecture in many of these sacred structures lends itself readily to decoration by the florist and shows off the fine contour of large palms and similar plants, while smilax or other festooning has a beautiful effect about the arches and pillars if well carried out. There are some flowers that seem to be singularly ap- propriate to church decoration. Among these may be specially noted the Easter lily in its many varieties and the even more lovely Madonna lily, Lilium candidum. For purity and grace nothing in the whole range ot cut flowers can equal the latter, though the eucharis, a flower that is not as much used as formerly, comes very near to it. before commencing. Another point of great importance is to see that, what- ever scheme of decoration is decided upon, the utmost care is taken not to injure the fabric of the church in any way by driving nails or anything else into the walls, pillars or woodwork. Plenty of string, that can easily be hidden when carrying out the work, must be used and wooden rods covered with green are often useful. Flowers may be fastened to these in any de- sired position for use on the edges of platforms, on rails, or in any other similar place, the rods being simply placed In position and secured at either end in a manner most suited to the oc- casion. The decorations will largely depend upon the amount to be spent and may be very elaborate or very simple. In some recent decorations the petals of of Kiillarney roses were strewn from the church door to the improvised platform where the service was con- ducted, prettily dressed flower girls opening the gates to the bride and groom at the end of their floral path. Pulpit, chancel and pew and choir stall ends give opportunities for fine floral effects, bunches of lilies, roses or other flowers often being used wdth ribbon streamers. Pretty effects in the chancel are often worked out with rambler roses when these are in sea- son; when they are not with southern smilax and cut roses. Tall vases of Easter lilies are always imposing and good, smaller ones being used to grace the altar table. In short, there Is room for abundant display of the best of the florist's art in this class of work, and as these interesting occa- sions are now timely, retailers should be out for the work with circulars, by displaying designs and in other ways.

 

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AT THE WASHINGTON AUTOMOBILE PARADE, JULY 6. Winii.r of $50 Lovinj; Cup. by .Marchi' & Co.—Sre Last Issue. Page 1254. Ministers of various denominations have often their own views on the sub- ject ot how their churches should be decorated, and the florist dn all cases will find it to his advantage to ascer- tain whether the incumbent of the church has any objection to any class ot work ordered by his custom- ers. Naturally, the customer will, in most cases, be sure of his ground dn regard to this before giving his order, but the florist should make sure of this Store Pointers. It is all right to have wreath frames mossed firmly so that the flowere do not slip about in them but the risk is usually the other way round; they are made so tight that the stems are broken in getting the flowers in. During the hot weather few choice greens last as well as the beautiful fronds of Nephrolepis Amerpohli and certainly no other is more attractive for use with choice flowers.

