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These gorgeous grey-headed flying foxes (or fruit bats) live not far from where I do, in trees that line the Yarra River in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. I can't tell you how thrilling it is to see them silently soaring overhead every evening as they search for fruit, nectar and pollen.

 

7 Days With Flickr - Fauna (Sundays).

Réalisée le 20 novembre 2014 au Tissa Tank, près de Udawalawe, Sri Lanka.

 

Made on November, 20th / 2014 at the Tissa Tank, near Udawalawe, Sri Lanka.

The Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus), also known as the greater Indian fruit bat, is a species of flying fox in the Pteropodidae family. It is nocturnal and feeds mainly on ripe fruits, such as mangoes and bananas, and nectar.

 

The Indian flying fox lives in rain forests and swamps, where a large body of water is nearby. It is found in Bangladesh, China, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

 

The Indian flying fox is frugivorous or nectarivorous, i.e., they eat fruits or lick nectar from flowers. At dusk, these bats forage for ripe fruit. While ingesting fruit, these bats expel waste that pollinates and disperse seeds.

The Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus), also known as the greater Indian fruit bat, is a species of flying fox in the Pteropodidae family. It is nocturnal and feeds mainly on ripe fruits, such as mangoes and bananas, and nectar.

 

The Indian flying fox lives in rain forests and swamps, where a large body of water is nearby. It is found in Bangladesh, China, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

 

The Indian flying fox is frugivorous or nectarivorous, i.e., they eat fruits or lick nectar from flowers. At dusk, these bats forage for ripe fruit. While ingesting fruit, these bats expel waste that pollinates and disperse seeds.

Also known as the greater Indian fruit bat.

Pteropus vampyrus : Chonburi province,Thailand

The Flying fox or Fruit Bat is a bat in the genus Pteropus, belonging to the Megachiroptera sub-order, the largest bats in the world. There are many sub-species in this genus.They live in the tropics and subtropics of Asia and a number of remote oceanic islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

 

The genus Pteropus goes back a long time. Fossils unearthed were dated 35 million years old. The notable difference in the fossil being the presence of a tail for stabilisation in early flight adaptation.

 

Pteropus do not possess echolocation. They do not have super-sonar like the microbats. However, they have well developed sense of smell and sight. Pteropus feed only on nectar, blossom, pollen and fruits. When it locates food, it often crash into the foliage and grabs for it. Feeding ranges can reach up to 40 miles.

 

Many species are threatened with extinction today. All Pteropus are listed in Appendix II (threatened) of CITES. (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). {Condensed from wikipedia}.

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Photographed through the wire mesh of a large cage at Lok Kawi Wildlife Park. (macro lens). Unfortunately, it was not possible to get a frontal shot.

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My butterfly photo "Malay Lacewing II" is on frontpage this week at Vos plus belles photos . Many thanks to everyone. :-)))

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_flying_fox

  

The Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus), also known as the greater Indian fruit bat, is a species of flying fox in the Pteropodidae family. It is nocturnal and feeds mainly on ripe fruits, such as mangoes and bananas, and nectar.

  

Habitat

  

The Indian flying fox lives in rain forests and swamps, where a large body of water is nearby.[2] It is found in Bangladesh, China, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

  

Culture

  

Known as මා වවුලා (maa wawula) in Sinhala.

  

Feeding

  

The Indian flying fox is frugivorous or nectarivorous, i.e., they eat fruits or lick nectar from flowers. At dusk, these bats forage for ripe fruit. While ingesting fruit, these bats expel waste that pollinates and disperse seeds.

  

Reproduction

  

Mating System: P. giganteus is a polygynandrous species, and breeds yearly from July to October. Births occur from February to May. Gestation period is typically 140 to 150 days. The average birth number is 1 to 2 pups. Among members of the genus Pteropus, pups are carried by the mother for the first few weeks of life, with weaning occurring around 5 months of age. Males do not participate in parental care. Young bats learn to fly at approximately 11 weeks of age. Reproductive maturity occurs at 1.5 years. [3]

  

Natural reservoirs of disease

  

Like other fruit bats, the Indian flying fox may be a natural reservoir for a number of diseases including members of the groups Henipavirus and Coronavirus. These can prove fatal to humans and domestic animals.[4][5] Fruit bats are considered a delicacy by South Pacific Islanders as well as in Micronesia where, on the island of Guam, consumption has been suggested as a possible cause of Lytico-Bodig disease.

