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@ Recycle Collective Birthday - free party campania area

@ Recycle Collective Birthday - free party campania area

 

black and white inside

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

@ Recycle Collective Birthday - free party campania area

 

more inside

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

@ Recycle Collective Birthday - free party campania area

@ Recycle Collective Birthday - free party campania area

 

View On Black

Recycle Collective party @ Underground

 

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage): non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson, Ariz.

 

Located at 44 W 6th St., Tucson, AZ 85705

 

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage): non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson, Ariz.

 

44 W 6th St

Tucson, AZ 85705

@ Recycle Collective Birthday - free party campania area

 

View On Black

Recycle Collective party @ Underground

 

@ Recycle Collective Birthday - free party campania area

1955 Morrison Electricar milkfloat converted to a pick-up.

 

Registered as a Morris tipper in April 1990.

This was used by a recycling collective in Girton, Cambridge, back in 2007.

Picture by Gabriel Szabo/Guzelian.

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MP Hilary Benn is visiting York Bike Rescue, a succesful bike recycling collective in York on 15th of June, 2009.

 

This big suitcase I got off ebay is where I put all of our fabric supplies. We are running low on supplies and need your help please to fill our suitcase back up with pretty cotton fabric we can use (20cm x15cm is the smallest size we can use). Can you or someone you know help? Do you have fabric hidden away that you are not using? Old patterned shirts we could use & even turn the sleeves into craftivism kits?

 

I’m hyper-conscious of the mark the Craftivist Collective make on this planet. I worry about the fact that we are putting more ‘stuff’ out in the world & I hope it won’t end in a landfill. That’s why I’m always keen to upcycle unwanted fabric as much as possible, use donated needles & thread where possible, & use the most eco & ethical suppliers we can find for the other elements such as our paper instruction sheet, kit packaging, postcards & stickers (all using recycled paper, made in the UK & suppliers who pay a living wage to their employees).

  

Some of the suitcase is packed with 20cm strips of fabric I’ve spotted in shops (we are on a budget so can’t buy by the metre, sorry shopkeepers!) I thought they would be perfect for our mini protest banners or bespoke projects for charities & organisations we work with because of their colours, patterns, or objects on the fabric that help convey the message we are trying to put across (e.g objects from nature to encourage us to love the environment, superhero icons to encourage us to be the change we wish to see in the world rather than relying on a superhero, pretty patterns in hopeful colours like yellow that just make our craftivism pieces too pretty to ignore). But the suitcase is mainly filled with donated pieces to help us create ethical sustainable kits. Some donations come with such lovely heartfelt letters from people who are no longer able to use the fabric whether that’s for health reasons or lack of time. Some come from resource centres who hold back their small patches for us. Some are from people who have samples they’ve ordered and no longer need .

 

What we need:

Thin cotton fabric with small patterns on (20cm x 15cm minimum size)

Embroidery needles size 6 (or around that size- not too small)

Embroidery thread/floss black

Bobbin thread cards

eyelets size 5mm diameter

Scissors

$upport /donate to us financially here

 

Please post to

Sarah Corbett

℅ Craftivist Collective c/o

Hawkhurst Vault (who are a brilliant & supportive ethical local independent cafe)

240 Brick Lane

London

E2 7EB

 

Thanks Rachel Taylor & Clare Mead for these puuuurrrrfect samples you donated last week.

 

www.craftivist-collective.com/blog

 

This big suitcase I got off ebay is where I put all of our fabric supplies. We are running low on supplies and need your help please to fill our suitcase back up with pretty cotton fabric we can use (20cm x15cm is the smallest size we can use). Can you or someone you know help? Do you have fabric hidden away that you are not using? Old patterned shirts we could use & even turn the sleeves into craftivism kits?

 

I’m hyper-conscious of the mark the Craftivist Collective make on this planet. I worry about the fact that we are putting more ‘stuff’ out in the world & I hope it won’t end in a landfill. That’s why I’m always keen to upcycle unwanted fabric as much as possible, use donated needles & thread where possible, & use the most eco & ethical suppliers we can find for the other elements such as our paper instruction sheet, kit packaging, postcards & stickers (all using recycled paper, made in the UK & suppliers who pay a living wage to their employees).