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw40amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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igog. The American Florist. 415 Chicag:o Notes. Therp was an unusually large rep- resentation from the trade at the fuueral of Mrs. J. F. Kidwell March 12. Among those present were: Frank Oechslin. W. J. Smythe, J. B. Deamud, W. P. Kyle, John Degnan. L. H. Winterson, John Muir, Geo. Wagner and Geo. Walther. Zech & Mann, are receiving increased shipments of Killarney, Bride, Bridesmaid and Richmond roses. This firm expects to handle a large quantity of vei-y fine lilies for Easter. Joseph Vacha, 2550 Forty-Seventh place, will erect two new greenhouses, «ach 22x]00 feet. The Foley Mfg. Co., will furnish the materia!. C. Ij. Washburn returned last week from West Baden, Ind., entirely recov- •ered from the grip from which he had been suffering. Alex Newett, of the Stuppy Floral Co.. St. Joseph, Mo., was in the city Monday to attend the funeral of his brother. Visitors; C. S. Ford, Philadelphia, Pa.: T. T. Bailey, Manitoba, Que.; P. J. Nohos and wife, Milwaukee, Wis.; T. B. Conmandros. St. Paul, Minn.; C. S. Dwight, Janesville, Wis. Cincinnati. ROSES MORE PLENTIFUL. _ Market conditions have changed some since last report and tea roses are more plentiful. The carnation supply was not <iuite as large as the week previous but the grower will receive better returns as very few blooms were sacrificed. Single violets had a good call the entire week and lilies of all kinds were good prop- erty. Bulbous stock was not so plentiful and fair prices were realized for all that was sold. Green goods of all kinds were in good demand with an ample supply. NOTES. We had a fine attendance at the meet- ing of the Florists' Club Saturday even- ing, with President J. A. Peterson in the chair. Herbert Greensmith and A. C. Heckman, Jr., were elected to member- ship. Reports of S. A. F. matters re- ceived from the different committees were all favorable and showed everything to be in first class shape and matters pro- gressing nicely. A. M. Miller of Vaughan's Seed Store, Chicago, was present and gave the members a nice little talk. J. W. Rodgers submitted the following resolutions on the death of E. V. Hallock which were unanimously adopted by the society: Whereas, The Lord had deemed It expedient fD His AU-wise Providence to call from us our ■brother craftsman. E. V. Hallock, and Whereas, We feel deeply grieved to lose a friend so noble and true, and we are reminded also that by his deatii the horticultural world lias lost one of its most noble and ardent friends, therefore, be it Resolved. That the Cincinnati Florists' So- ciety deeply feel the loss of our friend and t»rother, and extend their heartfelt sympathy to the family of the deceased, and be it further Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be mailed to the family of the deceased, and It also be spread upon the minutes of tlie meet- ing. After ad.iournment C. C. Critchell and Wm. Gardener served lunch, refresh- ments and cigars to which all present did full justice. The executive committee of the S. A. F. then made its appearance, being in charge of E. G. Gillette. Speeches were made by President Valentine, Secretary Rudd, George Asmus and Judge Vesey and a pleasant hour was spent. The executive board of the Florists' Society will meet with the chairmen of the different committees on Saturday evening, March 27, at 8 p. m. Wm. Speck, who suffered a paralytic stroke last month, is, we are glad to hear, improving and we trust he will soon be himself again. Joe Maunder of Newport, Ky., is very busy with plant decorations for spring openings. Visitors: A. M. Miller, Chicago; J. T. Herdegen, Aurora, Ind.; Henry Lod- cler, Hamilton. S. STERLING IRON RESERVOIR VASE8 Original Designs. r~^

 

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Attractively Finished. We alao mantifactnre a complete line of Lawn Furniture, Settees, Chairs, Hitcliing Posts, Etc. We are making a special o9er to dealers. Write for catalog and fall Information. THE STERLING EMERY WHEEL MFG. CO. Manufacturers of General Iron Work, TIFFIN, OHIO, U. S. A. f 1^1 Fluid T THE IDEAL mNTER SPRAY SCALE KILLER&FUNGIGIDE POWERFUL CLEANSER AND INVIGORATOR Mixes Instantly. No Sediment. No clogging. Non-injurious to user COMPARATIVE TEST WILL PROVE ITS MERITS Quart, $1.00; Gallon, $3.00 1 gallon makes 100 gallons. Write for descriptive pamphlet and testimony PR0PS.WJ3X:OOPER, & N EPH E WS 177 ILLINOIS ST. CHICAGO Freight prepaid on direct orders. Mention this paper. NfetiTICIDE

  

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Title: Childs' rare flowers, vegetables, and fruits

Identifier: childsrareflower00john_15

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: John Lewis Childs (Firm); Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Commercial catalogs Seeds; Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs; Seeds Catalogs; Flowers Catalogs; Vegetables Catalogs; Fruit trees Catalogs; John Lewis Childs (Firm); Commercial catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture); Seeds; Flowers; Vegetables; Fruit trees