 

Black Flying Fox - a rare sighting close-up in daytime. While attempting to photograph a Magpie-lark, below me, out of the corner of my eye, I noticed something black. Fully expecting it to be one of our regular crows, I was more than startled to see this Black Flying Fox. It struggled to get a hold on the bricks near me and then proceeded to crawl up the wall. After I stepped inside for a moment, it had disappeared when I returned. This is SOOC - straight out of the camera - with only the conversion from RAW to JPG in ACDSee PRO3.

 

Black flying-foxes are native to Australia (NSW, Qld, NT and WA), Papua New Guinea (Western Province) and Indonesia (Sulawesi, Sumba, Savu and Papua). The black flying-fox has short black hair with a contrasting reddish-brown mantel with a mean forearm length of 164 mm (6.46 in) and a mean weight of 710 grams (1.57 lb). It is one of the largest bat species in the world, and has a wing-span of more than one metre. Black flying-foxes eat pollen and nectar from native eucalyptus, Lilypillies, paperbark and turpentine trees. When native foods are scarce, particularly during drought, the bats may take introduced or commercial fruits such as mangos and apples. This species had been known to travel up to 50 km a night in search of food.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Flying_Fox

 

They are common visitors in our suburb at night as they like the fruit on palm trees (we have three bearing fruit).

A huge number of these flying foxes moved into the Katherine Gorge campsite a few days before we got there. Prior to that, there were only a few Black Flying-foxes.

These bats were so numerous they were breaking branches off the trees with the sheer weight of their numbers (see photos below)

A grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) comes into land in the treetops in Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens.

 

They are actually large fruit bats with an average wingspan of about 1m and can weigh around 1kg.

 

They congregate in trees in their hundreds (see first comment field). Despite some occasional grumblings about the damage they can cause to vegetation and the discovery that they can carry viruses potentially fatal to humans, they are now firmly a conservation target.

 

Frankly, I like 'em!

 

View Large And On Black

Pteropus poliocephalus -Spring Botanical Gardens Flying Fox, Sydney Australia.

 

Hey! Who you looking at?

Grey-headed Flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)

Oh. Just a nosy photographer.

Yarra Bend Park, Melbourne, Australia

Location: Mt. Kanlaon National Park, Philippines

 

I'm not a fan of bats, but for me to not photograph them while I'm in Negros would be a crime. So I'm paying respects to these endangered animals.

 

They roost along with other species of bats like the Giant golden-crowned flying fox (Acerodon jubatus) which I also photographed. If someone wants to really see them, let me know, otherwise, it will just remain in my storage drives.

 

My mountain guide showed me a spot above the Mambukal Mountain Resort and I had the bats at eye level.

 

Despite the funky "vampyrus" name to it, these bats are fruit bats. I believe they are the main reason why I found santol fruit trees (Sandoricum koetjape) at the primary forest in Mt. Kanlaon. There's no farming or human activity up there.

Another shot of a grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) hanging upside down, as is their norm, and showing some alarming interest in me. For a moment I thought he was going to drop down to see what I was doing .... or even what I was.

 

As it was, he was just interested, it seemed. There is a more "cute" upside down image of another bat in the comment field.

Little Red Flying Foxes (Pteropus scapulatus) or fruit bats at Nitmiluk National Park. I was amazed at how much they bicker with themselves during what should be sleeping time during the day. They are quite noisy.

 

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:copyright:2016 Fantommst

 

For us North Americans, these were huge in several respects. Besides being very large, it was totally amazing to see them in the wild.

Near daytime roost, Batchelor, Northern Territory, Australia

The Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus), also known as the greater Indian fruit bat, is a species of flying fox in the Pteropodidae family. It is nocturnal and feeds mainly on ripe fruits, such as mangoes and bananas, and nectar.

 

The Indian flying fox lives in rain forests and swamps, where a large body of water is nearby. It is found in Bangladesh, China, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

 

The Indian flying fox is frugivorous or nectarivorous, i.e., they eat fruits or lick nectar from flowers. At dusk, these bats forage for ripe fruit. While ingesting fruit, these bats expel waste that pollinates and disperse seeds.

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