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We had the kitchen/dining room floor sanded and polyurethaned. We had to remove everything from the kitchen to do that, so it's all in the living room at the moment.

 

The counter top is the same flooring material, so we had that sanded also. That got 8 coats of polyurethane. 1 day between coats. We had to remove the sink to do that, so we decided to get a new sink also. However, we don't currently have a schedule for the new sink.

 

Next step is painting the walls. We've been doing that to the other rooms also, so everything is now out of place. We have 2 chairs we can sit in. The living room is full but we can move through it with care.

 

Not having a functioning kitchen, we have to eat out a lot. Saves work, but costs a lot of time.

refinish and decorate old furniture-

cask for Acrilan pieces

refinish and decorate old furniture

This 'after' Betty is a refinish and restoration of a mannequin from the '70's, but designed to look from a much earlier era. The owner was thrilled with her "new" old look!

Our back door has lovely hinges and we never noticed because they were painted over.

Superior Upholstery & Refinishing in Dublin, Georgia

Great night out shooting with Gav aka sedge808

Shot in Wichita Falls, TX

www.recyclart.org/2016/10/friends-old-dresser-became-new-...

 

Once my husband brought it home, I gave it a light sanding all over. I primed and painted the shell black and added new stain to the front of each drawer. I painted the old hardware and reattached. In one weekend my friend's trash became my new treasure.

 

See original post for more information on the project process.

   

A great idea for an old dresser without drawers. Create a shelving unit to store crafting goodies. From the June 2002

edition of Country Sampler Decorating Ideas.

This is part of the 365 project which is taking one photo a day for one year.

Make sure you press the "L" key for full screen in lightbox mode!

My passion is outdoor art photography with a main concentration dealing with landscapes, sunrises, sunsets, and Mother Nature activity. In each artwork I try to relate a certain feeling or beauty at that precise moment. I also pay attention to many details as I am taking and processing the photo.

Visit the images at the link and I hope you enjoy them as much as I did taking and processing them. You can see my most popular photos at Canon Shooter on Facebook If you have any questions please contact me on FlickrMail. Remember all photography is copyrighted so please respect the Copyright.

 

Grant is also done refinishing our table.

Full custom BBS LM: 3" lips, reverse mount, powdercoated faces, gold bolts, chrome lips, chrome barrels, black/gold centercaps.

Restoring a Cunningham (or any bar aluminum frame) that has seen the worst of the elements involves a two step process.

 

#1 apply Fluid Film, a corrosion/protectant with #8447 or #7447 Scotch Brite pads. In the case of this frame, this step was repeated 3 times. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after each application.

 

#2 apply a liquid wax, Nu-Finish in this case, with a #7445 Scotch Brite Pad. This further protects the frame. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after the wax is on for a bit.

Restoring a Cunningham (or any bar aluminum frame) that has seen the worst of the elements involves a two step process.

 

#1 apply Fluid Film, a corrosion/protectant with #8447 or #7447 Scotch Brite pads. In the case of this frame, this step was repeated 3 times. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after each application.

 

#2 apply a liquid wax, Nu-Finish in this case, with a #7445 Scotch Brite Pad. This further protects the frame. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after the wax is on for a bit.

Vintage Japanese steel frame bike (Takara) that I stripped to the bare metal. Spent several hours inside taking about 95% of the paint and primer off with a hand scraper and some biodegradable removers, then got the rest off outside with some nasty chemical stuff (wore thick gloves, mask, and goggles just in case) and a bit of scraping with wire brushes. Wiped everything down with a rag damp with mineral spirits and let it dry.

In contrast to the too-shallow original drawers on the left side, the right side drawers were too deep. So I made removable hatches, giving each drawer two levels.

While I was rubbing down the woodwork, with 00 steel wool, in the hallway to tone down the gloss varnish from the previous owner, I thought I'd see how it worked on my weathered front door - WOW .. it did a great job cutting through to the good wood - I thought the wood was too far gone and that I'd have to paint it - now maybe a little tung oil or rub-on urethane will bring it back to its former glory .. and I gotta polish that escutcheon and door knob .. yes the work is seemingly never ending.

This refinish project was aided by Howard's Restor-A-Finish for the 76 year old wood surfaces.

Restoring a Cunningham (or any bar aluminum frame) that has seen the worst of the elements involves a two step process.

 

#1 apply Fluid Film, a corrosion/protectant with #8447 or #7447 Scotch Brite pads. In the case of this frame, this step was repeated 3 times. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after each application.

 

#2 apply a liquid wax, Nu-Finish in this case, with a #7445 Scotch Brite Pad. This further protects the frame. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after the wax is on for a bit.

Sanded down this old end table, it was a really dark brown paint with water spots all over it. The plan is to stain and seal it and then to a mosaic in the top with ceramic tile.

Full custom BBS LM: 3" lips, reverse mount, powdercoated faces, gold bolts, chrome lips, chrome barrels, black/gold centercaps.

Definitely on the chunky side, it measures 14" in each direction.

Whoever first constructed this box showed absolutely no regard for wood matching. So I went with the flow and emphasized the thin dark stripes on the sides and built the drawer spacers out of a different, contrasting wood. Then I veneered a black strip vertically between the drawer banks to carry the theme on. The drawers were a completely different kettle -- I had to use three different dye and glaze combinations to get them even remotely into the same tonal ballpark.

Restoring a Cunningham (or any bar aluminum frame) that has seen the worst of the elements involves a two step process.

 

#1 apply Fluid Film, a corrosion/protectant with #8447 or #7447 Scotch Brite pads. In the case of this frame, this step was repeated 3 times. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after each application.

 

#2 apply a liquid wax, Nu-Finish in this case, with a #7445 Scotch Brite Pad. This further protects the frame. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after the wax is on for a bit.

Restoring a Cunningham (or any bar aluminum frame) that has seen the worst of the elements involves a two step process.

 

#1 apply Fluid Film, a corrosion/protectant with #8447 or #7447 Scotch Brite pads. In the case of this frame, this step was repeated 3 times. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after each application.

 

#2 apply a liquid wax, Nu-Finish in this case, with a #7445 Scotch Brite Pad. This further protects the frame. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after the wax is on for a bit.

Restoring a Cunningham (or any bar aluminum frame) that has seen the worst of the elements involves a two step process.

 

#1 apply Fluid Film, a corrosion/protectant with #8447 or #7447 Scotch Brite pads. In the case of this frame, this step was repeated 3 times. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after each application.

 

#2 apply a liquid wax, Nu-Finish in this case, with a #7445 Scotch Brite Pad. This further protects the frame. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after the wax is on for a bit.

I'd just like to mention, since it doesn't really show well in the finished pictures, that all the new veneer matches all the way around the the box. You're welcome.

It occurs to me that I have covered up with brass every single corner that I painstaking fitted. I don't even know why I try anymore.

Restoring a Cunningham (or any bar aluminum frame) that has seen the worst of the elements involves a two step process.

 

#1 apply Fluid Film, a corrosion/protectant with #8447 or #7447 Scotch Brite pads. In the case of this frame, this step was repeated 3 times. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after each application.

 

#2 apply a liquid wax, Nu-Finish in this case, with a #7445 Scotch Brite Pad. This further protects the frame. Buff with a clean terry cloth rag after the wax is on for a bit.

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