Publisher: Floral Park, N. Y. : John Lewis Childs

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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122 JOHN LEWIS CHILDS, FLORAL PARK, N. Y, Plants and Seeds of Select New or Recently Introduced WINDOW OR GREENHOUSE PLANTS- ~ i.- „i„^M»5etiPs rvnlv such as are of unusual merit, new, or of recent introduc- In plants we offer comparatively^ of packitlg is tion, and which will be sure to g^anunusual de^ world. We are careful to send such that our Plants carry successfellythro^h the ^ils ^Jf^fg asAa?e sure to give satisfaction-the very best o^^Tnis ^l^^l^^^^l^^^ t0 °ffef thC fineSt plantS °f thC ChiCeSt Varie" ties at a price so low that they are ^JJ^J^."^e°f bright, refreshing, cheery ; winter may rage without Plants are man's natural ^°^S^Pa^^^^l^e ^f^s nature craves plants and flowers. Nothing else Ske^eir^l^ taStCS l0Ve f°r g° la*ge" ^uSafi^ _ , T s&zalea iDdica. Elegant pot plants, much used for Easter decorations. Though attaining a good size, commence to bloom when very small. The flowers are large and very beauti- ful, always much admired, and range from white to deep crimson in color, with all intermediate shades and markings. Easily grown in a window. Our plants are finest new varieties, and are greatly superior to the older sorts- Many of them are very double and the colors of all are greatly im- proved, as well as the flowering qualities. All the plants we send out are blooming size. Simon Mardeur — Large double rose or deep pink. Dr. D. Moore—Lovely rose, with white and violet reflex. Raphael-Immense double white. Deutch Perle —Large double white. Very early. Firefly—Bright soft scarlet Price, 30c. each; s for 75c Tlie 5 for $1,00. DoWqy piume. A new and very robust form of Asparagus Plumosus, the foliage of which is exceedingly fine and downy.. Of all green foliage plants of this sort this new form of Asparagusi s by tar tne grandest and best It is an easily grown pot pla it aiUl tne feathery foliage is unsurpassed for small bouquets. As a pot plant it is highly ornamental. Fine plants, 25c-eacn, 2 for 40c Seed, 20c. per pkt. See cut on page 47.

 

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New Rex Begonias. The=e new varieties of Begonia Eex are of our own origin, and they far excel any that have previously beeu in cultivation. The colors and markings of the leaves are ex- ceedingly varied and rich. Crimson Glow—Magnificent large leaves, center half of which is a rich, metallic crimson, which graduates into a wide zone of light green with lace-like veins, the rim of the leaf having a distinct border of the same metallic crimson as the center. Midnight—Elegant leaves almost black in color, variegated with large pink blotches, with irridescent glow. Fireflush—Immense leaf, silvery colored, bordered dark purplish-green, and with a dark center. The whole leaf flushed with crimson-pink. Storm Cloud—Rich, dark color, a sort of blackish-green with purple iustre, and large, pure silvery spots. Monster—Leaf, 2K feet across. Color, pure silver, veined with dark green. Emperor William -Very light green leaves, overlaid with line crimson. Entirely distinct Mikado—Large silvery gray leaves, bordered maroon biack. with a i.lush-ribbed center flushed crimson. Czar Nicholas—A beautiful stipple of green and silver with a finely flushed center. Alfonso—Silvery green with a dark border filled with con- spicuous silver spots. Exceedingly novel and fine. Edward IV-Deep maroon black with a striking zone of pink and silver spots. Grand. Victor—An oddly colored leaf of a peculiar dark color, with- out variation except that it has the appearance of being regularly and densely specked. toe, each; s for COc; the 11 for $2.00.

