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Where else can you see natural beauty in an urban setting than down on the waterfront at sundown

Right on the waterfront in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

Photo by Steven Pisano

 

Hamilton Avenue, underneath the Gowanus Expressway, from near intersection with Mill Street. (Shot through the windshield of a car.)

Sunset seen from Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY.

 

Photo by Steven Pisano

Photo by Steven Pisano

 

Fence on Conover Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY.

in explore 20 april 2018

Thank you all for comments & faves !!!!!

At Dikeman & Conover, in Red Hook (Brooklyn). Zoned commercial, but no explanation of what it will be. Someone sprayed an obscene note indicating it is not to their taste; to be honest it is very different from the surrounding area.

 

Google's current street view shot is from May, 2018. In addition to the white building being new, the grey building beyond the yellow building on the left is new as well.

Taken around or near Red Hook, Brooklyn

Photo by Steven Pisano

 

Sunset over the roofs of Red Hook.

Photo by Steven Pisano

 

Shadow of a tree on a doorway, Red Hook, Brooklyn.

Taken around or near Red Hook, Brooklyn

Some scenes of Red Hook streets on a walk around to get some fresh air and sunshine during Covid-19.

 

Van Dyke Street and Beard Street.

 

Photo by Steven Pisano

Photo by Steven Pisano

 

Clouds over New York Harbor, seen from Imlay Street in Red Hook. Statue of Liberty at bottom center.

nrhp # 87002297- From their origins as horse-drawn hot lunch carts, diners had evolved during the early 20th century into stationary, yet movable, fixtures of the developed urban landscape of the urban Northeast. The increasing use of the automobile during the 1920s for intercity travel brought them into the countryside. Manufacturers offered prefabricated models with lessons in management, giving entrepreneurs the chance to get into the restaurant business with less capital than it usually took.

In 1925, Lou Dubois of Kingston, across the Hudson River from Red Hook, bought a popular Silk City Diner from the Paterson Vehicle Company, one of the leading diner manufacturers. He chose to install it first in an area along recently designated Route 9, the Albany Post Road, just north of nearby Rhinebeck called Astor Flats. They called it the Halfway Diner because he thought it was about halfway along Route 9 between New York City and Albany.[1][5][6] Dubois's wife managed the diner while her husband continued to drive trucks for a beer distributor.[1]

Three years later he died, and his family sold the diner to Bert Coons. He moved it to its current location and continued to make a profit. When the Taconic State Parkway was completed through northern Dutchess County after World War II, he moved the diner east, to where Route 199 intersected with the new road, to take advantage of changed transportation patterns. It is not clear whether he changed the name at the same time.[1]

In 1957, with the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge having restored some of the lost through traffic to Red Hook, Coons moved the diner back to its present location. He rented it to others and then finally sold it in the 1960s, after adding onto it to make it more of a traditional restaurant. A new roadside sign announced its new name to travelers — the Village Restaurant.[1] The current owners refer to it as the Historic Village Diner. It has become a local institution.

 

from Wikipedia

Some scenes of Red Hook streets on a walk around to get some fresh air and sunshine during Covid-19.

 

Ghost bike on Van Dyke Street.

 

Photo by Steven Pisano

Photo by Steven Pisano

 

In Erie Basin Park at sunset.

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