  

Some of the suitcase is packed with 20cm strips of fabric I’ve spotted in shops (we are on a budget so can’t buy by the metre, sorry shopkeepers!) I thought they would be perfect for our mini protest banners or bespoke projects for charities & organisations we work with because of their colours, patterns, or objects on the fabric that help convey the message we are trying to put across (e.g objects from nature to encourage us to love the environment, superhero icons to encourage us to be the change we wish to see in the world rather than relying on a superhero, pretty patterns in hopeful colours like yellow that just make our craftivism pieces too pretty to ignore). But the suitcase is mainly filled with donated pieces to help us create ethical sustainable kits. Some donations come with such lovely heartfelt letters from people who are no longer able to use the fabric whether that’s for health reasons or lack of time. Some come from resource centres who hold back their small patches for us. Some are from people who have samples they’ve ordered and no longer need .

 

What we need:

Thin cotton fabric with small patterns on (20cm x 15cm minimum size)

Embroidery needles size 6 (or around that size- not too small)

Embroidery thread/floss black

Bobbin thread cards

eyelets size 5mm diameter

Scissors

$upport /donate to us financially here

 

Please post to

Sarah Corbett

℅ Craftivist Collective c/o

Hawkhurst Vault (who are a brilliant & supportive ethical local independent cafe)

240 Brick Lane

London

E2 7EB

 

Thanks Rachel Taylor & Clare Mead for these puuuurrrrfect samples you donated last week.

 

www.craftivist-collective.com/blog

 

This big suitcase I got off ebay is where I put all of our fabric supplies. We are running low on supplies and need your help please to fill our suitcase back up with pretty cotton fabric we can use (20cm x15cm is the smallest size we can use). Can you or someone you know help? Do you have fabric hidden away that you are not using? Old patterned shirts we could use & even turn the sleeves into craftivism kits?

 

I’m hyper-conscious of the mark the Craftivist Collective make on this planet. I worry about the fact that we are putting more ‘stuff’ out in the world & I hope it won’t end in a landfill. That’s why I’m always keen to upcycle unwanted fabric as much as possible, use donated needles & thread where possible, & use the most eco & ethical suppliers we can find for the other elements such as our paper instruction sheet, kit packaging, postcards & stickers (all using recycled paper, made in the UK & suppliers who pay a living wage to their employees).

  

Some of the suitcase is packed with 20cm strips of fabric I’ve spotted in shops (we are on a budget so can’t buy by the metre, sorry shopkeepers!) I thought they would be perfect for our mini protest banners or bespoke projects for charities & organisations we work with because of their colours, patterns, or objects on the fabric that help convey the message we are trying to put across (e.g objects from nature to encourage us to love the environment, superhero icons to encourage us to be the change we wish to see in the world rather than relying on a superhero, pretty patterns in hopeful colours like yellow that just make our craftivism pieces too pretty to ignore). But the suitcase is mainly filled with donated pieces to help us create ethical sustainable kits. Some donations come with such lovely heartfelt letters from people who are no longer able to use the fabric whether that’s for health reasons or lack of time. Some come from resource centres who hold back their small patches for us. Some are from people who have samples they’ve ordered and no longer need .

 

What we need:

Thin cotton fabric with small patterns on (20cm x 15cm minimum size)

Embroidery needles size 6 (or around that size- not too small)

Embroidery thread/floss black

Bobbin thread cards

eyelets size 5mm diameter

Scissors

$upport /donate to us financially here

 

Please post to

Sarah Corbett

℅ Craftivist Collective c/o

Hawkhurst Vault (who are a brilliant & supportive ethical local independent cafe)

240 Brick Lane

London

E2 7EB

 

Thanks Rachel Taylor & Clare Mead for these puuuurrrrfect samples you donated last week.

 

www.craftivist-collective.com/blog

 

This big suitcase I got off ebay is where I put all of our fabric supplies. We are running low on supplies and need your help please to fill our suitcase back up with pretty cotton fabric we can use (20cm x15cm is the smallest size we can use). Can you or someone you know help? Do you have fabric hidden away that you are not using? Old patterned shirts we could use & even turn the sleeves into craftivism kits?