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw36amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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igoj. The American Florist. 435 we are proud of your achievements, and with you we enjoy our sojourn amongst those creations of yours, the roses of midwinter, when all plant life outside is dormant. But as I look over this splendid display, my thoughts wander ahead, my vision leaves the narrow enclosure of this room, the hall and your hundreds of acres of greenhouses, and my longing lands me in a fairyland, in God's own paradifee, the home of our queen of flowers, the outdoor rose garden. I want ou to accompany me on this most pleasurable of all pleasure trips, and I want you to start out early. It is June, the month of roses, and truly the month in which I wish we could hold our convention. The sun is ris- ing on a clear sky, and the dew is on flower, leaf, frond and blade. The atmosphere is refreshing and the birds are jubilant in their renewed joy of lite. We enter our garden of well cultivated roses, and what a glorious sight! How beautiful are the plants in their perfection of foliage, their abundance of sweet scented, strong, well built flowers; what a richness and variety of colors and shades, and what a wholesome and refreshing fragrance is in the clear morning air! We here meet the rose at home in her very best form and beauty, in her modest garb and surroundings; and you will all agree with me that your very best creations of forced culture, be they I displayed in the costliest, most luxu- riantly furnished apartment of the millionaire's mansion, surrounded by priceless art treasures and draperies, are outshone in this garden, and that the wealth with which your coveted products are surrounded is an insig- nificant factor compared with this gar- den's draperies and attractive back- grounds of simple but majestic trees, shrubs and vines. The effect of the displays of your creations and products artistically and tastefully arranged with all known arts of decoration is gorgeous, pleasing, fascinating, but the effect of our rose garden in all its sim- plicity is unsurpassingly sublime. I suppose I have made myself clear by this time that I am an enthusiast on outdoor rose culture, without any attempt to belittle your efforts and achievements as indoor growers and decorators. Indoor rose culture has many advantages over outdoor culture, as it has within its reach an unlimited list of varieties and better yet a prac- tically unobstructed field of hybridiza- tion. Yet the list of varieties of all classes of roses available for outdoor culture is large enough to satisfy all reasonable demands; In fact, it is near- ly as much a matter of cleaning out and discarding many that are not worthy of culture, because they are superseded by so many better, as it is to get new varieties. Thanks to the earnest and successful efforts of the modern hybridizers of both America and Europe, the list of real everbloom- ing roses adapted and hardy for out- door culture is increasing from year to year. I refer to the class of hybrid teas. I notice in the last catalogue of Alex. Dickson & Sons, of Newtownards, Ire- land, that out of a list of 82 pedigree seedling roses, 43 are hybrid teas, 21 hybrid perpetuals. nine teas and nine singles. This is but the cream of a numberless list of new seedlings, but many of them, undoubtedly, will prove available for outdoor culture. The hybrid teas are now on comparatively the same epoch of development as were the hybrid perpetuals some 30 years ago, when the firm of Eugene Verdier, of Paris, France, alone offered between 40 and 50 new hybrids of that class every year from 1!>;2-1SS0, and the number introduced since then is legion. The hybrid tea rose will win for itself recognition and preference, as an out- door rose, the more its hardiness be- comes known. It is in reality this class which is entitled to the name per- petual in the proper sense of the word. I think that hybrid remontant is the proper name for what we call now hybrid perpetual; for the word remontant really means what they do, bloom a second time, but not continual- ly during the season, as do Uie hybrid teas, teas and polyanthas. Let us see what we -have today amongst the old standbys and new- comers well adapted for outdoor cult- ure. I do not claim that those I men- tion are the best, for therein we differ according to taste, experience and ob- servation. I simply mention them as varieties with which I have been suc- cessful and which seem to me to merit a place in every rose garden whose climatic condition is congenial to their growth. Every color and shade Is rep- resented. In white and shaded white we have the following hybrid remontants: Frau Karl Druschki, Mabel Morrison, Marchioness of Londonderry, Margaret Dickson, Mavourneen, Perfection des Blanches, Coquette des Blanches and Coquette des Alpes. Hybrid teas: Au- gustine Guinoisseau, Helene Gulllot, Kaiserin Augusta Victoria, Mildred Grant. Marquise Jeanne de la Chataig- neraye, Souv. de Mme. Eugenie Ver- dier and Maman Cochet. In red and its many shades we have

 

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CRIMSON RAMBLER ROSE FOR EASTER. By II. C. Rowc, Cliieago.

  

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Title: Childs' rare flowers, vegetables, and fruits

Identifier: childsrareflower00john_14

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors: John Lewis Childs (Firm); Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Commercial catalogs Seeds; Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs; Seeds Catalogs; Flowers Catalogs; Vegetables Catalogs; Fruit trees Catalogs; John Lewis Childs (Firm); Commercial catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture); Seeds; Flowers; Vegetables; Fruit trees

Publisher: Floral Park, N. Y. : John Lewis Childs

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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SPRING CATALOGUE OF SEEDS, BULBS AND PLANTS FOR 1909. 109 Plants and Seeds of Select New or Recently Introduced WINDOW OR GREENHOUSE PLANTS. In plants we offer comparatively few varieties, only such as are of unusual merit, new, or of recent introduc- tion, and which will be sure to give an unusual degree of pleasure and satisfaction. Our system of packing is such that our Plants carry successfully through the mails to nearly all parts of the world. We are careful to send out only well-rooted, healthy stock, and to offer only such varieties as are sure to give satisfactionâthe very best of their kinds. The enormous quantities which we grow enable us to offer the finest plants of the choicest varie- ties at a price so low that they are within the reach of all. Plants are man's natural home companions ; they are bright, refreshing, cheery ; winter may rage without but inside they make spring perpetual. A refined and generous nature craves plants and flowers. Nothing else can take their place; especially to the care-worn women, whose elevated tastes, and love for refinement go largely unsatisfied, plants and flowers are one of God's richest blessings. s^zalea Ipdica. Elegant pot plants, much used for Easter decorations. Though attaining a good size, commence to bloom when very small. The flowers are large and very beauti- ful, always much admired, and range from white to deep crimson in color, with all intermediate shades and markings, Easily grown in a window. Our plants are finest new varieties, and are greatly superior to the older sorts. Many of them are very double,and the colors of all are greatly im- proved, as well as the flowering qualities. All the plants we send out are of blooming size. NiobeâFine double white, flower large, bush compact. Simon Mardeur â Large double rose or deep pink. Dr. D. MooreâLovely rose, with white and violet reflex. Mad. Paul de Schrey verâE 1 e - gant, large, double red. RaphaelâImmense double white. â Deutch Perle â Large double white. Very early. G. de W. AnneâDouble,rosy-pink flaked white. ChicagoâVery large, double and perfect. Deep crimson clearly bordered white. Mad. VandercruysenâFine rose with large blotch. IllustrisâSemi-double, white and crimson, e double, brick-red, edged white, let. S for 75c. The 13 for $2.15.

 

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NeW Rex gegopias. These new varieties of Begonia Eex are of our own origin, and they far excel any that have previously been in cultivation. The colors and markings of the leaves are ex- ceedingly varied and rich. Crimson GlowâMagnificent large leaves, the center half of which is a rich, metallic crimson, which graduates into a wide zone of light green with lace-like veins, the rim of â¢â he leaf having a distinct border of the same metallic crimson as the center. Midnight-Elegant leaves almost black in color, variegated with large pink blotches, with irridescent glow. Fireflush â Immense leaf, silvery colored, bordered dark purplish-green, and with a dark center. The whole leaf flushed with crimson-pink. Storm CloudâRich, dark color, a sort of blackish-green ' with purple lustre, and large, pure silvery spots. MonsterâLeaf, feet across. Color, pure silver, veined with dark green, Emperor WilliamâVery light green leaves, overlaid with fine crimson. Entirely distinct. MikadoâLarge silvery gray leaves, bordered'maroon black, with a blush-ribbed center flushed crimson. Csar NicholasâA beautiful stipple of green and silver with a finely flushed center. AlfonsoâSilvery green with a dark border filled with con- spicuous silver spots. Exceedingly novel and fine. VictorâAn oddly colored leaf, of a peculiar dark color, with- out variation except that it has the appearance of being regularly and densely specked. 25c. each; 3 for 60c; the 10 for $1.75. Empress of IndiaâFnn FireflyâBright soft scar Price, SOc. each; I