 

I’m hyper-conscious of the mark the Craftivist Collective make on this planet. I worry about the fact that we are putting more ‘stuff’ out in the world & I hope it won’t end in a landfill. That’s why I’m always keen to upcycle unwanted fabric as much as possible, use donated needles & thread where possible, & use the most eco & ethical suppliers we can find for the other elements such as our paper instruction sheet, kit packaging, postcards & stickers (all using recycled paper, made in the UK & suppliers who pay a living wage to their employees).

  

Some of the suitcase is packed with 20cm strips of fabric I’ve spotted in shops (we are on a budget so can’t buy by the metre, sorry shopkeepers!) I thought they would be perfect for our mini protest banners or bespoke projects for charities & organisations we work with because of their colours, patterns, or objects on the fabric that help convey the message we are trying to put across (e.g objects from nature to encourage us to love the environment, superhero icons to encourage us to be the change we wish to see in the world rather than relying on a superhero, pretty patterns in hopeful colours like yellow that just make our craftivism pieces too pretty to ignore). But the suitcase is mainly filled with donated pieces to help us create ethical sustainable kits. Some donations come with such lovely heartfelt letters from people who are no longer able to use the fabric whether that’s for health reasons or lack of time. Some come from resource centres who hold back their small patches for us. Some are from people who have samples they’ve ordered and no longer need .

 

What we need:

Thin cotton fabric with small patterns on (20cm x 15cm minimum size)

Embroidery needles size 6 (or around that size- not too small)

Embroidery thread/floss black

Bobbin thread cards

eyelets size 5mm diameter

Scissors

$upport /donate to us financially here

 

Please post to

Sarah Corbett

℅ Craftivist Collective c/o

Hawkhurst Vault (who are a brilliant & supportive ethical local independent cafe)

240 Brick Lane

London

E2 7EB

 

Thanks Rachel Taylor & Clare Mead for these puuuurrrrfect samples you donated last week.

 

www.craftivist-collective.com/blog

 

This big suitcase I got off ebay is where I put all of our fabric supplies. We are running low on supplies and need your help please to fill our suitcase back up with pretty cotton fabric we can use (20cm x15cm is the smallest size we can use). Can you or someone you know help? Do you have fabric hidden away that you are not using? Old patterned shirts we could use & even turn the sleeves into craftivism kits?

 

I’m hyper-conscious of the mark the Craftivist Collective make on this planet. I worry about the fact that we are putting more ‘stuff’ out in the world & I hope it won’t end in a landfill. That’s why I’m always keen to upcycle unwanted fabric as much as possible, use donated needles & thread where possible, & use the most eco & ethical suppliers we can find for the other elements such as our paper instruction sheet, kit packaging, postcards & stickers (all using recycled paper, made in the UK & suppliers who pay a living wage to their employees).

  

Some of the suitcase is packed with 20cm strips of fabric I’ve spotted in shops (we are on a budget so can’t buy by the metre, sorry shopkeepers!) I thought they would be perfect for our mini protest banners or bespoke projects for charities & organisations we work with because of their colours, patterns, or objects on the fabric that help convey the message we are trying to put across (e.g objects from nature to encourage us to love the environment, superhero icons to encourage us to be the change we wish to see in the world rather than relying on a superhero, pretty patterns in hopeful colours like yellow that just make our craftivism pieces too pretty to ignore). But the suitcase is mainly filled with donated pieces to help us create ethical sustainable kits. Some donations come with such lovely heartfelt letters from people who are no longer able to use the fabric whether that’s for health reasons or lack of time. Some come from resource centres who hold back their small patches for us. Some are from people who have samples they’ve ordered and no longer need .

 

What we need:

Thin cotton fabric with small patterns on (20cm x 15cm minimum size)

Embroidery needles size 6 (or around that size- not too small)

Embroidery thread/floss black

Bobbin thread cards

eyelets size 5mm diameter

Scissors

$upport /donate to us financially here

 

Please post to

Sarah Corbett

℅ Craftivist Collective c/o

Hawkhurst Vault (who are a brilliant & supportive ethical local independent cafe)

240 Brick Lane

London

E2 7EB

 

Thanks Rachel Taylor & Clare Mead for these puuuurrrrfect samples you donated last week.