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw39amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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92 The American Florist. Aug. ^5. this season, fine though they undoubtedly are. Far nicer are the great billowy spikes of Hydrangea paniculata, cool looking and exquisite for any class of decoration. The sun has brought them to the purest white and a great bowl of these in one of the principal retail stores this week was a very beautiful sight. Flowering at a time when prac- tically no other shrub is in bloom, hardy and thriving anywhere, this grand shrub is bound to become more popular. The snake root of the prairie (liatris) is one of the offerings this week. Its tall, somewhat stiff looking spikes are very pleasing and its color, a soft rosy pink, is decidedly good. The stems may be cut as long as need be and though a wildling, it is a very useful flower. The popularity of this individual flower goes to show what a demand could bo created for good hardy herbaceous stock for cut- ting, if it was only forthcoming. Even the sunflower, grown on poor soil so that the flowers are small, is fine for decorating, while some of the smaller flowered asters or Slichaelmas daisies now flowering are almost as graceful and pretty as the gypsophila. Gaillar- dias are getting over, so are pansies, and the flowers are getting smaller but there are still some to be had. Perhaps the prettiest flowers of all now, are the water lilies. They are in great variety and the effect of a window well decorated with them is very cool and refreshing these hot days. All colors can now be had. Some of the pale sulphur yellows, the deep reds and pale blues are as yet scarce and there are lovely rare forms of varying shades, but there is quite a large variety in all the best colors and they are certainly very beautiful and effective. The old way of sticking them stiflly in vases or laying them on their sides in trays of water is over. The long stout stems of the newer forms fit them for use in the finest decorations, while some at least are delightfully fragrant. Bermuda Lilies. For some years past a considerable amount of damage has been done to the Bermuda lily industry by our growers here carelessly or iguorantly permitting the different varieties to become mixed together, causing a tremendous loss to the florist who purchases them, for not only is the first cost on a large percentage of the bulbs quite lost, but the loss of house room, the disappointment of both grower and customer, caused by the non- flowei'ing of bulbs sent over as Lilium Harrisii, but which are not, have com- bined to reduce the value of the indus- try here in Bernmda by some SO per cent. Since I have been here I have given the subject very careful consideration, and I feel sure that the florists of Amer- ica will welcome the news that their in- terests are being watched at Bermuda. All know now that L. Harrisii is the only bulb that can be forced into flow- er at any time between November and Easter, and that the value of a batch of Harrisii depends ou the stock beiug pure, and the certain knowledge that they are pure and unmixed is perhaps as valuable. Some two or more of our largest growers, I am glad to say, have for the last few years very carefully weeded out during growth the hybrids and longi- florums and can now guarantee their stock absolutely pure Harrisii; these, of course, sell privately to the large deal- ers. A large number of cases are sold in the open market and the florist who purchases them is entirely in the hands of the packer, for it is very diflicult to distinguish between the different bulbs. The illustrations are from photographs and cannot fail to be of service to the florists of America. Fig. 1, taken early in April, shows the different kinds in their various stages of development, when Harrisii is in full flower. In this picture 1 is a plant of Harrisii, 2 a hybrid sometimes called Doeii, 3, 4 and .5 another hybrid of dwarf growth, while 0 and 7 are L. longiflorum. In Fig. 2 the mature bulbs of these are shown: the heap ticketed 1 is Har- risii ; 2, Doeii; 3. the dwarf hybrid, and 4, lon^-iflorum. 1"he large figures are two typical bulbs from each heap—No. 1, Harrisii; No. 2, dwarf hybrid; No. 3 Doeii ; No. 4, longiflorum. T. J. Harris. Formosa Lilies. A papor read b.v I. Rosnosky, of the Henry P.- Michell Co., PUiladelphia, Pa., at the meetiug ot the Florists' Club of Philadelphia, August 4, lyOS. The Formosa lily was discovered about three years ago by Uhei Suzuki, of Yoko- hama, Japan. Mr. Suzuki, after repeat- ed efforts to bring a lily on the market that could compete in earliness with the Bermuda L. Harrisii, discovered on the island of Formosa a wild lily of the longiflorum type. The bulbs were col- lected and cultivated exactly as they are are on the mainland. The cultivation proved highly successful, and three years ago six cases, in miscellaneous sizes, of the Formosa lily were shipped for the purpose of exiierimenting in the United States. SUCCESS AT ONCE. The experiment x^roved a success, and as the tollowiug year a further consign- ment of 60 cases resulted equally well, the Yokohama house was instructed to plant as many Formosa lilies as pos- sible. The Formosa lily flowers in February in its native island, which is about two mouths earlier than L. Harrisii flowers in Bermuda. By the end of May the bulbs are ready for shipment and ought to reach here in August. Repeated ex- periments have proved the Formosa lily to be strictly free from disease and the bulbs are good for either pot plants or cut flowers. VARIETIES. There are about six different kinds of Formosa lilies, but the flowers are

 

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FIG. 1.—HARRISII LILIES IN VARIOUS STAGES OF DEVELOPEMENT. 1. —I.ilium Harrisii. 2.—L. Doeii. 3, 4, 5.—Dwarf Hybrid. 6, 7.—L. Longillorum.