 

www.craftivist-collective.com/blog

 

This big suitcase I got off ebay is where I put all of our fabric supplies. We are running low on supplies and need your help please to fill our suitcase back up with pretty cotton fabric we can use (20cm x15cm is the smallest size we can use). Can you or someone you know help? Do you have fabric hidden away that you are not using? Old patterned shirts we could use & even turn the sleeves into craftivism kits?

 

I’m hyper-conscious of the mark the Craftivist Collective make on this planet. I worry about the fact that we are putting more ‘stuff’ out in the world & I hope it won’t end in a landfill. That’s why I’m always keen to upcycle unwanted fabric as much as possible, use donated needles & thread where possible, & use the most eco & ethical suppliers we can find for the other elements such as our paper instruction sheet, kit packaging, postcards & stickers (all using recycled paper, made in the UK & suppliers who pay a living wage to their employees).

  

Some of the suitcase is packed with 20cm strips of fabric I’ve spotted in shops (we are on a budget so can’t buy by the metre, sorry shopkeepers!) I thought they would be perfect for our mini protest banners or bespoke projects for charities & organisations we work with because of their colours, patterns, or objects on the fabric that help convey the message we are trying to put across (e.g objects from nature to encourage us to love the environment, superhero icons to encourage us to be the change we wish to see in the world rather than relying on a superhero, pretty patterns in hopeful colours like yellow that just make our craftivism pieces too pretty to ignore). But the suitcase is mainly filled with donated pieces to help us create ethical sustainable kits. Some donations come with such lovely heartfelt letters from people who are no longer able to use the fabric whether that’s for health reasons or lack of time. Some come from resource centres who hold back their small patches for us. Some are from people who have samples they’ve ordered and no longer need .

 

What we need:

Thin cotton fabric with small patterns on (20cm x 15cm minimum size)

Embroidery needles size 6 (or around that size- not too small)

Embroidery thread/floss black

Bobbin thread cards

eyelets size 5mm diameter

Scissors

$upport /donate to us financially here

 

Please post to

Sarah Corbett

℅ Craftivist Collective c/o

Hawkhurst Vault (who are a brilliant & supportive ethical local independent cafe)

240 Brick Lane

London

E2 7EB

 

Thanks Rachel Taylor & Clare Mead for these puuuurrrrfect samples you donated last week.

 

www.craftivist-collective.com/blog

 

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

feel free to use this for posters/promo etc. Please credit 'Steve Brown - stevebrownphoto.co.uk'. Cheers.

Really nice all-original 70s Schwinn 3-speed, complete with yellow grips and yellow seat, and Sturmey Archer light and shifters. $350 and she's yours. BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

Steve Lawson and Julie McKee previewed their Edinburgh show at Darbuka in London

Recycle Collective party

View On Black

 

Please, do not flood me with pool icons without comments!

Photo by Steve Brown - www.stevebrownphoto.co.uk all rights reserved. Please email steve for usage rights...

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

Photo by Steve Brown - www.stevebrownphoto.co.uk all rights reserved. Please email steve for usage rights...

feel free to use this for posters/promo etc. Please credit 'Steve Brown - stevebrownphoto.co.uk'. Cheers.

Cleveland-based artist Nicole McGee of Plenty Underfoot creates gorgeous pieces from recycled materials.

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

Cleveland-based artist Nicole McGee of Plenty Underfoot creates gorgeous pieces from recycled materials.

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

Cleveland-based artist Nicole McGee of Plenty Underfoot creates gorgeous pieces from recycled materials.

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

Cleveland-based artist Nicole McGee of Plenty Underfoot creates gorgeous pieces from recycled materials.

BICAS (Bicycle Inter-Community Art and Salvage) is a non-profit bike repair and recycling collective in Tucson

Recycle Collective party

View On Black

 

Please, do not flood me with pool icons without comments!

Cleveland-based artist Nicole McGee of Plenty Underfoot creates gorgeous pieces from recycled materials.

Photo by Steve Brown - www.stevebrownphoto.co.uk all rights reserved. Please email steve for usage rights...

Photo by Steve Brown - www.stevebrownphoto.co.uk all rights reserved. Please email steve for usage rights...

Cleveland-based artist Nicole McGee of Plenty Underfoot creates gorgeous pieces from recycled materials.

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