  

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I hope we have refreshed you with our assortment of 20 refreshing handmade spring wreaths which we have made not so long ago, but now it is time to place those spring wreaths away and start off contemplating of a wonderful door wreath that will suit your Easter decorations.That is why we have ...

 

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_13

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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■'J^ "Jt^f-^^HLW SfWW* !*^-li>-:''!» J*y-!.%'.'.<^A»ArW»JJ,'l'l^"i! 8^0 The Weekly Florists^ Review* Mabch 17, 1004. BUFFALO. The Market. Lent has made some difference to trade the past three weeks and Buffalo being the healthiest city in the world, purest air and purest water and most impure government, business has been rather dull. Still from what we hear of prices ill our largest cities, we have some rea- son to be thankful. Several of our large department stores are decorating for their spring openings this week and that helps some. I have more personal gossip this week than usual. Various Items.. Prof. John F. Cowell took a steamer for another of his West Indian trips February 20. This time Jamaica is the destination. Let us pray that in that island of tropic heat and almost alpine heights he may discover some unknown gem. Wm. Slattery has severed his connec- tions with the firm of Byrne & Slatterv. The new firm may be Byrne Bros. We liope Mr. Slattery will find something worthy of his ability in our city. Joseph Stafflinger, who for several years carried on business on High street, (lied last week of congestion of the brain. He was a young man but very active in business and made decorations his spe- cialty. We have just had a visit from George Fancourt, of Wilkesbarre, Pa., who stopped off for a day on his return from a trip to Spokane, Wash. He has a most favorable opinion of the salubrious cli- mate of that far off state. It rains and snows most frequently in winter, but both are agreeable. The rain is a bath and the snow is warm and refreshing. No frost in the ground. Mr. Fancourt says floriculture is not as advanced in Washington as many other less virtuous industries, but that it will come with set- tled population and refinement. Sorry to say, our popular park super- intendent, Capt. James Braik, has had five weeks of rheumatism and suffered much. It is about over and he will be around as soon as the parks need him. To see this strong man stretched out and read- in er Alex Wallace's charming book, "The Heather in Love, Lyric and Lay," is a most pathetic sight, but while so well employed you feel like going to see him frequently; if reading local politics or the latest wrestling match you would not. There is likely to be all the Easter plants that the trade will need and we look forward with nervous anxiety to what the elements will give us. It would be interesting, but a sad tale, if all the floods and frosts and fires that have visited the florists could be told of this terrible winter. Out of the bitter experience of many may come good and more will in the future be prepared for very extreme conditions of flood and frost. W. S. We are in receipt of the first annual report of the board of park commission- ers of Lowell, Mass. The pamphlet is illustrated with some very handsome half-tones. OwATONNA, Minn.—Thomas E. Cash- man, manager of the Lord Greenhouse Co., and president of the Clinton Falls Nursery Co., has been re-elected mayor of the city of Owatonna. IRON RESERVOIR VASES IRON-FLOWEIWASES Wrm RESERVOIR

 

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OVER 100 DESIGNS and SIZES Ranging In Price from $3 Up D IRON SETTEES WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. Vase Catalogue Vo. 12 HE8E RESERVOIR VASES do not need watering oftener than every ten or fifteen days. Tbe soil remains moist, open and loose. They are very desirable for Ceme- teries or other places where they cannot be frequently watered. Just enouKh water Is drawn up Into tbe soil tbrcuKh the sponge or moss to keep plants in growlnK and healthy condition. Thousands of Reservoir Vases are In use on lawns and cemeteries all over tbe country.

  

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